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#2391827 - Yesterday at 08:55 PM We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!!
pianoman9 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/02/15
Posts: 96
I don't mean to sound a bit dogmatic, but this is something
I've noticed about the young kids I have been teaching:

They play the notes, but the note durations are WAY off!

They are not counting the beats correctly, and some of them can't follow me when I count for them. I try to get them to sing the melody while counting the beats at the same time.

The better students understand what I'm getting at, and
will count the beats with me, and the phrasing gets much
better, but I surprises me that they weren't disciplined
to do this.

How can they begin to understand the rhythms of music notation if they cannot assign the correct note duration to each note?

Anyways, now I know what a tough job it is to teach music!

Probably why some piano teachers end up becoming a bit authoritarian, and dictatorial!

smirk



Edited by pianoman9 (Yesterday at 08:55 PM)

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#2391833 - Yesterday at 09:17 PM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 12087
Loc: Canada
Are these transfer students from other teachers, coming to you with these lacks?

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#2391836 - Yesterday at 09:29 PM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: keystring]
pianoman9 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/02/15
Posts: 96
Originally Posted By keystring
Are these transfer students from other teachers, coming to you with these lacks?


These have been kids I've taught as a substitute teacher.

It may not be the teacher's fault completely. Many
of these students don't practice at all, and just show up
for the lesson. Many are too young to really love practicing.

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#2391840 - Yesterday at 10:02 PM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
anamnesis Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 01/17/11
Posts: 162
Loc: Alabama
Originally Posted By pianoman9
I don't mean to sound a bit dogmatic, but this is something
I've noticed about the young kids I have been teaching:

They play the notes, but the note durations are WAY off!

They are not counting the beats correctly, and some of them can't follow me when I count for them. I try to get them to sing the melody while counting the beats at the same time.

The better students understand what I'm getting at, and
will count the beats with me, and the phrasing gets much
better, but I surprises me that they weren't disciplined
to do this.

How can they begin to understand the rhythms of music notation if they cannot assign the correct note duration to each note?

Anyways, now I know what a tough job it is to teach music!

Probably why some piano teachers end up becoming a bit authoritarian, and dictatorial!

smirk



It's because assigning note duration is the wrong way to get them to think about. It turns it into an additive process, rather than a divisive process.

First and foremost, you want them to feel the beat, the internal pulse. And more often than not, simple clapping will not get it done for the rhythmically challenged. It takes a whole body experience, and the physically inhibited, neurotic, perfectionist types will struggle.

Only once the beat is felt, do you then work on getting to subdivide the beat. Where you don't feel durations, but simply how you have cut the beat into different proportions. The ones who try to count durations, and not sense the subdivision are typically the ones who struggle.







Edited by anamnesis (Yesterday at 10:03 PM)

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#2391848 - Yesterday at 11:44 PM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: anamnesis]
pianoman9 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/02/15
Posts: 96
Originally Posted By anamnesis


It's because assigning note duration is the wrong way to get them to think about. It turns it into an additive process, rather than a divisive process.

First and foremost, you want them to feel the beat, the internal pulse. And more often than not, simple clapping will not get it done for the rhythmically challenged. It takes a whole body experience, and the physically inhibited, neurotic, perfectionist types will struggle.

Only once the beat is felt, do you then work on getting to subdivide the beat. Where you don't feel durations, but simply how you have cut the beat into different proportions. The ones who try to count durations, and not sense the subdivision are typically the ones who struggle.




That sounds like a bunch of hippie non-sense.

How can you feel a beat if you are not counting beats
yourself?

Now I know what my old music teacher in Jr. High was
trying to drill into us.

"1 e-and-a, 2 e-and-a, Tri-pl-let, tri-pl-let!"

grin

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#2391850 - Yesterday at 11:57 PM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
The Monkeys Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/13/12
Posts: 462
Loc: Vancouver BC
deleted


Edited by The Monkeys (Today at 12:54 AM)

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#2391852 - Today at 12:02 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
The Monkeys Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/13/12
Posts: 462
Loc: Vancouver BC
deleted


Edited by The Monkeys (Today at 12:55 AM)

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#2391855 - Today at 12:23 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: anamnesis]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5698
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By anamnesis
First and foremost, you want them to feel the beat, the internal pulse. And more often than not, simple clapping will not get it done for the rhythmically challenged. It takes a whole body experience, and the physically inhibited, neurotic, perfectionist types will struggle.

In theory, yes.

But what about those kids who are TRULY challenged, in more ways than one? (i.e., low general aptitude and ZERO musical intelligence)

I pick my battles.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#2391858 - Today at 12:47 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: The Monkeys]
pianoman9 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/02/15
Posts: 96
Originally Posted By The Monkeys
It is boring counting



That's true for a seasoned sight-reader, but
when you are first learning, and you are 6-8 years
old, YOU GOTTA COUNT BEATS!!!

NO GETTING AROUND IT!!

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#2391859 - Today at 12:56 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5698
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By pianoman9
That's true for a seasoned sight-reader, but
when you are first learning, and you are 6-8 years
old, YOU GOTTA COUNT BEATS!!!

NO GETTING AROUND IT!!

Actually, there are ways.

It's like 16th notes. Some kids just can't play them evenly no matter what kind of drills you do to them. Then, when they turn 14, suddenly their 16th notes come running evenly.

Teach wisely.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#2391860 - Today at 12:57 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
The Monkeys Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/13/12
Posts: 462
Loc: Vancouver BC
Originally Posted By The Monkeys
It is boring counting


Sorry, it was my 10 year old wrote that while I was away!
My apologies.

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#2391862 - Today at 01:01 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: The Monkeys]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5698
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By The Monkeys
Sorry, it was my 10 year old wrote that while I was away!
My apologies.

While it is wrong to make a post in the guise of his mother, your son does make a good point!
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#2391871 - Today at 02:35 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: anamnesis]
The Monkeys Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/13/12
Posts: 462
Loc: Vancouver BC
Originally Posted By anamnesis


It's because assigning note duration is the wrong way to get them to think about. It turns it into an additive process, rather than a divisive process.

First and foremost, you want them to feel the beat, the internal pulse. And more often than not, simple clapping will not get it done for the rhythmically challenged. It takes a whole body experience, and the physically inhibited, neurotic, perfectionist types will struggle.

Only once the beat is felt, do you then work on getting to subdivide the beat. Where you don't feel durations, but simply how you have cut the beat into different proportions. The ones who try to count durations, and not sense the subdivision are typically the ones who struggle.


How do you teach a piece? Do you play for them and let them get familiar to the song first before ask them to read and play? That way the student is learning by ear, not by reading, is that correct?

If a student is to read and play a brand new piece, isn't counting the duration of the notes essential?

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#2391874 - Today at 02:44 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
currawong Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/15/07
Posts: 6001
Loc: Down Under
Originally Posted By pianoman9
YOU GOTTA COUNT BEATS!!!
NO GETTING AROUND IT!!
pianoman9, on internet forums, posting in all caps is considered shouting, and is frowned upon. It makes you come across as impatient and angry. And you're not - are you? It also makes you seem like those "teachers" whose motto is "If a student doesn't understand something, say it again only louder!" (I put the word teacher in quotation marks because I don't think such a person deserves the title...)
_________________________
Du holde Kunst...

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#2391877 - Today at 03:01 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
currawong Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/15/07
Posts: 6001
Loc: Down Under
And yes, there are other effective ways of teaching young children to read rhythmic notation without counting numbers out loud. Maybe you haven't heard of Kodaly and his time names, for example. (This ties in with what anamnesis was saying about subdividing beats.)
_________________________
Du holde Kunst...

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#2391879 - Today at 03:05 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
Ben Crosland Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 03/11/10
Posts: 427
Loc: Worcester, UK
Originally Posted By pianoman9
That sounds like a bunch of hippie non-sense.


Not to me, it doesn't. To me, it sounds like anamnesis has a lot more experience than you, and therefore might deserve a little more respect than your comment afforded.

Some students find counting too difficult. The younger they are, the more this is the case, but some adults really struggle with it, too. It has nothing to do with intelligence, either.

Verbalising the rhythm can be much more effective for students like this.

Originally Posted By pianoman9
How can you feel a beat if you are not counting beats
yourself?


This, coupled with the above quotes, makes me wonder if you aren't just trolling.

Of course you can feel a beat without counting it.
_________________________
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#2391890 - Today at 04:10 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: Ben Crosland]
pianoman9 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/02/15
Posts: 96
Originally Posted By Ben Crosland
Originally Posted By pianoman9
That sounds like a bunch of hippie non-sense.


Not to me, it doesn't. To me, it sounds like anamnesis has a lot more experience than you, and therefore might deserve a little more respect than your comment afforded.

Some students find counting too difficult. The younger they are, the more this is the case, but some adults really struggle with it, too. It has nothing to do with intelligence, either.

Verbalising the rhythm can be much more effective for students like this.

Originally Posted By pianoman9
How can you feel a beat if you are not counting beats
yourself?


