Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures

Posted by: Barbara G

Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/20/07 10:48 AM

During the past few months we have been posting comments and asking for advice as we shopped for a new grand piano. Now that we know the ending of this story, we, my husband and I, want to share our quest with you. Bare with me as I give you some background information.

Please note, that as when we wrote this article I and We used the name of Jordang[/b] but I am now using the name of Barbara G[/b]. This came about as my husband signed up first. When we started this thread he thought it was funny that people thought he was a woman and it was really US writing this together.

It is kind of fun hiding behind screen names. We even used Barbara and Jordan[/b] for a while after we finished this article. So read this thread now without confusion;. Jordang and Barbara G are the same.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/20/07 11:07 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Jordang:
During the past few months we have been posting comments and asking for advice as we shopped for a new grand piano. Now that we know the ending of this story, we, my husband and I, want to share our quest with you. Bare with me as I give you some background information.

When we got married (many years ago)we lived in a tiny, college owned, one room apartment while we worked on our masters degrees. The first thing we bought was a good used car. The second thing we bought was a Yamaha studio upright for me. It was my dream piano, because it was just like the one my college professor had in his home, and it barely fit in our little apartment. When we opened our sofa bed to sleep, the piano, with the bench pushed in, came right up next to the end of the bed. This filled the whole area of that part of our living quarters. But we were in love and the piano added music to our lives, and I loved my husband and my piano. :3hearts:


The store owner really did not want to sell this piano as he was asking as much for it as the brand new Strauss Bosendorfer in Denton. And it did not have the BIG sound that I wanted. But this piano is situated just inside the front door of this fancy store. It is meant to attract piano lovers like me just like those race cars in front of the car dealers attract men into the store. And this piano attracted me. Should I say I was emotionally moved to sit and play this baby?!!

Then there were those antique art case Steinways. With most Steinways I don't like the action and stiff keyweight. But we found some 100+ year old art case ones which reached out for my fancy heart. We scheduled trips to play some. My joy would well up as we walked in the store and saw their shiney new looking beauty and fancy case. But when I would play them, the sound of the bass and high treble would be so lacking. We even found one that played like a dream, not like a Steinway. The store owner told me that he had worked on the action for years to make it play like that. But he had rebuilt it with the antique string scales and sound board designs and it sounded old. \:\(

My husband noticed my love for these fancy amazing European men, uh pianos. (Ha ha) -- and he knew he was in for spending a lot more money that he had planned for. Oh... but my wonderful husband figured he was up to the challenge. He began to talk of trips to New York or Europe to find me an amazing piano that we could afford. He searched this Piano Forum "Pianos for sale", Piano Mart, internet listings, European web sites, and much more. \:D (Chapter 2 next) [/b]
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/20/07 02:43 PM

Thanks for posting part 1 of your story. The suspense is killing me! What'd you buy? Pictures!

No matter what you bought, congratulations on your new piano!
Posted by: atropos

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/20/07 02:45 PM

I am CERTAIN that I've been in that same exact store about 3 weeks ago, while visting a friend in TX, and looked at that very same Bosendorfer... a stunningly nice instrument!!

I ended up spending most of my time in that shop playing a nice used Yamaha in the back, and wondering why the concert Baldwin they have back there is so (all things considered) cheap...

Looking forward to the rest of this story.
Posted by: MarKey

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/20/07 03:12 PM

Ah Come on!
Posted by: brummell

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/20/07 05:24 PM

Patience is NOT one of my virtues.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/20/07 05:54 PM

Chapter 2:

Not long when my husband was looking for a wonderful grand piano, he was checking all of the classified newspapers in Texas. Then, what's this? Behold! There was an ad for a 22 year old 6' 4" August Foester grand owned by a church in Dallas that wanted it off of their stage so that they had room for dramas. They were, also, planning to buy an electric keyboard to use in place of their piano. We had read in Fines book that AF were dream pianos and this was selling for only $6000.00! The pastor, who was also the church pianist, said that it played and sounded better than a Bosendorfer. Wow! Well, my husband was thinking he was almost home free for only $6,000. We hurried off to Dallas the next weekend to play the August Foester. True to the pastor's comments, it played and sounded wonderful. Boy did I have my appetite increased for a wonderful German piano.


The problem with this piano was that it was made 25 years ago in East Germany and they must have used inferior glue on the veneers. The veneer was developing deep waves in the finish all over the piano and the plastic polyester finish was holding the veneer on but it was starting to look bad. It was also plain black. My researcher husband researched refinishing pianos and talked to several people about this. He learned that it was impractical to fix this piano.

Next we considered a 100 year old Bechstein at Encore Pianos in Dallas. Mr. Kahn owns the store.
The Bechstein was a very interesting piano to look at and it played fairly well, but to us it had that old piano sound which we weren't interested in.



It needed to be rebuilt, which would take many months to complete. So this one was out. Later we played a similar piano at Atlantic Music in Florida. It WAS completely refinished and rebuilt... but more about that later.

Next my husband begin to research Charles Walters. (See our thread about them here on Piano World.) They make a 6'4" grand in cherry or walnut Chippendale which sells for maybe $30,000+. So he upped the price range for us and we went in search of a Charles Walters to play. It turns out that they are sold by Steinway dealers in DFW and Houston. We were really wanting to love them. We first made a trip to Ft. Worth one weekend and then to Houston a couple of weeks later. At the Steinway dealers I discovered that I liked the action of the Charles Walters better than Steinways. The sound was good, but alas, they did not sound as rich and interesting as the Schimmels, Mason and Hamlins, Bosendorfers or August Foester. Such nice prices and such nice people - the Walters family, and such nice German Renner actions, too. But now I knew the sound, the action, and the case of my dream piano and wanted to find one that had all of these desired qualities. I kept telling my husband that "you can't give the baby a taste of the candy then take it away from her!" --- And I sure liked that $50,000 Nicholas Schimmel with the beautiful sound, with a veneer fallboard and inside lid and with such beautiful trims. Dallas Piano Warehouse wanted to sell us one. But it was mostly black and even with a better price, after sales tax, it would be $50,000. So we hoped that the dealer in Houston would have a better selection and better prices for Schimmel. Next my husband called all the dealers in Houston to see what brands they had for sell and we planed a trip there.

We spent two days playing in Houston and had a great time. The 225 Bosendorfers were very nice, as we already knew, but costs too much money for us to buy. Piano Forte had a great selection of large grands including several Schimmels, a Sauter, August Foester, Charles Walter, Baldwin SF10, Kawai 7', and a very nice black Petrof Passat 7' grand. (Too bad they only come in concert black.)

Here is the lovely Sauter Delta Intarsia which they would very much like to sell since they have had it a long time.


This piano had a beautiful action, very clear bell like voice which really sings. Almost the best piano there. However it did not have the rich complex sound of the Schimmels which I liked better. And the case was a light veneer instead of the dark veneer that would go with our living room furniture.

So the question was would they make us a great price on their beautiful Schimmels?? A few days later we learned that the store owner wanted us to buy from the Dallas Schimmel dealer, which did not have what we wanted. He would not offer us any great prices.

Then there was also in Houston a 240 cm Seiler concert piano. WHAT A PIANO! :p My husband reminded me we were not looking for a concert stage grand in black --- but it sure was fun to play.



Well, at least we had a fun trip to Houston and we left thinking we really liked some Seilers and Schimmels. We discussed and reminded ourselves that we had not yet found several other German brands I wanted to play, and besides that, we were getting in deeper and deeper money wise-- the prices of the pianos I really liked were going up higher and higher.
Posted by: Benecs

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/20/07 06:41 PM

Phuh, I would have taken the Förster. You say you liked it, and that price is really incredible. If you have the money for new pianos, refinishing the piano wouldn't have costed you so much.

Anyway, in the end I'm sure you have made a good decision! \:\)
Posted by: Benecs

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/20/07 06:43 PM

And that Bösendorfer is a really beautiful piano! Did it have a vienna action or a roller?
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/20/07 06:50 PM

It had been updated to have a roller action. The Bosendorfer store in Las Vegas has done the same with a very similar piano. I'm told that SAP in Poland takes old plain Bosendorfers and transforms them. This one had an old and cheaply shimmed soundboard. It looked like plastic wood filler had been put in a lot of cracks. However it currently played and sounded nice. With the prices that they are asking for this piano, a modern piano makes much more sense. Woods Piano in Denver has a 10 year old 200cm much like this for a very good price.
Posted by: pianobroker

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/20/07 07:18 PM

A word of caution on the Polish restorations

Look at the soundboards from underneath Whoa!
New pinblock, pins leaning already ? "what"
Converted Viennese action " How come it plays kinda strange"

Beautiful furniture! Reveneer Wow!
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/20/07 08:20 PM

Chapter 3:

I'm leaving a lot out of this story but will add some of that here... Very early in the quest for a new grand piano, my husband discovered, by way of Google, that some universities are using keyboards of reduced sizes which help people with small hands play wider span chords easier and with less hand fatigue. He came home one day very excited because he had heard me lament over the years how my small hands made it harder for me to play some music. He had discovered that David Steinbuhler has perfected his work to update any grand piano or upright piano to his custom designed and built smaller keyboards.
http://www.steinbuhler.com/

These custom keyboards cost seven to ten thousand dollars plus the cost of regulation and voicing. This sounded very interesting and exciting to me. I went to Southern Methodist University and played one of Steinbuhler's reduced keyboards and learned more about them from a piano professor there. North Texas University and Texas Tech are also using these now. So we decided to add this to the cost of buying a new grand - the cost to upgrade the keyboard. \:D Now I will be able to play music on my new Grand without rolling chords. \:D

I mentioned earlier that he decided to give me this Grand Piano while sitting in church. I told my grown children that I was looking forward to him going back to church and seeing what he would decide next!! ;\)

Well, he went to a national conferance for Christian Financial Professionals. At the conferance a preacher talked about how most people spend their lives working for sucess. Then some people decide that working for significance is more important. He defined "sucess" as accomplishing personal goals and "significance" as being important in people's lives. My husband bought the preacher's book about this and began to really think about it. He decided one of the most significant things that he could do is to bless me with a very fine piano -- so that I would be truly blessed. Isn't that awesome?

So now he became like who Vippo talks about in his Thread -- compulsive with researching and shopping for a great piano. He began to research Bluthners, Bosendorfers, Steingraebers, Bechsteins, Feurichs, and many more. He came home after talking to Orie, with CDs of music played on Bluthners. He announced that he wanted to locate a Bluthner that we could afford. I protested that I havn't played a Bluthner, Bechstein, Grotrian, Feurich, or Steingraber, yet, and their cost was TOO MUCH for us. I think he liked the TOO MUCH comment. So he began to tell me many people like Seilers and Schimmels best, and he had decided that we could afford one of them or a new M&H BB in mahogony. The next day he found an almost new Steinway B in Rosewood that someone had in Austin. It truly was beautiful in the pictures. Almost new and only $40,000.
http://austin.craigslist.org/msg/318709830.html
Okay, I could love that piano. It is a beautiful Rosewood. However it looks much like that M&H in Mahogony or Rosewood which I already loved and I like the sound and touch of a M&H or Schimmel better than Steinway. One draw back is that they don't have the fancy music desks and legs that I really wanted. (My husband told me that he thought about this being like a man wanting a sports car and getting a 1990 Lincoln Town Car with 500 HP instead.)


