Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#88891 - 01/05/09 02:11 PM Pianos as Investments
RoyP Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/10/03
Posts: 786
Loc: Cincinnati, Ohio
The common wisdom here has been that pianos are not good investments. Whenever someone has posted about this, the standard response has been that there are better places to put your money if you want a return on investment. Invest in the stock market. Well, in the last six months, it's become a different world, hasn't it? It turns out that many of the better returns people were getting were based upon, well....fraud. It's not just the Madoff ponzi scheme which has been uncovered.
-The rating firms which determine risk on investments were giving securities AAA ratings, which were actually high risk investments. They were doing this because there was a quick buck to be made.
-401k's have tanked.
-Some stocks have lost half their value. My brother, who knows this stuff, says that stocks are still not cheap relative to P/E ratios. He still advises buying gold.
- We have seen investors buying treasury bonds for little or no return, just because they think it's a safehaven for their funds. So, T-bills have been at record lows. Reuters Article

So my question is, are pianos now a more attractive investment? We may be entering a deflationary period. If pianos will at least hold their value, that's better than a 401k has been doing.
_________________________
Roy Peters, RPT
Cincinnati, Ohio
www.cincypiano.com

Top
(ads 568) Hailun Pianos

 

#88892 - 01/05/09 02:16 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
ProdigalPianist Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/08/07
Posts: 1049
Loc: Phoenix Metro, AZ
No matter how world-class the piano is, it's only worth as much, as an investment, as someone is willing and able to pay for it.

What most people are 'willing and able' to pay for anything these days seems to have taken a nosedive.

Plus, isn't the general wisdom that, the older a piano gets, even if (perhaps especially if) it hasn't been played...the more work it will need, to the point of rebuilding or trashing?

None of these factors points to a piano being a good investment, in my opinion. Keep in mind, of course, I know nothing about finances and investing.

I would, however, say that for a piano buyer, it seems like a good time to make a purchase, if you have the funds to do so.
_________________________
Adult Amateur Pianist

My only domestic quality is that I live in a house.

Top
#88893 - 01/05/09 02:32 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
PoStTeNeBrAsLuX Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/31/05
Posts: 2618
Loc: Geneva, Switzerland
For many people a piano is still a "would like to have" rather than a "must have" article. As belts are tightened I'd regretfully suppose that many parents will perhaps be passing on such a purchase and rather be making sure they can continue to provide what they can in terms of housing, future education costs, etc. And thereby tending to save (or at least pay off outstanding debt) rather than spending on consumer goods (like musical instruments) and services (like music lessons), which in a way is precisely what most Western politicians do not want them to do



-Michael B.
_________________________
There are two rules to success in life: Rule #1. Don't tell people everything you know.

Top
#88894 - 01/05/09 03:19 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
FogVilleLad Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/02/05
Posts: 4680
Loc: San Francisco
Pianos are still depreciating assets, which still often take a long time to sell.

Top
#88895 - 01/05/09 03:44 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
ChristinaW Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/05/04
Posts: 152
Loc: Washington DC
A musical instrument is not an "investment". Anyone who seriously wants to invest money for a return should not be putting it into a musical instrument, if that is really their sole purpose for buying the instrument.

Nothing about the stock market changes that, nor T-bills, which really doesn't change it. Pianos go down in value as they age. Period. The only exception might be some rare collectible, but that would depend upon a buyer wanting that particular value. Pianos need maintenance and upkeep, and there are parts that just go bad due to age, there isn't anything you can do about that. If you don't do maintenance or restoration, a piano will not even stay at the same value.

Top
#88896 - 01/05/09 04:02 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
Digitus Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/08/06
Posts: 866
Loc: Singapore
I guess it depends somewhat on where you are. In any case, I don't think pianos are investments, despite what some manufacturers might tell you.

Here in Singapore, all things being equal, pianos depreciate sharply in the first three to five years. The minute the piano arrives in your home the resale value drops to something like 20% of the retail price.

However, currency values and the cost of parts and manufacturing aren't static. Since I placed the order for my Sauter Omega back in September 2007 the Sauter factory has had to increase the cost price to its dealers, and the Euro has appreciated sharply against the Singapore dollar. So if I sell my Omega today I reckon I would take less of a hit on depreciation than I otherwise would. But that's assuming I can find a willing buyer in the current economic climate.

Roy's brother is right. The worst may not be over yet. There is an increasing chance that the U.S. could default on its sovereign debt by summer this year. I read (can't remember where) that the country owes almost as much as it's net worth. China alone holds almost half of that debt!

The incoming Obama administration is going to add tremendously to that debt in trying to prevent all the wheels from falling off. Unfortunately there's nothing else it can do.

Top
#88897 - 01/05/09 04:31 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
ScottM Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/11/05
Posts: 556
I think it only works when you buy the land under the piano. Otherwise it doesn't really work.
_________________________
Scott

Top
#88898 - 01/05/09 04:49 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
Sir Lurksalot Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/19/04
Posts: 1243
On a related note (pun intended), there are now investment funds that specialize in rare musical instruments (not new ones, and no pianos that I'm aware of).

http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/03/26/invest.violins/index.html?eref=rss_latest

Top
#88899 - 01/05/09 05:16 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
Grotriman Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/07/04
Posts: 724
Loc: New York City
Hello everybody, been a while since I've posted here. Been rather busy.

The cost of the Grotrian Cabinet (192cm) model has gone up from 32K Euro (when I bought mine) to 43K Euro in 5 years.

The issue in the next few years is that the depreciation of all currencies will mean that all items will become more expensive (in currency not necessarily value).

This means that if you have the money now to buy something you want, you should buy it now. Because your money will be worth less in the future.

Of course if our banks and financial firms had not gotten us in to the mess we are in, the govt would not have to mint money like they will and inflation would not be an issue. But that is life.
_________________________
Regards,

Grotriman

Top
#88900 - 01/05/09 05:22 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
Deerwood Dad Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/04/07
Posts: 478
Loc: Minneapolis
Pianos are NOT investments, unless of course you purchase a particularly rare instrument, which might ultimately go up in value (akin to a piece of art or other collectible). 99.999% of all pianos (yes, even Steinways) are depreciable items, like cars -- they just don't depreciate quite as rapidly.

Bernie Madoff is to the investment world what Terry Wilson (perhaps?) is to the piano world. I choose to think that neither comes close to defining the industry they have sullied (Madoff far more spectacularly, and perhaps a tad more willfully, than Wilson).
_________________________
Mason & Hamlin A (2006); Yamaha P140

Top
#88901 - 01/05/09 05:32 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
pianosxxi Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/21/08
Posts: 218
Loc: Southern California
RoyP

Not all pianos! Just one, Steinway! \:\) Under one condition:
Buy it directly from restoration company. The best deal you will get and will save you money.

You basically answered your own questions regarding piano being a good investment.
_________________________
Gene Korolev, RPT
President, Master Piano Rebuilder

PIANO SOLUTIONS XXI
Exclusive Piano Restoration, Custom Piano Design and Sales
http://www.pianosxxi.com | http://www.custompianodesign.com
Contact: 818.503.0800

Top
#88902 - 01/05/09 09:04 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
Bob Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/01/01
Posts: 3869
If one was double short the stock market in October when it crashed, you would have made money \:D

It is a great time to find pianos at low prices. People are selling to cover their loans, or because they have to move and can't take it with them. This does not mean your piano will become an investment and gain value....it simply means your cost basis is below current market value.

Eventually the two will meet. :rolleyes:
_________________________
www.PianoTunerOrlando.com






Top
#88903 - 01/05/09 09:54 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
Norbert Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/03/01
Posts: 14138
Loc: Surrey, B.C.
While pianos may not be the most ideal or often 'hoped-for' investment that some stores use in their selling techniques, there are still differences in the choices out there.

There are at almost all times pianos that are fairly priced, overpriced as well as underpriced.

As a dealer I have always concentrated a bit on those makes which I believe happen to be "under-priced" showing hopefully some basic upward mobility in terms of higher ratings by Larry Fine, at least as time goes by.

In this regard Sauter,Brodmann grands, Hailun and especially Estonia have done exceptionally well for us.

And hopefully for our customers...

How this translates in actual "investment $$" in terms of resale is anybody's guess, however the proper fundamentals of increased recognition are certainly important here.

