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#977534 - 09/19/06 11:22 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Hi btb:

Wow...I love that likeness of Chopin. It seems quite accurate according to all descriptions. Thanks for posting it.

PM means "private message" or as you put it, post me at my e-mail address.

Yes, I do agree that those who think Chopin's music is wimpy and weepy certainly don't have the musical maturity it takes to recognize his genius. And yes, he was a poet of the highest order because music is the hightest form of art.

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977535 - 09/19/06 11:53 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
btb Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/21/04
Posts: 4261
Loc: Pretoria South Africa
Seem to have got the JPG right because the Chopin picture emerges. Hurray ... thanks Frycek.

Kathleen might just get a bit of opposition to her parting words "music is the highest form of art" ... what about architecture, literature, poetry, fine art, sculpture ... with names like Michaelangelo, Shakespeare, John Keats, Rembrandt and Donatello to mention a few? Chopin might battle to win the day against the likes of such mighty warriors. I prefer to compare apples ...

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#977536 - 09/19/06 01:09 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
btb:

Knowing you are a retired architect, I know I am asking for "trouble" with my statement; however, I will stand by my opinion and give reasons why...right after I practice. ;\)

\:\)
Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977537 - 09/19/06 01:31 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
-Frycek Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/06/05
Posts: 5921
Loc: SC Mountains
 Quote:
Originally posted by btb:

Upon reflection, it might well be that I wrote up the JPG in lower case lettering ... would this
change have incapacitated the process?

[/b]
Yes, html directions are case sensitive
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#977538 - 09/19/06 01:40 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
btb Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 01/21/04
Posts: 4261
Loc: Pretoria South Africa
Thanks for the clarification... and there was I thinking that CAPITAL letters were "LOUD".

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#977539 - 09/21/06 10:19 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
I have to bump us up to the first page again.

No way am I going to let Chopin lovers have to hunt for him.

After practicing, I'm going to write something about what an "expert" said about Chopin's handwriting...quite interesting and spooky.

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977540 - 09/21/06 11:59 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
-Frycek Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/06/05
Posts: 5921
Loc: SC Mountains
Now I really am looking forward to that. I've had a few thoughts myself.
_________________________
Slow down and do it right.

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#977541 - 09/22/06 06:33 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
I promise first thing tomorrow. :rolleyes:

I am going to scan (I hope) the page from the book. Too tired today, fooling around with all this stuff. \:\(

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977542 - 09/23/06 12:30 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Here is the statement about Chopin's handwriting. I tried to scan from the book, but I have lost my patience with these new all-in-ones.

_____________
Chopin had his first portrait done about the the first etudes were written. The artist Miroszewski painted portraits of the five members of the Chopin family.

On the basis of this painting and several graphological documents, psychologist Andre Rabs drew the "silhouette of Chopin's character.

"Deductive rather than intuitive despite appearances. Very strong connection with the past. Elective sociability. Very strong will, to the point of depotism. Highly developed instincitve plane, but only going as far as the affective plane. Spirituality appeared only at the end of his life. Imagination precise and concise. Paradoxically, the artistic sense did not appear at all in the penmanship. In Chopin there is an overloading of this sense, like a splitting of his personality. This handwriting is astonishingly similar to Pascal's. Like his, the handwriting denotes--particularly, by the letter "f", which is no more than a bar---a kind of sterility, the interior burn that marks the neuropath. Toward to end of his life, a need for frankness, exteriorization is revealed; whereas, in the first part, there is reserve, excessive restraint.

If he had not died so early, the writer would have achieved something very strange in metaphysical terms. He tried to catch hold of it, but was unable to do so. Toward his death, terrible aggressiveness manifests itself, and becomes extremely hard. The graphology also implies that he must have had an eye disorder and that he was like a ball of fire, transfiguring the interior, but devestating everything it its way."

This is not by opinion.[/b]

To be honest, I had to look up a few word to be certain I understood the analyses.

deductive..to infer from a general principle
intutive...to know or sense by insight

instinctive...behavior that is mediated by reactions below the conscious level

metaphysical...of or relating to a reality beyond what is perceptible to the senses...supernatural

Blaise Pascal[/b] (June 19, 1623 – August 19, 1662) was a French mathematician, physicist, and religious philosopher. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father. Pascal's earliest work was in the natural and applied sciences where he made important contributions to the construction of mechanical calculators, the study of fluids, and clarified the concepts of pressure and vacuum by generalizing the work of Evangelista Torricelli. Pascal also wrote powerfully in defense of the scientific method.

He was a mathematician of the first order. Pascal helped create two major new areas of research. He wrote a significant treatise on the subject of projective geometry at the age of sixteen and corresponded with Pierre de Fermat from 1654 on probability theory, strongly influencing the development of modern economics and social science.

Following a mystical experience in late 1654, he abandoned his scientific work and devoted himself to philosophy and theology. His two most famous works date from this period: the Lettres provinciales and the Pensées. However, he had suffered from ill-health throughout his life and his new interests were ended by his early death two months after his 39th birthday.


Well...all I can say is Wow and

Thought it was interesting though.

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977543 - 09/23/06 01:54 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
-Frycek Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/06/05
Posts: 5921
Loc: SC Mountains
 Quote:
Originally posted by loveschopintoomuch:

_____________
Chopin had his first portrait done about the the first etudes were written. The artist Miroszewski painted portraits of the five members of the Chopin family.
This is the portrait in question. Chopin thought it a good likeness. He was nineteen.


 Quote:
"Deductive rather than intuitive despite appearances.
The two are not mutually exclusive. Chopin was also highly intuitive based on anecdotal evidence. Today he'd be one of those people who usually knows who's on the phone before he picks up the receiver.
 Quote:
Very strong connection with the past Elective sociability..
Both very true
 Quote:
Very strong will, to the point of depotism.
Very stong will yes, the "despotism," probably too strong a word, was subconscious, manifested in charm. As a child, particularly, he probably could've "gotten away with murder." People wanted to do things for him.
 Quote:
Highly developed instincitve plane, but only going as far as the affective plane.
I have no idea what he means by this.
 Quote:
Spirituality appeared only at the end of his life.
Chopin's spiritual beliefs were the most private beliefs of a most private man.
 Quote:
Imagination precise and concise.
Also very stong and probably graphic
 Quote:
Paradoxically, the artistic sense did not appear at all in the penmanship.
I doubt that.
 Quote:
In Chopin there is an overloading of this sense, like a splitting of his personality. This handwriting is astonishingly similar to Pascal's. Like his, the handwriting denotes--particularly, by the letter "f", which is no more than a bar---a kind of sterility, the interior burn that marks the neuropath.
Whatever - -
 Quote:
Toward to end of his life, a need for frankness, exteriorization is revealed; whereas, in the first part, there is reserve, excessive restraint.
With maturity, he did seem to loosen up just a bit. That often happens as shy people gain a bit of confidence. Reserve also tends to suffer when one is in extremis.

 Quote:
If he had not died so early, the writer would have achieved something very strange in metaphysical terms. He tried to catch hold of it, but was unable to do so.
Chopin was a rock hard realist. He hadn't the patience, time or intellecutal self indulgence for metaphysics.
 Quote:

Toward his death, terrible aggressiveness manifests itself, and becomes extremely hard.
Say what?? If anything Chopin seemed resigned to his death. He lost the will to fight when he lost George Sand.
 Quote:
The graphology also implies that he must have had an eye disorder
Possibly he had transient vision problems. He suffered from migraines and complained of facial neuralgia from time to time both of which can affect the vision.
 Quote:
and that he was like a ball of fire, transfiguring the interior, but devestating everything it its way."
The makers of Chopin, Desire for Love certainly wished to imply that.
_________________________
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#977544 - 09/23/06 02:31 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
Ragnhild Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/22/06
Posts: 1117
Loc: Norway
I think these two sentences are meant to be read together :

 Quote:
Highly developed instincitve plane, but only going as far as the affective plane. Spirituality appeared only at the end of his life.
I believe Chopin's music is emotional rather than religious.
About Chopin's beliefs I know nothing.

Ragnhild
_________________________
Trying to play the piano:
http://www.box.net/public/dbr23ll03e

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#977545 - 09/23/06 03:47 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
-Frycek Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/06/05
Posts: 5921
Loc: SC Mountains
 Quote:
Originally posted by Ragnhild:
I think these two sentences are meant to be read together :

 Quote:
Highly developed instincitve plane, but only going as far as the affective plane. Spirituality appeared only at the end of his life.
I believe Chopin's music is emotional rather than religious.
About Chopin's beliefs I know nothing.

Ragnhild [/b]
About the two sentences- you're probably right. And I doubt there is any conscious religious expression in Chopin's compositions. I believe the inclusion of the "Jesus Lullaby" in the first schrezo (an island of calm in a very skittish composition) is intended as a symbol of childhood security and nostalgia rather than a manifestation of religious feeling. According to George Sand, Chopin was a believing, very orthodox but publicly non practicing Catholic. He made a deathbed confession and received the last rites but most of the religious utterances credited to him at the time were most probably after the fact wishful thinking by his confessor a Polish priest who had been a childhood friend. What Chopin did in private was another matter. When Chopin was unwell his servant, Jan, was in the habit keeping a covert eye on him, concerned that he might faint and injure himself. According to Jan, Chopin secretly knealt beside his bed like a child and prayed. Liszt, who probably knew Chopin better than Chopin would've liked or credited, referred to him "as a man of prayer." One thing Liszt did to alienate Chopin was try to talk about spiritual matters with him, something Liszt did easily, and Chopin could not do at all.
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#977546 - 09/23/06 04:32 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
Ragnhild Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/22/06
Posts: 1117
Loc: Norway
This is to lovechopintoomuch:

After seeing the picture of the young Chopin and reading this :
 Quote:
Liszt, who probably knew Chopin better than Chopin would've liked or credited, referred to him "as a man of prayer."
I think I am falling in love too :3hearts:

Ragnhild
_________________________
Trying to play the piano:
http://www.box.net/public/dbr23ll03e

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#977547 - 09/23/06 06:10 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
This is really going to sound off the wall, but I could never explain why I love Chopin's music so and how it affects me. There is just something about it that defies description (at least with words I can bring to mind).

When I read that sentence about the metaphysical, (and I had to look up the word), I found just what I was looking for.

His music is supernatural. It does seem of this world.

To quote Jane Stirling "He wasn't like the others."

Thanks, Frycek, for your input on that article. I believe Chopin was, like his music, undefinable.

And I just knew you were going to post that picture. \:\)

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977548 - 09/24/06 12:06 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
-Frycek Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/06/05
Posts: 5921
Loc: SC Mountains
Wonderful quote by Liszt. I think we can all guess to whom he is referring. He never forgave George Sand for Chopin.

 Quote:
"Madame Sand would catch a butterfly, cage it, and feed it with herbs and flowers. That was the period of love. Then she put a pin through it and it struggled, for it was always she who broke off first. Afterwards she vivisected it and prepared it for her collection of heroes for her novels.[/b] It was trading in souls who had given themselves to her that finally made me sicken of her friendship." Again, "She has warmth solely in the works of her imagination, and an utterly cold heart."
_________________________
Slow down and do it right.

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#977549 - 09/24/06 04:49 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Wow! That's pretty rought stuff. But from what I've read of her, she was completely capable of being as evil as they come.

What I can't understand is how Chopin could have been attracted to her. I know it had to do with her being the care-giver, and he not having to worry about the mundane things in life, like buying food and paying rent.

But even after the break-up, he was still broken-hearted. Why? When she was such a liar and so vindictive? What was it about Chopin that he could go on loving a woman like that? Was it pure gratitude, or did he miss her as one would miss a sister (or mother?). Did he feel abandoned?

He "saw through" everyone else, but not her. Why?

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977550 - 09/24/06 06:08 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
-Frycek Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/06/05
Posts: 5921
Loc: SC Mountains
I think he did see through many layers of her. I think he understood her better than Liszt and better than she did herself. I think he easily could have reconciled with her in healthier circumstances, but his dignity would not permit that he present himself as an emotional beggar crawling home only to die. I believe he found the generosity of spirit to spare her that decision, knowing that loyalty to her self image would oblige her to take him back as a "patient" if not as a man. Even dying he would not be had back on sufferance.
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#977551 - 09/25/06 09:08 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
dannylux Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/15/06
Posts: 1820
Loc: Connecticut
The University of Chicago has over 400 first and early editions of Chopin's music to download for free here:


http://chopin.lib.uchicago.edu/home.html


Mel
_________________________
My Recordings

"Love has nothing to do with what you are expecting to get — only what you are expecting to give — which is everything. What you will receive in return varies. But it really has no connection with what you give. You give because you love and cannot help giving." Katharine Hepburn

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#977552 - 09/25/06 09:15 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Thanks, Mel. Great site.

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977553 - 09/25/06 09:17 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Oh, just wanted to tell you about a lovely and so simple and short composition by Chopin called Largo in EfMajor. It's wonderful!! It's played by Valerie Lloyd Watts.

I think, as simple as it sounds, it speaks volumes about the genius of this man.

Largo in EbMajor

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977554 - 09/26/06 03:17 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
Ragnhild Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/22/06
Posts: 1117
Loc: Norway
Nice link, Mel, the quality of the pictures is amazing !

The Largo is just so sad (It is morning and working hours and I should not be crying...)

Another sad thing:
Yesteday I went to the biggest record store in the district hoping they could help me to order a recording of the Chopin Nocturnes
(I am just not so good at this buying on the internet)
They have a small classical shelf, there were labels for Beethoven and Mozart and even Faure, but not Chopin and no cd's with any of his music.
So I had to ask, and the youth behind the desk asked me how to spell Chopin, checked his pc and said sorry, I can not help you.

OK, I know you can get anything on the web, but then you have to know what to ask for, I am afraid we have a generation that has hardly. heard of Chopin \:\(

Ragnhild
_________________________
Trying to play the piano:
http://www.box.net/public/dbr23ll03e

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#977555 - 09/26/06 03:03 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
That is REALLY SAD! But not surprising.

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977556 - 09/29/06 08:34 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Just me again, bumping old Fred up to the first page.

Yesterday, as I was trying to figure out my new scanner (still haven't got it down right yet ), but I was listening to his preludes. Once again I was swept away with the beauty of his 25/1. I remember hearing it (perhaps the first time) while watching the Winter Olympics many years ago, the figure skating competition. Seeing the young woman on skates gliding to that lovely, breath-taking melody, was something I'll never forget. \:\) \:\)

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

Top
#977557 - 09/29/06 08:53 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Just me again, bumping old Fred up to the first page.

Yesterday, as I was trying to figure out my new scanner (still haven't got it down right yet ), but I was listening to his preludes. Once again I was swept away with the beauty of his 25/1. I remember hearing it (perhaps the first time) while watching the Winter Olympics many years ago, the figure skating competition. Seeing the young woman on skates gliding to that lovely, breath-taking melody, was something I'll never forget. \:\) \:\)

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977558 - 09/29/06 09:30 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
sotto voce Offline
6000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/15/06
Posts: 6163
Loc: Briarcliff Manor, NY, USA
_________________________

"There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats."
—Albert Schweitzer

Chopin: Allegro de Concert Op. 46
Schumann: Toccata Op. 7
Fauré: Ballade Op. 19

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#977559 - 10/02/06 12:16 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
I think this site is going to get a lot more action. We've been doing a lot of posting about Chopin, in general, on the Nocturne site.

However, because it is a study group and should be mostly devoted to questions, concerns suggestions, etc. about the 55.1, it would probably be more suitable for us to use this thread for anything relating to Chopin, the man, his life, or his music.

It could be a question (we do have a resident expert on campus) or observations or remarks, pictures (Frycek never seems to run out of these. What does she get them? )whatever. Things we've read or concerts we've attended...

We have 5 pages of thread already. This is very encouraging.

I know I'm a nut for Chopin, but I make no apologies for it. As one gets older, one realizes that there are very few things in life that can provide real and lasting pleasure. All that material stuff that we thought we had to have...the big house, the best car, designer clothes, etc., they all mean nothing in the end. They're just "stuff." George Carlin (I know he can be X-rated, but he is funny) has a routine he does on "stuff." It's hilarious.

And I do know there are many, many other great composers out there. Many of them are my favorites. I do encourage anyone who has a passion for one of them, to start a thread like this one. It can be very interesting.

Well, that's it.

Regards to all,
Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977560 - 10/04/06 04:16 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
When I thought that this site was going to get more action, I didn't think that I was the one to be doing it. \:\)

I don't mind one bit. I could talk and write about Chopin all day if someone didn't shut me up.

I don't know if you think this is interesting, but I was rather intrigued by this essay by Authur Hutchings about Chopin and the meaning and the power of his music.

****************
For Chopin's beneficiaries his music is certainly like a second diary more interesting that the one he kept in his pocket or drawer, and it may prove to be his real diary and to be unintenionally deceptive. Being the diary of his unconscious, his music may show the hidden and less-harnessed part of his personality reacting against the declared aspirations of his time and place, and contradicting sentiments known to have come from his lips and to have been implicit in his public behavior.

Musical expression reveals the unconscious to an extent neither possible nor permissible in verbal expression, and therefore music should not be judged according to it susceptibiility to verbal description.

Plato was the first to describe a human's dual character, consicious and unconscious, which he likened to the harnessing together of two horses, one docile and one wild.

During movements called "romantic", artists tend to reveal the "wild horse" to the delight of the young, the adventurous and the less tame spirits of society. Someone defined one element of romantic as the power to transport us mentally in time or space. Mild or passionate, these yearnings betoken discontent with present circumstances that is quickly relegated to the unconscious so that daily duty may be performed in disciplined if sometimes insincere contentment. Whatever the pull between the conscious and the unconscious, the daily control does not necessarily hide the romantic rebellion.

What is hidden in us may prove as dark and primitive when it is evoked by the gentle melancholy of Chopin (although Chopin is not by any means an entirely gentle artist).

**************

The above is indeed put in very stilted language, but I think the message comes across.

Chopin hid his true feelings (that other part of his "dual character") from society, friends, etc. He "played the part" expected of him. Pretty much what we all have to do. He did this in order to survive, pretty much what we all do.

But that other part of him was in deep conflict with the demands of this outter world. And, because he could not or would not express his discontent with words, he did so with his music.

And, his music reveals his true self, his complete self. He could and was often happy and gay and much of his music shows this. But there was a very deep resentment, anger and rage that also boiled within. And a lot of his music shows this also.

O.K. So why are some of us passionate about Chopin and others can take him or leave him. And still others can't stand him.

I think it's the power of his music to touch what we have hidden and to allow us to bring it out in the open, if only for a few hours, here and there, once in while. I think it "grants us permission" to express (without words) what we truly think and feel. His music says what we wish we could say, if we knew how and if we weren't afraid to say it. His music is our voice.

There was a song popular quite a few years ago called: His Is the Only Music that Makes Me Dance."

That sort of sums it up, for me.

Now...is there anyone out there?? Any comments would be appreciated and valued.


Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977561 - 10/04/06 06:36 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
-Frycek Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/06/05
Posts: 5921
Loc: SC Mountains
The plumpest looking I've seen Chopin, a portrait that apparently dates from the short time early on when he wore sidewhiskers. I think it's probably just a very[/b] bad portrait. His hair is way too dark, his features seem too small, hie forehead too high, and his cheeks too full. (I think the painter had trouble with his shadows. It looks the same problem a photographer has when the light is to bright full on and the facial bone structure loses its definition from lack of shadow.) And what's with that odd garment with the fur collar?
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#977562 - 10/05/06 08:19 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
There is no way that this picture is a portrait of Chopin.

It doesn't even come close to resembling him. I think every time someone find a dusty picture in their attic, they think it's him. Much like the rumor that he died in just about every princess's arms.

Kathleen
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After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#977563 - 10/17/06 04:14 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
Ragnhild Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/22/06
Posts: 1117
Loc: Norway
Even if I am not the most devoted at the forum, just to tell that Fryderyk is not forgotten:

I did not have any Chopin recordings other than his sonatas, but yesterday this one arrived :



The first introduction I had to Chopins music as a child was an LP with Askenase playing Mazurkas, Nocturnes, Waltzes....
Still I find his playing a very "natural" Chopin without "too much" of anything.
I also like that Askenase learned piano playing from his mother who's teacher had been one of Chopins students.

I was surprised that the Etudes were not in this collection. Maybe Askenase did not play them ? Who has recorded the Etudes ?

Ragnhild
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Trying to play the piano:
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