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#541917 - 07/11/02 01:16 PM Etudes
Tyulan Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/08/02
Posts: 24
Loc: UK
I recently finished learning Chopin's first Etude in C major (Op.10 No.1). After a lot of practising to get it off the ground initially I found that learning subsequent bars became easier and easier because the actual mechanism (i.e. broken tenth chords) basically remained the same throughout the entire piece. When I played his Etude in C minor, 'Revolutionary' (Op.10 No.12), I also found that the piece became easier to learn as I delved deeper into it, even though the mechanisms of the composition changed fairly constantly.

Has anyone else found that when practising/learning particularly difficult pieces (such as Liszt's Transcendental Etudes or, say, Nancarrow studies) that their progression through the piece, if they learn it in order, becomes easier because of the hurdles already surpassed?

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#541918 - 07/11/02 01:28 PM Re: Etudes
Mr. Gould Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/07/01
Posts: 1111
Hey cool Tyulan! I wish I could play that piece..
Do you use the pedal alot??

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#541919 - 07/11/02 03:12 PM Re: Etudes
mkesfahani Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/26/02
Posts: 836
Loc: Irvine, CA
I find most that most of Chopin's etudes are like this. I don't think the idea works so well with Liszt or Rachmaninoff because their etudes don't sound very etudish, but Chopin's you can usually just listen to and know what technical challenges are present. Think about the Harp, Octave, or Thirds etudes. They are all awkward until about the second page when it starts to feel natural.

Mike

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#541920 - 07/11/02 03:38 PM Re: Etudes
Tyulan Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/08/02
Posts: 24
Loc: UK
 Quote:
Originally posted by Classical Player:
Hey cool Tyulan! I wish I could play that piece..
Do you use the pedal alot??[/b]
Well, for the Op.10 No.1 I tend to practise without pedal to ensure a good legato phrase, especially during the measures before the reprisal of the opening motif.

However, when performing or playing for pleasure I always use pedal with Chopin: how could you not? To listen to Glenn Gould's Chopin recordings is to go into the world of very eccentric and frequently pedal-less Chopin.

Don't get me wrong, I like Gould's playing but the way he interprets Chopin strikes me as very individual (as was his Bach and practically everything else really) and very bohemian.

On the other hand, his Ravel is superb...so it's all a matter of taste I suppose. The easy mistake with the C major Etude is to RELY upon the pedal to gain that legato singing line, which is a bad habit to fall into and one which I sometimes catch myself doing. Remember: the pedal is an aid to good legato, but first and foremost the fingers create it.

Be well all!

Nath

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#541921 - 07/13/02 02:01 AM Re: Etudes
Palindrome Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/22/01
Posts: 3916
Loc: Chicago, IL USA
 Quote:
Originally posted by Tyulan:
...To listen to Glenn Gould's Chopin recordings is to go into the world of very eccentric and frequently pedal-less Chopin.

Don't get me wrong, I like Gould's playing but the way he interprets Chopin strikes me as very individual (as was his Bach and practically everything else really) and very bohemian.
[/b]
It has been said that the virtuoso is the master of the music, and the musician is the servant of the music. With Glenn Gould I get the impression that often it doesn't involve the music at all -- it's more about Glenn Gould! (Hey look, ma, no hands!)
_________________________
There is no end of learning. -Robert Schumann Rules for Young Musicians

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#541922 - 07/13/02 04:54 PM Re: Etudes
aznxk3vi17 Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/13/02
Posts: 701
Loc: Johns Hopkins University
About that Op. 10 no. 1:

I can never comprehend playing this. The first page is ok, the notes are in REASONABLE reach, except for one, the C F C F arpeggio... my span is not THAT wide.

Later on though, the notes become just about impossible! Some of them, I catch my fourth finger behind a black key, and I twist it and injure it a LOT... How does one play those arpeggios without injuring themselves?

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#541923 - 07/13/02 05:12 PM Re: Etudes
Tyulan Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/08/02
Posts: 24
Loc: UK
 Quote:
Originally posted by aznxk3vi17:
About that Op. 10 no. 1:

I can never comprehend playing this. The first page is ok, the notes are in REASONABLE reach, except for one, the C F C F arpeggio... my span is not THAT wide.

Later on though, the notes become just about impossible! Some of them, I catch my fourth finger behind a black key, and I twist it and injure it a LOT... How does one play those arpeggios without injuring themselves?[/b]
Chopin said that to play Op.10 no.1 "only a supple hand is required" not a large one. I know that some peoples' hands are not big enough but if you can move your hand to accomodate the notes without actually slowing down or tensing then you should be able to get through the piece okay. Though I do agree that the odd note here and there is quite difficult to bring under the fingers. Practise, practise, practise...I suppose...

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