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#2558137 - 07/23/16 02:25 AM Teaching Advanced Students
Piano Playground Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 02/21/16
Posts: 14
I studied Piano Pedagogy in college and have been teaching for many years but have mostly taught beginning - late intermediate students. I would like to feel confident teaching advanced students. I know it would be very rewarding. I'm wondering how other teachers have made this transition. One question that I have is: in order to teach an advanced piece to a student, do you need to have played it/thoroughly analyzed it yourself? It seems helpful to know exactly how the song feels in your hands. But do teachers limit their advanced students to their own repertoire? If not - if you would start your student on a piece that you have not played, do you begin practicing it at the same time as them? Do you spend time analyzing the piece? Do you listen to recordings and choose your favorite interpretation and kind of nudge them in that direction? Do you watch great pianists perform these pieces? Thanks for your help! smile Any other advice or experience you have that could help me would be wonderful!

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#2558140 - 07/23/16 03:08 AM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
AZNpiano Online   happy
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 6807
Loc: Orange County, CA
There is a world of difference between being able to play a piece and being able to teach a piece. There are definitely areas that overlap.

I encourage my advanced kids to explore their own repertoire, but most of them end up just taking what I give them. So I go out of way to assign interesting pieces that I may or may not know. When students are interested in the piece, that's half the battle.

I first work out the difficult spots, pages or sections that may need detailed work like fingering. While I don't advocate analyzing every single phrase and chord, analysis can be helpful in the learning process. Large works need to be taught in sections, and almost never from the beginning to the end in one sitting.

To be honest, recordings are not my favorite teaching tool. I know colleagues who rely on recordings because they can't play anything, and they teach non-thinking robots to imitate, imitate, imitate.
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#2558164 - 07/23/16 07:37 AM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: AZNpiano]
BrianDX Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/14/14
Posts: 2031
Loc: First Town, First State
Originally Posted By AZNpiano
... While I don't advocate analyzing every single phrase and chord, analysis can be helpful in the learning process. Large works need to be taught in sections, and almost never from the beginning to the end in one sitting.

As we have shifted into Intermediate level material I have found that spending time at the very beginning carefully analyzing the structure of a piece (chord structures and progressions, overall form, etc.) has really helped me deal with material that right now is at the upper limit of what I can do.

My initial concern was that too much analysis might lead to a rather robotic way of seeing (and playing) these pieces. However, the opposite is true, at least for me. Knowing what is going on ahead of time allows me to focus on actually playing the piece. Of course, spending 35 years as an IT analyst sort of colors things.
_________________________
Yamaha C2X | Yamaha M500-F ......
"Humor is reason gone mad": Groucho Marx
Curriculum: Faber PA Level 5; Faber DA Book 3
Current: Jazz Reflection (Faber) (OC); Allegro in A Major (Hassler) (OF)

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#2558220 - 07/23/16 02:55 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
hreichgott Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/13
Posts: 2934
Loc: western MA, USA
I don't play everything my advanced students play, but it's all of a difficulty level that I can sort out and demonstrate any section pretty readily in the lesson, at least well enough to get my point across. If a student were learning something stylistically very different from music I play, or if I couldn't analyze it or understand the structure at a glance, I'd probably learn the piece in order to gain insight into how it could be approached.

That said, it's also valuable for our students to see us as learners, so when there are questions I can't answer right away, I think out loud with the student for awhile and then if need be I say I'll research it and get back to them next lesson.

The drawback of teaching advanced pieces that I do play is that my own mental image of the piece is very specific and it can be hard to keep a sense of what's my personal interpretation and what's something the student needs to do.

I send students on to other teachers when they get advanced enough that they sound like first-year piano majors at a decent college program. That's the point at which they really do need someone other than me, and also, that way they aren't playing anything that's anywhere close to the hardest music I play.


Edited by hreichgott (07/23/16 03:01 PM)
_________________________
Heather W. Reichgott, piano http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com

Working on:
Dvorak, Trio no. 4
Beethoven, Diabelli Variations
Mozart, Sonata for four hands K. 497
Mendelssohn, variations for four hands Op. 83a

I love Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and new music

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#2558223 - 07/23/16 03:36 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
Peter K. Mose Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/06/12
Posts: 1906
Loc: Toronto, Ontario
Interesting questions, and fine answers already. No wisdom from me. But I'd say that if Playground is feeling nervous or uncertain, then she *should* learn a few advanced pieces before assigning them to students. Or it may be time to return to her own piano studies with a teacher, to take her own playing to a higher level of security and awareness.

In my experience, very few private piano students ever reach a stage beyond intermediate pieces, so this is largely a nonissue. There is no hidden reservoir of advanced pupils waiting to ring a studio teacher's doorbell. But Heather suggests otherwise. Maybe she has a fancier doorbell than I do.

Nevertheless, I do have some adult piano students - transfer students or summer coaching students - who are very advanced players. They are playing music of their own selection, that is either not in my fingers at all, or was so only long ago. Sometimes it would not be repertoire I would even wish to play, even if I found 40 hours to practice it. I still have helpful things to impart during their lessons. Or so I am told.

I agree with AZN that recordings are not the way to go.

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#2558278 - 07/23/16 09:32 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Peter K. Mose]
AZNpiano Online   happy
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Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 6807
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By Peter K. Mose
In my experience, very few private piano students ever reach a stage beyond intermediate pieces

What's "very few"? I judge/evaluate hundreds of students every year in Southern California, and I'd say a very healthy percentage of them are beyond the intermediate level. Granted, they are split among many studios, but I think your assessment is rather pessimistic.
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#2558281 - 07/23/16 09:52 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
Peter K. Mose Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/06/12
Posts: 1906
Loc: Toronto, Ontario
I'm just relating my long experience in the recreational piano community, AZN. When I say very few, I mean very few. Clearly your piano world differs from mine.

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#2558282 - 07/23/16 09:56 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
hreichgott Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/13
Posts: 2934
Loc: western MA, USA
I don't have many advanced students at any one time, Peter, the vast majority of my private teaching is Suzuki books 1 and 2 wink
_________________________
Heather W. Reichgott, piano http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com

Working on:
Dvorak, Trio no. 4
Beethoven, Diabelli Variations
Mozart, Sonata for four hands K. 497
Mendelssohn, variations for four hands Op. 83a

I love Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and new music

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#2558311 - 07/24/16 03:27 AM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Peter K. Mose]
The Monkeys Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/13/12
Posts: 594
Loc: Vancouver BC
What is the definition of "advanced level"?
I am curious and would like everyone to be the same page.

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#2558339 - 07/24/16 08:59 AM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: The Monkeys]
bennevis Offline
8000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/14/10
Posts: 8391
Originally Posted By The Monkeys
What is the definition of "advanced level"?
I am curious and would like everyone to be the same page.

I too am curious as to what people believe 'intermediate' and 'advanced' levels are, having been brought up on the ABRSM grade system - where students and their teachers (actually, practically everyone who knows anything about music in the UK) define a person's standard by the grade they're playing at, or the grade exam they've passed grin.

I subscribe to Pianist magazine (www.pianistmagazine.com) which is advertised here in PW, though a British publication (- see the right column on this page), which has, in every issue, a pull-out booklet of pieces suitable for standards ranging from beginner to advanced, all in their original form, mainly 'classical' though with a fair smattering of jazz in most issues, and comes with a CD of all of them played by a concert pianist (on a Steinway D), plus a few 'promotional tracks' from recent piano CD releases. The pieces don't have ABRSM grades appended to them, but are given 'beginner', 'beginner/intermediate', 'intermediate', 'intermediate/advanced' and 'advanced' levels.

So, from a recent issue, Schubert's Ecossaise D977 no.5 is beginner, Schumann's Melodie (Album for the Young, Op.68/1) is beginner/intermediate, Henselt's Romance in B flat minor, Op.10 is intermediate, Grieg's Prelude from Holberg Suite is intermediate/advanced, Liszt's Impromptu in F#, S.191 is advanced.

