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#2294652 - 06/25/14 03:40 AM AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student
littlebirdblue Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/12/14
Posts: 56
Hi, I'm new. smile

My daughter is almost 4 and she has been taking violin lessons for over 8 months. Her teacher is wonderful and wants to make sure that DD doesn't get used to playing on her own. She is too young to join our city's youth orchestra so the most obvious solution seems to be that I learn to accompany her on our digital piano. I can't keep up with her on violin so that's not an option and the recording on Suzuki CD goes too fast.

I was hoping that someone could offer some advice on how I should get started. I have no idea how difficult the task is and how I could get my skills up to that level. DD's lessons are costing a little fortune every month so I need to teach myself.

I've had over 5 years of lesson from age 4 to 9. I don't remember much but I do want to learn again.

Any help would be much appreciated. smile

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#2294658 - 06/25/14 04:51 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
johan d Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/20/14
Posts: 64
Loc: Belgium
Maybe don't rush things, she's just a child. Let her enjoy her music lessons.

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#2294662 - 06/25/14 05:17 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
Sam S Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/12/07
Posts: 1411
Loc: Georgia, USA
I accompany my wife on clarinet and recorder, so let me say it's not easy. But since your daughter is so young, maybe her pieces are very simple. On the other hand, you are a restarter who has forgotten much.

The first step should be to get the music and see what it looks like. Is it doable? Hopefully it is just simple chords behind her playing.

Since you haven't played since you were a kid, get one of the popular method books and refresh your memory. I used Alfred's Adult method, which has 3 volumes. Start with the one that seems to fit your current ability. It will answer many questions that you have just by working your way through the books.

As far as accompanying tips, the piano score has more info than the instrumental part. The violin part will be on a line above the piano part - obviously you don't play the violin part, but you can see what she is playing and that helps keep you together with her.

Starting together can be a problem. Depending on the music, the instrument may start first, or you may start first, or you may start together. There is no shame in counting out loud to get started until you can do it together.

If the piano part is too hard, there is no shame in simplifying it! Drop out one of the hands - usually the left hand is better to keep, but it depends on the music. If the music has chord symbols, or you can figure out what the chords are, you could just play simple block chords.

Anyway, it is great fun to accompany someone. Good luck!

Sam

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#2294666 - 06/25/14 05:52 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
littlebirdblue Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/12/14
Posts: 56
I promise I'm not a crazy mother who is hothousing her 3 year old so that I can produce a prodigy. smile

She started asking for violin lesson persistently when she was 2 & 1/2. She had never seen a violin at that time and we had never talked about music lesson. She works in a mysterious way.

After 8 months, I finally googled and found out that Suzuki method works with very young children but it is very much fun- and game-based at the beginning and she won't be expected to be able to play her first song properly for a whole year if not longer. That to me sounded age-appropriate so I found her a teacher and they got along beautifully from day one.

Fast forward to now, after 8 months of lesson, she is almost done with Book 1 as well as another book her teacher added on to reinforce note-reading. She practices at least an hour on her own accord every day and I have to plead with her to stop playing violin because I can take so much of it. She wakes up and the first thing she wants to play with is her metronome. At one point, I suggested to her that she takes a break from violin because I didn't want it to take over her life but then she cried her eyes out for 30 minutes and she looked absolutely traumatized. frown I still feel guilty about that incident.

I am uneasy about her having too much structured learning at this age but for every hour she spends on her lessons and practice, she spends 2 hours doing free-play using musical instruments so it's helping her with creativity and self-expression, which I feel is much more important than being able to play well at her age.

So, going back to the original point, her teacher is pleased with DD's progress but one concern that we both share is that DD insists on setting her own tempo and often refuses to play with her teacher during lesson. I hate to say this about my own child but she has a bit of diva-in-training thing going on and she thinks she should be the soloist all the time as she is THE star. Well, this is cute when she is 3 but it wouldn't be when she is older and she has to learn to be flexible and learn to learn from and with others. This is where the piano accompaniment idea came from. We're not trying to push her to the next level but we are trying to teach her a life lesson that she is not the only player that matters in this world.

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#2294686 - 06/25/14 06:34 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
Goof Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/05/12
Posts: 347
Loc: UK
Oh my! You are so fortunate to have a little genius!
Do not worry about her not doing the normal play type things that other kiddies do - what she is doing is to her play.
I did some piano teaching of a grand daughter using the Suzuki method and it certainly produced results.
Unfortunately for me she had to be bribed to pay attention, also parents were not really that interested.
The brain is a fascinating structure and can vary considerably; so do make best "use" of your child's gifts.
I wish I could be in with the teaching of such a child.

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#2294707 - 06/25/14 07:35 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
malkin Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/18/09
Posts: 2494
Loc: *sigh* Salt Lake City
Ask her teacher to find some other Suzuki kids for her to play with.
_________________________
A good student is one who makes the teacher feel like a good teacher.

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#2294715 - 06/25/14 08:06 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
knotty Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/01/07
Posts: 2993
Loc: Bethesda, MD (Washington D.C)
The suzuki accompaniement on piano are difficult to play. Your daughter will play fast very soon. Sooner than you think, and book 3 and 4 get very challenging for us.
There is a program called transcribe! That can slow down the provided accompaniement. It's not perfect playing with a record but it can help both you and your daughter.
Another optiom is simplyfying those accompaniement. Maybe stay with just bass and chord on the proper beat. Something like that. Make sure your time is solid rather than your playing full.

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#2295090 - 06/25/14 11:11 PM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
littlebirdblue Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/12/14
Posts: 56
Sam S, Thank you for the helpful tips. I will go to a Piano store to take a look at the Alfred books. I think I remember enough to be able to get myself through the basics. You're right that I don't need to be able to play everything as written. I'll strip it down to the bare necessity until my skills go up.

Goof, thank you for your kind words. DD unfortunately is not that perfect student who is attentive and does as told. She is very independent and oppositional. She is not as bad with her teachers but still, she wants to figure out everything herself and mostly learns through observation rather than instruction. She is lucky that her instructors are very understanding and patient. I'm hoping that maturity will help and she's become easier to teach as she gets older.

malkin, we have tried Suzuki group lesson once with other 3 year olds. While it was fun, it was not a good fit for DD. We're still looking for the right group learning opportunity for her. We opted out of the summer institute this year because they were going to put her in the pre-Twinkle group based on her age and her teacher did not think that'd be a meaningful experience.

knotty, thank you for sharing your thoughts on the accompaniments. I don't know if my piano level and DD's violin level would ever synchronize. She's zooming ahead at a lighting speed and I am so slow. I will pick up the piano accompaniment book for book 1 and ask DD to indulge me and go back to Twinkle Twinkle variations. She can always review and polish the earlier songs. I'll look into the program you mentioned too.

I'm really happy to have found this forum. I don't feel werid about wanting to re-learn as an adult anymore. smile

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#2295169 - 06/26/14 03:49 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
Dave B Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/01/11
Posts: 1943
Loc: Philadelphia area
It is extremely important that DD connect with her own inner rhythms and tempos. She is obviously still focused on notes and technique and is not ready, and possibly not able, to follow someone else's tempo. She obviously knows the tempo she is comfortable with, which in itself shows an insight that needs to be respected.

My personal opinion, for whatever it might be worth, is that most teachers push a ridged concept of tempo on students way too early in the students development. Rhythm and tempo are an integral part of the music that the player creates. Not something the Player follows. This is especially true in ensemble playing.

You playing along with her would be a wonderful and the simpler the better. If you played an arpeggio or a simple chord pattern as DD played a scale, with a little patients, you would be having fun making music together. Let it happen.


Enjoy


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#2295186 - 06/26/14 05:44 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: Dave B]
littlebirdblue Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/12/14
Posts: 56
Dave B, what you wrote makes perfect sense.