This, coupled with the above quotes, makes me wonder if you aren't just trolling.

Of course you can feel a beat without counting it.




The count IS the beat!

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#2391897 - Today at 04:37 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
Nahum Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 09/27/14
Posts: 471
Loc: Israel
Originally Posted By pianoman9

How can you feel a beat if you are not counting beats
yourself?

That's the way, through prosody the rhythm:


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#2391918 - Today at 06:41 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
Nahum Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 09/27/14
Posts: 471
Loc: Israel
Originally Posted By pianoman9



The count IS the beat!

It isn't. Beats counting are worthless without time intervals between them, but "one-two-three-four" do not fill the time. "Taka- tuku "- yes !.


Edited by Nahum (Today at 06:41 AM)

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#2391965 - Today at 09:17 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: The Monkeys]
AZNpiano Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 5698
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By The Monkeys
How do you teach a piece? Do you play for them and let them get familiar to the song first before ask them to read and play? That way the student is learning by ear, not by reading, is that correct?

If a student is to read and play a brand new piece, isn't counting the duration of the notes essential?

I know you didn't ask me, but I feel like chiming in, anyway.

There are many ways to teach rhythm to beginners. I'm focusing my reply on beginners because I use other tactics with more advanced students who have supremely challenging rhythm problems to tackle.

One way is to use clap-back to teach basic rhythmic patterns. Alfred Premier does a great job teaching rhythmic patterns with their "colored clouds." So, at the same time that students are clapping, I point to the series of notes, so that a GROUP of notes is learned together. This technique is similar to recognizing "sight words" for the 1st graders.

Of course, there are kids whose clap-back will reveal that they can't hold a steady beat, not even four quarter notes. We can try conducting, marching, stomping, etc. Verbalization can help, too. But there will be kids who just can't stay even. In that case, I just ignore the rhythm problem and move on to something else. Perhaps when these kids turn 16, they'll be developmentally ready to tackle rhythm.

BTW, the "TA TA titi TA" method (I don't know what name is associated with this) really works for most kids, and they even teach this in elementary schools where I work! I have private students who, by the time I introduce them to TA TA titi TA, told me they've already learned that at school. Music to my ears!!

All that being said, the traditional "ONE TWO THREE FOUR" (or "ONE ONE ONE ONE") counting works for some kids, too.

Sometimes I mix and match different strategies.

It's whatever works.

In my experience, "one-e-and-a" and "tri-pe-let" almost never works. If the students can't count 16th notes and triplets evenly by the time they encounter those in repertoire, then you might want to reconsider the repertoire choices. For these kids, I use the metronome, a lot. And there are tricks and techniques, too, associated with using a metronome. It's quite a useful tool.
_________________________
Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member

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#2391975 - Today at 09:56 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: Nahum]
pianoman9 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/02/15
Posts: 96
Originally Posted By Nahum
Originally Posted By pianoman9

How can you feel a beat if you are not counting beats
yourself?

That's the way, through prosody the rhythm:




They are still counting beats in that video!

So, your point is?

Agreed some kids have very poor sense of rhythm, but
most of them DO respond when I get them to count beats.

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#2391982 - Today at 10:31 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
Nahum Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 09/27/14
Posts: 471
Loc: Israel
Originally Posted By pianoman9


They are still counting beats in that video!

So, your point is?


Grandson and myself. In fact of the matter is that there is no counting, but creating a sense of pulse. Regular counting for this is not suitable - it lacks alternation of clear attack and sustain to create a truly rhythm .
COUNTING ISN'T A PULSE!

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#2391987 - Today at 10:54 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: Nahum]
pianoman9 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/02/15
Posts: 96
Originally Posted By Nahum
Originally Posted By pianoman9


They are still counting beats in that video!

So, your point is?


Grandson and myself. In fact of the matter is that there is no counting, but creating a sense of pulse. Regular counting for this is not suitable - it lacks alternation of clear attack and sustain to create a truly rhythm .
COUNTING ISN'T A PULSE!


If that's actually you in the video, what are
you doing counting 1, 2, 3, 4?

grin

THERE'S NO GETTING AROUND IT. GET THOSE KIDS TO
COUNT THEIR BEATS!

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#2391991 - Today at 11:05 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
Nahum Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 09/27/14
Posts: 471
Loc: Israel
Originally Posted By pianoman9

If that's actually you in the video, what are
you doing counting 1, 2, 3, 4?



The tempo and pulse of rhythm - two different parameters that must not be confused.

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#2392005 - Today at 11:41 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: pianoman9]
KurtZ Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/13/10
Posts: 1081
Loc: The Heart of Screenland
I have been playing drums, both kit and latin percussion since 1970. Anamnesis is right. Musical Pulse is something you feel. Decoding written rhythm is an odd combo of linguistics and math. The tools to teach each are individual to the the different tasks. Especially little kids generally need to learn experientially. I wouldn't use fractional subdivisions with any child who was still working to add and subtract. I would use the syllables of natural words, singing, marching etc. In teaching my rhythmically challenged wife, I find that duets work much better than lots of talking about fractions and intoning one-ee-and-uh.

Kurt
_________________________
One who does what the Friend wants done
will never need a friend.

Rumi

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#2392008 - Today at 11:43 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: anamnesis]
Carlos-CR Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 04/05/12
Posts: 75
Loc: Madrid, Spain
Originally Posted By anamnesis
Originally Posted By pianoman9
I don't mean to sound a bit dogmatic, but this is something
I've noticed about the young kids I have been teaching:

They play the notes, but the note durations are WAY off!

They are not counting the beats correctly, and some of them can't follow me when I count for them. I try to get them to sing the melody while counting the beats at the same time.

The better students understand what I'm getting at, and
will count the beats with me, and the phrasing gets much
better, but I surprises me that they weren't disciplined
to do this.

How can they begin to understand the rhythms of music notation if they cannot assign the correct note duration to each note?

Anyways, now I know what a tough job it is to teach music!

Probably why some piano teachers end up becoming a bit authoritarian, and dictatorial!

smirk



It's because assigning note duration is the wrong way to get them to think about. It turns it into an additive process, rather than a divisive process.

First and foremost, you want them to feel the beat, the internal pulse. And more often than not, simple clapping will not get it done for the rhythmically challenged. It takes a whole body experience, and the physically inhibited, neurotic, perfectionist types will struggle.

Only once the beat is felt, do you then work on getting to subdivide the beat. Where you don't feel durations, but simply how you have cut the beat into different proportions. The ones who try to count durations, and not sense the subdivision are typically the ones who struggle.




Fantastic answer Anamnesis. It goes straight to the heart of the problem. And I think pianoman9 hasn't realized what you really mean: When you are counting 1-2 each beat you are learning how dividing a beat in two sounds. When you say tri-ple-let you are learning how subdividing a beat in three sounds. So yes, you can count or use any other sound you want to mark each subdivision but that isnt the important thing. First you have to feel the beat and then learn and memorize how each type of subdivision sounds.

Carlos


Edited by Carlos-CR (Today at 11:45 AM)

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#2392009 - Today at 11:44 AM Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: KurtZ]
Nahum Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 09/27/14
Posts: 471
Loc: Israel


Edited by Nahum (32 minutes 15 seconds ago)

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#2392012 - 44 minutes 42 seconds ago Re: We Have to Teach These Kids to COUNT BEATS!!!!!! [Re: The Monkeys]
anamnesis Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 01/17/11
Posts: 162
Loc: Alabama
Originally Posted By The Monkeys
Originally Posted By anamnesis


It's because assigning note duration is the wrong way to get them to think about. It turns it into an additive process, rather than a divisive process.

First and foremost, you want them to feel the beat, the internal pulse. And more often than not, simple clapping will not get it done for the rhythmically challenged. It takes a whole body experience, and the physically inhibited, neurotic, perfectionist types will struggle.

Only once the beat is felt, do you then work on getting to subdivide the beat. Where you don't feel durations, but simply how you have cut the beat into different proportions. The ones who try to count durations, and not sense the subdivision are typically the ones who struggle.


How do you teach a piece? Do you play for them and let them get familiar to the song first before ask them to read and play? That way the student is learning by ear, not by reading, is that correct?

If a student is to read and play a brand new piece, isn't counting the duration of the notes essential?


There's several things involved that you actually have to separate out.

Much time is wasted on the piano because students are actually obtaining the aural image at the same time they are trying to discover how to create the aural image with the necessary movements, and then even ingrain those motor patterns.(Actually, the problem is students skip straight to the last step and hope the other two steps come along as a byproduct.)

These are completely separate processes. If you are trying to do them all at the same time, this actually slows down progress. There's a lot of work that needs to be done AWAY from the piano.

The ideal way to obtain the aural image from reading the score is to be able to audiate it. You read the score, can hear the sound in your head, and can intuit all the tonal relationships between the notes, allowing you to create an intrepretaiton. This is a lifelong process that should be started from the start while the music is still simple, and unfortunately many piano students, especially in the US, do not obtain this sort of training until they reach university level, when the music they are able to play becomes exceedingly complex. Like all other cognitive procsseses or conceptual models, complexity is best understood as elaborations or extensions of simpler models.

