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#979394 - 05/22/07 08:50 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Hi Buck:

I'll leave this up to the experts here...and maybe we can get Hersh's comment.

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#979395 - 05/22/07 09:01 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
gerg Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/07
Posts: 1651
Loc: Houston, TX
 Quote:
Originally posted by DeepElem:
Does anyone have a comment about the discussion in this thread on "Chopin Etude tempi" (it's a short thread) ? [/b]
Well I found it quite fascinating... and relevant since I'm learning one of the etudes for technique acquisition and have heard this particular piece played at vastly different tempos (some utterly unachievable \:\( ).

What WOULD Chopin think of today's performances? Did the light action of his Pleyel affect his tempo markings? Did he really exclaim "Oh my fatherland!" over his 10/3 performed by a student at a very fast (by today's standards) tempo?

Digging deeper, in Chopin's Europe piano was all the vogue - there was no PianoWorld, no television, no radio, no electricity. Would the socities have created an environment conducive to the normal student becoming what we in 2007 would consider a virtuoso? Did everyone play fast? These are fascinating ruminations.
_________________________
http://www.ecital.net
Wikicital: A collaborative effort to build a knowledgebase of classical music history combined with examples. Your chance to both perform and write...

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#979396 - 05/22/07 09:38 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
gerg Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/07
Posts: 1651
Loc: Houston, TX
 Quote:
Originally posted by Hershey88:
Kathleen - let's keep me, if that's okay, our little secret...

I love pianists and the piano, but I don't like arguing...I'm always happy to offer help in developing careers for those who have great craft, but haven't figured out a way to advance their work (it is a business, after all...) but you know - I like our little private chatroom - it's nice for all of us. Believe me - if they want us, they'll find us...
[/b]
You're a class act, Hersh. Glad you're here! \:\)

FWIW I am experiencing similar difficulties in 28/8 - the 'ole 3 against 4. It is probably not as tough as FI though because the bass plays three triplet sixteenths then an eighth, allowing resychronization, and the RH (unlike FI) is a consistent pattern throughout.

What might make FI so tough - and you probably alluded to the importance of maintaining a mental beat count for this reason - is its relentlessness - there is no rest for the LH.
_________________________
http://www.ecital.net
Wikicital: A collaborative effort to build a knowledgebase of classical music history combined with examples. Your chance to both perform and write...

Don't click here!

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#979397 - 05/23/07 01:41 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
Hershey88 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/27/06
Posts: 149
Loc: France
Chopin's Tempi...

May I say that I loved reading the Chopin Tempi thread and then coming back here to talk about it - like a secret interloper on the other site - subterfuge - then coming back to our private little world, and sharing my thoughts - I am ridiculous, such little things keep me entertained...

Well - Everything that everyone has to say seemed to me to be quite thoughtful - and quite correct - Tempi is a never ending issue...

There was Rubinstein who played F- 25/2 slower and completely detache (French inflection) as told to me by my teacher, Jerry Lowenthal, who studied with Rubinstein. Early in our lessons he made it very clear - the point is, as Rubinstein said, to MAKE MUSIC. And if one is in a large concert hall, a hall which in fact does a huge amount of pedalling for you - one cannot play super-legato at Chopin's requested speed - no one, including the pianist, will hear anything at all! I have always believed, and I would guess that Chopin would have believed so as well, that the point is indeed to make music - and that the tempi are suggestions - much like pedal instructions. Taken too literally, in particular in the case of Chopin, what is likely to emerge is a terrible mess - it is the ear that conducts all traffic, above all...

That... and the fact that the times have changed. In Chopin's day - the only way that there was music, was if someone actually made it - by actually playing an instrument. Today - we push a button - we have a symphony, an opera, a ballet on screens, in surround sound - better than hearing it live (in terms of sheer sonic levels, and controlled clarity - not to mention edited within an inch of its life, so as to make it note and level perfect....works are now longer played, they are pieced togther - makes it tough on everyone in the business except for Kissin who seems capable of playing note perfectly all the time!)

At any rate - given that our own sense of auditory enjoyment has changed - the pianos have changed along with it - they have become beasts - the halls are bigger - the pounding is louder - the pianissimi are even softer - everything seems to be magnified for greater effect. So in Chopin's day a moment around Chopin's piano, allowed him to create great effect with speed and legerte, (especially since the keys barely went down half as far as they do today...) and the guests around the piano would be spellbound and mezmerized at the effect. And as anyone who has played in a hall knows - playing quickly, and playing perfectly is no guarantee of anything exciting - so much comes into play...

A great example of this is listening to Horowitz's renditions of his own trasncriptions and then listening to anyone else do them - including Lang Lang - Lang Lang may play faster, and even more accurately - but it is never as electric as Horowitz who knew how to control sound and rhythm like no one before him and no one since. His playing was so electric (I must admit, much as I love Kissin, Horowitz to me personifies soloist as hero...with such a great musical sense of humour...) or listen carefully to the Moszkowski Etudes that he plays - Etincelles - not so fast at all - but EFFECTIVE - it SOUNDS fast - by using every trick in the book when it comes to sound - which after all - is what the piano is all about...

So (gee long winded...) Tempo is a matter of what one is trying to accomplish - and after all, we interpret, we don't imitate, copy or even recreate - for Chopin, it would seem to me that his fast tempi were perfect on an 1845 Pleyel (which I have played - his own, in fact - ) which is so easy to get around, the tempi are not only possible, but playing any slower would force you to get stuck ...strange as that may sound...) - in a salon, or in a studio - or for a gathering of maybe 300, no more (for that was what a sold out audience would have been for someone like Chopin at the Salle Pleyel) or for a Liszt masterclass - but on today's piano - in a large hall, with so much sound? It would sound at thaht speed like a mush.

Listen to Horowitz's recording pf 10/5 it sounds faster and lighter than most folks - then look at the timing of it - and then go listen to other folks and look at their timing... the tricks the ears play are amazing...turns out, Horowitz's is actuallys slower in terms of what we have been discussing "actual tempo" but strangely it SOUNDS faster....

All this to say - Chopin is suggesting that the etudes (take your pick) must SOUND fast - the slow ones must sound slow - all within good taste - the best way to understand this, is to actually go to an 1845 Pleyel is a smallish environment and play away - Mary Rose can do that in London, the Americans can go to AshBurnham near Boston, and the parisians can go to several locales - ) try Chopin's tempi on such a piano in a smallish room. You will see how quickly and easily some of the works fall into place (ie: in particular 25/11 - the winter wind just falls under your fingers, because the keys are so much thinner - it takes no effort to play wildly and wonderfully....and 10/1 is a breeze - it's so easy to play fast, and faster than anyone who plays it live - it is wild...) And then - remember the sounds - remember the excitement, and then go your beast of an instrument in a concert hall or even at home - and aim for the same effect - not the same tempo - the same effect on the ear... Even if one were to do this with real math, one would have to account for the change of acoustics, space, size, all the variables -

Anyway, that's my thought on tempi - and then there's that other thing - I am sure that mary rose of Frycek can confirm the student's name - the one who complained that she came to lessons and Chopin demonstrated the "right way" to play his work, She went home and worked on exactly this way. When she returned and played it that way for him - he got flustered, said no, and sat down and played it for her. Only she says that he played it in an entirely different manner. We know for certain that Chopin never played a work the same way twice - and I would bet that included tempi....but the idea remained the same - which brings us to 10/3 -

As far as I remember, 10/3 was "intended" to be a fast etude with the same issues that make it an etude as a slow etude. My guess is, we simply have to thank Chopin's good taste - that he guided us to slow it down - because indeed, "oh ma patrie" - and I bet that would have been for the slower version - and yet his tempo marking is STILL fast - my guess is that he is telling the player "don't get stuck in the beauties of this, that will be vulgar. Keep the the thing moving, and then it will be beautiful...."

Fact is - listen to the many artists that have been recorded over the past century - there are no two who play anything exactly the same - rubati are never exactly the same - tempi, while metronomically the same, don't ever sound alike - or just take a note from Hoffman who was clear that he never practiced with a metronome, as such mathematics ruined the natural flow of the music...

And above all, as Chopin may say - - GOOD TASTE... but I really believe (it's my mantra anyway - ) that this is all about what comes OUT of the piano... not what goes IN. It is your ears that guide everything, not the mentronomoe, not the amount of force on each note, not how much and when you depress the pedal - but your ears... Always, your ears.

As for The Fantaisie impromptu and Gerg - it will become easier - the goal is to get to the point where your left hand doesn't NEED a rest - that's how loose and how fluid your work and playing has become. If the left hand ever needs a rest, then you are doing something wrong. As for 27/8 - I just love this work - it's harmonically staggering and what you are looking for again, is the result, as Chopin said: Imagine what you want to hear, and then you will find yourself playing that way...

\:\) Good morning then from Paris. Someone is moving into George's (Sand's) lat across the street this am - what a thing to witness!

Hersh

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#979398 - 05/23/07 07:26 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
DeepElem Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/27/06
Posts: 366
Loc: USA
Thanks for the detailed response Hersh. It's fascinating to hear about the differences playing on 1845 Pleyel makes with respect to creating this music. That's a perspective I'm not sure I would ever understand if it weren't for these forums.

I also think you can't go wrong remembering at all times, regardless of the composer or genre of music, to trust your ears, especially for those of us who are only creating music for our own pleasure. It seems obvious when stated as you have, however it is all too easy to get caught up in all the marks on the page. Sage advice indeed....
_________________________
-Buck
------
If you knew what you were doing, you'd probably be bored.
- Fresco's Law

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#979399 - 05/23/07 07:28 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Hi Hersh: \:\)

Only have time today to reiterate what Gerg said, and, of course, something I've known for quite a while.

You are a class act and we're very happy and fortunate to have you with "us." And we intend to keep you here, no matter what it takes! I pasted your response over to the Pianist Corner. You never have to worry about answering anywhere but here. I'll do the rest. \:D

As far as someone moving into George Sand's apartment, what does she look like? I'm afraid her ghost might decide to haunt the place, as if she hasn't done enough damage already.

Oh my gosh, I just had a terrible thought...don't go any where near her! We all know how she loves to get her claws into young, handsome and talented pianists/composers. Keep your doors locked! :p :p

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#979400 - 05/23/07 08:10 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Hi All:

I slaved away on the Index yesterday for about 12 hours until my eyes started to cross, trying to read the "code." You know you can't leave out a / of a [ or a ] or a . or a #...Yikes.

Can't for the life of me figure out why there is a double space starting about half-way through, studied the code for about 2 hours, trying many ways to fix it. I'm going to ask C7 if he has any ideas.

However, I have made some headway. But, I sincerely apologize to many of you who had made such great comments (funny, serious, interesting) that I just couldn't fit in; otherwise, the index would be as big as the thread!

What I did notice, sadly, is that many people who had posted right at the beginning, have disappeared. I hope to get them back. AND others who posted nice, long and great posts, are now just posting one line. MAY I ASK IF WE HAVE DONE SOMETHING TO OFFEND YOU? I think you know who you are. What happened? Your posts were the heart and mainstay of this thread and now, for some reason, who have seemed to have lost interest. If this is the case, I'm sorry. Please PM me (if you wish) and let me know just how we can bring you back as before. \:\( And to the others who keep posting (you know who you are) I am very grateful to you all. \:\) \:\)

OK, back to work.

Take care,
Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#979401 - 05/23/07 02:42 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
sophial Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/05
Posts: 3405
Loc: US
Hershey,
Thanks for that wonderful post! I really like the way you keep in perspective what makes MUSICAL sense out of all this. Your insights into these issues are so valuable!

Kathleen, thanks for all your work. I always visit this thread, even if I don't post. Don't wear yourself out with the index and take some time to play!

Sophia

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#979402 - 05/23/07 02:47 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Thanks, Sophia. You have always been so kind and appreciative. We valued you as one of us whenever you can pop in.

And I know Herhsey is appreciative of your words also. Isn't he something? With his busy schedule, he finds the time to help others with such great and detailed advice. I certainly hope he hangs around for a long time.

This thread wouldn't be the same without him.

Regards to all...
Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#979403 - 05/23/07 03:07 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
Hardway Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 05/06/07
Posts: 14
Loc: Austin, TX
I just finished reading the fine essay on tempi above. I wish to thank Hersh for taking the time to make that post. I found this site about 3 weeks ago and am AMAZED at the wealth of information available here. Thank you Hersh, and thank you ALL.

Scotty Hardway

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#979404 - 05/23/07 03:10 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Thank you! Hardway...wonderful words and, you know, that's what we're here for. Again, Hershey gives us the "professional" touch with true insight. So lucky to have him.
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#979405 - 05/23/07 06:13 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
I think this link might be of interest to all. It's how we could start our own Chopin Forum, by just using the usual "Post a New Topic" method.
Idea on How to Create a "Chopin Forum"

What do you think? It certainly makes sense to me now...that I am still only a little over half way through the index. But it's been fun, reading all the old threads...a real hoot, some of them.

You know what...I'm going to start. I am going to post a new topic on the ABF and Pianists Corner concerning Chopin. Let's see what kind of response I get. Should be interesting.

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

Top
#979406 - 05/24/07 08:27 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Hi All:

I have not given up on the index. Just trying to work out a gliche. But I am going out of town to meet a child-hood friend I haven't seen in 30 years. Should be interesting to compare who has the most gray hairs, wrinkles, bags and sags and such. ;\)

BTW...the new topic I posted in both forums has received some very interesting and thoughtful responses. \:\) Just a suggestion...but if you have the time, pop over and add your two cents, so to speak. Maybe this will work out.

Will return on Saturday...keep Fred on the first page. Please.

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#979407 - 05/24/07 10:03 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
LisztAddict Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/12/05
Posts: 2895
Loc: Florida
Hi Hardway - welcome to the forum and Chopin fan club. Enjoy your stay! \:\)

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#979408 - 05/24/07 02:31 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
Van Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 09/04/06
Posts: 1215
Loc: S. California
I just saw this yesterday, and I wondered if there's a ranking of Chopin's nocturnes in terms of difficulty?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZR2KkA1JlFs

I think I might want to explore them further. From my limited experience they seem to sound the best of all his works. Also any particular piece you'd recommend for a beginner?
_________________________

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#979409 - 05/24/07 05:35 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
DeepElem Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/27/06
Posts: 366
Loc: USA
In case you haven't seen it there's a thread in the Member Recordings forum on Recording from our NJ Gathering . In that thread are recordings of Alan Wasserman including a couple of Chopin pieces (Phantasie-Impromtu Op. 66 and Polonaise in Ab Major). Well worth listening to I think (all the pieces).
_________________________
-Buck
------
If you knew what you were doing, you'd probably be bored.
- Fresco's Law

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#979410 - 05/24/07 10:39 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
stephenc Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/15/06
Posts: 693
Loc: Australia
 Quote:
Originally posted by sid:
I just saw this yesterday, and I wondered if there's a ranking of Chopin's nocturnes in terms of difficulty?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZR2KkA1JlFs

I think I might want to explore them further. From my limited experience they seem to sound the best of all his works. Also any particular piece you'd recommend for a beginner? [/b]
I think the lowest graded nocturne is about a 6. The famous e-flat nocturne (op 9-2) is a seven, certainly not a beginners piece but very accessible for less experienced players (myself included! - it took me about a month to get it memorised and to a satisfactory level)

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#979411 - 05/24/07 10:49 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
stephenc Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/15/06
Posts: 693
Loc: Australia
What a great post on the tempi discussion by Hershey! (thanks!), as Hardway said, it really read more like an essay than a casual opinion on the subject.

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#979412 - 05/25/07 09:40 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
gerg Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 02/02/07
Posts: 1651
Loc: Houston, TX
It's certainly bookmark-worthy material (Hershey's commentary). Now to apply it...
_________________________
http://www.ecital.net
Wikicital: A collaborative effort to build a knowledgebase of classical music history combined with examples. Your chance to both perform and write...

Don't click here!

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#979413 - 05/26/07 11:01 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
Hershey88 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/27/06
Posts: 149
Loc: France
Hey gang -

It was really just casual run-on thinking.... I'd love to structure a GOOD piece for you all to read though... so if anyone feels like biting on a Chopin/music/piano/history subject suggestion for a "piece" I'll bite back, and write something that doesn't wander so much...

Woudl love to, as I love doing stuff like that!

\:\) Hersh

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#979414 - 05/26/07 01:30 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Alright, gang \:\)

Can someone come up with a piece worthy of Hershey's offer? Something rather large, I would expect, but something with history, some technical difficulities (ha) and certainly special/unique challenging dynamics...but something that, perhaps, one day in the relatively near future, we might all be able to play. \:D

Maybe something at a 7 or 8 or even a lovely piece at a 6...

Any suggestions?

Kathleen

P.S. Sorry, but I'm pretty beat today. Will log on tomorrow with more energy and respond to some previous posts.
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#979415 - 05/26/07 01:53 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
DeepElem Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/27/06
Posts: 366
Loc: USA
 Quote:
Originally posted by Hershey88:
Hey gang -

It was really just casual run-on thinking.... I'd love to structure a GOOD piece for you all to read though... so if anyone feels like biting on a Chopin/music/piano/history subject suggestion for a "piece" I'll bite back, and write something that doesn't wander so much...

Woudl love to, as I love doing stuff like that!

\:\) Hersh [/b]
How about something on the role of improvisation in classical music over the years, for both composers and performers ? I've heard Chopin's composition style involved a lot of improivisation, but I don't really know much more about it (or really if that's even true). Also maybe how you think improvisation should or should not be used in classical music in these modern times.
_________________________
-Buck
------
If you knew what you were doing, you'd probably be bored.
- Fresco's Law

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#979416 - 05/26/07 02:46 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
sophial Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/11/05
Posts: 3405
Loc: US
or how about something on rubato and how to learn and master it? Background on performance practices in Chopin's time and how that affected use of rubato versus today? Rubato is so essential to capturing the feel of Chopin's music, the "zal" as Kathleen put it, that I'd love to hear Hershey discuss the many facets of rubato.

Sophia

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#979417 - 05/26/07 05:00 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
Hershey88 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/27/06
Posts: 149
Loc: France
...Keep 'em coming, and after a few, I'll roll all the concepts into one piece..

hmmm - should be fun... \:\)

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#979418 - 05/26/07 06:01 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
stephenc Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/15/06
Posts: 693
Loc: Australia
Maybe a paragraph or so on the use of ornamentation in Chopin's music? - how he influenced and developed the use of embellishment in general, how he most likely executed his own and whether you believe pianists of today are performing them the way the composer intended - and does the modern piano even allow execution as Chopin envisaged? In your opinion, are there works (or a time in his life) in which Chopin used ornamentation for a show of virtuosity as opposed to making a piece more beautiful?

I look forward to your paper Hershey!

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#979419 - 05/26/07 07:29 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
Bach-in-a-Minuet Offline
Full Member

Registered: 04/13/07
Posts: 35
Loc: Massachusetts
Hershey, I have wondered if there is a distinct detectable difference between Chopin's "early" versus "later" compositions (analogous to early and late Beethoven or Listz). Granted, Chopin didn't live a very long life, but is there still a noticeable consistent difference between the works of the "younger" and "older" Chopin? My apologies if this has been covered before elsewhere, it's just that I don't have knowledge of the chronology of his compositions, and I was curious.

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#979420 - 05/26/07 08:23 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Hi Hersh:

Can you tell us of a few examples of Chopin compositions that are considered "futuristic?"
And specifically, what made them so?

Thanks,
Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#979421 - 05/27/07 07:34 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
I've read everything posted during my absence. Wonderful...to have new visitors and hope you will drop in more often. With each person comes a fresh comment, question, perspective, and we need it all. Thank you for your thoughtful and intelligent repsponses.

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

Top
#979422 - 05/27/07 07:51 AM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
loveschopintoomuch Offline
4000 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/05/06
Posts: 4690
Loc: Illinois
Thank you, Heshey[/b] for your great piece on tempi. And I am very happy that it does state what I have always thought. Chopin's music is to be played from the heart and not the metronome. So, often, in reading the book: "Chopin, as seen by his students," time and time again, we get the feeling that as long as we are "in the ballpark," we must put our soul into the music. He once told a student after the young man had played a piece for him(I'm paraphrasing), "Well, I wouldn't have played it that way, but you heard it differently, and you played it beautifully."

That's always been my guiding light. Certainly, there are many pieces that I will NEVER get into the ballpark with, but many others that I can. As Hersh said..."it's not what goes in, but what comes out." How great this expression is.

Kathleen
_________________________
After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own." Oscar Wilde, 1891

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#979423 - 05/27/07 01:11 PM Re: Just for those totally devoted to Chopin
Romantique Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/29/07
Posts: 20
I second sophial's request to learn more about Chopin's rubato.

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