Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Topic Options
#907855 - 01/13/05 04:18 AM From CBS News - LL, again!
AndrewG Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 2506
Loc: Denver, Colorado
I recently watched Lang Lang's DG DVD "Lang Lang Live in Carnegie Hall" four times in two days. This is my first ever semi-live experience with this sometimes referred to as a 'classical rock star' pianist's performance. Just noticed this article to share with this board.
==============================================================================================
From CBS News.com


Lang Lang: Piano Prodigy[/b]
Jan. 9, 2005


On a recent night in Hong Kong, Lang Lang captivated the sold-out house as he always does. All eyes were on center stage.

He's more than a mere virtuoso with elastic hands and dazzling dexterity. And he's more than just a supremely talented musician. Lang Lang is also a showman.

As Correspondent Bob Simon reports, Lang Lang is a spellbinding performer with a flair for drama –- strutting, swooning, and wrapping the crowd around his 10 nimble fingers.

"I love the audience, because I love the tension there. Because it seems like a lot of people watching, I mean, the creation of this wonderful work," says Lang Lang. "And then you are at the same time the interpreter. It's like building a bridge to their heart."

If Lang Lang sounds a little dreamy, he often plays that way too, with his eyes closed, head back, cast in a musical trance.

"Every time I play, I try to see the images. For example, I see something. I can see beautiful forest and everything's green," he says.

Lang Lang’s not the only one who sees green. So does his record company, which has hyped him like a rock star. Part Mozart, part MTV, they’re counting on Lang Lang to bring in a new generation of fans.

He embraces the limelight as he embraces everything – eagerly, and with a boyish enthusiasm, as Simon found out when they sifted through the delicacies at a Beijing street market.

"I think this animal can play really good piano," says Lang Lang, looking at an octopus.

Lang Lang’s mind is never very far from his music, which helps when you’re working with the best in the business -- as he did on a remarkable recording with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and maestro Daniel Barenboim.

"I can't describe him as a pianist, because you will only hear in my sentence the jealousy that I and all his colleagues feel," says Barenboim. "I'm sure he didn't show you, but you know, he has 11 fingers. He plays the piano like a cat with 11 fingers."

Lang Lang’s acrobatic mastery of the keyboard is undisputed. But some critics find his showy style indulgent, and say those dreamy swoons get in the way of the music.

"There's something about Lang Lang's playing now where he calls attention to himself, to his own feelings. He’s like a hammy actor," says Anthony Tommasini, chief classical music critic for The New York Times.

He skewered Lang Lang in a ruthless review, calling his playing "slam bang crass."

Tommasini says, "I don't think it does Lang Lang any good to have his very powerful record company promoting him the way it is right now: 'The future of classical music has arrived, Deutsche Gramophone says. His name is Lang Lang.'

"That's a lot of pressure. People come to his concerts now expecting a catharsis, an epiphany, rather than a musical performance."

If it’s a catharsis they want, Lang Lang is more than happy to provide it.

Rachmaninoff’s 3rd Piano Concerto, with one of the most haunting themes in all of classical music, has become his signature piece.

"This piece has driven at least one pianist mad. You know about that," asks Simon.

"Yeah, it drives me crazy," says Lang Lang, laughing.

"Rachmaninoff was this tortured Russian. And here you are...this very young Chinese man, who seems to be full of life and full of optimism, and full of happiness," says Simon. "How can you relate to this music?"

"I think when you play any piece, you are not you anymore," Lang Lang responded. "You are totally into the world of the composer's mind."

Prodigies have a way of silencing the skeptics, and wowing the crowds. Barely out of his teens, Lang Lang has arrived as an overnight sensation -- 22 years in the making.

What distinguishes him from the large number of very talented pianists? "I started early," he says.

Lang Lang began formal lessons when he was 3. At 5, barely able to reach the pedals, he was making Mozart look like child’s play. And if you’re wondering who raised such a boy, you’ve got to follow Lang Lang to the northern Chinese city of Shenyang.

Shenyang is Lang Lang’s hometown, an old, overcrowded industrial city. But for China, not unprosperous. Like so much of the country, it’s poised somewhere between its past, and its future. It’s where 60 Minutes found Lang Lang’s parents.

His father says he decided that Lang Lang was going to be an international star at the age of 2. "We planned to train him. When he was about 1 year old, I took him out on walks," recalls his father. "I would draw on the ground and teach him the musical scale. So it was like, today, he would learn 'Doh.' Tomorrow, he would learn 'Re' -– 'Doh, Re, Mi.'"

Lang Lang’s father spent half his yearly salary – $300 – and bought his son a piano when he was a toddler. In fact, Lang Lang’s destiny was conceived not long after he was. His mother played classical music to him while he was still in her womb.

She said she wanted to become a performer herself: "When I was young, that was my dream."

Lang Lang's mother wanted to be a professional dancer; his father hoped to travel the world as a musician. But their ambitions died an untimely death when they became victims of China’s cultural revolution. Jobs weren’t chosen; they were assigned. And so, like a generation of mothers and fathers living under China’s one-child policy, they sacrificed everything and placed their dreams into the hands of their only hope.

It's a lot of responsibility, but Lang Lang says he "didn't feel the pressure at that time."

"I really didn't," he says. "Because I thought, I mean, I always played really good. And always got the first prize."

Lang Lang may have been the prodigy in his hometown of Shenyang, but if you want to play on the world stage, you’ve got to get out of town first.

When he was just 8, Lang Lang’s parents, who were very happily married, decided to split up just for their son. His mother stayed home in Shenyang, and his father quit his job and took his boy to Beijing so Lang Lang could study in the finest music academy in China.

Their sacrifice paid off. Lang Lang was a standout at the Beijing Conservatory and, at 13, he won the International Tchaikovsky Competition for Young Musicians. But a child doesn’t leave his mother without leaving a few scars, too.

She remembers saying goodbye to her son. "At the time, Lang Lang was very small. It was very hard to say goodbye to him. I can never forget. His mouth was quivering, and then he and I both started up," she recalls. "He cried and I cried. But for his work, for the piano that he loves so much, I let him go."

Lang Lang said goodbye not just to his mother, but also to the comfortable life he lead in Shenyang. In Beijing, he and his father lived for six years in a dingy, unheated apartment, sharing a bathroom with three other families. Was it a painful move? Obviously. But his parents knew that an even bigger move was inevitable.

"You know since you play piano and classical music, this is the road," says Lang Lang, who, at 15, followed that road to America.

He moved with his father to Philadelphia, where he’d won a music scholarship. Then, he received his big break. He was tapped as a last-minute replacement at Chicago’s summer music festival. At 17, Lang Lang found himself being introduced by the legendary violinist Isaac Stern.

"I thought play the best in my life at that time. Absolutely the best," recalls Lang Lang. "They all jumped right after the last note. And I had some good reaction before, but never this kind of [reaction]."

It changed his life forever. International engagements came pouring in, and Lang Lang hasn’t looked back. He plays in 150 concerts a year. But the rewards are beyond measure. At 21, Lang Lang performed a rite of passage into the upper reaches of classical music – a solo debut at Carnegie Hall.

Not bad for a boy from Shenyang.

But our story doesn’t end there. Before the night was over, Lang Lang brought to the stage a special guest, someone who dreamed long ago of playing abroad. His father.

With his traditional Chinese fiddle, Lang Lang’s father accompanied his son in a finale, the likes of which Carnegie Hall had never heard before.

"I think a Chinese folk player, play with his son in Carnegie Hall. I think it's probably the most exciting thing in both of our lives," says Lang Lang.


© MMV, CBS Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Top
Piano & Music Accessories
#907856 - 01/13/05 05:43 AM Re: From CBS News - LL, again!
mamabird Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/17/04
Posts: 116
Loc: California
Thanks for sharing the article.