Playing a lovely Schimmel in Houston.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/20/07 09:49 PM

What a great story, Jordang, and you haven't even gotten to the grand conclusion! [pun intended ;\) ]

Of course, I'm rooting for the M&H.

And your husband is hereby nominated for the Spouse of the Decade award.
Posted by: bigcake

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/21/07 10:33 AM

Chapter 4? Come on.
Posted by: gryphon

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/21/07 11:16 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
What a great story, Jordang, and you haven't even gotten to the grand conclusion!

Of course, I'm rooting for the M&H. [/b]
Or maybe an Estonia in Bubinga or Pyramid Mahogany. Maybe we could start guessing... \:\)
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/21/07 10:58 PM

This is the last week of school. My little kids and my classroom will be most demanding this week. So please be patient with me, I'm working on the next chapter in my head.
Posted by: IrishMak

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/22/07 11:02 AM

The story is fascinating so far! Tho, I gotta admit, your husband sounds like mine- obsessive about the research! If we ever get to the point of buying a nice grand, can I have yours send a concise, condensed version to mine? \:D Would save me a lot of time... ;\)
Posted by: Bob Newbie

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/22/07 04:31 PM

This is relly getting good!...Ok Paul Harvey..give us "The Rest Of The Story"
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/25/07 09:46 PM

EASTERN EUROPEAN GRANDS
Early in our search for a new grand piano we read about several brands from Eastern Europe. Since many people here on Piano World really like Estonia and Petrof, we were eager to see and play them. The first time that we took a trip to Dallas, there was a classified ad for a Petrof 6'4". A retired doctor had bought a pretty Petrof and had planned to learn how to play it during his retirement. Now ten years later he and his wife were down sizing houses and were willing to sell it for only $12,000. It had a bright sound and played very nicely.

We looked at other Petrofs at a local dealer later. They, too, were nice, but the sound was similar to a Yamaha and didn't have the warm, rich sound I was looking for. Some time later I played a new 7' Petrof Passat at Forshey Piano in Houston. It had a big rich bass, but this particular size comes only in concert black.

Next I played Estonia. Peter Collora in Denton has several next to his M&H and Bosendorfers. They often have very pretty cases such as this one I tried.

(This is a corrected picture.)
The action was fine and the cases were beautiful, but the Estonias were against stiff competition and my heart was attracted to those Bosendorfers and my ears to the M&H. I tried them again in Houston at the Piano Store. I even got to try a 9' custom concert Estonia. (We thought that the owner was not truthful about his pianos so I caution anyone who talks with him about buying a piano. He told us one piano was new with new factory warranty. The next day his store manager told us the same piano was used and had been in a local condo. You may want to check the PW thread about Scott Covington/the Piano Store.)


The Estonia pianos had very long sustained tones which might be nice. However the bass notes seemed to have a growing, lingering sound and sort of reminded me of fireworks bursting close to each other and the colors overlapping. That is how the sound did in my opinion. I don't think I would enjoy this brand.

We had read about other brands that are built in Poland or the Czech Republic, but we found only Bohemia and I played them briefly. My sights had risen to bigger heights by that time so I had no interest in Bohemias.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/26/07 10:14 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Jordang:
My sights had risen to bigger heights by that time [/b]
Yeah, that's one of the risks of careful, extensive shopping. \:D

That fancy music desk on the Estonia was gorgeous.

Hmmm.... sounds like the M&H is still very much in the running. Looking forward to hearing the next chapter. \:\)
Posted by: PoStTeNeBrAsLuX

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/26/07 11:08 AM

Jordang:
several brands from Eastern Europe[/b]

In most politically correct circles, (and especially since the accession of the 12 newest member states of the European Union[1]), the entire region of Eastern Europe seems to have disappeared... But worry ye not, it has been swiftly and efficiently replaced by something known as Central Europe.

Hurrah! A socio-politico-geographical miracle! \:\)

-Michael B.
[1] Those being Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia, Poland, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Malta and Cyprus, and then more recently Romania and Bulgaria.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/26/07 11:51 AM

Where to Go Next[/b]

My husband was already working on where we would go next, even before our trip to Houston. He could not locate any other stores in Texas with other European brands, even though we have a population of 23.5 million people. I guess most Texans only like fine pianos from NY and Japan and don't know about European pianos. Too bad, because I was growing to love these European Grands. (Yes, most people I know buy Asian pianos, including myself before we ventured out on our quest -- remember I have a Yamaha studio piano and even a Clavinova myself.) Next my husband checked out all of the piano stores in Oklahoma --- nothing there. He read a Piano World post about Seilerdirect.com and called them. After a lot of work he got a price for a Seiler 186 in Walnut or Mahogany Chippendale, ordered and delivered by air-freight in 2-3 months for under $40,000. Now I wanted to play them very much. But where? The closest place was Denver. There were dealers in S. Calf. and Florida, too. He could not find a dealer in NY, and that was a real shame. I love New York City and have been trying to get my husband to take me back to some Broadway Shows for a long time now. He was talking to dealers in Denver and Florida. He had also located a dealer in Philly and was talking with him about a new Bosendorfer in a Pyramid Mahogany case at a bargain price. It is very pretty. :p


Another dealer in Ohio had some rebuilt German Grands. NYC dealers and Allegro Pianos had Bluthner, August Forster, and such that might be my "dream piano." So where and when would we fly next?

One day he came home after talking to Brian Gatchell at Atlantic Music Center and Atlantic Piano Rebuilders of Melbourne, Florida, near Orlando. Brian had a used Bluthner and a used Feurich (Never heard of that one) listed on Ebay. Brian is a concert pianist, was a college Piano professor in Europe, and who is currently finishing his new book on the Great Pianos of Europe. He has spent days and weeks at all of the piano factories, is the importer for several brands, and stocks many European brands as well as other nice pianos. Brian had been telling my husband all about Steingraeber, Feurich, and Pleyel pianos, all of which I had never heard of. So my husband printed off a 30 page sales book on Pleyel and a 45 page sales book on Steingraeber that he found on the internet company sites.

Over the years my husband has occasionally called me his French Broad. I grew up not too far from the French Broad River in NC, studied French in high school and college, and he tells me that I look like a sexy French woman. (He insisted I write that!!!!) He figured that surely I would love a French Pleyel grand in Pyramid Mahogany with a deluxe carved music desk and sexy round legs. Okay now the pictures looked great on the Internet.
Pleyel Pictures Click and see what I mean.

Brian filled my husband in on a very interesting story about Pleyel. A few years ago a very wealthy Frenchman decided to improve the French reputation in the arts. He bought the largest music concert hall in Paris, himself, and spent millions renovating it. He then bought Pleyel pianos wanting to improve the French brand which has been around for about 200 years. Now he has decided to end the production of the uprights and some of the grand piano versions and has appointed Brian to be the importer and to close out the current versions. So my husband was thinking "Close Out Prices on a great French Piano! Wow, sounds like a deal!" Pleyel has previously had Steingraeber produce a prototype concert grand, and is currently designing a new line of grands to be the highest quality, premium pianos. They have built prototypes and moved to a new factory near Paris. The owner wants to take on Fazioli and Steingraeber with the latest and greatest designed and built grands. The only problem was that Brian had not yet gotten his shipment of pianos from Pleyel, but he said that they should be there by early May.

So this was the plan --- buy cheap airline tickets for Mother's Day weekend. Go to Atlantic Music to play several brands and then to a Seiler dealer near Orlando (Pianos Forte) and find out if I wanted a Schimmel, M&H, Bluthner, Pleyel, Feurich, Bechstein, Bosendorfer, Seiler or Steingraeber. ALL this for a Mother's Day gift. (But then, after all I had given him the Most[/b] wonderful and amazing four children.)
Posted by: cartera45

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/26/07 01:05 PM

This is coming from someone who thought a Steingraeber was a greedy person at Oktoberfest, but I love the looks of that Pleyel piano.
Posted by: lilylady

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/26/07 06:04 PM

I am enjoying your travelog and piano expeditions Jordang.

Looking forward to the next installment!

LL
Posted by: whippen boy

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/26/07 06:32 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Jordang:
So this was the plan --- buy cheap airline tickets for Mother's Day weekend. Go to Atlantic Music to play several brands and then to a Seiler dealer near Orlando (Pianos Forte) and find out if I wanted a Schimmel, M&H, Bluthner, Pleyel, Feurich, Bechstein, Bosendorfer, Seiler or Steingraeber.
If you are looking at pianos in that rarefied stratum, why omit Grotrian? A Grotrian may well surprise you, price wise.

You simply must try one (and then post your thoughts here \:D ).
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/27/07 02:01 PM

Feurich Grand Piano[/b]

Since we were going to Atlantic Music Center my husband began to research Feurich pianos. He showed me a picture of a Feurich Rococo in walnut which would match our walnut furniture. I was amazed at this piano pictured on the website. http://atlanticmusiccenter.com/newpianos_feurich_roccoco.html
(Click to see.)
Our problem, Fine listed the piano as costing $135,000 !! (Very big problem.) When I first saw the Feurich Rococo I thought that it looked like it belonged in a castle or a palace. It did have Chippendale style legs which I love. \:D

So my husband searched the Internet for Feurich Rococo. He found a used 5'7" in Chicago.
Beautiful but a little short. "Could it have the big rich bass I want?" I wondered. \:\(

Then ---- BEHOLD! A PW thread saying that someone in Texas had a Feurich 190 (6'4") in Rococo which he had inherited from his grandfather. The thread was from last fall and the owner wanted to know how much it was worth and how to sell it. It seems his grandfather had paid $50,000 for it in the 1980s. Could this piano still be for sale? Would it be the right color? Could we find the owner? Would I love its sound and touch?

So with some searching the owner was found and my husband called him on the phone. Yes, it had not been sold. THEY ARE ASKING $29,000 AND WOULD LIKE AN OFFER. The piano is supposed to be in Mr. Kahn's store in Dallas! So the next weekend we rush off to Dallas. But, shucks, the piano is not in the store. The lady says Mr. Kahn is in S. Africa for an extended visit as his father, who lives there, is very ill.

The piano is not where it is supposed to be and we think that it could have been sold just before Mr. Kahn left. Shoot! \:\( Well at least we're having fun taking trips together every weekend in search for my Grand Piano. This sure beats going to my husband's college ball games like we did years ago, or going to business meeting trips and dinners and
Posted by: tm3

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/27/07 02:10 PM

jordang, i don't know how all this is going to shake out, but ... can i hire your husband to find ME a piano? \:D
Posted by: Starting Over

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/27/07 02:38 PM

And me...
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/27/07 04:22 PM

I'll tell him to consider it. He did learn a whole lot about pianos and I think he is an expert now, but that's just my opinion. When we were in Florida, Brian told him he knew more about pianos than 90% of people who sold them. That was quite a compliment, huh?
Posted by: lilylady

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/27/07 06:26 PM

And....

?????

I don't want to grow old here, waiting!!!
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/27/07 07:58 PM

Problems getting a Pleyel to Florida[/b]

Two weeks before we left for Florida, Brian called to say that his shipment of Pleyels would not be there by Mother's Day but he would have one shipped by air freight from Paris to Florida so that it should be there for us. (What a nice guy.) He would order a Pyramid Mahogany for us. Then on Monday before we left he called again. The workers in France take lots of vacations. It was currently spring break and the warehouse workers had more than a week off. He could not get a piano from the warehouse to the airport. He asks if we would like to delay coming. We decide that we can't change our tickets and we are ready to play all of his brands of pianos as soon as possible. "What a disappointment," my husband said. "No sexy legged Pleyel will be waiting for us in Florida." We figure that that drops Pleyel off our list of pianos to choose from. \:\( But our list of great pianos is so long that maybe we need to cut some.