Does that equate to what American teachers use as their standards?
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"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."

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#2558350 - 07/24/16 09:44 AM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
Peter K. Mose Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/06/12
Posts: 1906
Loc: Toronto, Ontario
Yup, that sounds similar, Bennevis. No two teachers fully agree on every piece, but you develop an instinct, or a sense of approximation. The Commonwealth countries do have their preselected-by-grade repertoire, but those are just educated guesses also as to level.

If you are working on a piece by Brahms or Liszt, and can sort of handle the task, you are an advanced pianist in my book. Each of these two wrote less difficult and more difficult piano music to be sure. But you need several years of playing to enter their world. They didn't write any easy stuff, unlike Schubert or Schumann. Chopin's music starts in the intermediate ranks but most of it is advanced, I'd say.

Other teachers may disagree with my guesstimates, and that's fine. To get back to the OP, she won't be teaching much Liszt in her private studio.

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#2558428 - 07/24/16 04:28 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
AZNpiano Online   happy
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 6807
Loc: Orange County, CA
When students finish learning sonatinas and maybe Mozart K. 545 and/or Beethoven Op. 49, they are generally ready to tackle Advanced Level repertoire. Bach Inventions and Brahms Waltzes are also borderline between Late Intermediate and Advanced. The easiest Chopin Preludes, Waltzes, and Mazurkas are Late Intermediate.

But once you get to the Advanced Level, you'll find out there's also a huge range of repertoire that ranges from difficult to very difficult to impossible.
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#2558449 - 07/24/16 06:51 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
hreichgott Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/13
Posts: 2934
Loc: western MA, USA
I'm using more or less the same rubric as AZN.
_________________________
Heather W. Reichgott, piano http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com

Working on:
Dvorak, Trio no. 4
Beethoven, Diabelli Variations
Mozart, Sonata for four hands K. 497
Mendelssohn, variations for four hands Op. 83a

I love Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and new music

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#2558459 - 07/24/16 08:01 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
pianoMom2006 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/07/15
Posts: 295
Just curious but how long does it take on average to get to this advanced level? I understand that not everyone who tries can get there but of the students who do, how long does it take the average student that began as a young child to reach that level? 10 years?
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#2558466 - 07/24/16 08:27 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: pianoMom2006]
AZNpiano Online   happy
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 6807
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By pianoMom2006
Just curious but how long does it take on average to get to this advanced level? I understand that not everyone who tries can get there but of the students who do, how long does it take the average student that began as a young child to reach that level? 10 years?

My "average" students get there in 7 years, doing one CM level per year. Some can get there in 5. Some never get there--not even close.
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#2558487 - 07/24/16 09:55 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: AZNpiano]
pianoMom2006 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/07/15
Posts: 295
Originally Posted By AZNpiano
Originally Posted By pianoMom2006
Just curious but how long does it take on average to get to this advanced level? I understand that not everyone who tries can get there but of the students who do, how long does it take the average student that began as a young child to reach that level? 10 years?

My "average" students get there in 7 years, doing one CM level per year. Some can get there in 5. Some never get there--not even close.


Interesting- thanks for sharing. I can understand how some students never reach advanced levels. My son I suppose is considered late beginner after three years of lessons (passed Guild level EE) and I think his music is pretty difficult. If he reaches what's considered an advanced level in 4 more years, I would be thrilled but I have a feeling he'll be early/mid intermediate then.


Edited by pianoMom2006 (07/25/16 06:12 AM)
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#2558496 - 07/24/16 10:36 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: pianoMom2006]
BrianDX Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/14/14
Posts: 2031
Loc: First Town, First State
Originally Posted By pianoMom2006
Interesting- thanks for sharing. I can understand how some students never reach advanced levels. Piano is such a hard instrument to learn to play. My son I suppose is considered late beginner after three years of lessons (passed Guild level EE) and I think his music is pretty difficult. If he reaches what's considered an the advanced level in 4 more years, I would be thrilled.

Starting from scratch (EA) almost three years ago, I have reached roughly level IC. Let me tell you, it took an hour+ daily practice 6 days a week, plus 60 minute lessons from a piano teacher with 40+ years of experience teaching adults, no summers off.

I think I have average abilities, but with a fanactical passion to succeed. I have no idea if I'll ever get out of the Intermediate level, but that's OK. Even where I am now there is enough original form material from the masters to keep me happy. I would like to be able to eventually play "easy" Chopin, however.

Here's the thing pianoMom2006; A little over a year I was playing late Elementary material; seemed almost impossible to me. But then a magical thing happened; lots of instruction from my teacher, more hard work, and the accumulation of mastered skills now have me playing pieces like The Happy Farmer by Schumann; unbelievable.

My guess is that if your son keeps going on the path he's on, good things will happen. As my teacher says, very few of her students are unteachable; most sadly quit or lose passion before they ever find out how far they can go...


Edited by BrianDX (07/24/16 10:38 PM)
_________________________
Yamaha C2X | Yamaha M500-F ......
"Humor is reason gone mad": Groucho Marx
Curriculum: Faber PA Level 5; Faber DA Book 3
Current: Jazz Reflection (Faber) (OC); Allegro in A Major (Hassler) (OF)

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#2558570 - 07/25/16 08:59 AM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
pianoMom2006 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/07/15
Posts: 295
Brian-

Piano levels are a very confusing concept to me. There are beginner/ intermediate/ advanced books. There are "big note" and "easy piano" books etc. Level books (on the same level) from what I've seen can vary quite a bit in difficulty depending on author (Glover Carr Level 3 (1970s edition which my son used last year) looked much easier than JT Level 3 (we picked up a copy second hand). Guild uses its own separate system for evaluation.

My son hasn't really played much of anything in OF- which from reading these forums sounds like another milestone.

I'm not in a rush for him to get to the next grade level" whatever that means...it's just a bit confusing.
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#2558586 - 07/25/16 10:22 AM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 13837
Loc: Canada
Thoughts as a student. Teachers please chime in if anything seems off base, or conversely, on track.

To me working at an advanced level would mean more than just learning to play music that has a greater level of difficulty. I'd expect to be guided in how to analyze and understand the music for interpreting it and for approaching it. I'd expect the teacher to have done the groundwork by knowing where areas of difficulty are likely, and what the best ways of approaching them are. So yes, I'd expect that the teacher has worked through the piece or has played it before, if teaching it to me.

I do see a role for recordings and videos of good musicians, but not in order to "see what the right interpretation should be". I could see a teacher going through some of those recordings with the student as they work on the piece, to see why different musicians made different choices and to help the student come up with choices - maybe after they analyzed and looked over the music themselves.

I think I'd also expect that some groundwork for this would have been laid at the earlier levels; reading skills, basic theory, otherwise how do you work on music for understanding and interpreting it?

What do you think?

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#2558601 - 07/25/16 11:44 AM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
Pianocat3 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/24/16
Posts: 46
There is probably value in seeing the teacher look over a score she or he has never seen before and discussing how they would approach it too. My teacher has done that for unfamiliar intermediate pieces I brought in to work on. It seems to me advanced students would pick at least some of their own music and their tastes probably are not the same as the teacher's.

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#2558633 - 07/25/16 02:12 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: pianoMom2006]
BrianDX Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/14/14
Posts: 2031
Loc: First Town, First State
Originally Posted By pianoMom2006
Brian-

Piano levels are a very confusing concept to me. There are beginner/ intermediate/ advanced books. There are "big note" and "easy piano" books etc. Level books (on the same level) from what I've seen can vary quite a bit in difficulty depending on author (Glover Carr Level 3 (1970s edition which my son used last year) looked much easier than JT Level 3 (we picked up a copy second hand). Guild uses its own separate system for evaluation.

My son hasn't really played much of anything in OF- which from reading these forums sounds like another milestone.

I'm not in a rush for him to get to the next grade level whatever that means...it's just a bit confusing.

pianoMom2006;

Yep, levels are confusing and are not always rated exactly the same between the Piano Guild, RCM, etc... Better to not to worry so much about that, as opposed to is your student happy with his/her progression and the level of music that can played.

BTW: "Easy Piano" is NOT easy if you are a beginner; I found that out the hard way. shocked

Here is what really counts to me; Over the past 12 months I have played original form pieces from Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann, etc. This was really a thrill, and is something for the student in the Elementary level to strive for, among other thing.

Try to keep your student interested and motivated, and good things will come in time.
_________________________
Yamaha C2X | Yamaha M500-F ......
"Humor is reason gone mad": Groucho Marx
Curriculum: Faber PA Level 5; Faber DA Book 3
Current: Jazz Reflection (Faber) (OC); Allegro in A Major (Hassler) (OF)

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#2558645 - 07/25/16 03:24 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: BrianDX]
pianoMom2006 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/07/15
Posts: 295
Originally Posted By BrianDX



BTW: "Easy Piano" is NOT easy if you are a beginner; I found that out the hard way. shocked


Totally agree. The first time my son learned to play an "easy piano" piece I thought this isn't easy at all. He played a Faber easy piano piece for Guild this year and it was really a challenging piece for him to learn to play well. I actually laughed thinking about the title.


Edited by pianoMom2006 (07/25/16 03:28 PM)
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#2558722 - 07/25/16 10:00 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
Piano*Dad Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/12/05
Posts: 10761
Loc: Williamsburg, VA
Students can reach what AZN is describing as the intermediate/advanced border in a wide range of times, so wide that "typical" may be a not particularly useful measuring stick for many people to compare rates of progress. My son hit that border at the end of his third year. Fast? Maybe. but then again he didn't start playing until he was eight, so he was a bit more motivated and he could absorb material much faster than most five year olds. An earlier starter may take a more leisurely path to the same level if they are not prodigy material. There are a scary lot of very advanced eleven year olds.

This set of advanced students may indeed be a small fraction of the total market of leisure-activity young learners, but its a sizable enough group to keep many teachers in business!
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#2558757 - 07/26/16 02:29 AM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano*Dad]
AZNpiano Online   happy
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 6807
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By Piano*Dad
This set of advanced students may indeed be a small fraction of the total market of leisure-activity young learners, but its a sizable enough group to keep many teachers in business!

I guess what struck me in Peter's post is the assumption that his world is full of students who will never reach the advanced level. Isn't it the job of the teacher to maximize the potential in each student? I would tend to think that the great majority of the students who start piano have the potential to reach advanced level, given the right conditions.

I teach all kinds of students, and I almost never turn students away. But it is vastly, vastly more fun to teach students toward advanced level than the hopeless "expensive babysitting" that I also do just to pay the bills.
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#2558900 - 07/26/16 05:33 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
chasingrainbows Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/19/06
Posts: 1524
Loc: NJ
We've gone OT. However, AZN, I believe most teachers start out with the dream and belief that we will maximize the potential of each student we accept. When I started teaching, I dutifully followed the methodology of my training (which was purely classical). Fresh out of college, I had no problem with my first student who practiced daily, and moved quickly through each level, playing musically and performing wonderfully. Fast forward 10 years - any student I have taken on, that has come through the music store with any potential has either moved away, or quit lessons, (I think the parents felt they were "good enough.") Most of my students never listen to music, music is never played in the car or at home. After much discussion, I learn what interests them and provide music they want to learn, spend hours communicating with parents on how to practice, follow all the "golden rules of good teaching", but the MAJORITY of my students just do not practice enough, and many do not practice at all until the day of their lesson. I have several students who have tremendous potential, yet the most they practice is barely 2 hours a week. I emphasize the importance of daily practice at the initial interview, and follow up regularly with reminders and practice Logs for students to fill out. Perhaps it's the draw of the music store - with a local "conservatory" nearby, most serious parents elect to send their children there first. If I were to drop the students who never practice, I'd lose half of my students.
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#2558927 - 07/26/16 08:04 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
keystring Offline
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Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 13837
Loc: Canada
I would still be interested in teachers' opinions on what I wrote on July 25, which in fact was on the topic and toward the question.

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#2558946 - 07/26/16 09:53 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
Peter K. Mose Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/06/12
Posts: 1906
Loc: Toronto, Ontario
Keystring, your thoughts - as usual - are for me on the mark and worth stating. I would indeed expect a teacher to lay groundwork for a student's commencing an advanced piece in many ways. Through analysis, through discussion of technical skills required, through discussion of the composer and his/her cultural milieu. Through comparison to other pieces the student has already worked on, etc.

If the student brings in their own selection, already halfway roughed in, I might do less of this, however.

Recordings or videos are another matter. They may be of some help or interest later in the learning process, if a student is mature enough neither to copy nor to feel intimidated by concert artists. But many of us teachers steer clear of them, preferring a student to cultivate his or her own ideas and physical approach to a piece without comparisons.

YouTube renderings of classical piano repertoire are ubiquitous, and I don't tell my students to avoid them. But I don't suggest they search them out, either.

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#2558973 - 07/26/16 11:45 PM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: Piano Playground]
Arghhh Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/31/08
Posts: 1558
I haven't had any advanced students yet. My beginning students are still in method books, and my transfer students are on track to get to Gr. 7 or 8 piano by the time they are seniors in high school. The farthest along was in Gr. 8 RCM.

I wouldn't dare, just starting out teaching advanced rep, assigning pieces I can't play. It wouldn't need to be at a highly polished level, but I would need to know and experience what it would take to master it. Even on the intermediate pieces I like to play through them to see where the difficult areas may be so that I can be ready to teach those areas if the student needs help there. If a student has just reached the advanced level, I would think they would need more help in learning the piece and would require me to be even more secure in what needs to be done. I'd also like to play through the piece myself to be able to answer questions like where are the phrases? Where is the climax? What are some of the different ways I can shape things to be effective (not just one final interpretation, there is always a choice to be made). Listening to recordings doesn't give me that kind of knowledge.

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#2558990 - 07/27/16 01:13 AM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: keystring]
AZNpiano Online   happy
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Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 6807
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By keystring
I think I'd also expect that some groundwork for this would have been laid at the earlier levels; reading skills, basic theory, otherwise how do you work on music for understanding and interpreting it?

You'd think that. One of my "advanced" transfer students came to me with this as her only instruction on interpretation: Write a story. This is how her last teacher taught. Tell a story. With absolutely no understanding of musical structure or theory. It's all done by feeling and intuition and "imagination."

At least this is one step beyond the Imitate The Recording method of teaching. At least the student is actively imagining instead of passively copying a recording.
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#2558991 - 07/27/16 01:22 AM Re: Teaching Advanced Students [Re: chasingrainbows]
AZNpiano Online   happy
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/07/07
Posts: 6807
Loc: Orange County, CA
Originally Posted By chasingrainbows
Fast forward 10 years - any student I have taken on, that has come through the music store with any potential has either moved away, or quit lessons, (I think the parents felt they were "good enough.") Most of my students never listen to music, music is never played in the car or at home. After much discussion, I learn what interests them and provide music they want to learn, spend hours communicating with parents on how to practice, follow all the "golden rules of good teaching", but the MAJORITY of my students just do not practice enough, and many do not practice at all until the day of their lesson.

But don't you think this is the problem with the clientele of the store? How about you go teach in-home lessons? You might find more serious students. And you can charge more.

Maybe I should start a separate thread on how to maintain high expectations. I've received countless transfer wrecks from incompetent teachers, but I fear most of that incompetence is merely low expectations. If the teacher already expects the student to go nowhere, then half the battle is lost.
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