Her teacher wants DD to develop some consistency in her internal rhythm as DD can be all over the place but I do wonder if it's really about her rhythm or if it has more to do with her inattentiveness. I swear she's daydreaming every time she practices scales and arpeggios.

We normally only use the metronome for scales and short songs her teacher is working with her for harmonization. She plays her Suzuki repertoire songs to her tempo but I do point out when her half-notes are too short as she tends to rush through them.

Maybe I need to ease up a little so she can develop her own "voice," so to speak.

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#2295310 - 06/26/14 01:05 PM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
LXXXVIIIdentes Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 03/04/14
Posts: 17
Have you considered sometimes using some sort of little drum to accompany her and provide a regular rhythm? It could be fun for some pieces.

You could teach her this way how to work with another player, join in after a bar or two, or together, and sense how to keep a steady time pulse.

If you have any feel for shaping music and phrases, you could provide her the regular beat, while easing it suitably in a way that a metronome can't. Doing so could be enjoyable for her. Even scales sound better when shaped.

(Metronome practice does have its uses too.)


Edited by LXXXVIIIdentes (06/26/14 01:06 PM)

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#2295344 - 06/26/14 02:16 PM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
PianoStudent88 Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/16/11
Posts: 3160
Loc: Maine
How is her rhythm in general? Can she play clapping games? Sing songs keeping to the rhythm? Dance to music?

You might think more broadly than solely playing piano accompaniment to her violin playing.

In addition to the above types of activities which you can do with her, without the violin, brainstorming some ideas to do with the violin includes: when she's playing violin you could play a drum as LXXXVIIIdentes suggests, or sing along, or play a note or chord on the piano on just the down beats of the measures, or 1st and 3rd beat, or every beat, or clap along, etc. You can sing or play the melody with her, or you can sing something simpler than the melody, and you can play with one hand or both, or alternating hands, even with just one note each time per hand).
_________________________
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#2295382 - 06/26/14 04:00 PM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
Charles Cohen Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/26/12
Posts: 1231
Loc: Richmond, BC, Canada
You have a kid who _wants_ to play fiddle, and practices on her own? Let her run with it!

Quote:
. . . We're not trying to push her to the next level but we are trying to teach her a life lesson that she is not the only player that matters in this world. . . .


Speaking as a parent (and grandparent) and amateur musician:

. . . _You_ don't have to be the person who teaches her this "life lesson".

The first (and every) time she plays in an ensemble -- whether with a pianist, or in a violin duet, orchestra, or whatever -- she will get a lesson in the need for cooperation. I wouldn't make this a "child vs parent" battle.

As for accompaniment, you might be able to find MIDI files of the Suzuki piano accompaniments. If you have a digital piano (which I think you do), you could play them through it. They'll be "mechanical", probably, but they'll do the job. And they might reinforce the idea of what "steady rhythm" means.

Rhythm games are fun. When adults do them, it's called a "drum circle". I've never seen someone as young as your daughter at one -- but there's always a first time. Bring earplugs.

. Charles

. Charles

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#2295383 - 06/26/14 04:01 PM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
Charles Cohen Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/26/12
Posts: 1231
Loc: Richmond, BC, Canada
By golly -- Googling "suzuki midi accompaniment" gets this:

http://mrfiddle.tripod.com/Suzuki.html

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#2295566 - 06/26/14 11:01 PM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
littlebirdblue Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/12/14
Posts: 56
LXXXVIIIdentes, she might be more receptive to a drum than a metronome. It could be a fun solution. When her teacher demonstrates scales, she manages to make them sound beautiful so it's certainly a goal DD could aim towards but right now, she is still focusing on her bow techniques and staying in the middle of the pitch, especially with her 4th finger. Hopefully, she's get there soon!

PianoStudent88, yes, yes, and yes. This is why it was a huge surprise when she couldn't start on the downbeat when she started playing songs on her violin. She kept on starting on the upbeat and it took a lot of work to get that sorted out. There is a disconnect between her natural sense of rhythm and how she plays on the violin. When I play the Suzuki violin CD at home, her first reaction is to dance so I should start doing that again.

Charles Cohen, after DD threw her first tantrum soon after turning one, I called a friend who has raised a child with a similar temperament. Her advice was "pick your battle carefully or you and your little girl would have a very strained relationship." It's hard to know where the lines are when she is so young and does require constant feedback to avoid forming bad habits.

DD has a little friend who loves to drum. I should talk to his mother about starting a drum circle. It could be very interesting and fun for both children. grin

I have to look up what midis are (a little clueless here) and how to make it work on our digital piano. DD would LOVE hearing her DP play Suzuki songs! Thank you for finding the link.

A little update: DD had her violin lesson today and she had a "breakthrough." She was perfectly in rhythm for the entire 30 minutes. Either her violin teacher is a miracle worker or this was an attitude problem rather than a rhythm problem and DD has adjusted her attitude. It's really hard with little children. I can see why so many teachers will only accept children 6 and older.

I'm still going to re-learn piano. Trying to be a good role model for DD.

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#2295616 - 06/27/14 02:31 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
Charles Cohen Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/26/12
Posts: 1231
Loc: Richmond, BC, Canada
Originally Posted By: littlebirdblue
. . .

DD has a little friend who loves to drum. I should talk to his mother about starting a drum circle. It could be very interesting and fun for both children. grin

I have to look up what midis are (a little clueless here) and how to make it work on our digital piano. DD would LOVE hearing her DP play Suzuki songs! Thank you for finding the link.

A little update: DD had her violin lesson today and she had a "breakthrough." She was perfectly in rhythm for the entire 30 minutes. Either her violin teacher is a miracle worker or this was an attitude problem rather than a rhythm problem and DD has adjusted her attitude. It's really hard with little children. I can see why so many teachers will only accept children 6 and older.

I'm still going to re-learn piano. Trying to be a good role model for DD.


30 minutes in perfect rhythm? A thanksgiving sacrifice is called for!

There's a program for little kids (and their parents) called "Music Together". It's singing, clapping, dancing -- sounds like fun. A friend of mine teaches some classes. Your DD might be too advanced, or she might find it fun.

www.musictogether.com

I don't know how she'd react to an _adult_ drum circle. They range from really free-form to rather structured, depending on the leader. It might be overwhelming, or she might just join in. There's probably an Internet directory . . .

The MIDI files on the "Mr Fiddle" website are full orchestral accompaniments. You download a file to your computer, and "Open" it -- a MIDI player (e.g. Windows Media Player) will start playing the file. Using Windows Media Player, the playback speed is adjustable (right-click on the main screen, "Enhancements --> Play Speed Settings" ). I assume Apple computers would be similar.

There are other ways to skin the cat. I suspect if your DP plays MIDI files, you could "point" it at the downloaded file. Or maybe it needs to be sent over a USB-to-MIDI connections. I haven't played around enough (even on my own PX-350) to have any real answers.

The trick, here, is to use the technology as a _support_, and not get hung up on it. Sometimes that's hard to do.

Have fun --

. Charles

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#2295658 - 06/27/14 05:43 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: Charles Cohen]
littlebirdblue Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/12/14
Posts: 56
Originally Posted By: Charles Cohen
30 minutes in perfect rhythm? A thanksgiving sacrifice is called for!


Alright. It was more like 98% correct but it was close enough. grin

I need to sit down and figure out our PX-150 or rather, DD's PX-150 so I know how to connect it to a computer and what it does once it is connected. I'm looking forward to getting the most out of its functions.

I think DD would enjoy the social aspect of MT but after paying preschool tuition and private music lessons, we're all tapped out. We need a fairy godmother with a fat checking account. blush

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#2295688 - 06/27/14 08:43 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
Ataru074 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/22/11
Posts: 303
Loc: Houston, TX
my wife is learning violin with the suzuki method and I agree, the piano part isn't too easy compared to the violin level ( but tough.. this is how it is in most cases where the piano plays the background )
what you can do, if you remember a little bit of theory you can simplify a good part of the piano part to basic chords or do an alberti bass... the concept behind the full blown accompaniment is to train the violinist to listen to something real and not to a melodic metronome but, I found out with my wife, that the melodic metronome works perfectly to help her intonation because it sticks out like a sore thumb against a chord.
_________________________
===============================================
working on:
Bach: BWV 871
Mozart: Kv397
Beethoven: Op 14 #2
Prokofiev: Op.10
Bartok: Notturno
===============================================

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#2295718 - 06/27/14 10:09 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11648
Loc: Canada
A couple of things:

- This is a 3 year old child, and it's Suzuki. Given both, it is surprising to read that the teacher wants to promote the child's reading skills. It does not seem age-appropriate in terms of child development: not from back in my educational psychology days in teacher training. Suzuki stresses hearing, technique while listening, and imitation. Reading often comes later, which is the other reason that reading skills for a 3 year old appears strange.

- Difficulty with intonation on the 4th finger (pinky). This is hard for anyone, and much harder to use than on a piano. Sometimes intonation stays approximate for a while, for sheer physical reasons.

- Rhythm and timing. There is the timing of music itself - the beat, note values etc. For violin, Suzuki also has rhythms in which a simple melody is played, and the purpose is to develop the bow arm correctly. That seems primordial.

To give an idea: here is a little 4 year old Suzuki girl who seems precocious. She starts with the Twinkle rhythms which are used to teach bow patterns and bow control, mid-bow (mid-bow is the starting place in Suzuki afaik).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQGVW2l5708

(I think that I don't see this little girl using her 4th finger yet).

From research, the rhythms seem to come together with little sayings: "mississippi stop stop -- run pony run pony -- etc.". Is anything like that happening?

The point is that correct playing of pieces, with the upbeat and downbeat etc., at that stage, and age, doesn't sound like the right concern. There is coordination which is hard. It is not just a matter of pressing a note, like piano.

The concern about her joining an ensemble at this age also seems off.

Above all, if she loves playing, and if she begins hating what she is asked to do, then I'd have a second look.

It would be good to ask in a violin forum (Maestronet, Violinist.com), where Suzuki teachers can weigh in. I think there are even Suzuki support groups for parents and for teachers.

I studied violin for a few years as an adult, and one of my children went on to the university level on viola. However, he began as a young teen.

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
Addendum: I ran into this Suzuki group when looking up words for the rhythms. Maybe useful? (I see there's a parents' corner).
https://suzukiassociation.org/discuss/5348/



Edited by keystring (06/27/14 10:55 AM)
Edit Reason: addendum

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#2295895 - 06/27/14 06:18 PM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
littlebirdblue Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/12/14
Posts: 56
Ataru074, I so wish I could be that mom who can play the Suzuki accompaniments and I regret quitting piano as soon as I realized playing piano is optional in life.

Hmmm. I certainly could use help with intonation so maybe I should be playing to some kind of accompaniments. My DD covers her ears every time I practice.

keystring, I know from developmental point of view, DD's violin lesson and progression make little sense. DH and I second-guess ourselves a lot. We don't want her to burnout but she is on this "rage to master violin" and she surprises both her teacher and us every week. It's a wonderful process to witness but a little scary that we are in charge of nurturing her talent. I'm trying to shift her focus from progressing as fast as she can to enjoying music but more she's exposed to live music, more driven and competitive she gets.

She goes to a lovely 100% play-based preschool so she gets a lot of play time with friends at school but as soon as she comes home, it's music, music, music, art, then more music. I often wonder what is going on in her head.

Our parenting goal is to nurture the whole child. There are many freakishly talented children out there who practice endless hours to reach impossibly high standards. For better or worse, we are not interested in DD walking down that path. If we feel DD is placed under any pressure to achieve, we'll make sure that stops immediately.

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#2295926 - 06/27/14 08:05 PM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
keystring Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11648
Loc: Canada
Originally Posted By: littlebirdblue

keystring, I know from developmental point of view, DD's violin lesson and progression make little sense. DH and I second-guess ourselves a lot. We don't want her to burnout but she is on this "rage to master violin" and she surprises both her teacher and us every week. It's a wonderful process to witness but a little scary that we are in charge of nurturing her talent. I'm trying to shift her focus from progressing as fast as she can to enjoying music but more she's exposed to live music, more driven and competitive she gets.

There is nothing senseless or strange about her drive for music, and her growth as you describe it. Everyone is born into his or her nature and a few individuals go that way. I commented specifically on the teacher's wanting her to read music at this age, this stage, and within Suzuki.

I responded to some specific things - especially in regards to timing whether it was the bowing type, or actual music - and I linked a video as well as other resources. What are your thoughts? I also gave several resources to sites involving violin for your reference.

When you say she gets more "competitive" --- is she trying to compete against other children, or is she simply driven by the art which is her love?

I am a parent, but my children are now young adults, so this part is behind us. I happen to believe in the innate. There is a delicate balance between what needs to be learned formally, and what is instinctive.

Again, if you find that what is being done in lessons starts causing her to disklike what she is doing, watch out for that. Not in a temporary since, but over the longer haul, or a trend. Follow your instincts.

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#2295935 - 06/27/14 08:37 PM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
littlebirdblue Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/12/14
Posts: 56
keystring, sending you a PM. smile


Edited by littlebirdblue (06/27/14 08:38 PM)

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#2296393 - 06/29/14 01:19 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
hreichgott Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/13
Posts: 955
Loc: western MA, USA
Hi littlebirdblue,
Playing along with your child is such a wonderful experience and very motivating for the child. So much better than sending her off to play with a machine. Just keep it simple. There is no need to overthink or to try to match the CD part exactly.
The teacher should know the harmony of the piece and be able to tell you what chords to play at what time, and you can write the chord names down and then play them as simple 3-note chords. Or even create a rudimentary bass line by playing only the single note that matches the chord name.
Enjoy!
_________________________
Heather W. Reichgott, piano http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com
Sounding the depths of small pieces: Beethoven Op. 33
Daily attempts at 16th notes: Chopin Op. 10 no. 4, Pischna
Totally loving Fauré/Barcarolles and Ravel/Tombeau de Couperin
I love Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and new music

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#2298082 - 07/03/14 03:17 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: hreichgott]
littlebirdblue Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/12/14
Posts: 56
Thank you hreichgott for your kind words of encouragement.

I've been trying to play a bit on our new digital piano but I'm a lot more hopeless than I thought. I really don't remember how to play at all, especially with my left hand. frown I don't think I'll ever force DD to continue but I'll certainly let her know how much I regret quitting now that I'm an adult.

For now, a friend's daughter who is an intermediate/advance piano student is going to come over once a week for a nominal babysitting fee. Meanwhile, I'm going to go back to the very basics and see if I can learn from scratch all over again.


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#2298485 - 07/04/14 04:14 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
Dave B Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/01/11
Posts: 1943
Loc: Philadelphia area
Sounds like a good plan,

Enjoy

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#2298541 - 07/04/14 10:28 AM Re: AB needs to accompany a young Suzuki violin student [Re: littlebirdblue]
FarmGirl Offline

Silver Supporter until Jan 02 2013


Registered: 09/14/10
Posts: 1952
Loc: Scottsdale, AZ
Good luck. I wish I could accompany myself. I play violin as well.
_________________________
Solo - Liszt Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2, Schubert Sonata D960 Andante sostenute (9/7/14), Bach f minor Fugue WTC Bk1, Rachmaninoff Elegie Op 3 #1, Chopin Trois Nouvelles Etudes #1



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