Before going I thought I'd recount: I know I love Mason & Hamlin in rosewood, but it is plain. Schimmels are great and come in beautiful cases. Both cost a little less than $50,000. I would love to have a Bosendorfer. I havent't gotten to play Feurichs, Steingraebers, Bluthners, Bechsteins, and some other wonderful pianos. My husband has gotten prices on Seilers in Chippendale, ordered and delivered for less than $40,000. Who knows what other brands of pianos my husband will discover. He keeeps finding more and more choices on the internet. \:D
Posted by: cartera45

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/27/07 10:36 PM

Your husband secretly doesn't want to actually buy a piano - he's having too much fun shopping for one. Keep on the lookout for symptoms of PPBD - post piano buying depression.
Posted by: sleepingcats

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/27/07 10:48 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by cartera45:
Your husband secretly doesn't want to actually buy a piano - he's having too much fun shopping for one. Keep on the lookout for symptoms of PPBD - post piano buying depression. [/b]
Like the saying goes, "It's the journey, not the destination"! \:D
Posted by: I. Bruton

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/28/07 10:22 AM

Jordang, welcome to PW. It sounds like you are having an exciting adventure and I wish you the best. Like Monica said, I'm hoping you end up with a Mason & Hamlin (though I wouldn't rule out Yamaha completely, either).

Good luck!
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/28/07 10:35 AM

Now I know why he wanted to help me write this story. He gets to relive and remember all of his shopping details. He remembers all of the pianos that he found for me to consider. And he had such fun checking out online stores and Ebay sites in Europe. He's trying to fight off PPSD! I didn't know that existed before. My family is home for Memorial Day visits. A big extra for having our new exciting piano is that my two daughters and-son-in law are sitting down to play again. Now my daughter and son-in-law have decided they want my husband to find them a piano.

So this adventure has given us such wonderful time together. It has trully recharged my passion and joy for playing. My husband has found and bought books on the great pianists and pianos for me and this is something I have not read a lot about before. Music history covers the great composers, not necessarily the pianists. He has been buying and listening to classical piano music and has gotten me interested and taking time to do this again. And I am going to get a new smaller keyboard for my new grand which will make playing hard music so much easier, possible, and enjoyable.
Posted by: sophial

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/28/07 02:20 PM

But...but.... did I miss something? what is the
"new exciting piano"??? Inquiring minds want (need) to know!

May everyone have a good Memorial Day!


Sophia
Posted by: sleepingcats

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/28/07 03:02 PM

Wow, I envy you! I wish my husband showed so much interest in piano and classical music! He wouldn't mind if I bought another piano, but he wouldn't want to be part of the process.

Congratulations, and hope you reveal your choice soon!
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/28/07 05:12 PM

Bosendorfers at Last[/b]

I had played several Bosendorfers of several sizes in Denton. I had loved Bosendorfers since I was 20 years old and this was wonderful. But the new Bosendorfers were beyond our reach financially, so my husband began early on to search for used ones. After much research, we wrote off antique Bosendorfers because they were built with old string scales, and the ones built before 1900 had straight strings. Those built before about 1910 had Viennese actions. After learning this, he devoted his time to finding a used modern one. He got a great offer on a new Bosendorfer 5'8" in Pyramid Mahogany, but we decided that it was too short to have the wonderful bass sound I wanted. (You can check with Cunningham in Phily if you would like the 5'8" Bosey.) There were several on Ebay but none that we wanted. He found a Bosendorfer 225 in Germany on German Ebay that was being sold by a Volkswagen dealer. No fooling! We wondered if it was his own piano or one he had taken in on trade. It was offered for less than $35,000. He talked about flying to Germany and trying it out, but this was not possible until June when school's out.

On a side note, did you see the pictures of the dropped Bosendorfer? My funny honey joked about buying and fixing that one. (Maybe he wasn't joking.) ;\) Check out the great articles about this.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=447706&in_page_id=1770
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/04/12/npiano12.xml

I got to play two used 225s in Houston which were great. Indeed that size seemed to be the most wonderful size as they had extra keys and a wider bass section soundboard to provide a richer sound in the low notes which I would use.

But the dealer would not take only $50,000, which was our new limit. In talking about those two, if we had bought one from the Houston dealer, ( the one we were afraid to trust, and if they were on consignment at his store and he did not pay the true owner, then we would be in the middle of a fight over ownership. Boy, that would be terrible.)

As our trip to Florida got nearer, my husband really wanted to find me a 225 Bosendorfer that we could afford. He found a 10 year old 200 cm Bose. in a Senator Case which was so beautiful. We often looked at the pictures of it on the internet and he called and negotiated a price which was still over $50,000. (Woods and Son)

He then decided that I could have it if I really wanted it. Oh my! What a gem I have for a husband! :3hearts:

He found classified ads in California: a music teacher in LA has three grands and is selling her 20 year old 225 cm. Ebony, and a person in SF asked for offers on his almost new 225 Ebony.

Then just before we left for Florida the 225 cm Ebony on Ebay, in Dallas no less, said: Price dropped to $49,000, owner very motivated to sell." My husband had done it! Two Bosendorfers for me to choose from. Which one did I want?

But Feurichs, Steingraebers, Bluthners, etc. waited for me to try in Florida. Would I love them more? I was now close to getting one of the finest pianos in the world. I had to try out these Grands that I had never seen or played before buying anything.
Posted by: I. Bruton

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/29/07 09:16 AM

Not to offend, but it's "irking" me...

The lower tones are bass notes, not base.

sorry...


When do we get to learn about the final selection?
Posted by: Derick II

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/29/07 09:46 AM

Monica,

If this is the piano desk you are referring to, I believe it is a Bosendorfer, not Estonia, music desk. It's a little hard to tell from the photo, but it looks an awful lot like music desk.

You can see it below.

Derick


Posted by: Bob Newbie

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/29/07 09:50 AM

like an Afred Hitchock movie! ..the suspense!!
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/29/07 10:40 AM

Wow. I believe that you are correct. I just called Kraig at Peter Collora Piano, He told me that Estonia and Bosendorfer music desks look very much alike. However the Bose's are straight on the top and Estonia are curved. See here.
http://www.petercollorapiano.com/estonia.html
So I posted an incorrect picture. Kraig will send me a correct picture tomorrow. The next chapter will be later today. Thanks for comments and having fun with us.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/29/07 02:13 PM

Feurich Rococo Again[/b]
Mr. Kahn calls. He just got back from S. Africa because his father is doing better. The piano is in a customer's home but the customer has not yet decided to buy it. Mr. Kahn is moving his store down the street and agreed to put the piano in the man's home and let him try it out. "May we see it?" My husband asks. A few days pass. The man has decided to buy an Artcase Steinway that Mr. Kahn is rebuilding. He says that we can come to his store on Friday and see it. Okay, we will hurry to Dallas on Friday evening and play this Feurich Rococo and then fly out of Dallas to Florida very early Saturday to see more Feurichs and the other fine pianos. What a plan this has become!

Friday comes and the plan is to rush to Dallas. I am delayed before getting out of town while trying to buy gas at a Flying J gas station with the best price in town. There were others with the same idea, and after waiting around 20 minutes to get up to a pump (because people were pulling around the other way and cutting in front of those of us in line) I finally fill the tank and leave town. Then a wreck on the highway to Dallas closes the highway completely. Traffic is completely stopped for an hour. We call Mr. Kahn. Will he wait until 8:30 or 9:00 PM when we can get there? He says yes.

Finally we arrive. There it is --- a piano fit for a palace, and the owner is there also.

We walk around the piano admiring its beauty while Mr. Kahn begins to tell us some of the history behind the piano. Then I sit down and begin to play it. I had instructed my husband to walk the dealer or pianos salesperson away from the piano while I played so I would not disturb their conversation and they wouldn't disturb my enjoyment playing it. My husband is into all kinds of piano's details. Ever since we looked at antique Steinways and the dealer went into how he could improve the sound by changing to Abel hammers, he is always asking such questions as what brand of hammers they have. And I want to play and listen and such. Mr. Kahn told him that this piano has Renner hammers but after 20 plus years of not being played very much they are harder and the sound could be improved with needling the hammers or even more by changing them to Abel hammers.

Mr. Kahn used to sell some of the greatest new pianos in the world and he had sold this one brand new in 1984. This piano had had no expense spared in the making of it. There were full ivory keys, not the usual two piece head and tail type pieced together. He tells us the piano has hardly been played since it was new, because it was bought to be a showpiece in a fine home. He tells us how Feurich makes the finest soundboards in the world. They start with a much oversized soundboard. Then they put some very fine sand on top of the board and start to tap on it. The sound waves put waves into the sand which tell where the sound centers of the board are. This allows them to determine where to cut the board to create the most wonderful soundboard. This wastes much soundboard but leaves behind the best.

We are truly impressed, but I comment that this piano looks like it belongs in a castle. The young man who is the owner tells me it belongs in my castle! I smile at him. The piano is beautiful with a beautiful sound and touch which Mr. Kahn says can be improved and there is fading on the trim pieces from sunlight which can be fixed. My husband negotiates a price, just in case... (He likes bargains.) ...and we rush off to the hotel for some sleep before our trip to Florida early the next morning.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/29/07 02:26 PM

That is a gorgeous example of a fancy art case, indeed. But you didn't say much regarding what you thought of the sound! How did it compare to some of the other pianos you have played?
Posted by: jperiod

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/29/07 04:34 PM

Hi Jordang,

that dealers description of soundboard building sounds like what Steingraeber does and is described in their brochure. Also, is this a 227 grand, or is it smaller?

Thanks
JW
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/29/07 07:06 PM

jperiod --- I'll say more about the soundboard on the next post. The size is a Feurich 190 (6'3")

Monica --- The Feurich sounded much to my liking. The bass notes were rich and rumbling and the high treble was clear and bell like. The middle keys sounded clear and well balanced. There was a brightness, which I like, but not too bright and certainly not thin. So this one was definitely on my list of the ones to consider.
Posted by: tm3

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/29/07 08:45 PM

 Quote:
... (He likes bargains.) ...
that cinches it -- now i REALLY want to hire your husband! \:\)

i've heard that story about the sand on the soundboard before, but i can't remember which piano it was about. it was not the one you are describing as i've never heard of that brand before.

this is a great piano adventure!
Posted by: I. Bruton

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/29/07 10:14 PM

I wonder if other companies do the sand test?
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/30/07 12:52 PM

Our Trip To Florida

5:00 AM is early for us, but we were up and rushing to the DFW airport for our direct flight to Orlando. We had a bit of a rough start at the airport because we had not paid attention to all of the new rules, and we had some personal items, like toothpaste and moisturizer with us in a see-through bag, but not a sandwich baggy. We were only taking a carryon, so the airport inspector took our stuff over to a table, confiscated all of the liquid and gel items and threw them away. We probably could have kept most of our things, but we didn't have time to go back through security again just to pick up a couple of baggies that were on the other side. The flight was fine and we got off and rushed to Hertz, then made the hour trip to Melbourne.

We found Atlantic Music after a quick lunch stop. When we walked in I saw a beautiful store with amazing grands. First was a completely restored Bechstein - a wonderful instrument that was like the first one which was not rebuilt. At last, one to play and compare to others we had seen and heard. Next an almost new Bluthner VI. Finally I could find out if this was the piano that my husband was searching to give me. He had purchased some CDs from Bluthner's artists so we could hear the quality and sound of the instrument. The Bluthner was indeed gorgeous sounding, better than the Bechstein. I tried to hear the difference that the Alloquat strings make and it sure has a wonderful treble.

This 6'3" Bluthner had been sold by Brian just a few years ago but a divorcee had returned it to be sold again.

The next one to try was the 5' 6" Steingraeber. We had read that it had an unusually large soundboard and it sounds like a 7' grand.

This SURELY was true. The bass side of the soundboard is about 5" wider than any other piano. You can see the extra space to the left of the keyboard. It also has a very wide tail which allows for an even larger soundboard and more crossover for the strings. So this is why this little piano sounds so very big. After a few trips back and forth between the first three pianos, the Steingraeber was on the TOP of my list.

Then Brian showed us two Broadwoods from the 1850s which he had restored. He wants people to be able to play the type of pianos that Liszt and Chopin played on.


This was great fun, and these old pianos played and sounded better than I had guessed. There were Feurichs, several Mason and Hamlins, a carefully prepped 7' Kawai, and lots of other Steingrabers to play, too. Brian had other Bluthners, also, and lots of uprights to see.

After a while we decided to cancel our plans to go to another store to play Seilers. Now that I had gotten to "taste of the most amazing candy," so to speak, (remember I told my husband not to show the baby the candy, then take it away) I wanted to feast here for hours. We spent all afternoon in this "Piano Paradise".

Finally we approached the 1992 Feurich 196 cm. that we had been looking at on Ebay, which was selling for less than $30,000.

What a beautiful piano! Although I had said I wanted a mahogany, walnut, rosewood, or some piano of brown wood, I knew that I could be happy with one of the finest pianos in the world in ebony if that is what I ended up loving. This piano was the same basic piano as the Rococo version I had played the night before. We asked about the hammers on it and learned that they were Abel. Now I started comparing it with the Steingraebers, M&Hs and Bluthners. I truly loved this rich sound, wonderful touch and action of the Feurich. I played the 7'5" Feurich and listened to it. This was becoming very difficult, having to narrow the choice between these amazing pianos.

We asked Brian if it was true that Feurich starts with a large soundboard, sprinkles sand on it, and taps in several places to produce sound waves in the sand; and then cuts the soundboard to create the best possible one. He says yes and he has watched this process at the Steingraeber factory. He also related that one day he saw a worker at Steingraeber sorting hammers and shanks. The man was tapping them on a table and then putting them to his ear to listen to them, then sorting them. What was he doing? He was listening for the pitch of each wooden piece. Each hammer and shank has a natural pitch which he was matching up with the pitch of the string it would hit. Hammers without a pitch were considered "dead" and thrown away. So on Steingraebers the hammer shanks natural sound corresponds to the area of pitch of the piano and helps to produce its great sound. Amazing!

Now there were more to try out. In the back was a 6'8" Steingraeber. (The cost is too much for us, but I can dream can't I?) It was marvelous! My husband told Brian we wanted to spend no more than $50,000. How much are the Steingraebers? Brian writes prices on a card and gives it to him. He studies it and says that we can afford the smaller Steingraeber in black, even though the cost goes beyond the $50,000. I am thrilled! But that is a lot of money.

There is still a small Bluthner and a very long, very beautiful 9' Steingraeber concert grand waiting for me...
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/30/07 02:24 PM

I'm enjoying reading about your piano search very much but you're killin' me! I'm a guy that reads the first chapter of a book, skips forward and reads the ending and then goes back and reads the rest of the book. I'm dying here! More!

And congratulations on your new piano (I'm assuming you're not just shining us on and that you did actually buy one \:D ).
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/30/07 02:44 PM

Hold on, Greg. We're almost there. The new grand is really sitting in our home now and I'm lovin' it.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/31/07 10:17 AM

Visiting Atlantic Music Center Part 2[/b]

I have played several 9' concert grands on this adventure including Yamaha, Baldwin, Estonia, Kanabe and wonderful, amazing Mason and Hamlin and Bosendorfer. Now here was a Steingraeber 9'. As I started to play it..... I could not believe it! This piano was more than wonderful. \:\)

It was glorious and awesome! Brian told us that he is expecting to sell this piano to the pianist for Julio Iglesias. Julio lives in Florida and is now the largest selling artist of all time (in the world). (I have always liked Julio Iglesias. He is a gorgeous man with a great voice.) His accompanist has come several times to play this Steingraeber in Brian's store for hours, and has arranged to use this piano for his next solo recording. In his story, Brian also added that he has secured the land and is about to build a new finer store with an enclosed recording studio. He believes that most piano recordings do not have the finest recording engineering, and he wants to provide it and with a 9' Steingraeber. WOW!!! Brian wants to add Grotrian and Bosendorfer 225s to his list of pianos in stock so that people can really compare all of the top pianos in one store.

I immediately fell in love with this Steingraeber and was lost in my own world of enjoying playing one of the finest pianos in the world. Everything was perfect on this Steingraeber. If I was a concert artist, this would be the piano I would insist performing on. My experience of this one exceeded my experience at a Bosendorfer and a Mason & Hamlin .......... but all good things must come to an end and finally my husband came over to me and said: "Honey, the list price on this piano is $183,000. Please come over and play the pianos we can afford." Reluctantly I ended the piece of music and drug myself away from the concert grand --- but that's okay. Julio needs that piano, so I'll just get another wonderful instrument that doesn't cost as many $$$$$, and I know I'll be very happy.

So back to the Feurichs, smaller Steingraebers, Bluthners, M&Hs, and the one Kawai. ( I think it was an RX-6. It was almost in the league of the other pianos in our opinion.) Carefully we compared the sound of each piano and the joy of playing them. From this experience, I arranged the pianos in this store in this order - the wonderful, full and grand Steingraeber, the beautiful grand bass and easily responsive treble of the Feurich, the bright and full sounding Mason and Hamlin, and the nice Bluthner. We tried out a newly rebuilt older Steingraeber grand, but it was not as beautiful as the new ones. In this adventure, I had determined that I wouldn't be happy with an antique rebuilt piano. For those who want a beautiful piece of furniture in their homes and are not as concerned about the actual instrument, a rebuilt piano would be just fine. I, too, am attracted to the beauty of their cases. I also tried out a few of the new and rebuilt uprights.

One was a Bechstein upright which my husband thought particularly pretty. I agreed, it was beautiful, but I was not shopping for an upright. For those pianists who are, they should certainly consider these.

Finally the day was over and we asked Brian where a nice seafood restaurant was so we could discuss everything so far. He suggested one a short distance away, we went off to the restaurant then to the beach to talk and make a decision. It was time to finalize the list, scrutinize each piano we had seen, and cross off the contenders until there was only one left. My husband was ready to spend his money and buy my Mother's Day present. What piano did I want most?
Posted by: Mike A

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/31/07 10:20 AM

"In 1836 [Charles] Dickens also began to publish in monthly installments THE POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB. This form of serial publication became a standard method of writing and producing fiction in the Victorian period and affected the literary methods of Dickens and other novelists. So great was Dickens's success with the procedure -- summed up in the formula, "Make them laugh; make them cry; make them wait" [/b] -- that PICKWICK became one of the most popular works of the time, continuing to be so after it was published in book form in 1837."
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/31/07 12:11 PM

I dont want to follow a thread if they go house hunting...
Posted by: Rod Verhnjak

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/31/07 12:38 PM

Jordang,


I look forward to finally finding out what you purchased.
But a comment like the one you made below is a bit, well you know, strange. It all depends on the rebuilder and the work performed.
But every one has an opinion and you have done some major homework.
Rebuilt piano's can be more than furniture and many clients are concerned with the end result.
__________________________________________________
In this adventure, I had determined that I wouldn't be happy with an antique rebuilt piano. For those who want a beautiful piece of furniture in their homes and are not as concerned about the actual instrument, a rebuilt piano would be just fine.
__________________________________________________
Posted by: teachum

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/31/07 12:46 PM

Sorry - but I'm getting tired of this. Enough already. Spit it out.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/31/07 02:54 PM

This is Jordang's husband writing:
Hello Teachum: you won't be 10 years older when you find out--only two days. Full pictures will be in the chapter in two days. Tomorrow she is writing about details of her final list. Then our adventure will last a few more days. (Not as long as American Idol or Dancing with the Stars.)

Thanks Mike A, we loved your quote from Dickens.

Rod, your comments have a lot of respect in our eyes. The rebuilt antique Bechsteins at Atlantic were very nice. We know that the best quality rebuilds are every bit as good as the pianos were new. However, we learned that some of the newest pianos are improved in design over older pianos. In the last few years alone, Seiler and Schimmel have improved scale designs to create richer sounds. C Bechstein has new designs and are putting their old designs in their Bechstein Academic line. M&H have better Renner actions now than their American versions sold up until recently. One H&H dealer we visited beleives that the M&H have improved scale designs also. We have been told that Yamaha and Kawai have improved their scale designs over the last few years also to improve the sound of their pianos.

However we read about some Steinway pianos which are being rebuilt with Renner actions and German hammers like the Hamburg Steinways. So we guess that some rebuilt Steinways could be better than new ones.

So my wife decided that she only would want a new M&H, a new Schimmel or Seiler, or a modern Bluthner or Bosendorfer or August Foester... trying to get the best piano. (These are only our non-professional opinions.)

Sorry Pleyel, Grotrian, Ibach, Bechstein, etc. we didn't get to play your wonderful modern pianos... \:\(
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/31/07 03:10 PM

Hi Jordang, and Jordang's hubby, I've really enjoyed your story, and I like having it in smaller batches than one huge thread I wouldn't have time to sit and read at one time. I'm looking forward to the outcome. \:\)

One small correction: M&H pianos don't have Renner actions; they use Renner Blue hammers but the action itself is made to their specification by Wessell, Nickel, & Gross.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/31/07 03:22 PM

Oh, thanks for the correction on the M&H.
Posted by: Chris W1

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/31/07 03:34 PM

"Sorry Pleyel, Grotrian, Ibach, Bechstein, etc. we didn't get to play your wonderful modern pianos..."

For what you spent, that's too bad.
Posted by: whippen boy

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/31/07 04:03 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Chris W1:
"Sorry Pleyel, Grotrian, Ibach, Bechstein, etc. we didn't get to play your wonderful modern pianos..."

For what you spent, that's too bad.
I'm puzzled about that too. Its not like Bechsteins and Grotrians are that hard to find.
Posted by: Rod Verhnjak

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/31/07 05:24 PM

Monica,

Where is the Wessell Nickel & Gross factory?
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 05/31/07 05:26 PM

Puzzled? These are very hard to find brands for people who do not live in NY or LA. We talked at length about flying to NYC and trying out piano row. Yet the problem there, as we understood it from afar, is you cannot compare many different piano brands in the same store and really go from one piano to the other and back to compare. So in the end we chose Atlantic Music Center to finish our piano shopping as they had many of the best brands to compare closely. We truly applaud Brian for building such an amazing store and he is building an even larger store with more brands. He has already added Pleyel and is wanting to add Grotrian and more Bosendorers.

Comparing pianos is very hard for the non-professional. I know accomplished pianists who know of nothing beyond Steinway. Most of the brands that we tried they have never heard of. But we had a wonderful time and adventure stepping far out of our home town. We have stepped out and now have all of you, who frequent this forum, as new friends to share with the joys of great pianos. Thanks for reading and sharing your comments.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 09:40 AM

Restaurant and My Final Decision[/b]
In a short time we found the restaurant and were lucky to get in without a reservation. We got the last table open, as they were expecting a crowd for the Saturday evening before Mother's Day. The fish dinners that we had were delicious. The sauce for the fresh fish was especially good.

So which pianos had made my final list? In the beginning I thought I wanted a Yamaha grand.
Yamaha C7 (7' Concert)in Denton

When I compared this Mason and Hamlin BB (7') at Peter Collora with the Steinways, a Yamaha C7, Estonias, and Bosendorfers it was the piano which was my measuring stick. It won out over Steinway for me because it had a much richer sound and a wonderful responsive action. It was a Yamaha and Steinway killer.

It was very well prepped and I loved playing it. (Since I fell in love with Yamaha and Bosendorfer pianos as a young woman, this was my first new love as a middle aged woman. ;\) ) The case was quality and very pretty, and I knew I would be satisfied with this one in my home. Its sound was brighter and more to my liking than the Bosendorfers. However the Boses had more refined actions and more emotional appeal.

So on my final list which my husband and I agreed on included this Mason and Hamlin BB in Rosewood; the Nicholas Schimmel 7' - such a big beautiful rich sound with a deluxe ebony and veneer case; a Bosendorfer 200 cm in Senator Case with beautiful veneer, wonderful action, gorgeous sound (I never got to play this piano but only a similar one); a Bosendorfer 225 cm in Ebony in Dallas with the extra keys, warm full bass and wonderful playing action, actually the best sound of the Bosendorfers in our opinion; Feurich 6'4" Rococo case in Dallas - the piano for a castle, but needing touchup and voicing; the Feurich 6'5" Ebony case in Florida, the piano with the richest most pleasing sound and wonderful action; and the Steingraeber and Sohne 5'6" in Ebony, amazing action and rich, clear, strong sound - a dream of a piano.

My husband said; "Honey which one do you want most?" I reviewed everything one more time in my mind and gave him my answer. He picked up his phone at the restaurant and made the call.

"We want to buy your ____ piano. Can we meet you tomorrow, Mothers Day, to finalize the deal?" I heard him say. The answer is "Yes" and everything is set. \:D So we take a walk on the beach and celebrate.

My husband has done it. He has blessed me with my new grand piano, the piano of my dreams! Pretty special to say the least!
Posted by: MarKey

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 10:11 AM

This is a neat story; kind of long, but interesting. There's only one thing that gets me in the gut: Why is your husband buying you the piano? Doesn't the money belong to both of you? If you're married, why do you need him to "give" or "bless" you with anything that already belongs to you? It's year 2007 and it's hard to imagine a wife having to ask her husband for anything that already belongs to her.

I think you got the Mason BB!
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 10:52 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by MarKey:
There's only one thing that gets me in the gut: Why is your husband buying you the piano? Doesn't the money belong to both of you? If you're married, why do you need him to "give" or "bless" you with anything that already belongs to you? It's year 2007 and it's hard to imagine a wife having to ask her husband for anything that already belongs to her.
[/b]
Not to derail the thread or state the obvious but:
  • Most couples don't have unlimited income.
  • Most couples both want things.
  • For inexpensive things, they probably just go ahead and buy.
  • When they both want expensive things, for one to buy, the other must wait.
  • It has nothing to do with permission, rather it's being generous enough, or loving enough, or both, to do without something you[/b] want so the other person can get something they[/b] want.
  • Hence, it's a "gift".
Posted by: mrgoodcat

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 11:05 AM

"Honey, the list price on this piano is $183,000. Please come over and play the pianos we can afford."

\:D \:D \:D
Posted by: atropos

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 12:45 PM

Fun read......

but I can't help thinking that this thread is the internet equivalent of Robert Jordans 'Wheel of Time' books! (readers will know of what I speak)

\:D
Posted by: IrishMak

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 01:18 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by atropos:
Fun read......

but I can't help thinking that this thread is the internet equivalent of Robert Jordans 'Wheel of Time' books! (readers will know of what I speak)

\:D [/b]
Except that, here, we've been promised an END!! Good one, atropos! ROFL
Posted by: mikhailoh

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 01:22 PM

These suspense threads are really very tiresome. I don't really mind details of the journey when you don't know, but once you know what you are buying, it is incredibly narcissistic to drag it out.

I hope you love your new piano, but I find I am no longer interested.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 01:27 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Rod Verhnjak:
Monica,

Where is the Wessell Nickel & Gross factory? [/b]
I don't know, but possibly China? The latest Fine book talks about some of the M&H action parts being outsourced to China; I suppose it's possible the assembly is taking place there, too.

Why do I get the feeling you knew the answer to that question? ;\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 01:35 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by MarKey:
There's only one thing that gets me in the gut: Why is your husband buying you the piano? Doesn't the money belong to both of you? If you're married, why do you need him to "give" or "bless" you with anything that already belongs to you? It's year 2007 and it's hard to imagine a wife having to ask her husband for anything that already belongs to her.

I think you got the Mason BB! [/b]
Hmmm.... I think every married couple works out a financial arrangement that is comfortable to them. I certainly don't consider my husband's earnings to be "mine" (it was his hard work and skill that earned it, after all), nor mine his. So I don't find Jordang's language in this regard at all strange or unusual.

p.s. I'm rooting for the M&H BB, too, but I think it will be the ebony Feurich.
Posted by: tm3

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 01:54 PM

i think it is a well written and entertaining thread.

what i don't understand is, if someone else does not like it (realizing that you can never please all of the people all of the time), why not just not read it? what is the point in being critical?

but really i'm just trying to suck up to the researching husband, so i'll get the inside tip on the RX6 that they passed over! \:\)
Posted by: mikhailoh

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 02:16 PM

Do you understand, tm3, that with that post you are being critical as well, just in a different style?
Posted by: Chris Vienna

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 02:23 PM

I think its pointless to voice your opinion on how you have 'lost interest.' By the way im enjoying this thread. Provide bigger pictures for when you get to the final product. So we don't see pixely pictures.
Posted by: mikhailoh

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 02:27 PM

Well that is where we differ, Chris. I believe if someone is going to tell a story they accord their audience the respect of not drawing it out as some sort of tease for their own amusement. It is called poor manners where I come from.
Posted by: MarKey

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 02:39 PM

I agree to some extent Monica, but it comes across as if she's asking almost begging for "him" to buy "her" a piano. She even said he "blessed" her as if he is a god!! Their money is joint funds by law!

I do, however,understand that someone might say my husband and I agree on this or that, but to say my husband has blessed me is much too oppressive for my taste!

I just can't imagine asking my spouse to buy me something. I can, however, ask for an opinion and an agreement in what "I" wish to purchase.

Different strokes

:rolleyes:
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 02:45 PM

[what i don't understand is, if someone else does not like it (realizing that you can never please all of the people all of the time), why not just not read it?]

Hey now, everybody; calm down. We're new at this having just discovered Piano World not that long ago. I agree with tm3 - if you don't like it, don't read it. Our account of searching for a Grand just evolved into this story, and because we are working together to tell the story (and both of us have jobs) we discuss and edit it usually at night. Don't you think telling one's experiences are personal and narcissistic many times anyway? To those readers who like it, thanks. To those who are bored of it, you don't have to click on the thread everyday. If you want to read the end, check back next week. We should be finished then. When you discover something exciting, the natural inclination is to share it. We had no knowledge of many of these pianos and have found it facinating and a wonderful experience. Our daughter and son-in-law have now decided they want to find a Baby Grand to buy, and another friend of ours is also searching for a piano. This adds to our fulfillment in learning so much and sharing it.
Posted by: Utrumpet

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 02:49 PM

I think Jordang has a future as a suspense novel author. Even those who are becoming annoyed have to agree that their curiosity has been piqued by this intriguing story... \:\)
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 03:00 PM

To Markey and all of the others who object to the language I'm using about my husband. There is a story behind our marriage that you don't know and if you did, you would understand better my feeling of being blessed. I won't even get into that because this is about pianos. I will tell you that I have a Yamaha studio piano and a Clavinova and never thought about having a Grand piano. I probably wouldn't buy one by myself or have given it serious thought because with a large family, health problems, and life in general, a Grand Piano is not an essential that I had to have. It is a gift because my husband decided to give it to me and I had not mentioned it to him at all. It was a total "out of the blue" surprise. He could have gone out and bought one at our local music store in our small city, but he wanted me to get not just any piano, but one that I would truly love. He became involved in searching and researching for it, which opened a whole new world to both of us. I am not a full time musician now, but a public school educator. While music was once my life work, it is now once again more of a hobby. I don't know about you, but hobbies are for pleasure and I have never spent a lot of money on hobbies. A house? Yes. A car? Yes. Insurance, utilities, clothes, gas (!!!), etc. come first. Traveling every weekend was also not something we did. It came with the search. Maybe this will give you an understanding and you won't get stuck on the language. I also hope that your "significant other" shows you that he/she loves and cares for you in just as special ways as my husband has me in buying me a piano. That's the end of my personal input. Let's get back to pianos.
Posted by: Bob Newbie

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 03:22 PM

he sounds like a great guy.. he didn't buy you
a Dyson vacumn..but a piano..something you love.
Posted by: PoStTeNeBrAsLuX

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 03:23 PM

Mikhailoh:
It is called poor manners where I come from.[/b]

Indeed it is.

I'm putting my money on it being an Ellenburg, by the way... ;\) .

-Michael B.
Posted by: ninja8701

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 03:30 PM

Today, I bought my wife a piano. It wouldn't matter if it was a piano or a wrist watch. I think we are about the same age as Jordang and her husband. It's not about who makes more money or whose money it is. Gifts, small or large, are given from the heart. Now I know what some of you are going to say but I'm not kidding!!!!!! And I like reading this thread too.
Posted by: mikhailoh

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 03:51 PM

I will agree with Jordang on one thing. I assure you that when I bought my grand I dang well had my wife's blessing to do so.

I, like Jordang, am lucky enough to be blessed with a mate that holds my happiness as I as I do hers. You don't make major purchases in a marriage without concensus.

But Jordang, you've had the piano for a couple days now. Holding the information back while expecting your audience to take the ride with you is not, IMO, as graceful as I think you are.
Posted by: kluurs

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 04:32 PM

Yeah Mik, but she's either playing the piano or showing appreciation...posting here is probably third best right now. Wonder if she chose the "right" piano...
Posted by: Derick II

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 05:17 PM

Actually, this is one of those "mystery" threads that I've enjoyed - but now I'm wondering if I missed what piano she got???

I'm rooting for Bosendorfer!

