Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Topic Options
#32602 - 09/20/03 09:42 AM Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
Osakans Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 09/07/03
Posts: 6
Sorry -- originally posted in the wrong forum.

After a fair amount of research and shopping, my wife and I have decided to buy a Yamaha GC1 grand piano. We had been looking at Kohler & Campbell and Story & Clark 4'7 grands, but found there to be a significant step up in feel and sound to the Yamaha without busting the budget.

We're also going to have a player system installed, and basically have a choice between the Disklavier version of the GC1 (the DGC1A) or the Pianodisc 228CFX. I know that the Disklavier basically comes with similar features to the 228 with all the optional add-ons (sound card, record strip, mute rail, extra storage sound chip). However, as the dealer is pricing the two, the Pianodisc would be about $1500 less, fully loaded (and we probably wouldn't be adding the record strip, mute rail, extra-storage sound chip or symphony feature right away, making the price difference for the initial sale closer to $3800).

Anyone have any thoughts as to the differences between these two systems? Is the Disklavier going to be worth $1500 more in a configuration with extremely similar features?

Thanks in advance.

Top
(ads 568) Hailun Pianos

piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
#32603 - 09/21/03 10:21 AM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
Rich Galassini Online   content
8000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/28/01
Posts: 8975
Loc: Philadelphia/South Jersey
Just a thought here. The GC1 is a "budget" Yamaha. It doesn't have a sostenuto pedal, it has thinner rims and less bracing than the C series Yamaha.

Why not consider the "Millenium" series K&C or Pramberger, Knabe,or Sohmer pianos? These are "top of the line" Korean products and many techs. and players prefer them today over the "middle of the line" Japanese products. You may even save a few $$$.(by the way many musicians simply would not consider a piano without a sostenuto pedal)

As far the player system, with proper installation the PDS system works well, so does the Disklavier. Choose what you like on that front.

Good Luck,
_________________________
Rich Galassini
Cunningham Piano Co.
Phila, Pa.
Dir. Line (215) 991-0834
rich@cunninghampiano.com
Get Cunningham Piano Email Updates

Top
#32604 - 09/21/03 10:48 AM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
Steve Cohen Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 10340
Loc: Maryland/DC/No. VA
I'm with Rich. Keep shopping.
_________________________
Piano Industry Consultant- http://www.linkedin.com/pub/steve-cohen/6/b92/b80

Consultant & Contributing Editor - Acoustic & Digital Piano Buyer

Jasons Music
Maryland/DC/No. VA
Since 1937.

www.jasonsmusic.com
My postings, unless stated otherwise, are my personal opinions, not those of my clients.

Top
#32605 - 09/21/03 12:14 PM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
Osakans Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 09/07/03
Posts: 6
Thanks for the advice. Actually, we had decided to purchase the GC1 on the advice of a sales clerk who told us it was the exact same as the C1 (which I had really liked) in a case without a lock and some other minor features. After I came home and did some research on Pianoworld and other places, I realized that buying the GC1 would have been a mistake.

I went back and played a number of Yamaha C1s which I did truly enjoy and we've decided to jump up from the GC1 to the C1.

Top
#32606 - 09/21/03 12:38 PM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
Luke's Dad Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/28/03
Posts: 1426
Loc: Mid Atlantic
I think you still owe it to yourself try some of the other pianos, especially in an instance where the salesman was dishonest and gave you misinformation. As Steve said, for less money than a C1 you can find nicer pianos by YC Pramberger, Knabe, Kohler Millenium, etc...
_________________________
Purveyor of Yamaha, Petrof, Pearl River, and Kohler & Campbell pianos.

Top
#32607 - 09/21/03 08:23 PM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
byebye Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/18/03
Posts: 1426
Another possibility: the Kawai RX-1, which usually costs a bit less than the Yamaha C1 but has a warmer tone.

Top
#32608 - 09/21/03 11:24 PM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
DigJazz Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/01/03
Posts: 23
Loc: San Diego, CA
Osakans, I think you'll find that in general this Forum rarely recommends Yamahas. I personally really like them. As for the GC1, the differences between it and the C1 are (1) Case (incl. fallboard, locks, etc.), (2) Bass Sustain vs. Full Sostenuto, and (2) Hammer weight. Am I missing anything? Anyone?

Top
#32609 - 09/22/03 06:30 AM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
gxprice Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/06/02
Posts: 225
Loc: Geneva
 Quote:
Originally posted by DigJazz:
Osakans, I think you'll find that in general this Forum rarely recommends Yamahas. I personally really like them. As for the GC1, the differences between it and the C1 are (1) Case (incl. fallboard, locks, etc.), (2) Bass Sustain vs. Full Sostenuto, and (2) Hammer weight. Am I missing anything? Anyone? [/b]
Don't know about missing anything but I went through the same process and preferred the C1 over the GC1 (so went with that). Main creria for me was a "silent" system (not the full Disklavier) and I've not heard good things about retro-installing generic silent systems so the decision was partly taken for me (to go with the only factory installed, guaranteed, grand silent system I could get here).

When Bluthner, Boesendorfer, Steinway or Fazioli build a "silent system" grand max. length 180cm, I'll buy one immediately (not a joke). Until then, the Yamaha C1 is the best "bang for my buck" for me until these top brands drag themselves into the 21st century.

Yes, the people here very rarely recommend Yamaha. It's a bit like a Daihatsu car - no-one seems to admit to buying them but they are everywhere and very popular (at least in Europe). You can argue about the tone etc. but at the end of the day, I think there is a slight stigma associated with the name Yamaha...

Regards,

Gary.

Top
#32610 - 09/22/03 07:18 AM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
Rich Galassini Online   content
8000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/28/01
Posts: 8975
Loc: Philadelphia/South Jersey
DigJazz wrote:
 Quote:
As for the GC1, the differences between it and the C1 are (1) Case (incl. fallboard, locks, etc.), (2) Bass Sustain vs. Full Sostenuto, and (2) Hammer weight. Am I missing anything? Anyone?
Hi Dig,

I am not at my office right now and can't quote exact specs., but there is also a difference in structure, specifically in rim construction and material. This information comes from Yamaha tech. support (it isn't in product spec.) so I know it is accurate. I hope that helps.
_________________________
Rich Galassini
Cunningham Piano Co.
Phila, Pa.
Dir. Line (215) 991-0834
rich@cunninghampiano.com
Get Cunningham Piano Email Updates

Top
#32611 - 09/22/03 08:51 AM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
Jim Volk Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/12/03
Posts: 916
Loc: Jacksonville, Florida
Osakans, as to your original question...
 Quote:
Is the Disklavier going to be worth $1500 more in a configuration with extremely similar features?[/b]
The answer is no. Go with the PianoDisc. It's the world's best selling player system, and has the advantage of (as you noted) modular upgrades, which to my knowledge Yamaha does not.

We've sold many dozens of PianoDisc systems with excellent results, no problems, no complaints. (The only problems I remember having, originated with the piano's action not being properly regulated.)

Also, although I think Yamaha is a consistently well-built piano, and a veritable workhorse, you may still end up with a better sounding piano if you opt for a larger model (within the same price range as a C1) Pramberger (Young Chang) or K&C Millenium (Samick). 5'3 compared to 5'9 or 6'1! And quality of build on these pianos is nothing to sneeze at, either, having improved quite a bit in the last 15 years.

BTW--when did Yamaha start retro-fitting their Disklavier system? I was under the impression it was only available factory-installed...unless they're sending the pianos back to the factory?!

-Jimbo
_________________________
Jim Volk
PIANOVATION

Top
#32612 - 09/22/03 10:09 AM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
pianomanrsn Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/24/03
Posts: 80
Loc: Dallas-Fort Worth
Note in reponse to Gary P

When Bluthner, Boesendorfer, Steinway or Fazioli build a "silent system" grand max. length 180cm, I'll buy one immediately (not a joke). Until then, the Yamaha C1 is the best "bang for my buck" for me until these top brands drag themselves into the 21st century. [/b]

Comparing a Yamaha C1 to any of the brands mentioned above is an uneducated exercise. Yamaha makes a good production piano that many people find attractive, but to suggest that they make instruments on par with Fazioli, Bluthner, or Bosendorfer is wishful thinking. The Yamaha C1 is a fairly good production instrument - that all.

Top
#32613 - 09/22/03 10:24 AM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
Luke's Dad Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/28/03
Posts: 1426
Loc: Mid Atlantic
 Quote:
Originally posted by Gary P.:
and I've not heard good things about retro-installing generic silent systems so the decision was partly taken for me (to go with the only factory installed, guaranteed, grand silent system I could get here).

When Bluthner, Boesendorfer, Steinway or Fazioli build a "silent system" grand max. length 180cm, I'll buy one immediately (not a joke). Until then, the Yamaha C1 is the best "bang for my buck" for me until these top brands drag themselves into the 21st century.

[/b]
What have you heard regarding retrofits? My experience is that a good system, installed by knowledgeable installers is every bit as good as factory installed. Yamaha used to have a big pitch against retrofits vs. factory installed, but i was smoke and mirrors. In the United States, Piano Disc is the top selling player system and includes a silent system. Currently, we sell 25% of our grands with them, and have had very few problems and complaints. The few problems we have had were easily rectified.

However, if you are looking for a better performing grand with the silent system, may I suggest you visit your local Seiler dealer? They do have a very effective silent system.
_________________________
Purveyor of Yamaha, Petrof, Pearl River, and Kohler & Campbell pianos.

Top
#32614 - 09/22/03 12:09 PM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
Osakans Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 09/07/03
Posts: 6
Thanks for all the help. To answer the various questions/suggestions that people have raised:

1. We decided to purchase the C1 during one of those "music conservatory sales" that piano dealers sometimes hold. We had gotten a letter in the mail suggesting that our local store (which is a reputable location, part of a substantial chain, and has been in the same location for at least 15 years) would have a large number of one-year used pianos on display. As I suspect all of you know (and I now know) that's not how these sales run, and they're really more opportunities for the stores to offer a few used pianos and a large number of new pianos at better discounts than they would ordinarily offer up front. (Albeit not discounts that wouldn't be available through decent negotiation at another time)

2. We had previously been to this dealer a few times and had been working with the store manager, a lovely gentleman who has the softest sell I've ever experienced. He's a person who obviously loves pianos, loves playing them, and loves spending his days around them. He also steered us away from a number of bad choices that would have made more money for the store and was the person who suggested that we would be nuts to buy a piano without playing the actual instrument (as opposed to just one of that model). Unfortunately, because the conservatory sale works somewhat differently at this store, we got paired for the sale with a different sales person who (after all was said and done) confided that his true passion is for drumming. He's the person who told us that the GC1 is basically the same thing as the C1 without the soft fallboard and locks. Thank goodness for "The Piano Book" and these forums. I wasn't 100% comfortable that I was getting accurate information at the store and before we committed to anything I told the salesman that we wanted to check with the resources we had at home, including sites like this. At the end of the day, we were able to work it out so that this person's involvement was minimized on our return to the store and we were mostly dealing with the store manager.

3. Our choice/comparison was between the Disklavier DGC1A/DC1A and the GC1/C1 with a PianoDisc retrofit. To my knowledge the Disklavier is still only available as factory installed.

4. The only differences anyone in the store could articulate between Disklavier and PianoDisc were 1) factory installation vs. retrofit and 2) 16 track sequencer on the Disklavier vs. 1 track on the PianoDisc. The store manager suggested that the only reason we'd get the Disklavier is if we wanted to use it to compose multi-track compositions.

5. I took 5-6 years of piano lessons as a child, but wouldn't pitch myself as a competent player. I can (with significant practice) play things like the Maple Leaf Rag, but that's really pushing my level of ability. Given my work schedule, I know it would be a fantasy to expect to be able to spend lots of time practicing -- this is likely to be a recreational instrument.

6. We actually don't have room with our room layout for a piano much larger than 5'3". The 5'3" size was a step up from the 4'7" Samick pianos we had been looking at and we were willing to do so because there was a quantum leap in touch and sound. We didn't perceive the same jump in going from 5'3" to 5'8".

7. Our key discriminating factors were a) touch and tone; b) whether or not the piano needed a lot of tweaking to make it sound the way it should -- something that immediately knocked out all the Indonesian made pianos even though I understand they may be just fine after a year or so of tweaking; and c) initial quality control and long term reliability. With those taken into account, and reading the entries in the Piano Book for some of the other brands people have recommended, my sense is that the only other option that would have served our needs as well would have been the Kawai RX-1 and we preferred the Yamaha to the Kawai.

Thanks again for all the help!

--Jeff

Top
#32615 - 09/22/03 01:30 PM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
PianoShopper1959 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/15/03
Posts: 29
Loc: San Diego
What happened to Gulbransen? Is that still around?

Top
#32616 - 09/23/03 06:03 AM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
gxprice Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/06/02
Posts: 225
Loc: Geneva
 Quote:
Originally posted by pianomanrsn:
Note in reponse to Gary P

When Bluthner, Boesendorfer, Steinway or Fazioli build a "silent system" grand max. length 180cm, I'll buy one immediately (not a joke). Until then, the Yamaha C1 is the best "bang for my buck" for me until these top brands drag themselves into the 21st century. [/b]

Comparing a Yamaha C1 to any of the brands mentioned above is an uneducated exercise. Yamaha makes a good production piano that many people find attractive, but to suggest that they make instruments on par with Fazioli, Bluthner, or Bosendorfer is wishful thinking. The Yamaha C1 is a fairly good production instrument - that all. [/b]
Uneducated exercise??? I never suggested that they were on par at all - they are way ahead (IMHO) of Yamaha. Having played some of them extensively (particularly Bluthner which is still in the family), I am fully aware of the difference. My statement was simply that my lifestyle, family, neighbourhood etc. does not permit a piano that cannot handle silent as well. However, I did want a grand that, when the weekend comes, I can play and have it sound okay. Hope that clears up any misunderstanding.

In terms of retrofitting silent systems (and pre-empting the next question to me in this thread), I have 2 dealers in town that say they've tried it and had nothing but problems over time. One of the dealers is the main Steinway dealer in Geneva and supplies many pianos for all of the concerts here so I tend to pay attention. He, in fact, now refuses to install any of the systems. The other will install but provide no reasonable guarantee. Since the conversations were in French, I was unable to get too buried in details but basically it came down to continual regulation of the silent system components required.

I'm curious though - how many people here (or that you know) have had silent systems retrofitted on the serious pianos (e.g. one of the 4 I mentioned earlier)? Any techs out there that regularly work on these systems and can confirm that there is no effect after the initial install/regulation?

Regards,

Gary.

Top
#32617 - 09/23/03 06:16 AM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
gxprice Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/06/02
Posts: 225
Loc: Geneva
 Quote:
Originally posted by Luke's Dad:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Gary P.:
and I've not heard good things about retro-installing generic silent systems so the decision was partly taken for me (to go with the only factory installed, guaranteed, grand silent system I could get here).

When Bluthner, Boesendorfer, Steinway or Fazioli build a "silent system" grand max. length 180cm, I'll buy one immediately (not a joke). Until then, the Yamaha C1 is the best "bang for my buck" for me until these top brands drag themselves into the 21st century.

[/b]
What have you heard regarding retrofits? My experience is that a good system, installed by knowledgeable installers is every bit as good as factory installed. Yamaha used to have a big pitch against retrofits vs. factory installed, but i was smoke and mirrors. In the United States, Piano Disc is the top selling player system and includes a silent system. Currently, we sell 25% of our grands with them, and have had very few problems and complaints. The few problems we have had were easily rectified.

However, if you are looking for a better performing grand with the silent system, may I suggest you visit your local Seiler dealer? They do have a very effective silent system. [/b]
Thanks for the information "Luke's Dad" - that's very interesting (and answers already some parts of the note I just posted). Do you retrofit any of the 4 that I mentioned earlier on a regular basis?

I wasn't going to start researching this stuff again until early 2004 when, with the deal I have on the C1S, I was going to review "silent" system pianos again to see what's changed and, if appropriate, swap it in for the agreed price or keep it for another year or two (i.e. until the right "silent" piano comes along).

Interesting what you say about Seiler - one of the local dealers here sells Seiler (I played one while I was on his shop floor) and he told me that the only factory installed, guaranteed systems were from Yamaha. Either they are not available in Switzerland or he was lying. In any event, I did buy there because a> the pianos in the showroom were badly prepared / tuned and b> dealing with him didn't feel right to me (despite his suit, he came across as a used car salesman).

Regards,

Gary.

Top
#32618 - 09/23/03 12:37 PM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
Luke's Dad Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/28/03
Posts: 1426
Loc: Mid Atlantic
We did stop installing the old Piano Disc Quit Time system a while back, I'm not even sure if they are still manufacturing them. However, the Piano Disc 228 system has a feature that can be installed that works pretty well. They install a mute rail where a bar prevents the hammer from striking the strings. Combined with a midirecord strip under the keys, and the symphony pro feature, you then have the equivalent to Yamaha's Silent Piano. Of course, the sound is only going to be as good as the sample and the speakers or headphones, so you may want to shop for an additional tone module and speakers as well. Give me a couple hours and I'll get you more info on Seiler's system.
_________________________
Purveyor of Yamaha, Petrof, Pearl River, and Kohler & Campbell pianos.

Top
#32619 - 09/23/03 02:28 PM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
RMAC Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/06/02
Posts: 367
We have installed many systems on Bosendorfers, Steinways, Mason & Hamlins, Knabes, Charles Walters, Estonias etc. both new and used and with great success. I would very strongly recommend that if you are in the price range of a DC1 Yamaha to consider an Estonia with a player system. The prices should be fairly close and I think that most people on here would agree that it is a higher quality piano (without going into the whole hand-made vs, mass produced thing).

Read the article in the current issue of Forbes magazine about the Estonia Piano Company, read what people are saying on here, and try to find a dealer in your area that can show you one before you make up your mind. Good luck and keep us posted!

Top
#32620 - 09/23/03 06:09 PM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
Luke's Dad Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/28/03
Posts: 1426
Loc: Mid Atlantic
Gary P, The name of Seiler's silent system is DuoVox. There is a great explanation of their system on Seiler's websight DuoVox

Also, I'm sorry, I didn't mention it before, but about 20% of the Steinways we sell have the PianoDisc 228 system with the mute rail.
_________________________
Purveyor of Yamaha, Petrof, Pearl River, and Kohler & Campbell pianos.

Top
#32621 - 09/24/03 02:43 AM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
gxprice Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/06/02
Posts: 225
Loc: Geneva
 Quote:
Originally posted by RJ McIlhenny:
We have installed many systems on Bosendorfers, Steinways, Mason & Hamlins, Knabes, Charles Walters, Estonias etc. both new and used and with great success. I would very strongly recommend that if you are in the price range of a DC1 Yamaha to consider an Estonia with a player system. [/b]
Thanks RJ, that's good information. Actually, I'm not so much limited in money as fussy about not having to worry about when things go wrong (as I heard about the retrofit silent systems up until now). When I lease/purchased the C1S (not the Disklavier), I had already prepared to buy a Bosey they had on the shop floor which was a fantastic piano. It was then that I started hearing about the unreliability of silent systems which pushed me into the Yamaha. The whole reason I lease/purchased was precisely so that I had an agreed (and reasonably priced) option of changing if a piano I really liked came along with a silent system.

As I said, it's approaching time to start researching - I only have about 5 months before my "deal" runs out \:\)

I have played an Estonia by the way - it certainly wasn't a bad piano \:\)

Regards,

Gary.

Top
#32622 - 09/24/03 02:51 AM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
gxprice Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/06/02
Posts: 225
Loc: Geneva
 Quote:
Originally posted by Luke's Dad:
We did stop installing the old Piano Disc Quit Time system a while back, I'm not even sure if they are still manufacturing them. However, the Piano Disc 228 system has a feature that can be installed that works pretty well. They install a mute rail where a bar prevents the hammer from striking the strings. Combined with a midirecord strip under the keys, and the symphony pro feature, you then have the equivalent to Yamaha's Silent Piano. Of course, the sound is only going to be as good as the sample and the speakers or headphones, so you may want to shop for an additional tone module and speakers as well. Give me a couple hours and I'll get you more info on Seiler's system. [/b]
First, thanks for the information on the Seiler. I've only ever played one Seiler and unfortunately, it was badly prep'ed (It sticks in my mind because I wondered if the hammers had been replaced by tea spoons!). However, I've heard many good things.

Yes, the system you describe is actually all I want (and what the S is in C1S). I don't need orchestra, recording to disk/CD features, player systems etc. - just the bar and the sensors / headphones. The Yamaha sampling is actually good (IMO) by the way.

For the plain, standard silent system (only), is it still necessary to "cut" the piano as I've read that this is necessary (both here and in LF's book)? You imply above (at least, I understand) that you can just lay the strip under the keys (obviously securing it each end) and that's about it.

Regards,

Gary.

Top
#32623 - 09/24/03 04:31 PM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
Jeff Bauer Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/28/03
Posts: 1718
Loc: Los Angeles
 Quote:
Originally posted by Osakans:
4. The only differences anyone in the store could articulate between Disklavier and PianoDisc were 1) factory installation vs. retrofit and 2) 16 track sequencer on the Disklavier vs. 1 track on the PianoDisc. The store manager suggested that the only reason we'd get the Disklavier is if we wanted to use it to compose multi-track compositions.[/b]
Disclaimer: I sell both systems - I find the Disklavier to be a better system, but less versatile when it comes to piano selection. Both systems are great systems - I love the pianodisc for many of the things it does, but mainly because I can put it on anything.

It seems there is little support for the Disklavier on this thread, so let me fill in the blanks with information that does not to appear to have been offered. I would reccommend the Disklavier "A" series for the following reasons:

Optic sensor system vs. Analog - PianoDisc uses an analog record strip located beneath the keys. I have found the Disklavier to be more accurate in playback when I recorded something on it, as compared to when I recorded on the PianoDisc. The DC3A and above have two optic sensors, where the DC2A and smaller have one sensor. The extra sensor gives for more accurate recording (I have found the smaller Disklavier to be less dynamic in the recordings, but still far superior to the PDS228+)

Silent System: There is a button to the left that engages the "Silent mode" on the disklavier - it's a slick device that gives multiple advantages. When the button is pressed, a bar moves in front of the hammers blocking them from hitting the strings - instead you hear a sampled piano sound (that is the best sample I have heard on anything, anywhere). You can play the piano with headphones, or make the piano whisper quiet if you have the disklavier going during a dinner party. The Optic sensor really comes into play here: If you ever played a PianoDisc with quiet time installed, you would realize the piano sample and sluggish performance barely passes for a piano.

Software - The available pool of Yamaha artists for recording allows for a large quantity of quality recordings. The music available on the Disklavier is the best I have heard for any system. PianoDisk will play Yamaha floppys, but not their CDs - Yamaha CDs is where the Disklavier shines. Also, the orchestra related floppy disks don't perform as intended on the pDS228 because PianoDisc does not support Yamaha's XG MIDI format.

Piano Smart - Yamaha found a way to sync the floppy disk drive with the CD drive to allow simultaneous playback, giving birth to SmartDisk. Yamaha brings in pianists and records their perfomance with pre-existing CDs. This helps avoid copywrite laws becuase you already own the original CD or you will go buy it at Tower: All you need to do is buy Yamaha's suppliment floppy: When both CD and floppy are put into the disklavier, you will hear the piano accompany the original recording. This allows for a more expansive live audio library and they are being cranked out in droves.

SmartKey - The disklavier will "wiggle" a key waiting for you to play it, showing you the correct notes to play. This works on any disk you put on the disklavier, but it's not a method of learning how to play. It's more a "fun" thing to do with those who don't play at all: There are certain disks that take advantage of this with one note melodies accompanied by complex passages after every keystroke.

Sorry for the longwinded post.
_________________________
Jeff Bauer | Keyboard Concepts

Yamaha | Schimmel | Bösendorfer | Knabe | Seiler | Restored Steinway

BauerHouse Productions

Top
#32624 - 09/25/03 07:44 PM Re: Disklavier vs. Pianodisc
Luke's Dad Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/28/03
Posts: 1426
Loc: Mid Atlantic
 Quote:
Originally posted by Gary P.:

For the plain, standard silent system (only), is it still necessary to "cut" the piano as I've read that this is necessary (both here and in LF's book)? You imply above (at least, I understand) that you can just lay the strip under the keys (obviously securing it each end) and that's about it.

Regards,

Gary. [/b]
Only if there is a player sytem mechanism is it necessary to cut the piano. The midi strip is very thin and lies on the keyframe. Some drilling may be necessary to mount the mute bar.
_________________________
Purveyor of Yamaha, Petrof, Pearl River, and Kohler & Campbell pianos.

Top

Moderator:  Ken Knapp, Piano World, Rickster 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
Download & Print Sheet Music Instantly
sheet music search
sheet music search

sheet music search
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
Who's Online
144 registered (Almaviva, 36251, acortot, Anne'sson, 43 invisible), 1503 Guests and 30 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
74223 Members
42 Forums
153542 Topics
2250194 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Uneven key balance
by Beemer
54 minutes 59 seconds ago
Antique Piano Shop from TN
by IPDRPT
Today at 08:52 AM
Piano song requests?
by kent2012
Today at 08:19 AM
Requests?
by kent2012
Today at 08:06 AM
2014 Bradshaw and Buono Piano Competition
by hsheck
Today at 01:21 AM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission