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#949984 - 01/17/09 07:41 PM Re: Teaching, some questions.
D Dillon Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 01/12/09
Posts: 14
Marianne, this is such a huge topic that I hardly know where to begin.

Like Wade, my favorite teaching method is Alfred's Basic Piano Library. For students age 7 and younger, I use the preparatory lesson books, the ones with levels like A, B, C, etc. For older students, I use the basic lesson books with levels like 1A, 1B, 2, 3, etc.

Once students learn to read notation, they really enjoy contemporary sheet music. Some level 1 sheet music that my students have really enjoyed are "Victory Bells", "Ancient Temple", "The Shark", "Festiva", and "Mist On the Lake". A great online source for ordering lesson materials is www.pianoatpepper.com.

When students progress to the intermediate level, you will need to be familiar with classical music at that level. A good source, though it can be a bit overwhelming, is Jane McGrath's "The Pianist's Guide to Standard Teaching and Performance Repertoire." I have been working on a database of repertoire that is searchable by composer and/or level, but it is not nearly complete, or I would offer you use of it.

Tuition varies depending on the area and a teacher's education and experience. I find that it is easier for parents and for me when the tuition is the same every month, so I calculate the number of lessons that will be offered between June and September (not including holidays and vacations), multiply that number by the tuition amount for each lesson, then divide it by 10 months. For example, I charge $40 for a 45-minute lesson. So I would multiply $40 by $35 lessons ($1400), then divide that amount by 10 months to come up with a monthly tuition of $140. this means that some months will have 5 lessons, and some may only have 2 (December?), but the monthly tuition amount is always the same. I do not offer refunds for missed lessons, but I do try to offer makeup lessons when possible. I also teach during the summer, but I calculate that differently, because so many students go on vacation during the summer.

Another suggestion, but one that will take a lot more preparation, is to have a website on which the students' performances can be posted for their friends and relatives to see. This gives them regular motivation to try and perfect their pieces as much as possible. If you like, you may visit my site at www.pianodreamsstudio.com.

I hope this helps. I will write more if I think of other suggestions.

Teaching music to children is a wonderfully rewarding experience. I congratulate and with you much success and joy in this incredible journey.
_________________________
Dillon

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#1173690 - 04/03/09 07:59 AM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: D Dillon]
musicteacher541 Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 10/25/08
Posts: 11
Loc: Murray, UT 84123
Hi Marriane,

I have also faced these concerns during my early years in the profession. I am also a private music teacher doing business just beside my house.

Those years are indeed hard for me. I even thought of giving up because I was not able to earn much money. I have faced problems in track payments, lesson schedules, and sending invoices to my students. Until the time that my friend introduce to me this music teacher's software. This website has indeed helped me in many aspects of music teaching. It also offers some credible resources and tips for music teachers.

Take some time to visit and learn how you may also gain from it.
_________________________
Music Teachers Helper : a great software to ease your music studio management worries

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#1195901 - 05/08/09 10:24 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
paulette Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 04/29/09
Posts: 17
Loc: Virginia, USA
Good for you! I have taught piano for many years! I really enjoy it and plan to continue. You would be wise to find a piano or music teacher's organization in your area. Then you would be able to find out about fees and where to find students etc.As to materials.I really like the Faber Piano Adventures series.

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#1213520 - 06/07/09 06:45 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: jazzyclassical]
Minniemay Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/09
Posts: 1702
Loc: CA
To get the Frances Clark book, go to www.francesclarkcenter.org and click on the store. You should be able to get it there. I just bought one in April at the MTNA convention.

Re: Musical Fingers This is a set of technique books, not a core method series.

Anything to do with the Music Tree series is now published by Alfred since they bought the license a few years ago.

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#1241509 - 08/01/09 12:37 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Morodiene]
TXPianoTeacher Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 07/17/09
Posts: 9
Loc: Texas
Originally Posted By: Morodiene
I second the list of books that John VD Brook listed, but I would add to that, "The Perfect Wrong Note" by William Westney.


In addition to being a private piano teacher, I was also a student of William Westney for a couple years at Texas Tech before changing majors, and have a signed copy of "The Perfect Wrong Note", but have not been able to make it through the whole thing for some reason. I suppose I should give it another go.

PS: While I haven't been able to finish his book, I am not trying to demean him as a musician or teacher, as he is excellent at both.

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#1241523 - 08/01/09 12:52 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: musicteacher541]
TXPianoTeacher Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 07/17/09
Posts: 9
Loc: Texas
Originally Posted By: musicteacher541
Hi Marriane,
Until the time that my friend introduce to me this music teacher's software. This website has indeed helped me in many aspects of music teaching. It also offers some credible resources and tips for music teachers.

Take some time to visit and learn how you may also gain from it.



I am also a private piano teacher, as posted above, and found "Music Teacher's Helper" to be a very interesting and informative website. As my husband and I run a studio together (I teach piano, especially the young ones, he teaches adult piano and voice), we have found several resources that help us with the business of running a studio. First, "The PracticeSpot Guide to Promoting Your Teaching Studio" by Philip Johnston, and also "The Independent Piano Teacher's Studio Handbook" by Beth Gigante Klingenstein." They have helped us immensely.

For example, as per the PracticeSpot book (for which there is also a website, by the way), we passed out flyers to the neighborhood and held an intensive two-week piano workshop for free, at the end of which we gave a small concert. I ended up teaching three students, and picked up two permanently after that. We also auctioned off piano and voice lessons at a local silent auction and got students who were very interested, and while they may not continue, will be great word of mouth.

I would also encourage you to have a web presence. As our culture continues to be more and more inundated with technology, it benefits the new private teacher to have a website full of studio information, etc. We also post a blog on our website, and the articles are not only interesting, but increase our visibility using keywords to help bump us up in Google listings. We have definitely gotten business off of our website.

Finally, regarding business, we put magnets on our car advertising our studio, and we have gotten calls and responses from that. Also, make business cards and never neglect to carry them around. You never know who you might meet that will strike up a conversation about music and end up wanting more information.

Regarding teaching and instruction books, I try to change things up. I have some VERY young ones (the youngest was 3 when she started), and for those, I like the "Music for Little Mozarts" series. For all older ages, I love the "Dozen A Day" books for exercise and technique. They are interesting and creative and cover a broad range of exercises. I tend to switch out lesson books frequently as we are only a year old, and I haven't really found a FAVORITE favorite yet. I also make sure to incorporate theory (notespelling for the very young) and history into every lesson. We are also in the process of purchasing some percussion instruments to help kids learn rhythms getting away from a metronome and piano for a minute.

One thing I picked up from another teacher: If you have an electric keyboard that makes different sounds this is great. Lay out a bunch of different pictures on the floor, and then play something on the keyboard and ask the student which picture it makes them think of. You can play sad things, happy things, royal things, rainy things, etc. It's a great little game.

Hope this helps and good luck with your studio.

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#1260097 - 09/01/09 04:08 AM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: TXPianoTeacher]
musicteacher541 Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 10/25/08
Posts: 11
Loc: Murray, UT 84123
There are, indeed, a lot of very helpful resources and information that music teachers may find on the internet. It is just that we must learn how to use them to become effective teachers and to make our music teaching career productive and sustainable.:)
_________________________
Music Teachers Helper : a great software to ease your music studio management worries

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#1347359 - 01/12/10 01:17 AM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: musicteacher541]
ILoveMusicTheory Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/02/07
Posts: 24
Loc: Illinois, USA
I can barely believe it's been 15 years since I started teaching piano and guitar! I started after earning my music degree from a Chicago college. I'm now an extremely successful (wait-list!!) but a trite bit overloaded teacher w/my own Studio in the Chicago suburbs. All my best to you as a new teacher!!

Stuff I've learned:

--Yeah, I use Faber but all the methods lack in some huge way. Always be ready to supplement with your own innovations/worksheets/other books.

--Come up with a firm, easy to understand Studio Policy with a liability waiver that parents sign & return. You can have a look at mine at kimberlysteelemusic.com/policy.html and you are free to paraphrase it.

--Make sure you have a website. Better if it's your own name like MariannesAwesomePianoLessons.com or whatever. I swear, 50 percent of my new students are coming from my dot com these days.

--Make it funny. I have always incorporated humor into my lessons, silly voices, funny snippets of popular music thrown into Music Theory demos, et. al. They love it.

--Joining the MTNA can help. It costs around 100 dollars a year but it's tax deductible. If only to meet some other teachers and network at the very least.

--HAVE RECITALS. OMG so important. Mine are 2x a year and not mandatory. Nevertheless, 75 percent of the students participate.



Edited by ILoveMusicTheory (01/12/10 01:19 AM)
_________________________
I'm an independent piano & guitar teacher from Illinois.


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#1401804 - 03/23/10 05:06 AM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
Dror Perl Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/20/10
Posts: 272
Loc: NY
Hello All...New member as well ! and i agree its a great website ! so much info !
i'm new to the website...but definitely not to piano or teaching piano.
to the question asked: good luck with the studio, i want to attack the question from a different angle, whaever books you got,and i saw that you got plenty of suggestions, make sure that you don't get locked into the same books and bore yourself and your student to death...keep it fresh, thats the important thing, find always new music, find different music for different students, bring them music that they like in addition to whatever method books you use to teach the fundementals, transcribe music of their choice to them, with them, you probably get the drift...

as for the advertise part...craigslist and flyers at the music stores and supermarket can't heart

how long...i think that no longer than 45 min..and you got to remember to be sensitive to it, each lesson has its own momentum

as for how much to charge...that depends on where are you located, i think that probably in every state the market is very different.

good luck!

Dror Perl. Pianist, Composer, teacher, author of the coming soon COLOR piano books series. www.SheerPiano.com, www.myspace.com/120674416, look me up on facebook

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#1402707 - 03/24/10 11:41 AM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: jazzyclassical]
Weedy Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 03/23/10
Posts: 19
Loc: Alberta Canada
Marianne,

I am new here as well and since I have been in the teaching business for about 2 or 3 hundred years I thought I would share a bit of a different take on what it is to be a great teacher.

First I have to agree with all the advice you have received in this thread. You can never stop learning. Now having said that I will share my story as a first year band teacher that will give you a bit to ponder.

My first year teaching I was teaching at 3 different school. On the first day of classes just before my first class the Principal took me aside and gave me this advice. In a gruff and assertive voice He said, "In my school teachers to do not teach math, they don't teach science, nor do they teach language arts or physical education and I sure as hell hope your not going to teach music!". Well I was stunned to say the least. I had just graduated with a Bach of Music Education and had been chosen to take over a very large and successful Band program. Who was this hick telling me not to teach music? So I asked him what do you want me to teach if not music? He responded with a one word answer, "Students", and walked away.

Now with 30 years of hindsight behind me it was the single most valuable lesson a teacher could be taught. Over the years my PrinciPAL was proven correct many times.

Over the years I have been reminded over and over of this lesson that no matter how much we strive to learn teaching methods, techniques and become better musicians we must never forget that we are really not teaching music or piano we are indeed teaching students.

Over the years music has really not changed much and really the most interesting and rewarding aspect of being a music teacher is not teaching music or piano, but your students. They are far more interesting and surprising than teaching music theory.

In 30 years when you look back you will not remember the music taught as much as you will remember the students.
_________________________
Gehres Weed
Music Teacher's Office
Music Teacher's Games

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#1411685 - 04/05/10 06:07 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: John v.d.Brook]
Vildbas Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 04/05/10
Posts: 12
Loc: Sweden
Hi!

I'm looking for "A Piano Teacher's Legacy" by Richard Chronister.

Can't find it on any serios european homepage... Were have you bought your book?

Emil, Sweden
_________________________
Visit my homepage! Lots of weird music by me smile http://f1-game-download.com

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#1411806 - 04/05/10 09:55 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Vildbas]
Minniemay Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/09
Posts: 1702
Loc: CA
www.francesclarkcenter.org

There should be a link to the store.
_________________________
B.A., Piano, Piano Pegagogy, Music Ed.
M.M., Piano

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#1418254 - 04/16/10 12:38 AM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
tdow Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/13/10
Posts: 203
Loc: Canada
So exciting that you are choosing this profession right out of high school!

You're asking some big questions - but as someone who also started teaching young here are my most important suggestions below. I never expected to be able to teach full time, but now, 10 years later, I run a studio of over 300 students....so if you have the desire it can be done!

1) Advertising yourself: It is really important when you're first starting out (and are competing with other more experienced and well-known piano teachers) to choose a niche market. Decide what area of piano teaching you are passionate about and direct all of your marketing to this target group. Once you've identified this group, select areas where these people congregate and centre your advertising here.

2) Try offering a period of free lessons. Our studio regularly holds "one month free trial lessons". It costs you nothing but your time and people WILL phone as it's fairly substantial to offer this. Then, wow them with your amazingly engaging lessons and they'll be hooked!

3) Charge the going rate. Nobody wants cheap lessons as it carries a negative connotation. Don't charge more, don't charge less. Word of mouth will accomplish much of your advertising if you are delivering what you promise. Don't sell yourself short with charging a nominal fee. Show confidence in your abilities.

4) 30 minute lessons are perfect for beginning students ages 4-15. Teens or beginning adults do well wtih 45 minutes. Unless a student is an advanced player, anything longer than that becomes too much for both the teacher and the student.

There is much to know when starting a new studio - but if you decide what kind of program you are going to teach, advertise this program to a niche market, and deliver fantastic lessons you'll be well on your way to having a successful business.

Good luck!
_________________________
Piano Teaching Resources with Personality
www.teachpianotoday.com
http://www.pianogeekweek.com

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#1423659 - 04/24/10 11:26 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: tdow]
Brinestone Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/06/10
Posts: 345
When do you teach 300 students? I'm finding that I can't start teaching until 3:00 because my students get out of school at 2:45. I must stop teaching, at least for a while, at 5:00 so I can make and eat dinner. I could probably teach a few more lessons in the evenings if I didn't have young children and a small house.

But 300? Do you teach at a music school? Do you teach them in groups?
_________________________
Piano teacher since 2008, member of NFMC

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#1423678 - 04/24/10 11:48 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Brinestone]
Minniemay Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 06/07/09
Posts: 1702
Loc: CA
Tdow runs a studio and is not the only teacher.
_________________________
B.A., Piano, Piano Pegagogy, Music Ed.
M.M., Piano

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#1423688 - 04/25/10 12:02 AM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Minniemay]
Brinestone Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/06/10
Posts: 345
Phew! That makes sense.
_________________________
Piano teacher since 2008, member of NFMC

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#1454350 - 06/10/10 11:47 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: D Dillon]
melodian Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/02/10
Posts: 52
Originally Posted By: D Dillon

Another suggestion, but one that will take a lot more preparation, is to have a website on which the students' performances can be posted for their friends and relatives to see. This gives them regular motivation to try and perfect their pieces as much as possible. If you like, you may visit my site at www.pianodreamsstudio.com.



I just browsed a couple of performances there and from what I've seen it seems that your students play well and I think it is great that you have your site displaying their fine playing . I'm relatively new to teaching so it is of special interest to see what pieces/arrangements are chosen for performance. Thank you for the link as an example.

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#1470521 - 07/08/10 01:43 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
Dave Horne Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 07/07/04
Posts: 5261
Loc: Vught, The Netherlands
Originally Posted By: Marianne Dashwood
New member here. This is an amazing site. I am so glad that I found it out! smile

I am going to graduate highschool soon, and I am planning to open up a small studio in my home. I own a grand piano, and my family will be moving into town and I will be closer to my future students homes.
I just want to start out with some young beginners maybe between 4 and 10.

Can anyone give me some good advice as to what books it will be necessary to purchase before starting out? How should I advertise myself? How long should I make me lessons? How much should I charge?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks.


I'm new to this thread but am troubled by a few things. Someone who graduates from high school is thinking about becoming a piano teacher and is asking for which method books to use?

My initial question would be, what makes the original poster think she is qualified to teach to begin with? Shouldn't she already have a good idea of what books to use if any?

I've had a few bad teachers in my life, all with advanced musical degrees and here is someone graduating from high school ready to open a studio. What am I missing here?





_________________________
website

mp3\wav files

AvantGrand N3, CP5

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#1476428 - 07/18/10 07:44 AM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
anamarme Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 03/21/10
Posts: 10
Welcome to the world of teaching! I believe lessons should be only as long as the student can handle. For little ones ages 4-8, I always make them 30 min two times per week and older ones, one hour long, once or twice a week depending on what the parents want. The cost depends on where you live and ongoing rate. 10 years ago I use to charge $30 per hour in Broward County....now I charge $25 in north Florida and I know there are many who charge more and some less. I have the students purchase their own books (exercise book, theory, song, lesson, and extra song book of choice). I stopped teaching years ago cuz students just don't study like they use to..time is much more limited these days. I have taken on one student again and it has brought back so many memories of why I loved it. Good luck!

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#1525688 - 09/30/10 02:48 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
David Sprunger Offline
Full Member

Registered: 09/30/07
Posts: 162
Loc: Oregon, USA
I'd like to throw in my 2¢ - one thing that makes sense from a business point of view is that you need to make sure your students pay at the beginning of the month for a full month. The new policy also needs to state that if they miss a lesson, they will receive a makeup lesson if there's time available. If YOU miss a lesson, you obviously have to make it up no matter what.

Back when I had a full teaching schedule, (60 students!) it took me about a year to come to this policy. Without it, I found that students would be a lot more apt to miss their lessons and then expect me to sit there was nothing to do for 30 minutes plus find a time to make their lesson up.

Like one of the earlier posters said, you have to have confidence in your abilities, and there's nothing wrong with having good policies like this.

Your piano students will respect you for it.
_________________________
David Sprunger - Learn to play piano by ear using the revolutionary technique of "Rhythmic Patterns". Piano Lessons Homepage here - includes library of piano lessons for beginners through advanced piano and keyboard players.

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#1575498 - 12/12/10 05:51 PM piano software for reading standard repertoire [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
Bruce Pennington Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 12/12/10
Posts: 6
Hi, this is Bruce Pennington out here in Colorado Springs, CO. I just joined the website and am enthused about learning some new things for my students and myself.

My big search now is to find a software setup to read anything from the standard rep., that I can find as a MIDI file then play along with it. Of course, I'll need to adjust the tempos for varying degrees of difficulty. It would be ideal to have the software give an accuracy rating.

Synthesia has something like "Guitar Hero" but I haven't heard anything about the program using standard notation yet.

Any ideas?

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#1575528 - 12/12/10 06:46 PM Re: piano software for reading standard repertoire [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
Canonie Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/04/09
Posts: 1941
Loc: Australia
Yes, start a new thread for this question on the ABF. There is not enough activity on this thread, but over there are some real Nerds who are very helpful with this sort of technical stuff.

And
_________________________

Composers manufacture a product that is universally deemed superfluous—at least until their music enters public consciousness, at which point people begin to say that they could not live without it.
Alex Ross.

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#1575679 - 12/13/10 12:23 AM Re: piano software for reading standard repertoire [Re: Canonie]
Bruce Pennington Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 12/12/10
Posts: 6
Sorry, I'm not very proficient at this kind of thing. What is ABF and how to I lind to it?

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#1575728 - 12/13/10 03:35 AM Re: piano software for reading standard repertoire [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
Canonie Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/04/09
Posts: 1941
Loc: Australia
Sorry, I'll explain better. It's another of the subforums in Piano World. You'll find it under Most Popular Forums (button at top) and it's full name is Adult Beginners Forum.

Once there, choose New Topic button near top of page and create a new thread, give the thread the title "piano software for reading standard repertoire" and you'll get lots of responses. There's nothing at all wrong with posting here it's just that I know that it doesn't get much traffic these days. The only reply you've had so far is me, and I have no idea how to answer your question frown

I hope that helps smile
_________________________

Composers manufacture a product that is universally deemed superfluous—at least until their music enters public consciousness, at which point people begin to say that they could not live without it.
Alex Ross.

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#1575853 - 12/13/10 10:23 AM Re: piano software for reading standard repertoire [Re: Canonie]
Bruce Pennington Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 12/12/10
Posts: 6
Once again, let me apologize. I'm not a beginner, I've played jazz piano all over the US and even alittle in Europe. I've taught Jazz at the college level. I've changed from playing gigs for a living to teaching and alot of piano tekking.
Most of my jazz piano students including myself do not read as well as we would like. So I'm looking for a way to put real piano music into a computer so that we can attempt to read real music in time (more or less)and have the end product evaluated. Something I think would be a useful tool.

I know the best way to improving sight reading skills is to work at it in a real situation ie., accompanying at church, dance classes, etc.. Many of us poor readers don't have that opportunity, even getting together with another pianist of similar reading skills have trouble getting together.

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#1622517 - 02/17/11 10:44 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
pianoeagle Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/16/11
Posts: 218
Loc: Texas
Hi Marianne -

Before you get started, I would recommend doing a market analysis. Call at least 15-20 teachers in your area and find out how much they charge, what type of instrument they teach on, what their training/education in music is, what their requirements for incoming students are, and what associations they are affiliated with.

Compare yourself with their qualifications and start getting some ideas on how your pricing can compare with theirs - i.e. if they have a Masters in Piano Performance, they'll be able to charge a lot more than you will.

Then, speak with a number of parents and find out how much they'd be willing to pay for lesson and what their expectations for their kids would be, given your qualifications. If you find out that parents in your area are only willing to pay $125 a month for lessons, and the average teacher charges $100-$150 a month, then why would you ask for $190 a month? You'd be pricing yourself out of the market.

Really understand what your potential 'customers' would want, and that'll answer all of your questions.
_________________________
Children's piano instructor
Member NGPT, MTNA/TMTA/PMTA, NFMC/SJFMC

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#1622549 - 02/17/11 11:52 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
keysmccarthy Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 02/15/11
Posts: 1
Loc: Ireland
Hi. New to the forums here. This is actually my first post shocked

Just thought I'd swoop in and agree with you Bruce. I'm a piano teacher and I get my students to pay 4 weeks in advance, this way if they don't show up to a lesson, they have paid for it anyway, so you aren't sitting doing nothing for 20 minutes (or however long) and not getting paid for it.

A few friends of mine also teach, and one in particular, gets her students to pay at the end of each lesson. But she is always going on about them not showing up and the hassles of sorting out money every lesson, etc. In my opinion, if the pupil has already paid for the lesson, they are MUCH more likely to show up. Otherwise, you leave them the opportunity to just not "feel" like going to their piano lesson and "pulling a sicky".

I teach for 20 minute lessons, as thats all Ive ever known. But I find it to be just the right length of a lesson, as over that amount of time, from experience, the kids start to loose concentration and not really listen to what you are saying, making the end of the lesson a waste of time and money.

However, I live in Ireland, and thats the standard lesson time for every teacher I know over here, I wonder is the status Quo different were other people live? smile


keysmccarthy

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#1661107 - 04/16/11 06:41 AM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
PianoLessonGirl Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 04/15/11
Posts: 17
Loc: Indiana
Hello,
I'm a bit young to be giving advice, but I've been teaching piano for about three years and can tell you how I've done that. I only charge $7.00 per half hour and people are happy to pay it. I don't have that many students due to school but could easily have more at that price. There will be a fair amount of turnover. I have a new student's parents sign a contract stating they will lose their money for the lesson if no show-no call. I start students out with Bastien Piano Basics for the Young Beginner. I learned on it so it is comfy for me to teach out of. Hope this helped.
Dakota
_________________________
My newest page is: www.pianolessongirl.net/top-ten-motivational-inspirational-songs-ever/
I am creating my own piano lesson system that I hope will be 'cutting edge':)
Enjoy the travels on your musical journey.
~Piano Lesson Girl,
Dakota

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#1683070 - 05/23/11 12:43 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
NeilOS Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/13/06
Posts: 599
Loc: Los Angeles
Other posters have given some good advice regarding books. Here's another one that you may not have thought of: Teaching Piano In Groups. Even if you plan to teach individuals, there are many useful teaching strategies here that work with individuals, i.e., how to teach note reading, rhythm, etc. My blog has many other resources that you might find useful.

My best advice: Remember that you are dealing with individual beings, each with a different set of learning abilities. Some will be more aurally gifted; others will be more visual or tactile. So, try to incorporate a variety of teaching strategies into your lesson plans.

Best of luck.
_________________________
Concert Pianist, University Professor, Private Teacher in Los Angeles
Blog: http://www.pianoteacherlosangeles.com/

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#1719038 - 07/22/11 10:19 PM Re: Teaching, some questions. [Re: Marianne Dashwood]
TonalHarmony Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/22/11
Posts: 73
Loc: Texas
I suggest using the John Thompson's Modern Course For The Piano, Teaching Little Fingers To Play. It is a book in which the pieces progressively get harder. I recommend it as an excellent start for beginners of any age.

As for the length of the lesson, I believe that varies on the skill of the student, and the progress they make each week. I recommend times of 3O, 45, and 60 minutes.

The price depends on your choice. I know of a teacher who charges $80 for 45 minutes. Really, it depends on the skill of the teacher.

As for advertising, I'm not quite sure. My former piano teacher gained her students by friends and through friends.

Best of Luck,

Joy


Edited by TonalHarmony (07/22/11 10:22 PM)
_________________________
Currently playing:

Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata
Mozart Sonate
Mozart's 21st Concerto Mov.3
Maple Leaf Rag

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