Insturctors familiar with Kodaly, Gordon, or even Dalcroze that teach these sort of things from the start with children, are unfortunately the exception and not the rule; moreover, they tend to be more in general music education or choir, and not specific instrumental specialties like the piano.

In terms of rhythm, there's two general approaches, verbalization and movement. Nahum just posted a video where he combines the two approaches with body drumming and scat. I personally favor movement with verbalization as a surrogate of it. Counting could be considered a type of verbalization, but there all sorts of methods such as Takadimi, Gordon syllables, or just nonsense words. Examples of movement focus would be Dalcroze Eurhythmics or how Whiteside protege, Sophia Rosoff, has her students dance their pieces.

Gun to my head, I would argue that the origins of music boil down to song and dance, which is why I favor movement as the primary representation of rhythm; moreover, it's kind of silly to say, but you actually have to move produce the sound other wise the aural image just stays in your head and is never produced on the piano.

Having said all that, we in the 21st century have access to recordindg at a click. Listening to the music while reading the score is a vital part of the process when the teacher isn't there to help out the student. While this is helpful for advance pieces, beginning lit isn't common; however the University of Iowa has come a long way in rectifiying that problem as they have recoreded a lot of good beginning literature:

https://www.youtube.com/user/UIPianoPed

---------
It's not that I'm not considering duration of the notes, it's just that I think that an indirect approach is better. Focusing on pulse first is more important, and then you relate durations to the pulse by feeling the subdivision. It's important to relate duration to the pulse because it's the combination of the two that helps you understand the tonal, rhythmic weight (importance) is a combination of duration (longer notes have more "weight") and metrical placement (important notes tend to be placed on the beat or even secondary beat).

This is important for technique and musicality because counting out duration implies that you are adding up a bunch of little movements, which slows down motor learning. I believe it to be a mistake to think that you have a good chance of discovering all the tiny little motions that will somehow add up to a flow into that produces a musical shape with comfort and ease.

The alternative is connecting the longer music line that is segmented by subordinate movements that are "tucked in" at different physical gestural levels. Just as there are tonal hierarchies, you create movement hierarchies that are counterparts to those. At the top level you have the shoulder girdle and torso. The torso/center is the part of the body most sensitive to the overall pulse that can coordinate the rest of the body. The shoulder girdle due to the GH joint (the only ball-and-socket joint in the upper limb), is what enables continuous motion that corresponds to the longer line.

How do you do this in practice? It's called several things: Outlining/Pulsing/Skeleton Practice

James Boyk explains the practice method here, but there's a bit more to it than can be explained by a short video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bdTjmWS3TU&list=PLQrG41HDvo7okqp87230Uae6pEF5auR1N#t=173

---------

Having typed all, that I'm still not sure I'm being completely clear. There are too many things that are interrelated, and I choose to things a certain way because I think it best matches up with how I approach other aspects.

Originally Posted By AZNpiano
Originally Posted By anamnesis
First and foremost, you want them to feel the beat, the internal pulse. And more often than not, simple clapping will not get it done for the rhythmically challenged. It takes a whole body experience, and the physically inhibited, neurotic, perfectionist types will struggle.

In theory, yes.

But what about those kids who are TRULY challenged, in more ways than one? (i.e., low general aptitude and ZERO musical intelligence)

I pick my battles.


For me, at least in terms of rhythm, the only one who can't be helped are those who are incapable of learning how to synchronize their body to music they enjoy listening to. In some ways something that involves the whole body, like dance is the best indicator, but you will find many students too inhibited or shy to do it. That in of itself is part of reason why they are underdeveloped rhythmically from the start. Sometimes I simply delay lessons at the piano until this is established, and I find ways to get students to come out of their shell.

If they can do this, then it is possible to help them, even if it takes longer. The goal is to transfer this same sensation to their actual playing.


Edited by anamnesis (23 minutes 9 seconds ago)

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Hypnotherapist
by Mike.
02/28/15 12:31 PM
Yundi Li wins14th International Chopin Competition (2000)
by pianoman9
02/28/15 10:50 AM
Yuja Wang plays Scriabin
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02/28/15 10:19 AM
Moving a digital grand across country
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02/28/15 09:42 AM
Acoustical Piano Actions vs High End Digital Piano Action
by LarryMan
02/28/15 08:07 AM
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