I know Lang Lang isn' t well received in the PW. When Lang Lang was at Disney Concert Hall the first time I was not able to get tickets. Tickets were sold out about 3 months prior, so we drove 2 and half hours to Escondido to see him at 8pm on a school night with kids.

He was a very entertaining performer for both of my kids 9 & 10 years old. Now, bear in mind that a long performance is hard for children to stay focus especially after a long road trip. Lang Lang's performance was exciting, and I love the duet with his father on stage - a unique way to pay love and respect to his father. Afterwards, I told his father that he is very lucky to have a son like Lang Lang, and that bought a huge smile on his face.

In November , I attended a Master Class given by Lang Lang at Steinway Hall (It was free to the public - amazing opportunity). There were 3 teenage students, playing music of 3 different style/period. He gave each about 20 minutes lesson in front of a room full of crowds and news people.

The last student played a Lizst piece - Spanish Rhapsody. After a few minutes of coaching from Lang Lang, that student improved so much musically!!! It's like seeing magic in front of your eyes, and the crowd loved it! His youth energy is contagious. Our teacher was surprised when I told her about what happened because she said that student's teacher is quite good and well known.

My 9 years old daughter whispered several times to me that she wanted a lesson with Lang Lang too.   \:\) I am not a player, so I can't command on his technical performance, but I know for sure with the strong impressions that he left us, we will definitely remember Lang Lang's name for the rest of our lives.

My 100th post \:D

Top
#907857 - 01/15/05 05:33 PM Re: From CBS News - LL, again!
AndrewG Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/26/01
Posts: 2506
Loc: Denver, Colorado
You're welcome, mamabird. Here is another one from Detroit Free Press:

==============================================================================================


NOW THAT'S A PIANO LESSON: In town for a DSO gig, superstar Lang Lang plays for the neighborhood kids[/b]

BY MARK STRYKER
FREE PRESS MUSIC WRITER

January 14, 2005


It wasn't as prestigious or lucrative as playing a solo recital at Carnegie Hall. But for the 22-year-old Chinese pianist Lang Lang, the hottest new star in classical music, his unusual Wednesday night appearance in a Bloomfield Township living room was just as much fun (maybe more) and every bit as challenging.


You try playing finger-busting Liszt and Chopin with dozens of elementary school kids swarming about the piano like bees at a hive, some even squished tightly underneath the instrument and others standing so close that their breath tickles the back of your neck.


Lang -- whose full name is pronounced Long Long -- performs this weekend with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, but he took a night out to play a rare mini-recital for about 80 kids and perhaps 35 adults at the sprawling contemporary home of Wei Shen, a mother of a 7- and 9-year-old, both of whom study piano. Lang, wearing natty pinstripes and longer jet-black hair than in many of his publicity shots, stayed for hours, playing several pieces, answering questions, posing for countless pictures, autographing CDs, horsing around with the children, partaking in the potluck Chinese feast and offering some impromptu coaching.


When a 9-year-old in pigtails hopped up on the piano bench and started playing a charming Mozart piece from memory, Lang plopped down beside her and played along with his right hand. The duet ended in giggles as the pianists' hands tied themselves into a knot at the center of the keyboard.


"I really love children," said Lang, adding quickly, "but not like Michael Jackson. I find a great connection to children through music. Kids need to be inspired by musicians just like scientists or athletes. They need to see the possibilities of life. My part is to help them enjoy the music."


It's difficult to convey how rare it is for a pianist of Lang's celebrity to find his way to an anonymous suburban home to play a free concert disconnected from any corporate sponsorship or commercial agenda or the kinds of formalized outreach and education programs that have become de rigueur in classical music. Maybe Brad Pitt accepting an invitation to your daughter's birthday party would be a similar jaw dropper.