Derick
Posted by: whippen boy

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 06:13 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Bob Newbie:
he sounds like a great guy.. he didn't buy you a Dyson vacumn..but a piano..something you love.
I would be overjoyed to receive a Dyson vacuum!
Posted by: mikhailoh

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 06:44 PM

must resist that sucks jokes..... must resist....
Posted by: lynni-j

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 09:54 PM

I'm LOVING this thread and agree if one doesn't like it or enjoy it go somewhere else - quietly.

Jordang thank you so much for the little morsels all along the way - it's been wonderful to come in every evening this week and rush to find out what happens next.

It's generous of you to take your time and share your life with us - I'm richer for it and have learned so much just reading this.

What a blessing to have a husband who loves you so much.
Posted by: lynni-j

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 10:05 PM

"Our daughter and son-in-law have now decided they want to find a Baby Grand to buy, and another friend of ours is also searching for a piano."

I know of a Knabe baby - 5'1" - that I understand has the deepest, stronest bass keys imaginable for a piano this size. Our piano teacher said it makes up in sound what it lacks in size and she would buy it for her daughter if she had the chance.

email me privately for more details - it is not mine but is being sold by a couple I know.
lynda@usmcjosts.com
(Am I allowed to post that here?)
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 11:27 PM

Buying and Work to Get Delivery[/b]
After enjoying an evening on the beach at Melbourne, we drove back to Orlando and checked into a hotel for the night. Early the next morning we turned in our rental car and caught an early flight to St. Louis, MO. We were on our way to buy a piano in St. Louis that we have not told about! A Grotrian Rococo that my husband found at an internet Superstore.




NOT! (He thought that'd be funny to say because of some comments that have been made. Oh well...)

So no, we were just flying back to Dallas. Once in Dallas we went to a Mother's Day dinner with our families where we shared the news and pictures of the piano. Afterwards we hurried out to the piano owner's home and arranged the details of the bill of sale. Mission accomplished!

On Monday my husband begin working with Mr. Kahn over the telephone, on how the touch up work on the Feurich would be done. The problem was that the trim pieces were of a different wood than the veneer case and they had taken the stain differently during the manufacturing process. After staining the pianos was coated with several coats of clear polyester finish and then polished. The piano had been in the living room of a house on a lake with lots of windows and UV rays fading the finish for 20 years. The veneer was only lightly faded and very beautiful in the lighter shade. The trim pieces had faded much more and this made the piano look strange.


Mr. Kahn, who had been involved in the manufacture and rebuilding of fine pianos all of his life, believed that he could brush on colored touch up lacquer over the trim only and then coat these pieces with new polyester clear coat. This made sense to my husband but he wanted a second opinion. So he emailed Mr. Julius Feurich in Germany at the Feurich factory. Mr. Feurich responded promptly and very nicely at length. He suggested that we ship the piano back to him in Germany and he would laboriously remove the polyester finish and then refinish the piano as if it was new. The finishing process is a 12 step process. He suggested that "since we had such a fine piano, it was worth the very large expense!" He has just completed refinishing a Feurich piano like this which was damaged by water in the New Orleans hurricane and flood. (I wonder how many months that has taken.) If we decided on that course of repair, we would finish this adventure story next year when I finally got to play it.!!!
But my husband decided to go ahead and ask Mr. Kahn to touch up all of the trim in lacquer and polyester clear coat as he suggested. It only took 4 days to get the colored lacquer from a specialty dealer and finish the piano. Mr. Kahn also regulated and tuned the piano.

On Friday my new 6'4" Feurich Rococo Grand Piano was delivered. In two or three weeks his special tech will come and again tune and revoice the piano in our home. He wanted to wait until I had played it a lot to see how much the 25 year old hammers change with playing. They may get softer with being played regularly. Currently the hammers look like new, as the piano has barely been played over the years, but age has hardened them.

So this is my new Grand piano!

Since Chris Vienna asked for high resolution pictures, these are links to these same pictures only in higher resolution.
http://www.pianoworld.com/Uploads/files/Feurichme.jpg

http://www.pianoworld.com/Uploads/files/Feurichplayed1.jpg

And here are links to two more pictures in high resolution:
http://www.pianoworld.com/Uploads/files/FeurichHR.jpg
http://www.pianoworld.com/Uploads/files/FeurichHR2.jpg
Posted by: sophial

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 11:53 PM

Congratulations on your new piano-- as you said it's fit for a castle and very lovely ! I hope you have many happy years making music with it. I have to admit, I thought you were going for the ebony Feurich or a Bosendorfer... but this one seemed to have captured your heart and imagination.
best wishes,

Sophia
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/01/07 11:55 PM

These are more pictures of my Feurich Rococo which was made in Germany in 1982 by the Julius Feurich family.

And check back again for three more days as we have two or three more chapters to write! This adventure is not quite over. Thanks for reading and sharing it with us.






These keys are made of Ivory. They are each of one piece. On most pianos with ivory keys each top is made from two parts, the head and the tail. Another neat thing is that the black keys are made from real ebony wood, not painted black.

Posted by: jazzwee

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 12:09 AM

Beautiful piano! I love seeing reflections on the wood and the full size ivory keys are great. I forgot now what you said about how it sounds. You'll have to summarize...
Posted by: lynni-j

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 12:11 AM

If only it were possible to just touch it across the internet....

It is beautiful!!!

I'm so thrilled for you and so envious (in a good way of course.)

Indeed a wonderful blessing and a wonderful gift from your husband.

Do you think he'd help me find one now??? lol - just kidding. We're looking in a market much much lower than what I'm sure you spent!
Posted by: mdsdurango

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 12:15 AM

THAT - is a beautiful piano!

Congratulations Jordang.
Enjoy!
Thanks for the story too. It sounds like the journey was as much fun as the destination.

Mike
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 12:28 AM

Gorgeous
Posted by: bigcake

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 01:07 AM

Congratulations. What a beautiful piano. I will miss checking your post every morning.
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 02:20 AM

Beautiful piano and a great end to the story! Please post a follow up in a month or so and let us know how it sounds after being played for a while.

Congratulations!
Posted by: mikhailoh

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 07:47 AM

Stunning! I will eventually have a Louis XV too. I love the style and we have a number of other French pieces in our home.

Enjoy!
Posted by: tm3

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 07:52 AM

beautiful! congratulations!

i like the twist about the grotian over the internet. ;\)
Posted by: Happyshawtrapp

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 09:12 AM

I realize Jordang there is more however I need to tell you I so admire your lack of impulse control and I think that really speaks to your relationship as well as yourself. You had a faith that there was going to be no pressure. I am so impressed that you could be joined in your search so completely by your husband. What a lovely journey and something that is more precious than the piano itself. Congratulations you certainly are one lucky woman
Posted by: MarKey

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 09:26 AM

Wow! I never seen a piano like that. That is very stylish.

Congrats

After all the mention of prices, you never mentioned how much you ended paying for this.

$$$???
Posted by: ninja8701

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 09:32 AM

Wow!!! The piano I just bought is like an old volkswagon beetle compared to that one. Solid but obviously not on the same scale. That piano is beautiful and all class as are you and your husband.
Posted by: Paret

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 02:07 PM

Congratulations on your new piano.
Thank you for sharing your shopping adventure.
Very nicely documented.
Hope you and your family enjoy the new instrument for many years to come.

Maybe we can meet sometime.I live in Keller (DFW) just NE of Fort Worth.

Posted by: lilylady

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 04:15 PM

Formal Elegance.

I have never experienced an Feurich.

Next, you will need to purchase a ZOOM H4 (check the several pages of posts) for about $270 and make some recordings for us.

;-)

BTW, can we clone your husband?

LL
Posted by: jazzpianist

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 04:39 PM

Great story! Not the instrument I thought you would go for, but obviously a stunning piano nonetheless. I particularly enjoyed all the pics. Thanks.

It would be good to hear some recordings....
Posted by: TX-Dennis

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 06:56 PM

That piano is truly beautiful. Congratulations and enjoy your gift.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 11:07 PM

Postlude[/b]
Why did I choose the Feurich? I will attempt to put into words a description that may possibly relate to you what I heard and felt when I played this piano. While in Atlantic Music Center in Florida I was able to compare the various brands and builds of the pianos. I played excerpts of the same music on each one, moving quickly from one to another. This enabled us to hear the differences in the pianos. Their ebony Feurich had a very rich basso profondo, powerful and bold.

As I play my piano the bass is wonderful even in comparing to the best concert grands on CDs, the high treble tones are very clear and bell like, and the middle keys sound bright and well balanced. There is good sustentation of the tones, also, and the piano sings beautifully. I detect no changes in the sound as the string types change. I thought then and also now that the piano responds so well to my touch and I am able to produce the sounds and interpret the music the way I desire.

Then as I considered the cases, both the Feurich in Florida and the one in Dallas were very nice. However, the lovely walnut case of the Rococo Feruich was the one my eyes and emotions loved the most. In the end the Rococo Feurich had more of everything I wanted than any other piano.... sound, action responsiveness, beauty, and price.
All of our hard work and shopping really paid off.[/b]

And yes, the adventure of the search was wonderful, exciting fun and allowed us to work together in wonderful new ways.

When the piano was placed on the hardwood floor in our house, that particular flooring made the sound seem almost too bright; so we put carpet under it (as you see it in the pictures). As I practice on it more and more, breaking in the hammers, the sound is indeed changing subtlety. It will be fun working with the technician when he returns to tweek the voicing until it is just right.

We are eager to have a new keyboard made, with smaller sized keys, by David Steinbuhler of www.Steinbuhler.com . We will remove the keyboard and action and ship them to him in a box which he will provide. He then makes many measurements and enters them into a computer which designs a new smaller keyboard to be a perfect fit for my piano. He then uses computer guided milling machines, which he normally uses to make textile machine parts, and creates a new custom keyboard. He can put a new Renner action stack on his keyboard or reuse most of the parts from my current action stack. Some people want two complete keyboards and actions so than in about 15 minutes then can change between them.

I am saddened that I will have to put my beautiful keyboard with ivory and real ebony keys into the closet, but if I or someone ever wants to use regular size keys it will be easy to change. The local techs have agreed to regulate, voice, tune or whatever we need when the transition takes place. I also think it will be very beneficial for children learning to play the piano. I plan to teach piano again someday. After a summer of loving my piano, and school restarts, we will send the keyboard off for measurement and then onward to an even finer piano.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/02/07 11:13 PM

More about the Steinbuhler Reduced Size Keyboards:[/b]
David Steinbuhler will put wider wood blocks on each side of the smaller keyboard so that it looks fit for the piano. Then he will ship the two keyboards back to me to have a local piano tech regulate and voice the piano with the new keyboard. During this process I will be faced with the hard choices of how I want to improve the current state of the piano. Do I want different hammers to have a little different sound? Do I want to change the touch weight to be lighter or harder? Do I want it regulated to change the balance of the voicing of the piano? These will be challenging questions for me as I have never approached such questions before. We have been learning about different hammers and touch weight and voicing and piano design balance as we have been on this learning adventure. Now we will be working with two local RPT (a husband and wife team) to learn more and make decisions.

Why am I changing the keyboard? I have small hands and have always had to roll the large full chords and jump to reach distant intervals. In his piano research, my husband discovered an article from the University of North Texas about students giving concerts on a smaller Steinbuhler keyboard. He became excited about this because he had heard me complain about how my small hands limited me. He shared this new information with me and I also became excited. We learned that Southern Methodist University, as well as other universities including Texas Tech and University of Nebraska at Lincoln, have been conducting research for a few years on how using smaller keyboards for students and professors with smaller hands have resulted in fewer injuries and discomfort for them.

To read this research:
Http://www.steinbuhler.com/html/our_research.html
Http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1002&context=musicpresentations
This is an article in Wikepedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_keyboard

I contacted a piano professor at SMU and arranged to go and try the Steinbuhler keyboard that she has on her Steinway in her studio. She was very helpful in talking with us and letting me spend as much time as I wanted playing her Steinbuhler keyboard. I found that it did take some adjustment. When I first put my hands on the keyboard to play an octave, she warned me to look down. The span that I use to play an octave was now about to produce a ninth. She explained to us that it normally takes her students 30 minutes or so to adjust so that they don't miss notes. I found that I did adjust in about that length of time. I had to watch the keyboard more at first, but it was not as difficult as I had thought it might be. The professor also said that she takes her Steinbuhler keyboard with her when she performs in various concert halls on Steinways Concert Pianos size D; and has learned to have it set up in by a tech in about 4 hours. Because I am now playing for my own personal enjoyment and for my friends and family who ask me to play something for them, I want to be able to tackle music that had been too difficult for me 30 years ago. My former piano professor, who I talked with about buying a new piano as we began our search, cautioned me that it would mess me up to practice on a smaller (7/8 size) keyboard, then perform on a regular size one. I tried to explain to him that my performing days are most probably passed, so I don't anticipate having to learn something at home then perform it elsewhere. If I do play something for church, I can always practice on my Yamaha, or switch the keyboards back.

When we were telling Brian Gotchell of Atlantic Music about the smaller keyboards, he told us that Steinway had made custom smaller keyboards for the great pianist Josef Hoffman. We then bought books about this famous pianist and also read about this. Hoffman was great on regular sized keyboards, but with his small hands (small for a man) he was even greater on a reduced keyboard. We have also heard that Bosendorfer made reduced size keyboard pianos for a famous woman pianist, but we have not yet learned her name.

By the way, Beethoven Pianos in NYC is selling Steinbuhler keyboards. Kraig made the comment that he would like for piano makers to put these in their pianos because there are more and more teachers who want them for their students. Charles Walters is the first to agree to put them in their pianos, verticial and grands.
Http://www.beethovenpianos.com/tuning6.php

Article by Dr, Carol Leon of SMU
Http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2493/is_6_52/ai_n6090014

Website of pianist Christopher Donison
Http://www.musicbythesea.ca/keyboard.html
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/03/07 01:43 PM

Congratulations, Jordang! It's always nice to hear when people have found the piano of their dreams.

Please do update us as after you get the reduced keyboard in and give us your impressions and a photo or two. \:\)
Posted by: John Citron

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/04/07 10:41 PM

Jordang,

Congratulations on your new piano! I've been following your piano journey since you started, and I'm so happy you find your instrument.

In regards to your smaller keyboard. This is interesting to me because I play early keyboard instruments where the keys are normally smaller, or about the size that your new keyboard will be.

It's interesting to note that the keyboards had keys that were once much wider than they are today, and actually varied quite a bit between instrument manufacturers and the country that the instruments came from.

The harpischord keyboard became narrower when the French builders started a renovating (a ravelment) process on older instruments. In order to fit the larger range into the smaller case, the keys had to be made thinner to make up the difference.

This thin-key size then become the norm on harpsichords after that, and later on the early pianos. So if you ever decide to play a harpsichord, or a fortepiano, you won't have any trouble getting used to it because the keys will be the right size for you!

John
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/04/07 11:33 PM

Interesting. Thanks for the info.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/08/07 10:55 AM

ENCORE[/b]

In our travels to many piano stores we met many wonderful piano
salespersons who treated us so nice and had such professional
knowledge. Several were of such personal character that they were very
nice to really help us, even when they knew that they did not have the piano
that we were looking for and they would make no sale to us. We really
thank them.

One man we met who was in this very professional category and he also was
the most interesting man we met. He talked with a slight foreign accent
and had an amazing command of piano knowledge which he shared generously
from. He was a man in his mid 50's who had spent his entire life in the
piano business as his parents were the owners of a large piano factory
in South Africa. He had spent his life traveling the world building his
family's piano business while building his own store in Texas.

We thought that several people who frequent this forum would like to
meet him. Of course many people here already know him and we thought they
might like to know how he is doing.

We are speaking of Mr. Ivan Kahn of Encore Pianos in Dallas, part of the
Kahn's Pianos Group.

We were amazed to learn of his education. He has four
college degrees, including Business and a Doctorate of Law. As a young man he
wanted to get out of the family business of pianos which began with his grandfather
in Germany in 1886. (His grandfather and a friend formed the Bernhard
Steiner Piano company, which moved to South Africa in 1903. Their
company worked with several companies around the world making and buying
pianos from each other, including Ibach, Sauter, Dietmann, Knight, Ajello,
Otto Bach, Kawai, SamIck, and others). But Ivan decided he did not like lawyers,
and he enjoyed the people in the piano business much better. In 1978 he and his
wife, Lesley, immigrated to the US to build the Bernhard Steiner wholesale business
and to start a piano store in Dallas selling some the finest brands from around
the world. They have raised three daughters who have continued the family tradition
of earning college degrees, (but not building and selling pianos). (Ivan's
wife has degrees in Math and Physics.)

He has long traveled the world dealing with the piano factories,
building dealers, selling pianos at home, rebuilding pianos, and raising
a family. When he left S. Africa in 1978 he was not allowed to bring
any money with him. But he could bring new and used pianos. (Big
baggage.) So he brought many old German pianos which he rebuilt in
Dallas to sell at a profit. He opened a store to sell the rebuilt
pianos, Bernhard Steiners from S. Africa, pianos from Europe and Korea
with the family names on them, and other famous German pianos.
Now with the many changes in the piano business, his business inventory
got to be too great and his sales too little and he almost lost his
business. He is in the process of restarting the business at a new
location in Dallas on Midway Road. Currently, most of his business is
rebuilding (which he loves) American grands and selling the best Chinese
pianos he can find, some of which carry the Bernhard Steiner and Dietmann
names.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/08/07 11:09 AM

Bernhard Steiner Piano Brand History[/b]

I am going to share just a brief retelling of the long story Ivan told us. If you want to know more about the details of the pianos which I mention below, just call him at his store with the model number and he can fill in all of the other information.

Bernhard Kahn and Hans Steiner started their piano company in Germany in 1886, and moved the factory to S. Africa in 1903. The world wars so damaged the piano factories in Germany and England that companies often contracted with the S. African company to build pianos for them. They built pianos in co-operation with Gors & Kallman, Ibach, Sauter, Dietmann, and other German companies and Knight and Ajello companies
of England. By the 1960's they stopped making their own grand pianos and moved the production of the main line of Bernhard Steiner grands to the Kawai factory in Hamamatsu, Japan. Ivan's father Billy (Bernard)and his mother Pearl, often visited Japan and Ivan smiles when he recalls that his mom, Pearl, was one of the first non military European women to visit Hamamatsu after the war, staying in what was then called the Grand Hotel, a "Western Style" hotel with Tatami mats as beds!.

In the meantime they continued the full production of verticals and also professional studio pianos from parts manufactured by Kawai and the German company, Sauter. Sauter also manufactured a German version of the Bernhard Steiner grand which was sold in Europe and South Africa. A few of these beautiful, but expensive pianos, found their way to the USA through Ivan's Dallas store.

In the early 1970's, Billy forged an alliance with Young Chang in Korea, and many Bernhard Steiner pianos, designed by the Kahns, were produced by Young Chang. By 1980, Samick of Korea was producing the Bernhard Steiner pianos for the American marketplace. These were sold by Ivan in Dallas, alongside their South African produced pianos, and throughout the USA.

Uprights were made in S. Africa until 1996, From that time, all the Bernhard Steiners sold in the USA were manufactured by Samick. Mr. Kahn worked with Samick, changing scales and including many European parts,such as hammers, on the Bernhard Steiner pianos. These "improved" pianos later
evolved into the very successful "World Series" line of pianos distributed by Samick America.

In recent years, arrangements have been made to move production of Bernhard Steiner and Dietmann pianos to Chinese manufactures, including Hailun of China.

If you want to know more about any of these pianos, Ivan Kahn can be reached at 972-233-2014 or ivan.kahn@encore-pianos.com.
Posted by: hotkeys

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/23/07 11:53 PM

What a wonderful story! Your musical journey with this piano is just beginning...may you experience the ultimate joy of playing the piano! Best wishes and many happy years with a beautiful instrument!

- Mark
-----------------------------------------------------------
...The ultimate joy in music is the joy of playing the piano...
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/24/07 06:30 PM

Telephone call from Julius Feurich[/b]
A very wonderful thing happened yesterday.

We have also learned that there are many unexpected advantages from buying a hand made piano from a small manufacture... \:D
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/24/07 06:41 PM

I have enjoyed reading your story.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/24/07 10:04 PM

Wow! What a treat to get to speak to the owner of the company that made your piano personally. I bet your jaw just dropped open when you answered the phone and discovered who was on the other end. \:\)
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/24/07 10:42 PM

Well not quite. Brian had talked to my husband the day before and arranged the Saturday morning telephone call. My husband was so excited that he spilled the beans to me the night before. I knew he would call sometime and I had time to think about what I was going to say. I was still terribly excited as you imagine. So was my husband, he had to tell several friends about it.
Posted by: teachum

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/25/07 12:21 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
Wow! What a treat to get to speak to the owner of the company that made your piano personally. I bet your jaw just dropped open when you answered the phone and discovered who was on the other end. \:\) [/b]
Very lovely piano. Dr. Indrek Laul of Estonia pianos called me after mine was delivered as well. It was a real honor to talk with him. My sister actually had the honor of having him play her piano in her home and sign her plate!

P.S. - Mr. Jordang - I do not watch American Idol or Dancing with the Stars. \:D I generally find TV to be a waste of time when there's a great piano in the house.
Posted by: schwammerl

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/25/07 03:38 AM

This is very nice indeed, manufacturers calling customers after delivery.

I wonder how many dealers[/b] are effectively calling their customers within a week or two after delivery? All too often I read posts of the kind "my piano was delivered a months ago...there was a little problem with...I called the dealer and he sent a tech over to...". I am afraid the number could well be something between "none and very few". This should be a standard procedure in many if not all B to C business transactions.

Benefits for the customer:
* peace of mind
* strenghtened realationship with dealer
* customer feels valued etc..
Benefits for dealer:
* proves his service claims are not merely lip-service
* anticipation is always better than reaction
* avoids customer spreading negative publicity
* or even customer is running to the competition in the (near)future etc..

schwammerl.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/26/07 01:16 PM

My dealer called me the night the piano was delivered. I was irritated because I was playing as he called and didn't want to be interrupted. I think I said rattled off something like "I-was-playing-it-when-you-called-it's-beautiful-
thanks-for-everything-goodbye." \:D
Posted by: RLeBlanc

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 03/26/08 07:54 PM

Your travels are wonderful, and there is nothing like a quest for some goal to make a big trip extra interesting. However, I am surprised that in all your research you apparently haven't encountered the Mason & Hamlin. I have a 1913 Mason & Hamlin AA (6'-2") completely restored, and it has that big warm full sound you want! Mason & Hamlin is in business again, and I just played their new 9'-6" concert grand. Words cannot describe how wonderful it is! It blows away every Steinway and Bosendorfer I have ever played (including the Imperial). Of course, at $90K+ it should. But check out Mason & Hamlin pianos in general. They are incredible!
Posted by: Rod Verhnjak

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 03/26/08 08:34 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by RLeBlanc:
I am surprised that in all your research you apparently haven't encountered the Mason & Hamlin. [/b]
__________________________________________________

Look at Jordang's tag line
Posted by: RLeBlanc

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 03/26/08 10:52 PM

Oh.... heh! I didn't read so carefully... But there are larger M&H pianos available now. They are hard to beat.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 03/26/08 11:48 PM

Thanks for reviving this thread. So much has happened since we wrote this story. When we finished the story we had just gotten our wonderful Feurich. It was much later that I learned that feurich means "fiery" and it was even later when my husband learned how to pronounce "Feurich'. :rolleyes: Several of the posters said that my husband was likely to get addicted to shopping for pianos. Well he did. :p We have been shopping in different stores and he is planning a visit for us to Piano Row in NY next month. Meanwhile he honed his internet shopping skills until he found a great buy on a recently completely rebuild M&H A in Walnut. (New soundboard, pinblock, and new action. So new strings and finish, etc.) It was being sold in an estate sale in Boston. He had it inspected, bought and shipped to us. He has paid for tunings and regulation on it. It is very nice and is more beautiful than we imagined. Yet it does hot play or sound as nice to me as the Feurich. Then he ordered the Steinbuhler 7/8 th size keyboard for our Feurich. It arrived and was regulated a couple of weeks ago. I am loving it. So we will start a new thread with pictures of it. Meanwhile he found a good deal on a Bòsendorfer 225 which had gotten mice in it while the piano was sitting in an emphy estate home. So he bought it and is having Ivan Kahn and his shop return to its new glory. They just got there last shipment of parts from Bòsendorfer today. We we hope to have it in a month where it may well replace the Mason. That will depend upon my heart once it gets here. :3hearts: I have to chose between three lovely grands!! (My husband just learned how to make an o with an umlaut last week, alt key with 149. Smart guy.)
Posted by: apple*

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 06/14/08 09:47 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Jordang:


My husband said; "Honey which one do you want most?" I reviewed everything one more time in my mind and gave him my answer. He picked up his phone at the restaurant and made the call.

"We want to buy your ____ piano. Can we meet you tomorrow, Mothers Day, to finalize the deal?" I heard him say. The answer is "Yes" and everything is set. \:D So we take a walk on the beach and celebrate.

My husband has done it. He has blessed me with my new grand piano, the piano of my dreams! Pretty special to say the least! [/b]
I can't believe i totally missed this thread last year. it's delightful to read your detailed account. Best wishes for a future filled with music and happiness.
Posted by: anna maria habermann

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 08/08/08 03:48 PM

hallo Jordang,
did you never play a FAZIOLI grand piano??
It is a very wonderful instrument, with an easy keyboard and a rich sound, plenty of armonical effects...
You must fill this gap on your researches!!!
You need came to Italy, to see the Fazioli's factory... or perhaps you can go at the next music exibition in Los Angeles, where you could find the Fazioli's instruments.
ciao
anna maria h.
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 08/08/08 04:31 PM

Greetings Dr. Habermann. Thank you for reading our "Adventure". You are so right about the Fazioli pianos being wonderful. This last February we played several and started a thread which then mostly changed to a thread talking about the merits of Steinways... PW Fazioli Thread

We wrote:
After reading about several people commenting that they had played Fazioli pianos at the International Piano Gallery in Little Rock, AR we decided to visit there yesterday. What an amazing place! The owner is Steve Whitkowski who until recently was the Fazioli importer. He also sells Mason and Hamlins, Schimmels, Kawai, and a large number of rebuilt antique German grand pianos. Man! did I have a wonderful time playing his pianos.

My husband and I were truly amazed at the facility that Steve has recently completed. In addition to having several large show rooms with wonderful pianos, he has built the Windsong Arts Center. It has a 310 person concert hall with wonderful acoustics and an amazing stage, a full recording studio, and a hall to host weddings and receptions with a large kitchen and such. His stage has a floating wood floor with a crown like a piano sound board so that the stage amplifies the sound like a piano does.

People who want to record can use the concert hall stage or the large recording studio. Pianists can use any of his amazing pianos. This is where Herby Hancock recorded his recent award winning album.

I began by playing Rachmaninov preludes and a Beethoven sonata on the Fazoli 228 grand. What an exciting experience that was! The piano was an instrument of perfection. The action and touch were wonderful and the sound was amazing! We wanted to compare this piano with the Mason and Hamlin A and AAs he had there. There was no comparison in the quality of the action or the sound.

I walked to other places in this beautiful facility and played a number of rebuilt large grands, Ibach, Bechsteins, Bluthners, etc. They were beautiful to look at, but they did not sound or play as well as the Fazoli pianos ---- but were closer to the M&Hs in quality. Then Steve took us to a Steinway D which he believes is as fine as a Steinway can be. I am not a great admirer of Steinway, and it did not impress me. [Embarrassed]

Steve then took us to his recording studio where he has a 9 foot Fazoli concert grand and a 10 foot concert grand. He uncovered each one and told me to try them out. Wow! The only piano that I have ever played which compares to these is the Steingraeber concert grand which I played last May. Amazing pianos! What a grand experience!

Before we left Steve had me play two twin Fazioli 228s. They have serial numbers next to each other so that they were made at the same time, by the same people, voiced by the same man, etc. They both were true perfection to play and to listen to. Neither was too harsh or brash as some have suggested of a Fazioli. Yet they did not sound just the same. One sounded bolder and richer in the bass. The same piano was warmer and brighter. Steve also said that they sounded different and he preferred the same one as I did. He opinion as to why they sounded different was that even though Fazioli goes to great effort to chose the most wonderful wood for the soundboards, each soundboard sounds different, just as of the fine Stradivarius violins, each sounds different. [Wow!]


Since you designed an ergonomic piano bench be sure and read our thread about an the new ergonomic smaller keyboards by Steinbuhler.
PW Steinbuhler Thread

Ciao[/b]
Posted by: anna maria habermann

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 08/08/08 06:11 PM

Smaller keyboard??? OK, I know the idea...
You couldn't believe, but I want tell you my (sad) history about. (Excuse me for my simple english)
I had an ugly adventure with my inter-changeable smaller keyboard for piano: PATENT n.00239023, registered "only" in Italy by "Jacobacci e Perani" in Torino-the 1996 october 7th-
In this time I was too stupid.
During the Frankfurt music exibition -in March 1997- I displayed my project and the pictures of prototype, realized for my Blüthner, to "herr" Kluge,who made keyboards.
After six months an american friend sent me an article published on "Wall street Journal" about a reduced keyboard, entitled "Ms Reimann wants to make world safe for small pianist" -as you can see on W.S.Journal of tuesday november 4, 1997- The keys' measures -reported on the article- were the same of my project, and the factor was an "unnamed man" who made keyboards for a famous german piano factory! I found also a similar article on the magazine Piano Today (fall 1997)...
NO COMMENT... Anyway it was too expensive for me appeal to law, and perhaps it could be also useless because I didn't have extended my patent (a worldwide protection was inconceivable...)
C'est la vie!!!
ciao
anna maria h.
Posted by: apple*

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 08/09/08 09:57 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by anna maria habermann:
Smaller keyboard??? OK, I know the idea...
You couldn't believe, but I want tell you my (sad) history about. (Excuse me for my simple english)
I had an ugly adventure with my inter-changeable smaller keyboard for piano: PATENT n.00239023, registered "only" in Italy by "Jacobacci e Perani" in Torino-the 1996 october 7th-
In this time I was too stupid.
During the Frankfurt music exibition -in March 1997- I displayed my project and the pictures of prototype, realized for my Blüthner, to "herr" Kluge,who made keyboards.
After six months an american friend sent me an article published on "Wall street Journal" about a reduced keyboard, entitled "Ms Reimann wants to make world safe for small pianist" -as you can see on W.S.Journal of tuesday november 4, 1997- The keys' measures -reported on the article- were the same of my project, and the factor was an "unnamed man" who made keyboards for a famous german piano factory! I found also a similar article on the magazine Piano Today (fall 1997)...
NO COMMENT... Anyway it was too expensive for me appeal to law, and perhaps it could be also useless because I didn't have extended my patent (a worldwide protection was inconceivable...)
C'est la vie!!!
ciao
anna maria h. [/b]
that's too bad anna maria. You seem to have some very interesting contributions to the world of pianos. I hope you post more often.
Posted by: Norbert

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 08/09/08 03:20 PM

Congratulations to your new Feurich!

Like Stuttgart's Pfeiffers, these can be really outstanding instruments, not widely known but often terrific!

Norbert
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 08/10/08 07:01 PM

Thanks Norbert. I have heard of Pfeiffers, a person in our town has one and I found the Pfeiffer website. Our Feurich is trully a wonderful piano and we have continued to try out other high cost pianos to compare and enjoy playing. \:\)
Posted by: Barbara G

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 08/10/08 07:40 PM

Dr. Anna Maria Habermann,
I am surprised and amazed to find that you also have worked on a smaller keyboard. Do you have a smaller keyboard for your Bluthner?

It now appears from your post, that several people in the world have worked on this problem in the last several years. David Steinbuhler started working on this problem more than 18 years ago. He has found encouragement here in the US from many people but not much support from piano manufacturers. I believe that he is not aware that you or anybody else has worked on this problem.

You should contact him, and maybe you two could work together, if you like, because I believe he needs people in Europe to help him. Together you both could accomplish more.

I would love to hear more about your keyboard and your efforts.
Posted by: anna maria habermann

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 08/11/08 06:16 AM

I search to explain how I started to conceive my keyboard with "narrow keys": this happened after my impossibility to lengthen my fingers to play Scriabin's first etudes op 65! The only one solution was to reduce keyboard's wideness ...
I tought also that the children -who play string instruments- could begin their studies with a correct hand's position, having smaller instruments. Since that's impossible for piano, I conceived a narrow keyboard with a complete plank, easily "inter-changeable". I found two handicraftsmen -the "Barra sons" of Torino- who realized the prototype for my Blüthner. It is obvious that every different piano model needs a different axial structure, therefore I went in Frankfurt to search some piano manifacturer who would take(purchase)my project/ or could realize two keyboard for each piano model: the smaller one for children or woman with little hands,the normal for other people... I was thinking that the Japanese piano manifacturers should be interested, but I found many difficulties to have a meeting with them. Someone adressed me to herr Kluge... you know the history...
The Barra-sons were very elderly...and passed away some years ago. I don't know if ms. Annah Reimann is still carrying on narrower keyboards: she wrote (february 1998)that had an associate, Ludwig Tomescu, who after 15 years experience working with Steinway & Sons, become indipendent and was travelling around the world to repair grandpianos.
That's all... If you want you can send this letter to mr. Steinbuhler
ciao
annamaria
Posted by: Bob Newbie

Re: Our Adventure to the NEW Grand w/pictures - 08/11/08 09:53 AM

This is a great example of how much need there is for a narrower keyboard.. it is not a "niche" market..now if piano manufactures can get it through their "thick" heads..that if you build it they will come!(and buy!) \:\)