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#2437656 - Yesterday at 10:39 PM Do you use a lot of slash chords?
DeadPoets Online   happy
Full Member

Registered: 10/01/14
Posts: 200
Once I've memorized a song fairly well I will only refer to the chords listed above the measure when playing (like using a Fake book).

But I run into this sort of thing all the time where...

Elton John uses a lot of octaves in left hand. So in "Your Song" the 2nd chord of the verse is listed as an Abmaj7. LH = octave Ab, RH = G, C, Eb, G
And that's accurate.

However for the sake of remembering what to play in each hand I changed this to a Cm/Ab (same notes). This way I know exactly what's being played in RH (Cm) and the LH (Ab octaves). If I don't do this I tend to get confused and start looking for the Ab somewhere in the right hand.

Anyone else do this as a way to memorize the music easier? The slash chord system.


Edited by DeadPoets (Yesterday at 10:43 PM)

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#2437722 - Today at 05:33 AM Re: Do you use a lot of slash chords? [Re: DeadPoets]
beeboss Online   content
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/18/09
Posts: 1279
Loc: uk south
Yes it can be helpful to think of chords in this way not only to help memory but also it can help show how chords relate to each other - in your example you describe how a Cm7 chord is completely contained in an Abmaj9 chord.
Chords that seem complicated can be expressed in a simpler way - e.g. Ebmaj7 sharp 5 is the same thing as G/Eb. Also there are many chords that can be expressed using this format that have no other easy way of describing them - Eb/A for example. It can be an easy way to create new sounds.
Also in terms of voicings it can make it easy to find interesting chord extensions - try playing a C7 shell (C,E, Bb) in the LH and in the right experiment with A , D, Fsharp and Ab major triads. A lot of jazz harmonies can be found in this way.


Edited by beeboss (Today at 05:38 AM)
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#2437745 - Today at 07:18 AM Re: Do you use a lot of slash chords? [Re: DeadPoets]
DeadPoets Online   happy
Full Member

Registered: 10/01/14
Posts: 200
Thank you for response.

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#2437748 - Today at 07:24 AM Re: Do you use a lot of slash chords? [Re: DeadPoets]
Nahum Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/27/14
Posts: 733
Loc: Israel
=DeadPoets , what you do is practical and correct. Every seventh chord can be presented in several forms: as itself (Cm7); as a major triad under melodic pitch (Cm under Bb); as a triad over bass (Eb / C); as compound 2 triads (Eb maj over Cm).
So, when you play with both hands the slash chords, you should watch out for voice leading of triads in the right hand.

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#2437753 - Today at 07:38 AM Re: Do you use a lot of slash chords? [Re: DeadPoets]
samasap Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/10/10
Posts: 616
Loc: UK
Hi

If this system works for you then stick to it. I do invert and change chords around also to make things easier when I need too.
When teaching I always say to my students we can adapt music and always find a solution to make the music easier so they can still achieve their goals of playing their favourite music.

Have fun!
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#2437755 - Today at 07:39 AM Re: Do you use a lot of slash chords? [Re: Nahum]
DeadPoets Online   happy
Full Member

Registered: 10/01/14
Posts: 200
Originally Posted By Nahum
=DeadPoets , what you do is practical and correct. Every seventh chord can be presented in several forms: as itself (Cm7); as a major triad under melodic pitch (Cm under Bb); as a triad over bass (Eb / C); as compound 2 triads (Eb maj over Cm).
So, when you play with both hands the slash chords, you should watch out for voice leading of triads in the right hand.


Yes. Thanks.


Edited by DeadPoets (Today at 07:41 AM)

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#2437769 - 18 minutes 38 seconds ago Re: Do you use a lot of slash chords? [Re: DeadPoets]
jjo Online   content
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/09/08
Posts: 691
Loc: Chicago
Mark Levine's The Jazz Piano Book has a chapter on what he calls "upper structure chords" which is pretty much what you're describing. The only thing is he uses it primarily for adding 9ths, 11ths and 13ths and altered notes to chords, rather than, in your example, using it for a standard seventh chord.

I use the Levine upper structure chords ALL the time. My most common one is when you need to play an altered dominant chord where you need to sharp the 3rd and the 5th. It's hard for me to remember how to voice that in all 12 keys. But if you play the 3rd and seventh in the left hand, and play a triad a minor 6th up from the root in the right hand, you've got it. May sound complicated, but if you want to play C altered, you play E and Bb in the left and Ab major trial in the right. At least for me, that's much easier.

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