Try to apply same math or logic to pianos whose rating hasn't changed in some 20 odd years - or has even gone down, and the answer would certainly be somewhat more difficult.

For those who are hypnoticed simply by *brand name* preferring to live in a bubble of assumed safe economics, the moment of reckoning will surely come - as it has for many other sectors of the industry today.....

Personally, I do no longer believe in the old "name recognition" argument: just check pianomart and see how many "famous names" are there for sale - it sure seems endless and is getting longer by the day.....

For a nasty way of testing things, just call a dealer and pretend already owning the piano you are planning to buy - then ask what he would pay you if he would buy it back right then and there,[sit down for shockwaves coming..] then add about % 20%- 30% - there is your "HOPED FOR" real resale Value....... \:o

Final advice : do buy with your HEART - but don't forget to apply some basic logic either.

Remember, the more you really like your piano, the less the prospect of "selling" it may come up in your mind later....

Norbert ;\)
_________________________
www.heritagepianos.com
Greater Vancouver B.C. piano dealers for : C.Sauter, Estonia, Brodmann, Ritmuller
604-951-8642

Top
#88904 - 01/05/09 10:42 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
Kimsie Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/29/08
Posts: 95
Loc: Arlington, WA
A piano is not a financial investment. It has constant maintenance costs and it depreciates. The one we just bought we got for about 22% less than the person who bought it when it was new 3 years ago, and it is in beautiful condition, just broken in really. It is an investment of another kind, but only if someone enjoys playing it.

Top
#88905 - 01/05/09 10:57 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
doremi Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 1743
 Quote:
Originally posted by ScottM:
I think it only works when you buy the land under the piano. Otherwise it doesn't really work. [/b]
It still doesn't work if you don't buy the air above the land as well.
_________________________
I am 'doremi' because I play scales smile
Had I progressed to playing chords,
I would be 'domisol' shocked

Top
#88906 - 01/05/09 11:15 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
Avantgardenabi Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/17/08
Posts: 496
 Quote:
Originally posted by Norbert:
Personally, I do no longer believe in the old "name recognition" argument: just check pianomart and see how many "famous names" are there for sale - it sure seems endless and is getting longer by the day..... [/b]
I was actually puzzled by this phenomenon.

Right now in pianomart, 240 of Steinway grand pianos are being listed, and this number is larger than any other makes...

Yamaha comes in second, with 92 of pianos being listed, and Mason and Hamlin comes in third.

Of course, pianomart may not be the best representative of today's piano market, but still Steinway's overwhelming numbers being sold are really surprising. I never thought Steinways are so... common.

As for me, I bought an old piano that I truly marvel and love... \:\)

Top
#88907 - 01/05/09 11:23 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
sophial Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/05
Posts: 3468
Loc: US
Steinways are one of the few brands that retain value to the point that rebuilding and/or reselling are viable options. They don't get thrown out, so they will end up on the market again.
Where do you think many other old pianos end up, since they are not being resold? Three guesses.....


Sophia

Top
#88908 - 01/05/09 11:24 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
RealPlayer Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/02/03
Posts: 2334
Loc: NYC
 Quote:
Originally posted by Avantgardenabi:
Right now in pianomart, 240 of Steinway grand pianos are being listed, and this number is larger than any other makes...
[snip] I never thought Steinways are so... common.[/QB]
As pointed out in so many other Steinway-related threads, their output is far greater than other top-tier manufacturers. Couldn't that alone account for this?
_________________________
Joe

www.josephkubera.com

Top
#88909 - 01/06/09 12:04 AM Re: Pianos as Investments
Avantgardenabi Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/17/08
Posts: 496
I don't know...

Steinway reached this 200 number mark some time ago, (I regularly check pianomart in hope to see exotic pianos, actually) and I think this number stays as it is because Steinways are not being "sold" right now...

In today's harsh economy, lately all I hear is another business closing its doors or becoming bankrupt in the United States. Korea's economy suffers, also. \:\(

How can piano hold its value when the demand is (supposedly) lower than its supply on today's market?

As a member from younger generation, I can honestly say that especially in this century, there are more affordable temptations than pianos (especially Steinways) out on the market...

Top
#88910 - 01/06/09 01:12 AM Re: Pianos as Investments
birchy Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/29/06
Posts: 323
Loc: Vancouver
To me, there are two distinct aspects to an "investment in a piano".

The first is in the object itself, and realistically, it is a mechanical object which requires care, maintenance and will eventually wear out. It may be considered a work of art, but it far more prone to show wear and tear than other "art" investments such as painting. So thinking that you will see increasing monetary values does not apply to the object itself, though some types of pianos obviously decline in resale value faster than others. (Exception being Steinways, where no laws of the universe apply...)

The second and more important element of an investment in a piano is the actual experience of playing itself. The experience does not happen until you make the investment. The choice of instrument (affected obviously by the number of dollars invested) will have great bearing on the quality of the experience indeed. Measuring this value is somewhat difficult as experience and the attendant wisdom or pleasure gained are somewhat ephemeral. Like any kind of education or refining process, the result is in the life of the person, and assessment of it's value is subjective. But short-changing the investment to "save" money could be as ridiculous as buying an item on the menu at a restaurant that you hate, because it is a dollar cheaper than your favorite dish. You can save a dollar and lose the experience. There is no satisfaction in that.

Top
#88911 - 01/06/09 01:29 AM Re: Pianos as Investments
doremi Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 1743
 Quote:
Originally posted by birchy:
...as ridiculous as buying an item on the menu at a restaurant that you hate, because it is a dollar cheaper than your favorite dish. You can save a dollar and lose the experience. There is no satisfaction in that. [/b]
It helps you lose weight inexpensively.
_________________________
I am 'doremi' because I play scales smile
Had I progressed to playing chords,
I would be 'domisol' shocked

Top
#88912 - 01/06/09 04:24 AM Re: Pianos as Investments
JustAnotherPianist Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/20/08
Posts: 798
Loc: United Kingdom
Pianos are not good investments.
Violins, violas, and cellos are VERY good investments. They go up in value slowly, compared to more lucrative investments, but steadily.
Look at Guadagnini violins-10 years ago they could be had for as little as 2,3, or 4 hundred thousand. Now they are all up above one million.

Top
#88913 - 01/06/09 05:35 AM Re: Pianos as Investments
MAK Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/14/04
Posts: 153
Loc: New York Metropolitan Area
 Quote:
Originally posted by RoyP:
The common wisdom here has been that pianos are not good investments. Whenever someone has posted about this, the standard response has been that there are better places to put your money if you want a return on investment. Invest in the stock market. Well, in the last six months, it's become a different world, hasn't it? It turns out that many of the better returns people were getting were based upon, well....fraud. It's not just the Madoff ponzi scheme which has been uncovered.
-The rating firms which determine risk on investments were giving securities AAA ratings, which were actually high risk investments. They were doing this because there was a quick buck to be made.
-401k's have tanked.
-Some stocks have lost half their value. My brother, who knows this stuff, says that stocks are still not cheap relative to P/E ratios. He still advises buying gold.
- We have seen investors buying treasury bonds for little or no return, just because they think it's a safehaven for their funds. So, T-bills have been at record lows. Reuters Article

So my question is, are pianos now a more attractive investment? We may be entering a deflationary period. If pianos will at least hold their value, that's better than a 401k has been doing. [/b]
_________________________
Michael

Bosendorfer 175

Top
#88914 - 01/06/09 05:43 AM Re: Pianos as Investments
MAK Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/14/04
Posts: 153
Loc: New York Metropolitan Area
Curiously, I just had my piano appraised by a reputable appraiser and was advised, to my surprise, that the piano is worth about $35,000 more than I paid for it. Apparently, the "limited edition" aspect of it, which was ridiculed on this forum in the past, when I asked about it, meant something to the appraiser. I realize, of course, that a piano is worth only what someone will pay for it. Also realize that Bosendorfer raised their prices a lot since I purchased the piano new about four and a half years ago. Nevertheless, it is nice to know that at least someone thinks the piano appreciated in value. "This piano will appreciate in value for reasons of artistic merit, craftmanship, and rarity".

This was surprising given all the other information I have been able to find about the long term value of pianos.
_________________________
Michael

Bosendorfer 175

Top
#88915 - 01/06/09 07:32 AM Re: Pianos as Investments
Rank Piano Amateur Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/11/07
Posts: 1776
Pianos are great investments in enjoyment, happiness, music-making, and delight. Isn't that enough?

Top
#88916 - 01/06/09 08:13 AM Re: Pianos as Investments
Happy Birthday klk Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 05/06/08
Posts: 17
Loc: Baltimore
Re: Guadagnini violins, my grandfather decided not to buy one in the early 1950s because it was $500, and he didn't want to pay that much. The violin market is ridiculous. Meanwhile, pianos, as others have said, must be bought because you will love and use them.
_________________________
Irmler F18E (at work); Yamaha U7 (at home)

Top
#88917 - 01/06/09 10:49 AM Re: Pianos as Investments
RoyP Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/10/03
Posts: 786
Loc: Cincinnati, Ohio
Thanks for the responses. This is just something I've been thinking about. I was thinking more in terms of someone buying a quality used piano, which has already taken the initial drop in price by being sold for the first time. If you held onto it for ten years, you could probably still get your initial investment out of it, and maybe a little more if it has been well maintained. As some stated, there are some good deals out there right now. But yes, there are maintenence costs along the way.

There are, and are going to be, alot of used pianos on the market. And the average person's ability to pay will be down. So, at least short term, there will be less demand and more supply.

Why is the violin, viola, and cello market so different from the piano market? Plenty of violins are available, of all different levels. Are there more players? Do violin dealers approach old instruments differently?
_________________________
Roy Peters, RPT
Cincinnati, Ohio
www.cincypiano.com

Top
#88918 - 01/06/09 11:08 AM Re: Pianos as Investments
Rank Piano Amateur Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/11/07
Posts: 1776
RoyP: Part of the problem here is your definition of investment. An investment where you would get "your initial investment out of it" at the end of ten years is a terrible return on your money, especially given the need for ongoing maintenance. You would do better, even at today's interest rates, with your money in a savings account. Indeed, in light of inflation you will have lost money even if you sell the piano for what you paid for it.

In any event, I stick by what I said earlier. Buy a piano because you love it and want to play it, not for what you can get if you resell it ten years on.

As for violins, they are just different. Apparently they do not wear out in any meaningful sense. Let's face it: pianos are machines, and they wear out!

Top
#88919 - 01/06/09 11:31 AM Re: Pianos as Investments
John Pels Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/31/07
Posts: 1262
Loc: Tomball, Texas
Commodities are only worth what the market will bear. I think in the next couple of years we might all be finding that what we once regarded as "assets", might soon find themselves in the "liabilities" column. If this economy gets worse, we won't be able to give pianos away . I'm just glad that mine are paid for. There's not much solace in being a piano teacher either, as it's the luxury market that evaporates first. The fact that Piano Mart is inundated might be telling the tale. There again new cars of all kinds aren't selling either. There is a genuine wait and see attitude that has taken hold of the consumer in general. Don't forget folks, retailers just suffered the worst sales since 1970 for the Christmas shopping season.

Top
#88920 - 01/06/09 12:18 PM Re: Pianos as Investments
pianoloverus Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/29/01
Posts: 19366
Loc: New York City
 Quote:
Originally posted by pianosxxi:
RoyP

Not all pianos! Just one, Steinway! \:\) Under one condition:
Buy it directly from restoration company. The best deal you will get and will save you money.
[/b]
So if a buy a piano from you today, how much more will you give me for it a year from today?

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >

Moderator:  Ken Knapp, Piano World, Rickster 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
ad (Casio)
Celviano by Casio Rebate
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Knabe Pianos
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
New Topics - Multiple Forums
"How It's Made" and Cunningham Piano Co.
by Rich Galassini
09/30/14 09:43 AM
How many different actions do the Kawai digitals have?
by Giancarlo Robles
09/30/14 09:34 AM
Hearing the changes
by paul abrahams
09/30/14 09:07 AM
My Kawai CA-95 does not record drum patterns
by SP6NIN
09/30/14 06:18 AM
page-turning for tablets
by Barly
09/30/14 04:02 AM
Who's Online
143 registered (A Guy, accordeur, aesop, AaronH, 44 invisible), 1576 Guests and 14 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
76376 Members
42 Forums
157882 Topics
2318769 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
|
Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission