Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Gifts and supplies for the musician
SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) Pianoteq
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
Ad (Piano Sing)
How to Make Your Piano Sing
Who's Online
115 registered (acoxcae, anamnesis, accordeur, ando, ABC Vermonter, 36251, 34 invisible), 1420 Guests and 13 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Pianos
Topic Options
#938405 - 05/15/08 10:20 PM How to approach teaching a teenage boy
Dramaqueen Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/18/07
Posts: 70
Loc: Canada
I am new to the teaching field and am trying to figure out if I can handle a teenage boy to teach next year. He is a good kid and I will be teaching his two sisters. He takes guitar lessons from my husband and plays a bit of piano by ear at home. He is basically playing/picking out what his sisters play at home. (one sister is in level 3 PA the other is in level 2 PA)

I told the mom that I am not sure if I feel equipped to handle an older beginner.... I'm really not sure where to start with someone his age (almost 15)?

I am taking the RCM first level of pedagogy next year which will prepare me to teach beginner to grade 2 RCM. I was suppose to take my Grade 9 RCM this June but had to postpone because of health issues. (long story)

I have been teaching for a couple years now but all my students are under 10. I'm not sure what I'm really asking. I lack confidence when it comes to teaching but I am also really hard on myself. My students are all doing well and progressing well and I love to teach, I just don't feel equipped much of the time.

I guess what I am wondering is what do you teach to an older beginner? How do you approach piano without simplifying it too much but able to teach the basics? And where would I find good music for this age?
_________________________
Currently preparing for Grade 9 RCM
New private piano teacher
Kindermusik Educator
Just bought: Kawai GM-10k

Top
(ad) Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
#938406 - 05/16/08 01:46 AM Re: How to approach teaching a teenage boy
theJourney Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/22/07
Posts: 3946
Loc: Banned
As an ex-older (sounds better than post-older) beginner I can say with confidence that teaching an older beginner is not only easier but more fun. If I do say so myself. "Older" beginners have a better idea of what they want and like, are more motivated generally, have better focus and concentration and work habits, etc.

Instead of just spoon-feeding him, you will have the opportunity to have more interaction and push and pull. It will be a great experience for you too!

I might recommend to you to:

- find out what kind of music turns him on
- find out what he likes about the piano vs. guitar
- if you use method books, take the adult version
- consider doing duets earlier on with him so you can coax a nice sound out sooner
- catch him doing things right and use sincere praise
- encourage him to feel comfortable and free at the piano and to see practice time as experimentation and goal-seeking fun

You also might want to check out the resources from Philip Johnston, Practiceopedia. It sounds like he is already self-motivated, so if you could see yourself as being there to "help him teach himself piano" to practice independently and play what turns him on, all the while giving him what he needs at any moment in terms of technique and avoidance of bad habits, you might be shocked at how quickly he will learn!

Top
#938407 - 05/16/08 10:00 AM Re: How to approach teaching a teenage boy
Morodiene Online   content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/06/07
Posts: 12232
Loc: Boynton Beach, FL
Be prepared to have this older beginner move at a much quicker pace. Be sensitive to things you may do with your young ones that might seem "babyish" to him. Really take an interest in the style of music he likes. With his background in guitar, chances are he wants to play by ear, so be sure to help keep him doing that while improving his improv abilities, but also tell him that he needs to learn to read music (if he can't already), and get him to agree to those terms.

I would use whatever books/methods you might use for an adult beginner, but you'll most likely have to make the "duller" stuff more exciting for him (whereas adult students want to learn a lot of the details and the background).
_________________________
private piano/voice teacher - full time
MTNA member
www.valeoconservatory.com
Petrof 9'2 Concert, Yamaha G3, Roland FP-7, Yamaha MOX6, Kawai MP11

Top
#938408 - 05/16/08 08:31 PM Re: How to approach teaching a teenage boy
Karisofia Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/13/08
Posts: 201
Loc: Wisconsin
Teach him. You'll have a blast. As long as you listen to what he's telling you and show him that you value his ideas and opinions. I really enjoy my teenage boys.
_________________________
Private Teacher
Member MTNA, WMTA, CVMTA
Local Association President
The Achievement Program Center Representative

Top
#938409 - 05/16/08 09:52 PM Re: How to approach teaching a teenage boy
John v.d.Brook Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Registered: 03/18/06
Posts: 7418
Loc: Olympia, Washington, USA
Hi DQ - By all means, give it a go. You can be up-front and tell him you are going to use him as a guinea pig so be patient with you. I think the other advice is solid.

