The best thing you can do before dropping a few hundred bucks on any product is ask yourself a simple question: “How am I going to use this thing?” Buying a keyboard is no exception.

Are you primarily interested in a piano substitute to learn to play? Are you an eclectic type who wants a wide variety of built-in music styles and rhythms? Do you need DJ-oriented sounds and sampling capabilities? Will you be writing pop songs? Performing live? Or simply using the instrument to practice and improve your chops? These are good questions to consider as you explore different products.

While it’s fairly safe to assume that the more you spend the more you get, personal keyboards vary widely among manufacturers, so bear in mind that a price-to-price comparison isn’t always as straightforward as you’d think. But that’s why we’re here! The information that follows should arm you with the knowledge to find the keyboard that best suits your needs.

From an article on MusicPlayer.com
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- Frank B.
Founder / Host
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Estonia L-190, Yamaha P-80, Hammond XK-3, Hammond A-100, Estey 1895 Pump Organ, Harpsichord (kit), Clavichord (kit)
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