After all, Lang is a former prodigy with electrifying technique and the charisma of a pop star who arrives in Detroit riding a wave of record company and media hype, including last Sunday's profile on "60 Minutes," that might make even P.T. Barnum blush. Born in the metropolis of Shenyang in northeast China, he started lessons at 3, emigrated to America at 15 to study at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia and became an overnight sensation at 17 when he substituted for an ailing Andre Watts with the Chicago Symphony.


Lang's schedule is booked years in advance, and although he often plays charity events and travels as a goodwill ambassador for UNICEF, he has performed only once before at an event like the Wednesday party. That was during his last visit to Detroit, two years ago, when he played at the same house. Here's the back story:


Shen, marketing manager for Cadillac at General Motors, had been aware of the teenage piano sensation when a friend told her that Lang was coming to play with the DSO. The friend suggested that Shen, a wisp of a woman with the determination to reroute highways in her spare time, invite the pianist to her home to play for the neighborhood children. Shen, who grew up in China unable to study Western music during the repressive Cultural Revolution, wrote Lang an impassioned letter.


She laid out why music was so important to children -- that studies show it improves critical thinking skills and creativity, that music is crucial to the enrichment of their lives, that American children are too obsessed with sports -- and that children need a different kind of role model. She mailed the letter to the care of the DSO and followed up with a phone call to Lang's manager.


His response was frosty. Lang already had four other bids on his time, all with corporate ties. "What do you have to offer," he asked?


Shen replied, "Just food and kids." But that evening, the manager called back, sounding, as Shen remembered, "a lot nicer."


Lang had read the request and was intrigued by its unique lack of commercialism and Shen's passionate defense of music education. Lang also likes to connect with Chinese communities, and he noticed her name. He ended up playing for 60 children and so enjoyed the experience that when he was re-engaged by the DSO, he called Shen and asked if he could do it again.


That brings us back to Wednesday night. Lang played on the family's Yamaha baby grand, and the house was so packed that some children watched from the balcony overlooking the living room, their feet dangling through the rail. The kids, mostly between ages 6 and 11 from two Bloomfield Hills schools, were joined by parents, a couple music teachers and some VIPs, including Gunther Herbig, the former DSO music director who lives around the corner from Shen and who recently performed with Lang in Hong Kong.


Lang introduced Liszt's "Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2" by telling the children it was the piece from the Tom & Jerry and Bugs Bunny cartoons. He roared through the music at supersonic speed, his playing choreographed with darting kinetics and his familiar head-turned-toward-heaven gesture as if he were communing with God.


Lang has gotten into trouble with some critics, who while acknowledging his brilliant technique and charisma also hear an immature interpreter more interested in vulgar self-indulgence than illuminating the music at hand. Of course, nothing could be more irrelevant to the fired imaginations of these children, who flocked to Lang like Santa and roared their enthusiasm when he wrapped up each piece with a flourish.


"I thought he was really great," said Andrew Roth, 11, a piano student of four years. "I don't know how he can move his hands so fast."


Contact MARK STRYKER at 313-222-6459 or stryker@freepress.com.

Copyright ?2005 Detroit Free Press Inc.

Top
#907858 - 01/18/05 11:49 AM Re: From CBS News - LL, again!
SteinwayTony Offline
Full Member

Registered: 12/16/04
Posts: 222
Loc: New York, NY
 Quote:
Originally posted by AndrewG:
I recently watched Lang Lang's DG DVD "Lang Lang Live in Carnegie Hall" four times in two days. This is my first ever semi-live experience with this sometimes referred to as a 'classical rock star' pianist's performance. Just noticed this article to share with this board.
==============================================================================================
From CBS News.com


Lang Lang: Piano Prodigy[/b]
Jan. 9, 2005


On a recent night in Hong Kong, Lang Lang captivated the sold-out house as he always does. All eyes were on center stage.

He's more than a mere virtuoso with elastic hands and dazzling dexterity. And he's more than just a supremely talented musician. Lang Lang is also a showman.

As Correspondent Bob Simon reports, Lang Lang is a spellbinding performer with a flair for drama –- strutting, swooning, and wrapping the crowd around his 10 nimble fingers.

"I love the audience, because I love the tension there. Because it seems like a lot of people watching, I mean, the creation of this wonderful work," says Lang Lang. "And then you are at the same time the interpreter. It's like building a bridge to their heart."

If Lang Lang sounds a little dreamy, he often plays that way too, with his eyes closed, head back, cast in a musical trance.

"Every time I play, I try to see the images. For example, I see something. I can see beautiful forest and everything's green," he says.

Lang Lang’s not the only one who sees green. So does his record company, which has hyped him like a rock star. Part Mozart, part MTV, they’re counting on Lang Lang to bring in a new generation of fans.

He embraces the limelight as he embraces everything – eagerly, and with a boyish enthusiasm, as Simon found out when they sifted through the delicacies at a Beijing street market.

"I think this animal can play really good piano," says Lang Lang, looking at an octopus.

Lang Lang’s mind is never very far from his music, which helps when you’re working with the best in the business -- as he did on a remarkable recording with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and maestro Daniel Barenboim.

"I can't describe him as a pianist, because you will only hear in my sentence the jealousy that I and all his colleagues feel," says Barenboim. "I'm sure he didn't show you, but you know, he has 11 fingers. He plays the piano like a cat with 11 fingers."

Lang Lang’s acrobatic mastery of the keyboard is undisputed. But some critics find his showy style indulgent, and say those dreamy swoons get in the way of the music.

"There's something about Lang Lang's playing now where he calls attention to himself, to his own feelings. He’s like a hammy actor," says Anthony Tommasini, chief classical music critic for The New York Times.

He skewered Lang Lang in a ruthless review, calling his playing "slam bang crass."

Tommasini says, "I don't think it does Lang Lang any good to have his very powerful record company promoting him the way it is right now: 'The future of classical music has arrived, Deutsche Gramophone says. His name is Lang Lang.'

"That's a lot of pressure. People come to his concerts now expecting a catharsis, an epiphany, rather than a musical performance."

If it’s a catharsis they want, Lang Lang is more than happy to provide it.

Rachmaninoff’s 3rd Piano Concerto, with one of the most haunting themes in all of classical music, has become his signature piece.

"This piece has driven at least one pianist mad. You know about that," asks Simon.

"Yeah, it drives me crazy," says Lang Lang, laughing.

"Rachmaninoff was this tortured Russian. And here you are...this very young Chinese man, who seems to be full of life and full of optimism, and full of happiness," says Simon. "How can you relate to this music?"

"I think when you play any piece, you are not you anymore," Lang Lang responded. "You are totally into the world of the composer's mind."

Prodigies have a way of silencing the skeptics, and wowing the crowds. Barely out of his teens, Lang Lang has arrived as an overnight sensation -- 22 years in the making.

What distinguishes him from the large number of very talented pianists? "I started early," he says.

Lang Lang began formal lessons when he was 3. At 5, barely able to reach the pedals, he was making Mozart look like child’s play. And if you’re wondering who raised such a boy, you’ve got to follow Lang Lang to the northern Chinese city of Shenyang.

Shenyang is Lang Lang’s hometown, an old, overcrowded industrial city. But for China, not unprosperous. Like so much of the country, it’s poised somewhere between its past, and its future. It’s where 60 Minutes found Lang Lang’s parents.

His father says he decided that Lang Lang was going to be an international star at the age of 2. "We planned to train him. When he was about 1 year old, I took him out on walks," recalls his father. "I would draw on the ground and teach him the musical scale. So it was like, today, he would learn 'Doh.' Tomorrow, he would learn 'Re' -– 'Doh, Re, Mi.'"

Lang Lang’s father spent half his yearly salary – $300 – and bought his son a piano when he was a toddler. In fact, Lang Lang’s destiny was conceived not long after he was. His mother played classical music to him while he was still in her womb.

She said she wanted to become a performer herself: "When I was young, that was my dream."

Lang Lang's mother wanted to be a professional dancer; his father hoped to travel the world as a musician. But their ambitions died an untimely death when they became victims of China’s cultural revolution. Jobs weren’t chosen; they were assigned. And so, like a generation of mothers and fathers living under China’s one-child policy, they sacrificed everything and placed their dreams into the hands of their only hope.

It's a lot of responsibility, but Lang Lang says he "didn't feel the pressure at that time."

"I really didn't," he says. "Because I thought, I mean, I always played really good. And always got the first prize."

Lang Lang may have been the prodigy in his hometown of Shenyang, but if you want to play on the world stage, you’ve got to get out of town first.

When he was just 8, Lang Lang’s parents, who were very happily married, decided to split up just for their son. His mother stayed home in Shenyang, and his father quit his job and took his boy to Beijing so Lang Lang could study in the finest music academy in China.

Their sacrifice paid off. Lang Lang was a standout at the Beijing Conservatory and, at 13, he won the International Tchaikovsky Competition for Young Musicians. But a child doesn’t leave his mother without leaving a few scars, too.

She remembers saying goodbye to her son. "At the time, Lang Lang was very small. It was very hard to say goodbye to him. I can never forget. His mouth was quivering, and then he and I both started up," she recalls. "He cried and I cried. But for his work, for the piano that he loves so much, I let him go."

Lang Lang said goodbye not just to his mother, but also to the comfortable life he lead in Shenyang. In Beijing, he and his father lived for six years in a dingy, unheated apartment, sharing a bathroom with three other families. Was it a painful move? Obviously. But his parents knew that an even bigger move was inevitable.

"You know since you play piano and classical music, this is the road," says Lang Lang, who, at 15, followed that road to America.

He moved with his father to Philadelphia, where he’d won a music scholarship. Then, he received his big break. He was tapped as a last-minute replacement at Chicago’s summer music festival. At 17, Lang Lang found himself being introduced by the legendary violinist Isaac Stern.

"I thought play the best in my life at that time. Absolutely the best," recalls Lang Lang. "They all jumped right after the last note. And I had some good reaction before, but never this kind of [reaction]."

It changed his life forever. International engagements came pouring in, and Lang Lang hasn’t looked back. He plays in 150 concerts a year. But the rewards are beyond measure. At 21, Lang Lang performed a rite of passage into the upper reaches of classical music – a solo debut at Carnegie Hall.

Not bad for a boy from Shenyang.

But our story doesn’t end there. Before the night was over, Lang Lang brought to the stage a special guest, someone who dreamed long ago of playing abroad. His father.

With his traditional Chinese fiddle, Lang Lang’s father accompanied his son in a finale, the likes of which Carnegie Hall had never heard before.

"I think a Chinese folk player, play with his son in Carnegie Hall. I think it's probably the most exciting thing in both of our lives," says Lang Lang.


© MMV, CBS Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved. [/b]
That is an exact transcription of the 60 Minutes broadcast.

Top

Moderator:  Piano World 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
ad (Casio)
Celviano by Casio Rebate
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Seiler Pianos
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Trinity ATCL exam questions
by slava_richter
18 minutes 11 seconds ago
JBL LSR305 monitors too noisy for DP usage?
by Emiliano
20 minutes 0 seconds ago
Pletnev - Poise under duress
by vers la flan
Today at 07:34 PM
Chopin Op 10 No 6
by Cheeto717
Today at 07:08 PM
Charles R Walter upright
by landorrano
Today at 05:19 PM
Who's Online
111 registered (aesop, 36251, AZ_Astro, 32 invisible), 1111 Guests and 16 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
76253 Members
42 Forums
157636 Topics
2315382 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
|
Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission