Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 3 of 3 < 1 2 3
Topic Options
#2306467 - 07/24/14 01:37 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Piano Practice]
Del Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/03
Posts: 5293
Loc: Olympia, Washington
Originally Posted By: Piano Practice
I may have missed it in the replies above and hopefully I’m not falling off into the weeds when I ask this… Aren’t elementary school age kids in countries in Asia, such as Japan, required to take piano? (Emphasis on the word "required".) Thus, instilling in the kids music theory, piano skills, which produces, down the road, a strong skillset for mathematics, analytical/reasoning, etc. for future engineers and doctors, plus spurring on future techs/tuners, too? I wish we had this same emphasis here in the US… Just compare our math & science scores to other industrialized countries, I believe we need some help…

Yes.

The majority of pianos being built today are -- by a significant margin -- being sold in the Chinese market.

ddf
_________________________
Delwin D Fandrich
Piano Research, Design & Manufacturing Consultant
ddfandrich@gmail.com
(To contact me privately please use this e-mail address.)

Stupidity is a rare condition, ignorance is a common choice. --Anon

Top
(ads 568) Hailun Pianos

 

#2306468 - 07/24/14 01:44 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: michaelha]
gsmonks Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/10
Posts: 638
Loc: Saskatchewan, Canada
Originally Posted By: michaelha
Originally Posted By: gsmonks

That's not the issue here. The issue is the lack of jobs for working musicians. Each city used to have dozens, in some instances hundreds of clubs featuring live music. Today they're all gone. I can easily name 50 cities where I used to play that today have not one regular live venue, for ANY kind of music.

I have friends in Vancouver, Victoria, New York City, Chicago, Detroit, San Francisco, London, Paris, Berlin, Rome, Amsterdam, Montreal, Saskatoon, Regina, Edmonton, Calgary, Winnipeg, Boston, Seattle, and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, NONE of whom are working as full-time professional musicians any more. The clubs are all closed, gone out of business, the whole entire scene is kaputsky.

It's usually cyclical, but this time it's different. In the 70's, brass musicians were running all over North America like chickens with their heads cut off, chasing rumours of work. When it finally dawned on them that there wasn't any, they settled where they were, hung out their shingle, and taught for a living. That's why in the late 60's, early 70's, I had trumpet teachers like Bobby Hilton, Bobby Herriot, Joe de Bruyker, Len Whitely, and so on. The only reason I had them as teachers was because there was no place for them to play any more.

At that time, the bar band thing took over and replaced the dance and club thing.

But this time, the bar band scene has come to an end with NOTHING to replace it. THAT's the difference. It's not that things have changed this time. It's that the scene itself is gone.

The kids coming along aren't playing live venues. They're making videos.

The computer/video/Interweb scene is sucking the life out of both live music and the television industry. Television itself is on the way out. There are times when our local television stations are putting on public-service commercials because there are no paid ads to fill those slots.

The Interweb is the last big venue, and it is anathema to live ANYthing.


I don't know if there are less opportunities today for musicians then 20 years ago, but you can't say the system is broken because it's changed and you've stayed the same. "Making videos" - you mean YouTube, is a wonderful medium and those who know how to leverage it have created opportunities for themselves that probably wouldn't have been possible without it. There are many "YouTube Stars" that I know of, some I follow. Kyle Landry as an example, Sal Kahn (not a musician though), Hiromi Uehara I believe also got a lot of great exposure through YouTube. Even Rickster here seems to have a good following on YouTube, and I'm guessing he was born after 1980 and doesn't qualify as a millennial (if I'm wrong, please forgive me).

The bar band, EDM, these are all evolutions of music. They're not any less, though some will disagree.

The Internet is sucking the life out of those who refuse to adapt and learn new things. Everyone can make YouTube videos these days, even on your iPhone. Give it a try, maybe you'll get 300,000 views and be the next Justin Beieber!



There are many times less opportunities for musicians today. In 1978, a kid could take a few bass lessons and could be gigging, full-time, within a month, because the demand for bass players (especially GOOD bass players) was so high.

You can't tell me that anything resembling this demand exists today.

Yes, you can make YooToob videos. So what? That doesn't automatically translate into money. Regardless, people don't pay to view YooToob videos.

Top
#2306470 - 07/24/14 01:45 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Rickster]
gsmonks Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/10
Posts: 638
Loc: Saskatchewan, Canada
Originally Posted By: Rickster
Originally Posted By: Michaelha
The Internet is sucking the life out of those who refuse to adapt and learn new things. Everyone can make YouTube videos these days, even on your iPhone. Give it a try, maybe you'll get 300,000 views and be the next Justin Beieber!

Well, I'll never be a Justin Beiber, but one of my YouTube music videos has over 650,000 views! smile

It has certainly surprised the heck out of me...

Just goes to show that entertainment and musical proficiency are not the same thing. (Musically proficient I'm not smile )

Rick


Wonderful. And how much money has this translated into?

Top
#2306471 - 07/24/14 01:48 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian]
Markarian Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/06/12
Posts: 251
Loc: Seattle Area
Gsmonks,

With all due respect to your obviously extensive experience in music, you've kind of hijacked this thread and turned it into a nostalgic digression into the decline of live music over the last century, with the obligatory "You young'uns don't know what real music is!" You've provided a lot of insight, albeit with some questionable blanket statements, and I would kindly invite you to start a separate thread about it. I can't help but recall the opening lines to the theme for "All In the Family."

This thread is specifically about my worry that there are simply not enough new piano technicians and rebuilders entering the field to replace the huge slew of older techs who will at some point need to retire.

Adam, you raise a good point and I was going to mention the NBSS and the young people who are getting into their PT program! It does give me hope, but it would be nice to see these awesome techs and rebuilders with young apprentices in tow on their calls. And no, I am not volunteering--I'm far too impatient and fidgety to be a tech.

I was also going to mention the Asian market and how it is changing the industry. Most of buyers at my local dealership where I bought my original Steinway are well-to-do Chinese families, buying for their children. I have been told by several older people in the industry that East Asia is literally keeping the entire industry afloat right now. That may be true, from a retail perspective. So who is going to service these brand new Hailuns and Kawais in 30 years? Who is going to know enough about pianos to sell them to these little kids' own children in that amount of time? How will pianos be sold in the future?

Ando, I got another B. It will be here this weekend so I am understandably quite excited.
_________________________
NY Steinway Model B | Kawai MP11 | Korg Kross 61

Top
#2306472 - 07/24/14 01:51 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian]
Rickster Online   content


Registered: 03/25/06
Posts: 8534
Loc: Georgia, USA
Originally Posted By: gsmonks
Wonderful. And how much money has this translated into?

Not much, but more than I had before I posted the music video on YT... smile

Rick
_________________________
Piano enthusiast and amateur musician: "Treat others the way you would like to be treated". Yamaha C7. YouTube Channel

Top
#2306480 - 07/24/14 02:00 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian]
ando Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/23/10
Posts: 3582
Loc: Melbourne, Australia
Originally Posted By: Markarian

Ando, I got another B. It will be here this weekend so I am understandably quite excited.


Brilliant - hope you have a trouble free run with the new one. Congrats, and enjoy!

Top
#2306534 - 07/24/14 03:26 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian]
wimpiano Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/16/13
Posts: 1258
Loc: The Netherlands
@Markarian: Congratulations!!

@gsmonk, let's see this from another perspective:

This might sound a bit sauer but: In the Netherlands our generation, "the Millenials", are paying for the generations before us. For example: Some recent calculations have shown that the average person born in 1980-1988 will have a nett loss of 180,000.00 EUR on taxes and pensions as apposed to the soixante huitards which have a nett profit of an equivalent or higher amount.. Everybody born before 1960 receives, everybody after 1960 pays. And still the older people are complaining that they're getting not enough pension and that there's not enough tax money going to culture and so on while they are the very wealthiest group in the Netherlands. They even founded a political party called 50+ which has only one argument: more money to people older then 50. They're the same generation that invented national debt, which we have to pay since the EU doesn't allow growth of national debt anymore.. (Nor would I want that)
This isn't exaggerated, maybe I haven't shed enough light on all aspects of the situation (yes there are also poor older people) nor do I want to make this all political but you get the point.

So, maybe it's a question of economics. One DJ per 200? 1000? 50000? people is a lot cheaper then a jazz band in a small venue. It is just economically not feasible to have so much people in entertainment..

BTW. This situation applies to the Netherlands, I don't know how it is in the US or elsewhere.

On music: They liked Caruso back then, Pavarotti was a big hit quite recent, there will always be hypes.. And I hate to say it but there is also a lot of Jazz music that I simply do not enjoy and think is crap from a musical point of view. There has always been bad music as has there always been good music.

On modern music such as atonal music: luckily the genre is dying.. It is great from an art point of view but my personal opinion is that it doesn't have anything to do with music (my personal taste).

_________________________
Schimmel 116 S ..

Top
#2306535 - 07/24/14 03:27 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian]
Paul678 Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/13/13
Posts: 578
Originally Posted By: Markarian
Gsmonks,

With all due respect to your obviously extensive experience in music, you've kind of hijacked this thread and turned it into a nostalgic digression into the decline of live music over the last century, with the obligatory "You young'uns don't know what real music is!" You've provided a lot of insight, albeit with some questionable blanket statements, and I would kindly invite you to start a separate thread about it. I can't help but recall the opening lines to the theme for "All In the Family."

This thread is specifically about my worry that there are simply not enough new piano technicians and rebuilders entering the field to replace the huge slew of older techs who will at some point need to retire.

Adam, you raise a good point and I was going to mention the NBSS and the young people who are getting into their PT program! It does give me hope, but it would be nice to see these awesome techs and rebuilders with young apprentices in tow on their calls. And no, I am not volunteering--I'm far too impatient and fidgety to be a tech.

I was also going to mention the Asian market and how it is changing the industry. Most of buyers at my local dealership where I bought my original Steinway are well-to-do Chinese families, buying for their children. I have been told by several older people in the industry that East Asia is literally keeping the entire industry afloat right now. That may be true, from a retail perspective. So who is going to service these brand new Hailuns and Kawais in 30 years? Who is going to know enough about pianos to sell them to these little kids' own children in that amount of time? How will pianos be sold in the future?

Ando, I got another B. It will be here this weekend so I am understandably quite excited.



Don't worry so much about the future.

Live in the present. Here and Now.

The techs will be there, and if not, they will
learn quickly, and on the job. It ain't rocket science.....

Top
#2306541 - 07/24/14 03:31 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian]
wimpiano Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/16/13
Posts: 1258
Loc: The Netherlands
Oh and @Markarian, I do not have a single doubt that there will be enough techs and tuners in 30 years. It might be more expensive but I don't think the demand will completely die, so the supply won't either..
_________________________
Schimmel 116 S ..

Top
#2306548 - 07/24/14 03:36 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: BrainCramp]
gsmonks Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/10
Posts: 638
Loc: Saskatchewan, Canada
Originally Posted By: BrainCramp
Originally Posted By: gsmonks

I've been studying, writing and writing about classical music, probably a lot longer than you've been alive. I began composing in the 1950's.

You're probably not old enough to know how the classical world has changed since 1963. Most orchestras today are amateur organisations that keep the genre going, but like jazz musicians are enthusiasts without being the real deal.

gsmonks, I'm baffled as to why you'd make assumptions about someone's age based on no information. Believe it or not, some of us on these forums do remember the 1950s and 1960s.

You may have been writing about classical music for a long time. But given that you referred to all contemporary classical composers as "taxidermists", I'd say you haven't been writing about it very intelligently.

Maybe things look different in Saskatchewan than they do here in Boston...


Both classical music and jazz jumped the tracks around 1963. Neither has progressed since then. There have been no movements in either field (which pretty much merged by ca 1963) since then.

Your average well-educated classical/jazz person of today is not the same animal as existed in ca 1963. In ca 1963 you were dealing with professional individuals who were part of musical movements. Today you are dealing with enthusiasts, part-time weekend warriors, who keep up their chops, write and play because they enjoy it, but are not part of any great social and academic movement- hence the term "taxidermists". The horse is dead, but they've preserved the hide, and with the help of animatronics, are "riding" off into the sunset, having convinced themselves that the horse is alive and well.

Here is a perfect example of the corruption and erosion of the academic world:

Back in the 60's, the canon was set by the composers, who were also the top academicians of the day. In 1960 Hindemith was still alive, as was Ligeti, Khachaturian, Shostakovich, Messiaen, and several others. Walter Piston, also a composer, was putting out his books on Harmony, Counterpoint and Orchestration. Piston was something of a fruit-loop, and as he got older, his publications, especially on Harmony, got nuttier and nuttier.

What kept him in check was other academics, many of whom were his fellow composers. But when they finally all died off, he gave his nutty-ness free reign, and out came his notions of "tonicization" and I 6/4 as appoggiatura, which it is not.

Piston's theory of secondary dominants was a brilliant teaching tool, but useful beyond that it was not. At some point he went overboard, bought into his own method (he should've got out more, but instead spent his final days committing intellectual incest), and pressed for nutbar theories which have done a lot of damage and which are still widely accepted today.

I've singled out the I 6/4 as appoggiatura example for the sake of brevity, but since the 1980's have had to break too many students of this mental bad habit to count. Where analysis is concerned, where every example of a possible I 6/4 as appoggiatura you can show as "evidence", I can dig up ten more examples where it does NOT act as appoggiatura. For Piston's theory to be true, I 6/4 would have to be hard-wired into the human brain, when it is demonstrable that listening habits are a matter of bias based upon familiarity, meaning it is a learned thing. It may SEEM true to someone immersed in 19th century and earlier Harmony, but one could just as easily come up with theories that are no less nutty, based on theories of everything from secondary sub-dominants to the secret order of those who look for meaning in patterns of substituted chords that imply a whole other kind of hidden Harmony.

Wind back the clock to ca 1963, pull everyone's head out of their arse, and you had real work being done by real theorists. Ligeti's Requiem and other works managed to cross the theory-to-practice barrier and are still widely known today. This was also the high-water mark for avante garde jazz.

There have been no big unified social and cultural movements that have occurred since then. The Interweb doesn't count because it's only a vehicle, and as a vehicle, its members are all working in isolation. The term "internet culture" or "web culture" is by definition an oxymoron.

Top
#2306647 - 07/24/14 06:12 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian]
Markarian Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/06/12
Posts: 251
Loc: Seattle Area
Gsmonks,

Thanks for ignoring everything I said. I am going to be charitable and assume you're very knowledgeable and a tremendous resource for someone who is formally studying jazz. That being said, I can definitely say that those who are being creative on the Internet are far from working in isolation. I scored a film in Seattle with a film crew in California while their CG effects person was in Bulgaria. The Internet has a culture, a vibrant and dynamic one, and I'm sorry you feel left out of it. You can decry the decline of academia all you like, but you are sounding fairly bitter and incoherent to me from across this particular generation gap. In either case, thanks for the responses from those who actually took the time to read my OP and for your continued help. For now, things are way off track and I'm outta here.

_________________________
NY Steinway Model B | Kawai MP11 | Korg Kross 61

Top
#2306648 - 07/24/14 06:15 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian]
Minnesota Marty Online   content

Platinum Supporter until October 5 2014


Registered: 05/15/12
Posts: 7431
Loc: Rochester MN
Now, let us all enjoy a performance of 4'33"
_________________________
Marty in Minnesota

It's much easier to bash a Steinway than it is to play one.

Top
#2306692 - 07/24/14 08:15 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian]
Donzo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/04/14
Posts: 53
Loc: British Columbia
Originally Posted By: Markarian


I can't help but recall the opening lines to the theme for "All In the Family."



Markarian,

With all due respect you are way WAY too young to have ever seen that show.

And even if you have watched it ironically a few times on YouTube in your hipster search for "authenticity" you don't really understand it because you didn't watch it the way it was DESIGNED to be watched. On a REAL 20" TV with a curved CRT that smelled of ozone, a manual channel dial,only 9 minutes of commercials per hour and absolutely NOTHING else to watch because there was only one. other. channel!

You Millenials just have no. frigging. idea. what it was like.




Just kidding, ok, abandon thread.

Top
#2306983 - 07/25/14 01:25 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian]
gynnis Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/16/14
Posts: 121
Loc: Florida, Connecticut
There has been an interesting series on PBS about new classical music being written for video games. Some of it is pretty interesting. It's being done with the internet. The composers are often in multiple cities, the orchestra is somewhere else, and the game designers in another remote location. All are communicating over the internet and working interactively. No need for a venue!

There is plenty of young talent out there, they just don't show up much in the conventional old venues. When I was young Community Concerts sponsored student tickets for $1 at some rather unusual venues. Try getting a seat at any venue today for less than $40. Ticket prices are driving the venue shrinkage not the lack of talent.
_________________________
Seiler 206, Chickering 145, Estey 2 manual reed organ, Fudge clavichord, Zuckerman single harpsichord, Technics P-30, Roland RD-100.

Top
#2307054 - 07/25/14 04:07 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Minnesota Marty]
Retsacnal Offline

Platinum Supporter until Feb 18  2015


Registered: 10/11/12
Posts: 535
Loc: Northern Virgina
Originally Posted By: Minnesota Marty
Now, let us all enjoy a performance of 4'33"


Can 4'33" be performed on a parlor grand, or is a full concert grand needed to truly do it justice?
_________________________
1950 Baldwin M

Top
#2307056 - 07/25/14 04:08 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Paul678]
S. Phillips Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/15/07
Posts: 278
Loc: Forte Farm, Lexington, KY
Originally Posted By: Paul678
[quote=Markarian]Gsmonks,


The techs will be there, and if not, they will
learn quickly, and on the job. It ain't rocket science.....


Just wanted to reply to this remark. This thinking is extremely offensive to professional technicians who have worked for years to be proficient at concert quality tuning, regulation and voicing. It takes years to become a top technician. This is a huge problem because 30 years ago a young tech could work for dealers, and tune home pianos in the suburbs to get the experience they need to start to become proficient for concert work. Now most of the work is for much more discriminating clients who are professional musicians. On the job training is inadequate because the majority of the paying clients wouldn't want someone who was just starting to learn. With dealers becoming scarce, the sea of floor stock that needs servicing is just not there for the beginning tech who is sharpening their skills.

….and I've got rocket scientists who pay handsomely for superior piano technical work.
_________________________
Sally Phillips
Piano Technician
One can always find something to improve.
2 Steinway Os, Steinway B & C, C. Bechstein A
Phillips Piano Tech
Contributor - Acoustic and Digital Piano Buyer
New Federal and State Ivory Regulations and Pianos
http://www.pianobuyer.com/articles/ivory.html

Top
#2307058 - 07/25/14 04:27 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: S. Phillips]
Rich Galassini Online   content
9000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/28/01
Posts: 9223
Loc: Philadelphia/South Jersey
Originally Posted By: S. Phillips

….and I've got rocket scientists who pay handsomely for superior piano technical work.


Brava Sandy!

Discerning musicians are not necessarily professional musicians.
_________________________
Rich Galassini
Cunningham Piano Co.
Phila, Pa.
Dir. Line (215) 991-0834
rich@cunninghampiano.com
Get Cunningham Piano Email Updates

Top
#2307083 - 07/25/14 05:04 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: S. Phillips]
Grandman Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/18/12
Posts: 198
Loc: Usa
Originally Posted By: S. Phillips
Originally Posted By: Paul678
[quote=Markarian]Gsmonks,


The techs will be there, and if not, they will
learn quickly, and on the job. It ain't rocket science.....


Just wanted to reply to this remark. This thinking is extremely offensive to professional technicians who have worked for years to be proficient at concert quality tuning, regulation and voicing. It takes years to become a top technician. This is a huge problem because 30 years ago a young tech could work for dealers, and tune home pianos in the suburbs to get the experience they need to start to become proficient for concert work. Now most of the work is for much more discriminating clients who are professional musicians. On the job training is inadequate because the majority of the paying clients wouldn't want someone who was just starting to learn. With dealers becoming scarce, the sea of floor stock that needs servicing is just not there for the beginning tech who is sharpening their skills.

….and I've got rocket scientists who pay handsomely for superior piano technical work.


Agree wholeheartedly, Sally. And I do recognize and appreciate the skills and knowledge of an experienced and skilled tech, especially when they are as kind as you have been to me.

Top
#2307365 - 07/26/14 12:58 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian]
gsmonks Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/10
Posts: 638
Loc: Saskatchewan, Canada
Originally Posted By: Markarian
Gsmonks,

Thanks for ignoring everything I said. I am going to be charitable and assume you're very knowledgeable and a tremendous resource for someone who is formally studying jazz. That being said, I can definitely say that those who are being creative on the Internet are far from working in isolation. I scored a film in Seattle with a film crew in California while their CG effects person was in Bulgaria. The Internet has a culture, a vibrant and dynamic one, and I'm sorry you feel left out of it. You can decry the decline of academia all you like, but you are sounding fairly bitter and incoherent to me from across this particular generation gap. In either case, thanks for the responses from those who actually took the time to read my OP and for your continued help. For now, things are way off track and I'm outta here.



Well, due to your sarcasm, I'm not going to be charitable. You've obviously either misunderstood all I said or ignored it.

There is no forward progress in music in "Internet culture". THAT's the difference. Yes, the Interweb as a thing unto itself is moving forward, but the music (to isolate that one aspect) is not.

The underlying structure of music across the board is at a standstill, and has been since ca 1963. You apparently haven't a clue as to the full import of what Academia is all about if you think you can dismiss it as unimportant or irrelevant in terms of the underlying structure of music itself. You evidently have even less understanding of social movements.

In terms of "new blood", this is just as important for music itself (the nuts 'n' bolts of what makes it go) as it is for piano makers and tuners. It would take only the emergence of a small handful of pianists to emerge as popular figures in the public consciousness to turn things around, big-time.

Case in point: rockabilly 3/4 basses with cool paint jobs are selling like hotcakes right now. They're not works of art in terms of craftsmanship and durability, but the mere presence of hot interest inevitably results in a climate in which more bass players exist, and simply by virtue of sheer numbers, a percentage of them are looking for quality, and are trying to broaden their knowledge of bass-playing, which sends them in search of better-informed teachers. In short, in some areas the acoustic bass is doing very well right now, which translates into lots of work for repairmen and technicians.

Clarinet sales were probably at their all-time peak while Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw were in their heyday. In other words, demand and public perception go hand-in-hand.

The piano just isn't a "cool" instrument right now. What it will take to turn things around is the piano-player's version of the Big Bang Theory, which inspired lots of kids to seek a career in physics.

One thing that HAS to change, in the public perception, is a shift in the notion that a grand piano is just a stage-prop for singers, something like a microphone that is just there temporarily for the purpose. There's a world of difference between that, and someone coming out on stage with a model of guitar that everyone suddenly just has to own. A good many people take a good look at the guitar and can identify it. The piano, however, for most people, is just a big, black piece of furniture. It could say "John Deere" on it for all they care.

Top
#2307379 - 07/26/14 01:51 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: gsmonks]
Paul678 Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/13/13
Posts: 578
Originally Posted By: gsmonks


The piano just isn't a "cool" instrument right now. What it will take to turn things around is the piano-player's version of the Big Bang Theory, which inspired lots of kids to seek a career in physics.

One thing that HAS to change, in the public perception, is a shift in the notion that a grand piano is just a stage-prop for singers, something like a microphone that is just there temporarily for the purpose. There's a world of difference between that, and someone coming out on stage with a model of guitar that everyone suddenly just has to own. A good many people take a good look at the guitar and can identify it. The piano, however, for most people, is just a big, black piece of furniture. It could say "John Deere" on it for all they care.



I disagree with this, due to the Lang-Lang Effect!

The piano is VERY Cool, at the moment! Tons of kids are taking lessons, and not just in China!

All these techs and tuners owe Lang-Lang some gratitude!

Top
#2307385 - 07/26/14 02:14 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Paul678]
michaelha Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/05/13
Posts: 835
Originally Posted By: Paul678


I disagree with this, due to the Lang-Lang Effect!

The piano is VERY Cool, at the moment! Tons of kids are taking lessons, and not just in China!

All these techs and tuners owe Lang-Lang some gratitude!


I'm all for it if it helps more people get into the piano, even though I'm not a Lang Lang fan. One concern though is Lang Lang is a classical piano player, and classical music doesn't have much of a chance to go mainstream.
_________________________
Casio CDP-100
2012 Kawai RX-5 BLAK

Top
#2307392 - 07/26/14 02:53 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Paul678]
gsmonks Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/17/10
Posts: 638
Loc: Saskatchewan, Canada
Originally Posted By: Paul678
Originally Posted By: gsmonks


The piano just isn't a "cool" instrument right now. What it will take to turn things around is the piano-player's version of the Big Bang Theory, which inspired lots of kids to seek a career in physics.

One thing that HAS to change, in the public perception, is a shift in the notion that a grand piano is just a stage-prop for singers, something like a microphone that is just there temporarily for the purpose. There's a world of difference between that, and someone coming out on stage with a model of guitar that everyone suddenly just has to own. A good many people take a good look at the guitar and can identify it. The piano, however, for most people, is just a big, black piece of furniture. It could say "John Deere" on it for all they care.



I disagree with this, due to the Lang-Lang Effect!

The piano is VERY Cool, at the moment! Tons of kids are taking lessons, and not just in China!

All these techs and tuners owe Lang-Lang some gratitude!


Well, I wish that was true around here. There are two of us piano teachers out here in the sticks (rural Saskatchewan), and neither of us has a single student. This, in an area where almost every second home once had a piano, there were dozens of piano teachers, and three or four piano tuner/technicians. If it weren't for the piano-tuner/technician living in the next town, several of us would be in big trouble in terms of tuning and maintenance.

Kijiji is full of local pianos being given away for free.

Top
#2307475 - 07/26/14 07:14 PM Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: michaelha]
Paul678 Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/13/13
Posts: 578
Originally Posted By: michaelha


I'm all for it if it helps more people get into the piano, even though I'm not a Lang Lang fan. One concern though is Lang Lang is a classical piano player, and classical music doesn't have much of a chance to go mainstream.


Well, he's enjoying Rockstar-like status, so
that's not bad for a classical musician.

He's also recorded with Metallica!

That's about as mainstream as any classical musician can get!

Top
Page 3 of 3 < 1 2 3

Moderator:  Ken Knapp, Piano World, Rickster 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
ad (Casio)
Celviano by Casio Rebate
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Seiler Pianos
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
New Topics - Multiple Forums
George R Walter upright
by landorrano
09/19/14 05:19 PM
Does anybody know about Hayes London?
by Sam4
09/19/14 05:16 PM
Mason & Hamlin Opinions
by Hunt
09/19/14 03:23 PM
contacting with someone of VI Labs
by imyself
09/19/14 03:02 PM
My Initial Thoughts on Left/Right Hand Independence
by Visalia
09/19/14 01:23 PM
Who's Online
121 registered (accordeur, alfredo capurso, 36251, aesop, Alan F, 38 invisible), 1490 Guests and 14 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
76251 Members
42 Forums
157632 Topics
2315310 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
|
Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission