Feurich or possibly Hailun?

Posted by: Chris H.

Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 10:37 AM

I'm hoping to be in a position to buy a grand in the next couple of years and so have started looking at what's available. Unfortunately my budget is not huge. I should be able to find about 10k (uk pounds) which it seems doesn't buy you very much new piano over here. Initially I was thinking along the lines of a used Yamaha or kawai and might still go down that route as I have a nice U1 upright which I use daily for teaching and practice. It's served me well for a few years now and will be kept on as a teaching instrument.

As far as new pianos go I've been out of the loop for a while and haven't been keeping an eye on what's going on in the world of pianos. In particular Chinese pianos which in reality would be the only instruments available brand new within budget. A while back I played a nice wendl&lung 178 grand which I believe is branded Hailun in the US? Hailun seems to be well respected on these boards and I was impressed at the time. Looking at them now it appears that they are now called Feurich in the UK as the Feurich name was purchased by wendl&lung last year.

Does anyone know if there have been any changes since they became Feurich? Or if the 178 is exactly the same piano as a Hailun?

Also there is the similarly priced Brodmann to consider which I believe is slightly bigger.

I will of course be going to play them but it might be a while since neither is available locally so I would appreciate any opinions from people who have tried one.
Posted by: Steve Cohen

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 10:47 AM

I believe BoseEric, a regular here represents Feurich in the U.S.

You might want to PM him. He should be able to answer your questions.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 11:51 AM

Why not a quality used piano? I bet you could get a very nice one with your budget.
Posted by: Seeker

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 01:59 PM

There's a British ex-pat, Paul Barton, who plays (what I believe to be)a Feurich made in China. Barton lives in Thailand now. Here's a link to one of his videos where he plays his Feurich... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w49hnFQCA8Q. You might consider contacting him through his YouTube channel and ask him about his piano.
Posted by: Chris H.

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 03:13 PM

Thanks seeker, that link didn't work for me but I did manage to find a video of Paul playing his Feurich 218 and it seems very nice indeed. That particular model is priced around 16k over here which I think is good value for a big piano. I can't really accommodate that size so around 6 foot would be good.

Steve, I'll try BoseEric a little nearer the time when I'm in a position to go and look. Thanks for that.

Mark, a used piano might still be the best choice. Only problem is that there are very few modern used grands on the market prices are very high. Today I played a 1978 Yamaha G3 which was 10k and to be honest it was twangy and horrible. There was also a nearly new C1 but it was priced only slightly less than a brand new C1X. I would like to find a bargain private sale and still might but it's like looking for a needle in a haystack. Dealers are all over sites like eBay and places where the public advertise their pianos so anything good gets snapped up quickly.

Not long ago I wouldn't have considered a new Chinese piano but these ones look like they could be worth serious consideration.

Any thoughts on Brodmann? I believe it's the 187 so slightly bigger than the Feurich and only a little more expensive.
Posted by: turandot

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 04:34 PM

For you I recommend a Steinberg IQ 77 with heavily lacquered hammers. grin

Hi Chris,

When W&L first had the Hailun franchise for Europe, they touted their Vienna pass through where all their Chinese Hailun pianos were fine-tuned and regulated before release. When W&L neared the end of its run, there was some grumbling among Euro dealers that that procedure had been replaced by a warehouse in Holland that simply re-routed from China to the dealer. For whatever reason, Peter Velektsky opted out of W&L, and Feurich took over the franchise.I don't know exactly what their arrangement is.

As Steve Cohen suggested, Eric Johnson (Bose Eric here) would be a good one to contact. Eric has a hand in prepping the Chiense Feurichs for the US market. Since he's responsible for getting the brand off the ground here in open competition with Mother Hailun, I'd guess that our Chense Feurichs receive a high level of pres-sale attnetion. I'm sure Eric knows the set-up in Europe. The company is pretty small.

You might want to check Chris Venables also. Chris stocks the Hailun 180, a newer design, as a Venables Academy house brand. He posts sound clips and prices on his site. He also carries the Brodmann 187. It's another contender, but a little higher priced.

http://www.chrisvenables.co.uk/pianos/venables-and-son/venables-academy-180-grand-piano.htm
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 04:36 PM

I'm not a fan of Chinese pianos and someone who will seriously be using the piano to teach and play seems would be better off with a more quality product. Too bad the uk market makes it difficult to find what you really want and need.

Brodmann seems to be the best one on your list based on what I have heard. I found the Hailun to be sterile in sound, but that could be just me.

Hope you find a an inexpensive cherry out there...you teachers deserve the best.
Posted by: Chris H.

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 04:55 PM

Turandot, don't joke about that IQ77! There is one for sale not too far from me in a dealership and I swear it's the same bloomin' piano I used to have, there seems to be a small scratch to the left of the keys which mine had haha! It's up for sale at a lot more than I let it go for but I wouldn't want to go back there anyway.

I would do things a little differently this time around as I'm still unsure if my smallish room is really a suitable environment. It will need careful research and lots of auditions which is no hardship. That steinberg was so bright and loud it used to make my ears ring if I played anything meaty so I want something more mellow in character.

I know chris venables has the Brodmann and have listened to the sound clips on his site. I think I prefer the 187 to the bigger one from the recording although it could be different in the flesh. Never knew about the Hailun being their house brand though. The showroom is a fair distance from me but my brother lives down that way so I might be able to combine visiting him with a trip to their dealership. As far as I know they are the only place to sell Brodmann in the UK.
Posted by: Chris H.

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 05:05 PM

Mark, that kind of echoes the thoughts of my tech who looks after the Yamaha. He always pulls a face when I mention Chinese pianos but I thought things had moved on quite a bit in recent years? Much as I like my U1 it's hard to imagine that a brand new grand wouldn't be a step up.

I am generally a Yamaha fanboy and enjoyed playing the CX grands in London the other week. Even the small ones were lovely. These are probably beyond me but I have yet to try something like a GC2 which isn't too much more money. Then there's the kawai GE30 as well. It might be smaller but I don't mind that as long as the quality of sound is pleasing.
Posted by: turandot

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 05:07 PM

Chris,
I remembered that you found the IQ a little overbearing. That's why I added lacquered hammers to enhance your enjoyment. grin

Neither the Brodmanns nor the various children of Hailun are powerful in the way the IQ 77 is.

Chris Venables is the British distributor for Brodmann pianos. Chris is worth an in-person visit even if you have to walk there.
Posted by: Chris H.

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 05:29 PM

Lacquered hammers? It was like firing bullets at steel cable. Shame really because in many ways it was a good piano, the action in particular. But it had to go for financial reasons as well, such is life.

I will certainly try the venables academy 180, it's bang on budget. And they also carry the full Yamaha range as well to try and tempt me into huge debt!
Posted by: 4evrBeginR

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 08:03 PM

I think for someone who likes the Yamaha action, I have been quite impressed with Brodmann. I think it is based on or is from Renner. A lot of the Chinese pianos are perfectly fine sounding for their price, but I find their action not nearly as good as Yamaha. My Essex upright (Steinway/Pearl River), to me sounds better than the U1, but the action is inferior without a doubt, and I had the entire action completely regulated at some cost even though it was brand new. I would never imagine a Yamaha requiring that much prep. Of course, now it is done I'm quite happy with it. Oh, yeah, two notes began to make strange clicking sounds due to defective glue joints at the hammer shank. Steinway happily covered the technician's cost for the repairs through warranty. No problem, but again, never had any such issue with our Yamahas.
Posted by: PianoWorksATL

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 09:34 PM

While it is not yet across the board for Chinese pianos, even the worst offenders 5-7 years ago are much improved. I could tell stories about any brand (even those most highly thought of, often mentioned on this forum), but in general, most problems we learn about now are related to a goof in production or shipping, not deep construction flaws from badly cut corners.

I remember Asian makers that sent us pianos that flared at the sides or had keybeds with ripples, pot metal action brackets, keys that gave kids splinters, true junk. It takes a long time to erase those memories - much longer than it took to change the manufacturing culture of some of these piano manufacturers.
Posted by: BoseEric

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 09:42 PM

The Feurich 178, while originally based on the 178 plate, is quite different from the Hailun product. I don't mean to diss Hailun, just we are focusing on different touch and tone ideals. We now have our own assembly line withing the Hailun factory, with our own (Feurich) staff on site to oversee our production and QC.

Feurich is a separate company, and we use Hailun as a contract manufacturer. We have our own idea of how pianos should feel and sound and tweak some basic Hailun models to match that ideal. We have also developed some unique models, including the 115 vertical and the upcoming 179 grand that are ours alone. The piano world benefits from options.

The best recommendation is to try any and all...and don't listen to those who make any kind of categorical statements ("don't buy any pianos made in Sri Lanka..only buy those made in Western Montana").
Posted by: ando

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/07/13 10:37 PM

Originally Posted By: BoseEric
The Feurich 178, while originally based on the 178 plate, is quite different from the Hailun product. I don't mean to diss Hailun, just we are focusing on different touch and tone ideals. We now have our own assembly line withing the Hailun factory, with our own (Feurich) staff on site to oversee our production and QC.

Feurich is a separate company, and we use Hailun as a contract manufacturer. We have our own idea of how pianos should feel and sound and tweak some basic Hailun models to match that ideal. We have also developed some unique models, including the 115 vertical and the upcoming 179 grand that are ours alone. The piano world benefits from options.

The best recommendation is to try any and all...and don't listen to those who make any kind of categorical statements ("don't buy any pianos made in Sri Lanka..only buy those made in Western Montana").



I've heard this line from several of the companies working with the Hailun 178, but no matter how many times I hear it, I never hear specific details about what makes their version of the Hailun so different, or any better. It's always intentionally vague stuff about "quality, touch and tone." As far as I'm concerned, they are all Hailuns and all resemble the original Hailun model - not that there's anything wrong with that.
Posted by: BoseEric

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/08/13 07:30 AM

different hammers (Wurzen felt, different density, different pressing), different strings, different action ratios. Different options including the harmonic pedal, our own silent/midi system, and further customization options that we are offering in the US. The Distribution Center concept which requires that each and every Feurich gets set up and prepped. In fact, no Feurich gets ANY voicing or hammer work at the Hailun factory, allowing us to impart the specific European flavored tone we are looking for once the piano arrives. The Feurich 178 is morphing into the 179 which has a completely new plate design and casting.

BUT, a laundry list means nothing if one doesn't like the result. Try the pianos, buy the one you like. We're about offering an option, not taking over the world.
Posted by: Steve Cohen

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/08/13 09:32 AM

Originally Posted By: BoseEric
different hammers (Wurzen felt, different density, different pressing), different strings, different action ratios. Different options including the harmonic pedal, our own silent/midi system, and further customization options that we are offering in the US. The Distribution Center concept which requires that each and every Feurich gets set up and prepped. In fact, no Feurich gets ANY voicing or hammer work at the Hailun factory, allowing us to impart the specific European flavored tone we are looking for once the piano arrives. The Feurich 178 is morphing into the 179 which has a completely new plate design and casting.

BUT, a laundry list means nothing if one doesn't like the result. Try the pianos, buy the one you like. We're about offering an option, not taking over the world.


Great reply!

[I missed you at NAMM.]
Posted by: Chris H.

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/08/13 10:12 AM

Thanks for the replies and Eric, that information is really useful. By the time I'm ready I imagine the newer model will be available. Can't wait to try them out!
Posted by: Norbert

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/08/13 12:24 PM

Just back from a mid-sized town in B.C. where we just delivered a Chinese 50" upright and a 7' grand.

The owners invited their teachers in the evening who all took turns playing the pianos.

The Oohs and Aahs never stopped despite one of the teachers owning a well known high end grand.

Judging pianos by origin is one thing, judging specific models by what they deliver, quite another.

There would have been a number of pianos from "other points of origin" coming to mind that would have been almost toys in comparison.

As long as we keep talking in mere generalities as constantly suggested here by some, we're not talking about what's actually going on out there today.

When given the right opportunity, even experienced pianists will be able to tell how things have moved on.

From all I heard, Feurich pianos are just one of several other makes having made incredible progress offering a great instrument today.

Norbert
Posted by: turandot

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/08/13 05:25 PM

Originally Posted By: Norbert
Just back from a mid-sized town in B.C. where we just delivered a Chinese 50" upright and a 7' grand.

The owners invited their teachers in the evening who all took turns playing the pianos.

The Oohs and Aahs never stopped despite one of the teachers owning a well known high end grand.
Norbert


You know the old saying 'round these parts Norbert -- if you don't have pictures, it didn't happen. grin
Posted by: RX2Bunny

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/08/13 10:27 PM

Hi BoseEric, when will the 179 be out in the US market?
Posted by: BoseEric

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/09/13 07:16 PM

I'm hoping by fall
Posted by: musica71

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/10/13 10:28 PM

I am really confused as to why Feurich would "sell" their name to a Chinese outfit. I recently purchased a German Feurich (refurbished by the factory) and was told that the German made Feurich is superior to the Chinese. I wonder which Feurich Mr. Barton plays?? I'll bet it is a German made. Mine is a glorious instrument, will need some work to get it and keep it where I want it to be...it is like a new piano. I can tell you there is a great difference in price between the Chinese and German made Feurich!!
Posted by: RX2Bunny

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/10/13 11:24 PM

I think Paul Barton plays Feurich 218. I have seen a few videos of him playing on the 218. here's the spec of this particular model: http://www.feurichusa.com/index.php/model-218-grand
Posted by: turandot

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/11/13 01:30 AM

Originally Posted By: musica71
I am really confused as to why Feurich would "sell" their name to a Chinese outfit.


To get a toehold in the Chinese market. Piano sales are down in the US and down in Europe. The Chinese market is thriving and expanding. Entry by a foreign company is helped by partnering with a Chinese one.

If the Feurich/Ningbo partnership prospers, Feurich may be able to ramp up production a bit in Germany. There hasn't been much in the past few years. The name won't do much good if Feurich dies as a German brand, and it's not really fair to pre-judge the Chinese product without seeing and playing it. Hailun provides a good platform for grand pianos and big production capacity. Feurich is not alone in noticing that.
Posted by: Chris H.

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/11/13 07:50 AM

Paul Barton plays the Chinese built feurich 218.

The German built feurichs do still exist as far as I know and are simply branded JF pianos.

JF pianos
Posted by: BoseEric

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/13/13 08:03 AM

Feurich did NOT sell to a Chinese "outfit".
Wendl & Lung, founded by Ernest Bittner is headquartered in Vienna. Hailun has no stake in the new Feurich except as a contract manufacturer and, recently, has been acting as distributor in China.

Feurich sold to Wendl & Lung because a tiny, high priced German maker needed resources in the form of cash and distribution to survive. Wendl & Lung needed a new name and wanted to add German made pianos to its product line supporting its European background and sensibilities.

With some surprise, two years after having sold his company, Julius Feurich has voluntarily withdrawn from his licensing agreement and apparently plans to make pianos under the JF name. The new Feurich, which I represent, will be adding German made pianos, under the Feurich name based on Feurich designs, to its product line.
Posted by: ando

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/13/13 08:32 AM

Originally Posted By: BoseEric
Feurich did NOT sell to a Chinese "outfit".
Wendl & Lung, founded by Ernest Bittner is headquartered in Vienna. Hailun has no stake in the new Feurich except as a contract manufacturer and, recently, has been acting as distributor in China.

Feurich sold to Wendl & Lung because a tiny, high priced German maker needed resources in the form of cash and distribution to survive. Wendl & Lung needed a new name and wanted to add German made pianos to its product line supporting its European background and sensibilities.

With some surprise, two years after having sold his company, Julius Feurich has voluntarily withdrawn from his licensing agreement and apparently plans to make pianos under the JF name. The new Feurich, which I represent, will be adding German made pianos, under the Feurich name based on Feurich designs, to its product line.


I find it all a bit silly. The original Feurich name has nothing to do with the current one. How is this any different to all the stencil pianos which bare no relationship to their founders? I'd prefer to see a new brand enter the fray than to see "JF" pianos being made by the real descendant of the Feurich family, and "Feurich" pianos being made by a people with no connection to the original Feurich company other than a desire to trade on their name.

I get that contracts were signed and deals were made, but it just sits uncomfortably with me. I like things to be what they seem. Imagine having to explain that convoluted history to every new customer who wants to understand the heritage of the brand...
Posted by: BoseEric

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/13/13 08:45 AM

Both Ernest and I agree. It was certainly not the original intention. But, because of the rather baffling (to me) actions of one individual, it is now the situation.

Who says this is a dull business? You can read more at www.highendpianoguy.com
Posted by: Chris H.

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/13/13 09:15 AM

Eric, I thought I got all this but am now a little confused.

Are Feurich pianos built in China, Vienna or somewhere in Germany? And when you say that 'Hailun has no stake in Feurich pianos except as a contract manufacturer..' does that mean that the Feurich is made by Hailun, and if so does it not share the same basic design as a Hailun?

I'm just interested really. To me a good piano is a good piano and if it comes at a reasonable price then I'm not complaining. I don't really care where it was built. But I can see how some customers would be attracted to a Feurich because it sounds German or indeed they might think it is made in Germany. German pianos have always been thought of as amongst the best made and highest quality. I thought this was why Chinese manufacturers used German sounding names for their pianos.
Posted by: Steven Y. A.

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/13/13 09:47 AM

nvm did some research clarified some confusion..


http://www.feurich.com/en/innovative_production
Made in China by Hailun.



http://www.juliusfeurich.cn/Products.html
There were the same company, in 2002 Ye bought 52% of stakes to save them from bankrupt. Then moved the production in China.
in 2008 Julius Feurich passed away, JF starts to lose money again, been said Ye spent 20 million Yuan from 2004-2010 to fill the gap. Then Ye decide to quit, but Julius Feurich does not have enough money to pay back Ye's 52% stakes. In the end Julius Feurich decides to give the name "Julius Feurich" to Ye and changed their name to "Feurich".

Now JF is completly made in China, but still shares some roots with Fuerich since the production was already moved to China. and Hailun makes the new german Feurich pianosl.
Posted by: BoseEric

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/13/13 11:33 AM

Ummm, close but not quite correct.

The Julius Feurich brand, formed from an earlier partnership between Julius and the Chinese maker Artfield is for Chinese domestic sales only. This brand is unrelated to the current Feurich, headquartered in Vienna, and Hailun. In fact, if you see the Julius Feurich brand for sale outside of China, please let me know.

The Feurich models shown on www.feurichusa.com and www.feurich.com are made for us under contract by Hailun. We started with some standard Hailun models and added our own tweaks and customizations (originally developed as the Wendl & Lung brand). We are expanding out from that. For example the model 115 vertical, designed by Rolf Ibach, is our own exclusive design, as is the upcoming 179. Still made for us by Hailun, but our exclusive model.

As of right now, today, there is not a Feurich built in Germany. There was one as of earlier in 2012, but Julius withdrawing from the agreement ended that production. We (the NEW Feurich, an Austrian company headquartered in Vienna) is developing new German production of models built on original Feurich designs. This German production has always been important to the concept and we're not going to let Julius going his own way change that.

I know, it's a mess! The original concept was much much cleaner. However, we (including me)are proceeding because we, collectively, think we are bringing something important to the piano industry. Some innovative thinking is already available, including the 4th Harmonic pedal, a Feurich exclusive. There is more coming.

I've gotten to know Ernest and his crew in Vienna and really believe in his vision and capabilities. This, at heart, is still a European company. I know that is easy for skeptics to dismiss, but I don't care. My interest has always been in the European approach and sensibilities and that hasn't changed. I have never had any interest in simply marketing some Chinese stencil brand and that has not changed. Yes, it would have been much more effective if Julius had chosen to stay involved, but that didn't happen and, frankly, I'm not loosing too much sleep about it.
Posted by: BoseEric

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/13/13 11:43 AM

Just a thought, there are very few makers today managed by people whose name is on the fallboard. I can only think of Charles Walter, Sauter, Steingraeber and Hailun and one should include Overs and Stuart. Maybe there are others but I can't think of any. Michael Spreeman put somebody else's name (Ravenscroft) on his piano! Yes, Henry Steinway died just recently but I don't think anybody could claim that he played a managing role.

It is also wrong to dismiss all others as "stencil" brands. They are Brand Names. Nobody would call Boston a stencil I think. Even with Samicks broad range of products, they all have individual designs and characteristics and marketing approaches that make me very hesitant to just dismiss them as stencil. True, some are age old names that have no design connection with the original designs, but I think that is a good thing. Piano technology has progressed a lot!

Stencil brands were more common when dealers wanted their own exclusive brand but that practice is not very common anymore.
Posted by: Supply

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/13/13 05:12 PM

I think the list of makers is a bit longer than that. Förster, Blüthner, Schimmel, Grotrian, Pfeiffer, Shigeru, Fazioli come to mind right away. There are probably other piano companies which, although the name of the CEO is not the name on the fallboard, exhibit much more continuity of production designs, ideals, philosophy etc than all those German and American branded pianos now made in Asia.

The name Feurich still stands for a high-end and very musical piano. I wish them all success, no matter if they are built in China, Vienna, or in Mr. Feurich's own workshop!
Posted by: turandot

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/13/13 05:42 PM

Originally Posted By: BoseEric
Both Ernest and I agree. It was certainly not the original intention. But, because of the rather baffling (to me) actions of one individual, it is now the situation.


Baffling? It's pssible that the fiery passion was doused by the industry landscape, nagging debt carried forward, a cultural clash, and the difficulty of adjusting to becoming the rear wheels on a front-wheel-drive car. Whatever, your optimism is commendable.

I don't know if you're aware of it Eric, but JF was a member here for one brief day in 2009. There had been some forum chatter about the stalls and starts during Feurich's previous couple of decades and possible affiliations with China (Ningbo specifically, not Artfield). There was a member here who was heavily invested in a 'new' Feurich he had bought through the Melbourne,Fla. outfit that I believe you've had dealings with. The member was troubled by that chatter and driven to affirm the purity of his instrument, which I recall he later sold.. A connection was made, and JF came on board for a day.

Upon his arrival JF was greeted by assorted forum bon vivants and malcontents. [No! Not me! I was so stunned by the occasion that I bundled my fingers in duct tape grin] It got pretty funny at one point when JF asked if he needed to address the question of "a nameless" (a member who went by an avatar).

Anyway, here's some of what he had to say at the time. It may be interesting to look at it against the backdrop of known reality.

Quote:

I wanted to come back to several subjects I have read the last days, in this forum.

The first comment I would like to make is, that the present number of pianos in production does not mean anything about the SIZE of a company. It Has been said that Feurich is making 20 high end pianos only. This is correct in terms of grand pianos. Together with vertical pianos we are making about 50 pianos on total.

It also has been discussed several times if or if not Feurich has been made in Germany. I can assure you personally that every single FEURICH piano is hand made in Gunzenhausen, Germany. I am happy to wellcome anybody who wants to convince himself with a visit in Gunzenhausen. I am most upset if bad rumors are brought in this small branch, because we ALL does not need this kind of fence-war. Very disappointing that many of these rumors are installed by other manufactures and competitors. This does not tells about style and good education



Full text here

http://www.pianoworld.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/1259031/1.html
Posted by: Norbert

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/13/13 07:25 PM

Quote:

Hailun Piano is an 'in demand' component supplier for numerous piano brands.


Thinking if the 'full list' of those brands which are being suplied by Hailun [and have for a while now..] comes to light, a few more feather will be ruffled.

And minds boggled...

Including all those who have paid a premium price for a "European piano" basically 100% made by Hailun in China.

Norbert
Posted by: BoseEric

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/13/13 09:17 PM

As much as it pains me, I am quite confident that the instruments claimed to come out of Gunzenhausen over the past 5 years did, indeed come out of Gunzenhausen completely. I've seen the process and results with my own eyes and ears.

Julius has explored different partnerships but I do not believe that what was represented as German made was in fact something else.

Other brands, who knows?
Posted by: musica71

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/13/13 10:40 PM

Well I can tell you as the new owner of a refurbished at the factory in Gunzenhausen Feurich 197 (6' 6") built in 1989 (and serviced at the factory, one owner)...this is a wonderful piano. The sustain is incredible, the bass powerful, the treble a dream. I seemed to be always searching, though my 6' 3" Schimmel was a good piano. I am no longer searching!
Posted by: BoseEric

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/14/13 08:55 PM

crap Jurgen...you have clearly informed my on how truly shitty my memory is. How could I forget my friends in Lobau and Dr Christian of course, well, maybe a future friend in Sacile. Schimmel, OK. Grotrian? Please explain that connection. Kawai...really? wow! Didn't know ... really?

My most humble apologies to these great family piano makers, most of whom I've met in person. I have no excuse, except age and the fact that I grew up in the 70's.
Posted by: Minnesota Marty

Re: Feurich or possibly Hailun? - 02/14/13 09:03 PM

The Kawais:

Koichi
Shigeru
Hirotaka

Direct family tradition of piano building. The fallboard has always borne the family name.