There are some interesting choices available in music which will work great with this age group.

N. Jane Tan wrote a series titled Recital Etudes[/b], I think Willis Music still has them available, which are appropriate for beginning students who have knowledge of the clefs and can identify keys on the keyboard. They are quite contemporary sounds. There are a set of four, which prepare students for Intermediate level literature. There are also accompanying repertoire series.

The Etudes[/b] sound very impressive, yet are easy to learn. They acquaint students with working in different keys.

Of course, there are many other selections available. Most important, however, is to provide your student a solid grounding in playing technique, train him to listen to the sound he is producing, and give him the reading skills so that he can continue to enjoy playing through the years.

Regards,

John
_________________________
"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA

Top
#938410 - 05/20/08 08:41 AM Re: How to approach teaching a teenage boy
Dramaqueen Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/18/07
Posts: 70
Loc: Canada
Thanks for the help everyone. I decided to give it a go. The mom knows where I am at in piano and my studies and knows that things will change as the year and my knowledge progresses. As for the boy, I had a chat with him after his last guitar lesson and it made me feel a lot more confidante of being able to teach him. He is 'learning' Fur Elise right now \:\) but playing it by ear as he does not read music well yet. My thoughts on this were that it is great that he wants to play classical since I love classical music, he wants to be challenged and he has an idea of what he wants to play. I will keep my eyes open for good starting music for him to learn.

Talking more with my husband I realized that he does not know key signatures and is only starting to learn scales on the guitar. Hubby and I had a good laugh (all in good fun) about ganging up on him in the fall and messing with his mind, teaching him the same stuff on guitar and piano. \:\) Somehow, in my mind, I figured older meant more knowledge, I really have to stop making that assumption!

Thanks for the music selections John, I will keep my eyes open for it. I understand the need to sound impressive to others (and yourself sometimes too) while still learning the boring (his term) technique. \:\)
_________________________
Currently preparing for Grade 9 RCM
New private piano teacher
Kindermusik Educator
Just bought: Kawai GM-10k

Top
#938411 - 05/20/08 10:17 AM Re: How to approach teaching a teenage boy
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/11/07
Posts: 11857
Loc: Canada
Fwiw, Fuer Elise on the guitar can be done. Wouldn't it be fun.......... ? ;\)

Top
#938412 - 05/20/08 05:59 PM Re: How to approach teaching a teenage boy
gonechopin Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 09/11/07
Posts: 17
Loc: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
In my experience, teaching teenagers is really fun AND keeps me on my toes. They are always asking questions and as you read, they move MUCH faster than younger kids. There are a couple of good method books for this age, one is published by Faber and the other by Alfred. I would also encourage you not to skip over all the theory that goes along with learning the piano, even though your student may complain about it. Also, I have noticed that these age beginners want to play pieces that SOUND difficult, even though their ability isn't great yet. I have used Catherine Rollin's pieces, especially the jazz ones, with great success with this age. Don't be afraid to use "arrangements" of pieces either. For example, the original piece for Fur Elise is quite difficult for a beginner. But there is a great arrangement of it that preserves the main parts by William Gillock (I think) that you can use instead.

I'm so glad you decided to take the challenge. I think you will learn as much from him as he does from you!

Top
#938413 - 05/21/08 08:57 AM Re: How to approach teaching a teenage boy
keyboardklutz Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Registered: 05/21/07
Posts: 10856
Loc: London, UK (though if it's Aug...
Maybe we should get teenage boy together with embarassing question for female pianists? Plenty of motivation then I should think.
_________________________
snobbyish, yet maybe helpful.
http://keyboardclass.blogspot.com/


Top
#938414 - 05/24/08 11:18 AM Re: How to approach teaching a teenage boy
cjp_piano Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/23/08
Posts: 202
Loc: Cincinnati OH
Great suggestions! As gonechopin said, I like Catherine Rollin's pieces. Another one is Robert Vandall. Like Rollin's, his sound really cool and are fun to play, but not too difficult. Check out "Take Note" and "Celebrated Piano Solos."

I have several teenage boy students, and I find that I don't spend lots of time explaining to them "The time signature means . . . ", or "The dot on the quarter note means . .. "

They simply want to know how it goes, so we go about it that way: learning by ear and imitation alot. Eventually, once they see how the sound is represented on the page, they can transfer these things to new pieces that they haven't heard yet. Actually, this is a good approach for anyone, but especially the older beginners.

I also show them chords and chord progressions that they begin improvising with, including the 12-bar blues. We have lots of fun with this in the lessons since we can play together (I'll play a walking bass while they play a LH chord and improvise RH, or vice versa).

Good luck, you'll have a blast!
_________________________
MTNA Nationally Certified Teacher of Music, Piano
Instructor of Music Theory, Accompanist
Member: MTNA, OhioMTA, SW District OhioMTA
www.mtna.org
www.ohiomta.org
www.swomta.org

Top
#938415 - 05/27/08 05:29 AM Re: How to approach teaching a teenage boy
teachn88 Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 05/21/08
Posts: 9
 Quote:
Originally posted by Dramaqueen:
I am new to the teaching field and am trying to figure out if I can handle a teenage boy to teach next year. He is a good kid and I will be teaching his two sisters. He takes guitar lessons from my husband and plays a bit of piano by ear at home. He is basically playing/picking out what his sisters play at home. (one sister is in level 3 PA the other is in level 2 PA)

I told the mom that I am not sure if I feel equipped to handle an older beginner.... I'm really not sure where to start with someone his age (almost 15)?

I am taking the RCM first level of pedagogy next year which will prepare me to teach beginner to grade 2 RCM. I was suppose to take my Grade 9 RCM this June but had to postpone because of health issues. (long story)

I have been teaching for a couple years now but all my students are under 10. I'm not sure what I'm really asking. I lack confidence when it comes to teaching but I am also really hard on myself. My students are all doing well and progressing well and I love to teach, I just don't feel equipped much of the time.

I guess what I am wondering is what do you teach to an older beginner? How do you approach piano without simplifying it too much but able to teach the basics? And where would I find good music for this age? [/b]
Dear Dramaqueen- as a teacher of all ages for 22+ years, the first hard lesson I learned early on is that a student, any level, age, and/or gender, will detect/sense/notice a teacher's insecurity and lack of confidence. And teenagers, especially boys, can be among the most challenging and sometimes frustrating to teach. So, I'm offering this suggestion based on experience AND success in this area...Don't take on a 15 year old boy as your first older beginner! I truly believe you need to build some confidence first and foremost, THEN, start with less-challenging older beginners (i.e. females your age or older, etc.) As your confidence and teaching abilities grow, (in that order)you will be better equipped to have success with all levels, ages, gender, etc. Good Luck!
James

Top

Moderator:  Ken Knapp 
What's Hot!!
Christmas Header
Christmas Lights at Piano World Headquarters in Maine 2014
-------------------
The December Free Piano Newsletter
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(ad) Yamaha CP Music Rest Promo
Yamaha CP Music Rest Promo
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Knabe Pianos
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
Sheet Music Plus (125)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
New Topics - Multiple Forums
How to learn everything and anything about piano?
by MrMusicianship
12/22/14 07:22 PM
is my piano tunable
by d3c0
12/22/14 05:45 PM
SSHD running VST
by daz100
12/22/14 05:01 PM
do you recommend further service?
by ShannonG
12/22/14 04:34 PM
Is this now real enough?
by Philip_Johnston
12/22/14 04:21 PM
Forum Stats
77398 Members
42 Forums
160067 Topics
2350655 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
Gift Ideas for Music Lovers!
Find the Perfect Gift for the Music Lovers on your List!
Visit our online store today.

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
|
Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission