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#960543 - 12/20/04 06:31 AM Teaching a Beginning piano student
Plwatcher Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/10/04
Posts: 171
Loc: Atlanta, GA
Hello to ALL

I just wanted some recommendations for the piano books to start off two new students that I will begin teaching.

I am considering using the Faber series and Alfredf Theory books. Plus of course Hanon and Scales.
Any ideas??? These kids have NO PIANO experience by the way.

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#960544 - 12/20/04 06:56 AM Re: Teaching a Beginning piano student
mound Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/10/04
Posts: 782
Loc: Rochester, NY
Hello!

How old are they? Faber is good. Stay far away from Hanon, especially for a total beginner. Introduce scales in the context of a piece of music you give them so as to give context. Try to get them singing along with their playing as soon as possible.

I'm not a teacher, so I won't try to go to any greater depth.

-Paul
_________________________
"You look hopefully for an idea and then you're humble when you find it and you wish your skills were better. To have even a half-baked touch of creativity is an honor."
-- Ernie Stires, composer

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#960545 - 12/20/04 07:19 AM Re: Teaching a Beginning piano student
Plwatcher Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/10/04
Posts: 171
Loc: Atlanta, GA
The kids range from age 13 to age 15..
.So they are not exactly 'little kids' at this point.

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#960546 - 12/20/04 07:41 AM Re: Teaching a Beginning piano student
cranky woman Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/06/04
Posts: 282
Loc: Phoenix, AZ
Try Frederick Harris' Celebrate piano series,(it's a wonderful new series) as well as Faber Adventures, also very good. I find the Alfred series adequate, but not as interesting as Faber or FH. If your students are siblings, it is helpful to use two different methods so that they don't compete with each other.

For theory, try the Accelerando 1 theory book offered by tcw resources. (for the record, I am one of the founding partners in this company) This is the only theory book on the market geared for teen beginners. Accelerando 2 is the next in the series. It offers 200+ pages of explanation and worksheets presented specifically for the teenager. It's full of puzzles, games, and eartraining exercises that are meant to inspire creativity as well as being fun. You can find it at tcwresources.com

cranky \:D
_________________________
www.tcwresources.com

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#960547 - 01/23/05 03:24 PM Re: Teaching a Beginning piano student
Piana Justice Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/16/05
Posts: 299
Loc: Greenville, NC
i know i've posted this a gazillion times, but... here goes...
-well, to save a lot of time, you could go to Piano World and go to the 'Fun and Interesting' section and scroll down to 'Piano Chords' print out, draw out, make a copy, whatever of the various chords, Major or Minor, and then give them to the student. it's defintitly saved me some time, b/c i learn by ear.
_________________________

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#960548 - 02/28/05 04:05 PM Re: Teaching a Beginning piano student
princessclara2005 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/02/05
Posts: 429
Loc: Dallas, Texas
if they are 13-15, then try faber & faber for older beginner, they have theory, lesson and performance book.

celetration series are good, but they are for those who has studied 2-3 years, so not the best for beginners.

the alfred series are pretty good for beginners since it is organized in the most easy to to follow for teachers, but they keep on saying C position, G position and middle C position, which is not right, and very annonying....so if you do use that, stay away from it or re-word it. Other than that, they have a great amount of theory, ear training, and note speller books.

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#960549 - 02/28/05 05:39 PM Re: Teaching a Beginning piano student
Varcon Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/15/04
Posts: 1931
Loc: Mount Vernon, Georgia 30445
Mound and I are at opposite ends on the use of Hanon so, in judicious doses, it can be very beneficial. If you're familiar with several series of books, those that don't dwell on the Middle C approach too long are best. I try to get my students to play the basic five-finger position in C to start then have them move up by half-step until they've covered the full octave and for a while that's the first thing they do at lessons. It covers every position (basic) and they know what the black keys sound like as well. It's good technic and no book is necessary. Since you say they have no music background, then note-reading and basic theory should be included at each lesson. I'm sure you'll receive a lot of suggestions as to particular series to use and theory and technical advice as well.

Since you're a high school student, make sure your teacher is available for consultation if you encounter something with which you are unfamiliar--I'm assuming you are taking lessons. If not, then you need some 'authority' to consult if you do encounter something with which you are puzzled. Good luck!

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#960550 - 02/28/05 05:40 PM Re: Teaching a Beginning piano student
apple* Offline


Registered: 01/01/03
Posts: 19862
Loc: Kansas
 Quote:
Originally posted by Piana Justice:
i know i've posted this a gazillion times, but... here goes...
-well, to save a lot of time, you could go to Piano World and go to the 'Fun and Interesting' section and scroll down to 'Piano Chords' print out, draw out, make a copy, whatever of the various chords, Major or Minor, and then give them to the student. it's defintitly saved me some time, b/c i learn by ear. [/b]
I'm a dope and can't find it... help..
_________________________
accompanist/organist.. a non-MTNA teacher to a few

love and peace, ├Ľun (apple in Estonian)

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#960551 - 02/28/05 06:41 PM Re: Teaching a Beginning piano student
princessclara2005 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/02/05
Posts: 429
Loc: Dallas, Texas
Varcon:

Hanon is helpful and beneficial, but not to beginners, they have to learn how to read, and master basic rhythm first.

Hanon uses straight 16th notes mainly, and also 4 octave scales, those don't apply to beginners, they can use it after 3 years or study, maybe more.

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#960552 - 03/01/05 10:14 AM Re: Teaching a Beginning piano student
Phlebas Offline


Registered: 01/02/03
Posts: 4654
Loc: New York City
 Quote:
Originally posted by princessclara2005:
Varcon:

Hanon is helpful and beneficial, but not to beginners, they have to learn how to read, and master basic rhythm first.

Hanon uses straight 16th notes mainly, and also 4 octave scales, those don't apply to beginners, they can use it after 3 years or study, maybe more. [/b]
Right, so you don't use it to teach reading, and rhythm. You use other material for that. Hanon is very useful for technique, and getting kids to learn how to move up and down the keyboard if taught the right way.

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#960553 - 03/01/05 02:00 PM Re: Teaching a Beginning piano student
Varcon Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/15/04
Posts: 1931
Loc: Mount Vernon, Georgia 30445
PrincessClara and Phlebas:

I don't propose to use Hanon at the first lesson but there are books that have them written out as quarter notes and eighth notes as well, mainly the first 10 or so, and some only go up one octave so it's not like handing them the full set of exercises and expecting them to do it immediately. Its relative simplicity would make it easy to get the fingers co-ordinating and my adult beginners are using it right now.

You might have missed my statement 'in judicious doses' so I didn't mean that they should cover the first 20 in a couple of weeks. And, of course, I would not think of assigning it until some basic rudiments were well in hand either.

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