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#2324273 - 09/05/14 05:11 AM How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz?
Mihai Sirbu Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 09/02/14
Posts: 1
Hi everyone. I'm new on this forum and I want some advices and tips. I'm a classically trained pianist (11 years) in a High School of Arts and I really want to know how can I start playng some jazz. I think the start is the hard part...I don't know, my morale is down. I really need help because I love jazz.
Thank you smile

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#2324322 - 09/05/14 09:04 AM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
beeboss Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/18/09
Posts: 1202
Loc: uk south
Learn about chords and sequences, listen to jazz and copy what you hear, get a real book and struggle through some tunes, but best would be to find a good jazz teacher for a few lessons
_________________________
http://www.youtube.com/davebeeboss

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#2324346 - 09/05/14 10:00 AM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
Michael Sayers Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/15/13
Posts: 1137
Loc: Stockholms län, Sverige
You can use the piano solo scores of music by Jelly Roll Morton, Scott Joplin, Art Tatum, and others, to get a feel for how music can lay under the hands differently than in Bach, Liszt, Chopin, Brahms, et al. And I think the idea of getting a teacher in jazz piano is best, that person will know how to get started. If you are going to pursue jazz rather than classical then a teacher at least up to a certain level of study and immersion is necessary - don't be like me and have only an appreciation of jazz, and enjoy some playing of jazz and related music on the piano, which isn't the same thing as really being a jazz pianist. Maybe like Loussier and sometimes Brubeck you can eventually come up with a compelling quasi-synthesis of classical and jazz. There are also such things as Jan Johansson's great Jazz på Svenska. Don't feel down about it or overwhelmed, just get a teacher to help you get started. Try to find your own style or presence as a jazz pianist.

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#2324351 - 09/05/14 10:15 AM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
Mark Polishook Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/29/12
Posts: 676
Loc: Leicester, UK
In the spirit of total agreement with all advice posted so far: Get a teacher to work with. It's a music that's learned very well with others. Whether it's just you and a teacher. Or you and a teacher and a group of friends.

t's often said the best teachers help their students to learn how to teach themselves. But in the beginning of learning to play jazz it'll save a ton of time and effort to work with a teacher. Over time you'll know how to teach yourself. A good teacher will also help you to build your growing interests in jazz right on top of all the skills you already have.

... yes of course, there are great pianists who are self-taught, and they're exceptional and, really, the exceptions.

And have fun with the learning process! (Which a good teacher can help you to do as well).

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#2324366 - 09/05/14 11:06 AM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
chrisbell Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/11/07
Posts: 1361
Loc: Stockholm, Sweden
Whilst you're searching for a teacher you need to listen - a lot - to jazz. You need to find the pianist (and with that a specific period in jazz; swing, bop, cool, latin, etc) that you want to emulate.
Imitate, Integrate, Innovate: are the three corner stones to learning jazz.
When you've found the pianist of your choice, collect all you can find, articles, interviews, albums where the pianist is a side-man a part from his/her own. And then listen some more; obsessively.
You will start to acquire the inner-ear that a jazz musician needs to develop.

And get that teacher . . .
_________________________

I never play anything the same way once.

https://soundcloud.com/chrisb/sets
https://www.youtube.com/user/djboing/videos

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#2324367 - 09/05/14 11:16 AM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
jjo Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/09/08
Posts: 637
Loc: Chicago
I'm a classical guy who switched to jazz (and love it!), so here's what you need to realize. Some classical people think jazz is just another style, like baroque, impressionism, etc. It's not. It's a totally different mental approach to music. Your chops will serve you well, but you'll need to start from scratch on the mental approach to music. Classical is about playing notes on a page. Jazz is about playing over a harmonic structure, normally a series of chord progressions. That's why jazz is generally played from a lead sheet, which provides the harmony and the single note melody; we fill in the rest.

Jazz can be learned without a teacher, but it's much easier if you have a good teacher to get you going. My teacher really likes (and I do, as well) the Jazz Piano book by Mark Levine. It's a classic. However, it is not set up as an instruction guide; it's really more of a reference work. It might be a good purchase, however, because you can be comfortable that what's in there is very valuable stuff.

Unfortunately, I learned with a teacher, so I really can't suggest a course of instruction without one.

Good luck; learning jazz is a fantastic journey!

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#2324396 - 09/05/14 12:03 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
JazzPianoOnline Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/14/07
Posts: 91
Loc: raleigh, nc
i agree completely with jjo.

the best way to describe jazz to a classically trained player is that jazz is composing in the moment. and because of that everything that you do when you play jazz is improvised. you improvise the choice of voicings for chords, the rhythmic concept, the melodic content, etc.

this is a daunting concept for most classical players who are mainly trained at executing a series of notes on a page. you can take comfort in the fact, however, that the improvising that you are doing is within very structured boundaries. you play tunes from a fairly limited repertoire (standards) that have a form of one of two types 12 bar blues and 32 bar AABA, and a repeating series of chord changes that is composed of only 60 chords distributed among 5 distinct types.

i hope this makes it seem like a more manageable task.

the first place you want to start is to learn the 5 chord types and the 60 chords (5 chord types x 12 keys) that make up the harmony of mainstream jazz. while you are doing this listen to the repertoire and get to know some tunes. buy a real book and then play the tunes using the chords.

you can then move on to learn voicings (particular arrangements of notes of chords that vary the sound of the chords) and then improv.

all of that is a long term project and it is best done with a studio teacher or a good online teaching site.

feel free to contact me to talk more!
_________________________
br
bill@jazzpianoonline.com
www.JazzPianoOnline.com

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#2324529 - 09/05/14 06:17 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
Dfrankjazz Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 139
Loc: NYC
There is no hope)

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#2325103 - 09/07/14 05:38 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
Jim Frazee Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/31/06
Posts: 393
Loc: Westchester County, New York
You can also learn a LOT by buying and using Joy of Improvisation by Dave Frank, also a contributor to this board. He also offers lessons on line and he has lots of tutorials about different players. Try davefrankjazz.com You'll be glad you did. Best of luck!
_________________________
PianoPerfection
Teacher, performer, technician
Westchester County, NY

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#2325139 - 09/07/14 07:45 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
Dfrankjazz Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 139
Loc: NYC
You mean there is hope?

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#2326007 - 09/10/14 11:52 AM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
Michael Martinez Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/22/12
Posts: 415
Loc: California
Originally Posted By: Mihai Sirbu
Hi everyone. I'm new on this forum and I want some advices and tips. I'm a classically trained pianist (11 years) in a High School of Arts and I really want to know how can I start playng some jazz. I think the start is the hard part...I don't know, my morale is down. I really need help because I love jazz.
Thank you smile


Chords and chord voicings. Something (book, teacher or online course) that shows you the standard chord progressions and their voicings on piano, and provides exercises for you to work on these. Start applying these in the context of tunes (jazz standards).

A good online course that has you do this is Paul Abrahams site: www.learnjazzpianoonline.com

A good book that has you do this is:

  • the jazz harmony book. david berkman
  • jazz piano voicings for the intermediate to advanced pianist
  • the harmonic foundation for jazz and popular music. jimmie amadie

You can use these three books in conjunction, as they each teach things slightly differently and can complement eachother
_________________________
Music Educator, Computer Engineer, avid reader of literature, enjoyer of the outdoors
http://www.michael--martinez.com/music/

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#2326008 - 09/10/14 11:55 AM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Michael Martinez]
Michael Martinez Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/22/12
Posts: 415
Loc: California
Originally Posted By: Michael Martinez
Originally Posted By: Mihai Sirbu
Hi everyone. I'm new on this forum and I want some advices and tips. I'm a classically trained pianist (11 years) in a High School of Arts and I really want to know how can I start playng some jazz. I think the start is the hard part...I don't know, my morale is down. I really need help because I love jazz.
Thank you smile


Chords and chord voicings. Something (book, teacher or online course) that shows you the standard chord progressions and their voicings on piano, and provides exercises for you to work on these. Start applying these in the context of tunes (jazz standards).

The term "standard chord progression" is important. This is the proper place to start.

A good online course that has you do this is Paul Abrahams site: www.learnjazzpianoonline.com

A good book that has you do this is:

  • the jazz harmony book. david berkman
  • jazz piano voicings for the intermediate to advanced pianist
  • the harmonic foundation for jazz and popular music. jimmie amadie

You can use these three books in conjunction, as they each teach things slightly differently and can complement eachother

I recommend you don't look at the Mark Levine book until later after you already have the foundation.
_________________________
Music Educator, Computer Engineer, avid reader of literature, enjoyer of the outdoors
http://www.michael--martinez.com/music/

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#2326009 - 09/10/14 11:56 AM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Michael Martinez]
Michael Martinez Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/22/12
Posts: 415
Loc: California
Originally Posted By: Mihai Sirbu
Hi everyone. I'm new on this forum and I want some advices and tips. I'm a classically trained pianist (11 years) in a High School of Arts and I really want to know how can I start playng some jazz. I think the start is the hard part...I don't know, my morale is down. I really need help because I love jazz.
Thank you smile


Chords and chord voicings. Something (book, teacher or online course) that shows you the standard chord progressions and their voicings on piano, and provides exercises for you to work on these. Start applying these in the context of tunes (jazz standards).

The term "standard chord progression" is important. This is the proper place to start.

A good online course that has you do this is Paul Abrahams site: www.learnjazzpianoonline.com

A good book that has you do this is:

  • the jazz harmony book. david berkman
  • jazz piano voicings for the intermediate to advanced pianist
  • the harmonic foundation for jazz and popular music. jimmie amadie

You can use these three books in conjunction, as they each teach things slightly differently and can complement eachother

I recommend you don't look at the Mark Levine book until later after you already have the foundation.
_________________________
Music Educator, Computer Engineer, avid reader of literature, enjoyer of the outdoors
http://www.michael--martinez.com/music/

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#2326483 - 09/11/14 04:39 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
kanadajin Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 09/06/14
Posts: 12
Speaking of good books, I would also suggest Tim Richard's excellent 2 volumes of Exploring Jazz Piano Vol. 1 and Vol. 2. I have learned quite a bit from these books, particularly the second one.

Also, learning to transcribe note-for-note a recording is an excellent exercise, not only for ear training but also for learning new chord progressions, voicing, etc. Use software for slowing things down as required (such as Transcribe!, but there are others).

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#2327130 - 09/13/14 12:24 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: kanadajin]
Michael Martinez Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/22/12
Posts: 415
Loc: California
Originally Posted By: kanadajin

Also, learning to transcribe note-for-note a recording is an excellent exercise,


Yes, but only after you have a solid foundation of harmony, otherwise it's is going to confuse you. This is really true when it comes to jazz recording artists, and also sometimes with professional musicians in other styles of music, because they are often doing very complex things. And with different takes they are harmonize things differently. So if you don't already have a good command of the harmonic language, it's not going to make any sense, and what you end up with when you transcribe them is something that is just another piece of sheet music.

a much better thing to do, after you go through the foundation, is to go your local jazz bar, take a recorder along and transcribe "run-of-the-mill" jazz musicians that nobody's ever heard of, because these guys are usually doing stuff in a much simpler fashion (but still have a lot more experience than you, so you'll learn a lot, but it'll be easier for you.)

(Really the worst thing you can do when you're first starting out is try to learn from transcriptions of pianists who are at "the top of their game" so to speak. But later on, when you are gigging and you already have a decent amount of chops, then it's a good thing to do)


Edited by Michael Martinez (09/13/14 12:26 PM)
_________________________
Music Educator, Computer Engineer, avid reader of literature, enjoyer of the outdoors
http://www.michael--martinez.com/music/

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#2329817 - 09/21/14 11:22 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
RollingTenths Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 10/13/12
Posts: 19
Loc: Minnesota
Getting out of playing "what's written" is the biggest obstacle so far for me (still not over it). Reading music is such a crutch... and so is muscle memory argh... I could go through an entire performance nervous out of my mind and still have the finger memory to sound great. With jazz? wow no way.

Transcribing is tough. Especially when the only recordings of your fav songs (played by the composer himself) were recorded by phonograph. Still working through it though!
_________________________
-"RollingTenths words of wisdom"

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#2331871 - 09/28/14 01:10 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Michael Martinez]
Elkayem Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/02/12
Posts: 160
Loc: Santa Clara, CA
Originally Posted By: Michael Martinez
Originally Posted By: kanadajin

Also, learning to transcribe note-for-note a recording is an excellent exercise,


Yes, but only after you have a solid foundation of harmony, otherwise it's is going to confuse you. This is really true when it comes to jazz recording artists, and also sometimes with professional musicians in other styles of music, because they are often doing very complex things. And with different takes they are harmonize things differently. So if you don't already have a good command of the harmonic language, it's not going to make any sense, and what you end up with when you transcribe them is something that is just another piece of sheet music.

a much better thing to do, after you go through the foundation, is to go your local jazz bar, take a recorder along and transcribe "run-of-the-mill" jazz musicians that nobody's ever heard of, because these guys are usually doing stuff in a much simpler fashion (but still have a lot more experience than you, so you'll learn a lot, but it'll be easier for you.)

(Really the worst thing you can do when you're first starting out is try to learn from transcriptions of pianists who are at "the top of their game" so to speak. But later on, when you are gigging and you already have a decent amount of chops, then it's a good thing to do)

If I may, I am going to respectfully disagree with the above post and suggest that transcribing is a worthy endeavor, even for a beginner. It isn't just the harmony but also the phrasing and timing that are learned, as well as helping with ear training. I have been taking jazz piano lessons for a few years now and would describe myself as a solid "intermediate" player, whatever that means, playing for fun with friends and private jam sessions but still years away from being a regular gigging musician. One of the first assignments my piano teacher gave me was to transcribe a Sonny Clark solo (before I could improvise), and I have kept it up with many solos since then. I feel that has paid dividends in many ways. Part of the secret is choosing a solo which is appealing and within my ability to play. I don't restrict myself to piano either, since there are many horn players I love.

I think these guys put it best. They have a great blog by the way, worth checking out:

http://jazzadvice.com/what-why-where-who-when-and-how-to-transcribe/
_________________________
Schimmel 130T

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#2331934 - 09/28/14 04:30 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
T E Bekken Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 09/27/14
Posts: 10
Loc: Trondheim; Norway
I believe listening is probably the most important thing you can do. As one person said above; OBSESSIVE listening, combined with practice and trying to emulate what you hear.
_________________________
Dr Bekken
Jazz Blues Ragtime Stride Free Improvisation
http://youtube.com/drbekken

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#2332326 - 09/29/14 08:09 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: T E Bekken]
Michael Martinez Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/22/12
Posts: 415
Loc: California
[quote=T E Bekken]I believe listening is probably the most important thing you can do. As one person said above; OBSESSIVE listening, combined with practice and trying to emulate what you hear. [/quote] Everybody says this, but it's not the right place to start. Jazz is fast, it has so many chord changes, and so many different ways to harmonize the same thing, that if you're just listening, there's no way you're gonna figure out what's going on, unless you've already got a solid grounding in chords and all the different ways that people string them together. I mean, even people who have been playing jazz for a long time can have a hard time listening to a recording and figuring out what the guy is doing. So the right place to start is learn your keys, your chords, and start learning tunes. Basic stuff first.
_________________________
Music Educator, Computer Engineer, avid reader of literature, enjoyer of the outdoors
http://www.michael--martinez.com/music/

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#2332408 - Yesterday at 12:33 AM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
T E Bekken Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 09/27/14
Posts: 10
Loc: Trondheim; Norway
A combination of listening and practice. It's like learning a language. Listening is probably more basic than reading. Nobody learns to read before they can speak. Well, probably.
_________________________
Dr Bekken
Jazz Blues Ragtime Stride Free Improvisation
http://youtube.com/drbekken

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#2332595 - Yesterday at 01:06 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
RonDrotos Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/31/13
Posts: 69
Loc: New York City
It's great that you want to improvise; you just need a way to get started. To successfully learn to improvise, there are really 2 separate aspects to pursue, sometimes at the same time. The first, which is most often overlooked, is to simply start improvising, using the vocabulary you already know. Major scales, triads, simple accompaniment patterns, etc. Then the second is to learn the specific vocabulary of whatever style you're ultimately interested in, in your case, jazz. Many classical pianists jump right to jazz and sometimes it's such a different world than they're used to that the learn the chord voicings and riffs, but they don't ever become fluent. It never becomes natural. I've seen that the best approach is a well-rounded one, in which the player becomes fluent at improv by using the basics, and either at the same time or a little later, starts learning the specifics of jazz or whatever style they want. Best of luck; you'll experience music in a whole new, exciting way!
_________________________
Ron Drotos
rondrotos@keyboardimprov.com

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#2332831 - Today at 01:23 AM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: RonDrotos]
T E Bekken Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 09/27/14
Posts: 10
Loc: Trondheim; Norway
Excellent advice. I played classical piano since childhood, and my way into jazz went through ragtime, which is sheet music based. Then, I realised I could improvise in that style, using much of the rhythmic and harmonic vocabulary of that style. From there, I developed interest in the entire history of jazz piano; stride, boogie woogie, bebop and beyond. A classically trained pianist possesses a large vocabulary, and quite often, good technique. This means that the basic tools of improv are already there. Still, crossing the threshold into actual improvisation sometimes feels like a Herculean task. Just jump into it though!
_________________________
Dr Bekken
Jazz Blues Ragtime Stride Free Improvisation
http://youtube.com/drbekken

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#2332850 - Today at 02:18 AM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
Nahum Online   content
Junior Member

Registered: 09/27/14
Posts: 17
Loc: Israel
If we are talking about improvisation, in nature, there is a natural order - as in other processes of human evolution:

I hear - I imitate with the voice - I play

So teach Indian music - ie improvisation in Indian traditions - for 5,000 years. With this experience, we can trust to them. These lessons can be seen in YouTube ( usually stage of singing absent, although it is very important) .
Hence, is required a teacher who is playing with you and your singing .No book can do it.
However, your knowledge of the theory and notation greatly simplifies and speeds up the whole process of understanding - which is also very important.


Edited by Nahum (Today at 02:19 AM)

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#2333138 - Today at 07:52 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
Music Me Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 10/23/12
Posts: 212
Loc: New York
Sometimes I think we are chasing our tails. I, too, am classically trained and love jazz. For years I have done everything just about all of you suggest: Transcribing, playing along with tunes I love, purchasing all the well known jazz piano teaching aides. Truth is, there is no one answer.
We all learn differently. We all have different goals. Mine is to learn jazz piano for my own compositions. I would love to learn to solo. In the privacy of my music room, I make a complete idiot of myself attempting to solo over tunes I have learned (i.e., Bill Evans' "Very Early") and even some of my own tunes. Sometimes it sounds pretty good; sometimes I want to cut my fingers off one at a time.
Many years ago I had the fortune to make to acquaintance of the great Don Grolnick. He was an amazing jazz pianist - also classically trained. I asked how he learned; I asked if he could teach me and his response was that he didn't know how. H referred me to Warren Bernhardt. Another great jazz pianist. Warren was the one who suggested that the best thing I could do is purchase a DJ turntable, where I can adjust the speed of records to play in tune with my piano and play along.
My point is that, again, there is no answer - there is no one way, one technique, one thing we could do and then we're playing jazz piano. Fact is, if it were that easy, we would ALL be playing brilliantly already. If I could, I would be able to solo just as great as I play Beethoven and Rachmaninoff and Debussy and everybody else classical that I love.
So, I love jazz; I play my Bill Evans transcriptions; I look and learn from his voicings. I compose my own tunes, work on playing them with a trio and recording them for prosperity's sake.
And, every now and then, I play something, if even just a little bit, that sounds good.
Maybe when I retire in three years I'll try looking for a teacher and see if that is any better/different.

If there is reincarnation, I'll come back as the brilliant jazz pianist who wants to play classical ;-D
Regardless, my heart sings because of jazz.
_________________________
Barbara
...without music, no life...

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#2333154 - Today at 09:15 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
Mark Polishook Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/29/12
Posts: 676
Loc: Leicester, UK
Barbara,

You're point about there is no one way is well observed. Because for everyone who says "don't to it this way" there are 10 who did it that way and prospered.

Generally speaking playing with others is among the time-honoured ways in jazz to learn. "Bandstand" experience, so to speak. But not just any bandstand. Playing with experienced players who can help to point out shortcoming and show ways to improvement. And it makes all the difference when it's continuous experience, meaning night after night and week after week and etc.

It makes a difference too when the other players on the bandstand are all working themselves on sounding as absolutely as good as they can. Because in that sort of situation things can take off like a bonfire. Everyone' collaborating, everyone's excited about the same goal ... good things just happen smile ... and sometimes the more experience players on the bandstand can help to point out what the good things are ... Eons ago I tenor player I worked with (the proverbial guy who played everywhere with EVERYONE) would stand behind me while I soloed. When he heard something he liked he'd yell "PLAY THAT AGAIN!" And that sort of thing exists as well on gigs where the audience really participates in the performance. The kind of gig where they're listening and really contributing to the energy of the performance.

There's a component of "acceptance" that goes along with becoming a great improviser. "Acceptance" meaning it may be digits cry to be severed one at a time (as you eloquently describe smile I know that feeling - the cry for severance! It's part of the learning curve.

But what doesn't work today on a bandstand or in a practice session may come back tomorrow in a totally different and successful form. So being non-judgemental about what we play–learning to be non-judgemental–and accepting that we're in a learning curve ... that's a huge skill to develop. Because over time with patience, and acceptance, we can begin to hear where we started so to speak and where we've come to. Seeing the patterns in that leads to all sorts of good things. Such as knowing what to practice, what needs more work and etc.

There's definitely a role that a good teacher can play in all of this. A good teacher can save a lot of time and identify concepts that would otherwise surface only after a lot of time. A good teacher can be a collaborator - and when necessary the voice of "acceptance." Because the "inner critic" as I call it - the inner voice that wants to severe the digits - it often needs to balanced!

That DJ turntable thingy you mentioned - those sorts of things are in software these days. Transcribe and Anytune Pro are two of the best examples. But they do more than just let you adjust tuning through speed. They can slow down a recording without changing the pitch. So those who want to transcribe can hear what needs to be heard at half speed. And those who want to play along can play along at half speed. All of that while the original pitch of the recording remains the same.

Let it be said again. You're totally correct to point out there is no one right way. Except maybe to amend that a little, staying with it ... accepting that learning take times. Over time that can lead to all sorts of amazing gains.

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#2333164 - Today at 10:11 PM Re: How can a classical pianist learn piano jazz? [Re: Mihai Sirbu]
Music Me Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 10/23/12
Posts: 212
Loc: New York
Thank you, Mark.
You are so right about playing with a group. I did so many years ago for a very long time. I learned a lot and near the end of my playing with them I started to take chances with my playing, as in improvising.
Anyhow, I do plan to play with a group again.

And I will keep my fingers! ;-D
_________________________
Barbara
...without music, no life...

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