Save the Music - Bach in the Subway?

Posted by: Piano World

Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/22/10 07:10 PM

He's playing to save the music
By Tawanda Scott, CNN
October 21, 2010 9:06 a.m. EDT




New York (CNN) -- It is fear that drives Dale Henderson down into the subways, lugging his large case.

"I caught some fear from some other musicians that classical music is dying and in 100 years there will be no more classical music. I can't believe that's true. I mean, it scares me to my soul if it were true."

So he sits with his cello on a New York subway platform and plays Bach as a sort of CPR to keep his style of music alive.

Henderson has played cello since the age of 5, making his professional debut at age 13 with the Buffalo Philharmonic and earning a degree from the New England Conservatory of Music.

When he first moved to New York in 2008, he played for tip money that he needed to survive. He now supports himself by teaching cello and playing at recitals and solo performances.

Henderson stopped accepting tips in 2009 and began focusing on Bach Solo Cello Suites. His website says he chose them because their "power and beauty unfailingly inspire great appreciation, joy and deep emotion in those who hear them."

"From the first time I ever started Bach in the Subways, I had a sense of conviction of the value of what I'm doing," he said. "I think that Bach in the Subways is providing something meaningful to the people who hear it."

Some commuters immerse themselves in the harmonic sounds as they pull out their cameras to record the experience, and others just stare, as if they are captivated by the ambience.

Postcards propped on his silver music stand read, "I do not take donations."

"I don't collect donations while I play, because on the most simple level, it pollutes the experience for myself and everyone listening," he said.

"I think the most obvious answer to the question why am I doing this without collecting money on my own time is that I love it," he said. "The interest is growing, so I think it's working."

Some listeners take a postcard from the music stand to learn more about Henderson and his music.

"The most memorable, satisfying moments happen when there's a group of people listening to me and connecting with the music, and it creates this other space -- this other realm that we can all come together in. And that's an incredible thing ... that's the magic of music."


http://cnn.com/video/?/video/living/2010/10/20/bach.subway.save.genre.cnn
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/22/10 07:25 PM

That's pretty neat! I wish it were that easy to get a piano on the streets. I'd love to do things like this!

And I love his choice of pieces, hehe. wink

And the best part is, he can play as many "concerts" as he wants! If I could perform as much as I want...
Posted by: How you doing?

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/22/10 08:43 PM

I'm kind of shocked that when Joshua Bell did something similar no one actually stayed to listen but when this guy does it he actually gets a lot of attention!
Posted by: bellamusica

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/22/10 09:50 PM

Originally Posted By: How you doing?
I'm kind of shocked that when Joshua Bell did something similar no one actually stayed to listen but when this guy does it he actually gets a lot of attention!


Haha, maybe what got the attention was the "No Donations" sign! laugh

Also, a cello is probably a bit less commonly seen in this setting than a violin. At least in my own experience, I have seen multiple street violinists, but never a street cellist.

Those are my unscientific hypotheses at any rate...
Posted by: eweiss

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/22/10 10:23 PM

There's nothing to save. If people like the music they'll listen to it. If not, they won't. It's that simple folks.
Posted by: ChibiSF

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/22/10 10:25 PM

Ooh! I'm in NYC frequently, perhaps one day I'll spot him.
Posted by: bellamusica

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/22/10 10:36 PM

Originally Posted By: eweiss
There's nothing to save. If people like the music they'll listen to it. If not, they won't. It's that simple folks.


I totally agree.
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/22/10 10:38 PM

Originally Posted By: eweiss
There's nothing to save. If people like the music they'll listen to it. If not, they won't. It's that simple folks.


Do you think it may be more appropriate for him to use the word "promote" instead of "save"?
Posted by: Lingyis

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/22/10 10:39 PM

59th st? hmm... i guess he doesn't play on the 66th st station since that's the lincoln center and juilliard stop...
Posted by: Victor25

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 02:27 AM

Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Originally Posted By: eweiss
There's nothing to save. If people like the music they'll listen to it. If not, they won't. It's that simple folks.


Do you think it may be more appropriate for him to use the word "promote" instead of "save"?


Yes! And he should get donations for a good cause (I won't mention Iraq and wikileaks here :P)
Posted by: Nikolas

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 04:05 AM

First of all, the cello is a bit underrated in all, and as a monophonic basically instrument it doesn't gather that much attention as the piano does... So it's not that weird that people haven't heard the Bach cello suite! In fact I haven't and I don't feel that bad with myself!

Then, it's this silly argument of music dying. Completely silly! We don't need preachers around the road to promote that loudly, we need education! It's nice and all, but let's face it the Joshua Bell experiment was aiming at the opposite end!

So, yes, a nice promotion, nice advertisement for himself but that's about it. Sorry frown
Posted by: lilylady

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 07:10 AM

Nice that he shares himself and his music.
Posted by: GeorgeB

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 07:18 AM

Originally Posted By: Lingyis
59th st? hmm... i guess he doesn't play on the 66th st station since that's the lincoln center and juilliard stop...


haha, the people that pass by there have certaily listened to alot of music *cough* juilliard people*cough*
Posted by: Bart Kinlein

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 07:48 AM

Quote:
let's face it the Joshua Bell experiment was aiming at the opposite end!



Explain, please.
Posted by: Mostly

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 08:45 AM

Originally Posted By: eweiss
There's nothing to save. If people like the music they'll listen to it. If not, they won't. It's that simple folks.

One could object that classical music often is an acquired taste - and how could people acquire it if they aren't exposed to classical ?
Sometimes art and culture isn't as simple as just "liking it" ; sometimes you need time, education, hard work even. Not everything is "ready to be liked".

So I disagree, and I think this quote illustrates a pretty sad train of thought, and often dominant thought.


Quote:
the cello is a bit underrated in all, and as a monophonic basically instrument it doesn't gather that much attention as the piano does...

Well, it's obviously no piano (but then, what is !), but the Cello's probably my second favorite instrument.
Posted by: Nikolas

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 10:19 AM

Originally Posted By: Bart Kinlein
Quote:
let's face it the Joshua Bell experiment was aiming at the opposite end!



Explain, please.
The Bell experiment was spread because it was THE JOSHUA BELL who wasn't attracting THAT MUCH attention. On the contrary here we have someone who isn't Joshua Bell and indeed he is attracting attention!

So on one case: "People are not listening to music, despite having one of the best violonists playing. It's sad that music isn't coming through", while on the other "A cellist is saving classical music and things are going better all the time.".

And yes, I also adore the cello (and actually most of the other symphonic instruments), but it remains a monophonic mainly instrument and as such, for the general public less attractive as a solo. (at least I think).
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 10:26 AM

Originally Posted By: Nikolas
First of all, the cello is a bit underrated in all, and as a monophonic basically instrument it doesn't gather that much attention as the piano does... So it's not that weird that people haven't heard the Bach cello suite! In fact I haven't and I don't feel that bad with myself!

Then, it's this silly argument of music dying. Completely silly! We don't need preachers around the road to promote that loudly, we need education! It's nice and all, but let's face it the Joshua Bell experiment was aiming at the opposite end!

So, yes, a nice promotion, nice advertisement for himself but that's about it. Sorry frown


Bet you would've felt different if it wasn't Bach but your music wink
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 10:44 AM

I think the Joshua Bell subway performance didn't get many people staying to watch his performance at least in part because he did it during a time when many were going to work.

I definitely agree with the cellist about his concern with classical music dying out. One only has to look to the % of the population that regularly listens to classical music or consider the financial problems facing some orchestras and classical music radio stations.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 10:49 AM

Originally Posted By: Nikolas
So, yes, a nice promotion, nice advertisement for himself but that's about it. Sorry frown
I don't think he's doing it as an advertisement for himself.
Posted by: apple*

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 10:58 AM

Originally Posted By: eweiss
There's nothing to save. If people like the music they'll listen to it. If not, they won't. It's that simple folks.


centuries of Bach conveys that he is liked.
Posted by: eweiss

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 12:00 PM

Originally Posted By: Mostly
One could object that classical music often is an acquired taste - and how could people acquire it if they aren't exposed to classical ?

Sometimes art and culture isn't as simple as just "liking it" ; sometimes you need time, education, hard work even. Not everything is "ready to be liked".

If we're talking about liking music for music's sake, then it is that simple. In fact, that's a good litmus test. As far as culture goes, that's another subject entirely. You shouldn't have to study the culture the music came from to like it. You either do or don't. Amazing how so many think they need to 'understand' something other than actually enjoying what they are hearing.

Perfect example ... I hate brussels sprouts. You can tell me they're good for me. You can tell me how healthy they are. It won't matter. I'll still hate em.

Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 12:07 PM

Originally Posted By: eweiss
If we're talking about liking music for music's sake, then it is that simple. In fact, that's a good litmus test. As far as culture goes, that's another subject entirely. You shouldn't have to study the culture the music came from to like it. You either do or don't. Amazing how so many think they need to 'understand' something other than actually enjoying what they are hearing.


But it makes such a difference if you do study it. And it kind of opens your eyes to it. Instead of thinking Prokofiev got inspired by video games.. or something retarded.. you could read up on Prokofiev, or the war, or Russian history.

I used to hate Shostakovich before I started giving it a chance, and particularly reading about his life and how he composed music. Then I understood a lot of things, it just clicked. Of course it would've been different if I lived back then, when his works were premiered and people loved them - because I would've understood the exact circumstances and the way people felt. But without knowing any of that, it's quite easy actually to dismiss a composer such as Shost.
Posted by: eweiss

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 12:10 PM

Another example. Rap music. You could say ... if you don't understand the culture, you won't get it or like it. I don't like rap music. I 'get' the culture it comes from. Still don't like it.

Why is it so hard for some to admit they don't like something and leave it at that? No need to force feed 'culture' to someone. Judge and evaluate music on its own terms.
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 12:43 PM

I didn't say that studying the culture will automatically make you like the music. But it still has a chance that once you understand it better you will see it in a different way. Don't dismiss something simply because you have no clue about any aspect of it. Ignorance is bliss, eh?

Sure, judge music on its own terms but really, you're going to refuse a little bit of extra educaton about something? Why? If anything, it's interesting on its own. It's not that difficult to read a book.
Posted by: Elene

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 12:59 PM

Classical music is sure going strong in Asia.

Elene
Posted by: Mostly

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 01:40 PM

Originally Posted By: eweiss
Originally Posted By: Mostly
One could object that classical music often is an acquired taste - and how could people acquire it if they aren't exposed to classical ?

Sometimes art and culture isn't as simple as just "liking it" ; sometimes you need time, education, hard work even. Not everything is "ready to be liked".

If we're talking about liking music for music's sake, then it is that simple. In fact, that's a good litmus test. As far as culture goes, that's another subject entirely. You shouldn't have to study the culture the music came from to like it. You either do or don't. Amazing how so many think they need to 'understand' something other than actually enjoying what they are hearing.

Perfect example ... I hate brussels sprouts. You can tell me they're good for me. You can tell me how healthy they are. It won't matter. I'll still hate em.


You obviously have no clue.
Having a weird feeling, I checked your post history, and saw a few points you tried to make on this forum ; then it all came back to me.

Even your example with the brussels sprouts shows you don't really understand what I meant, and I do believe I conveyed my point decently. Would a great French chef working in a famous restaurant use brussels sprouts in some of his cooking, even if he himself doesn't like them ? He probably would, because he knows that for centuries, people have come up with great menus involving brussels sprouts, and that they can provide an enjoyement different than other foods.
It has nothing to do with how healthy they make you, how intelligent you need to be to eat them, how knowledgeable of the brussels sprouts history you are ; it has to do with learning how to appreciate (and here, make) fine cuisine. That's also why cooking can be an art form, and not simply a mean of sustaining yourself to live another day.

I really have nothing against you, but your close-mindedness is a widespread plague, and apparently a cure has yet to be found.

"Understanding" a taste for something is really different that understanding a mathematical equation.
You might not like brussel sprouts because they taste bad, and one could make that argument. But a dish with brussel sprouts in them ? Many dishes have a very complex taste, made of several flavors, that need rigorous training (and lots of practice) to be perceived. Likewise, much of classical music require an ear (that is to say : a brain) trained to perceive what makes it good. Because it is a complex object, and at best, trying to perceive it as a whole "as is", you would only hear a blurred mess.
That's why "pop"(ular) music exists ; it doesn't require much training to be enjoyed because it is relatively simple most of the time (or on a different complexity level, relying on sounds rather than pitches, etc.)
Posted by: eweiss

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 02:09 PM

Originally Posted By: Mostly
It has nothing to do with how healthy they make you, how intelligent you need to be to eat them, how knowledgeable of the brussels sprouts history you are ; it has to do with learning how to appreciate (and here, make) fine cuisine.

No need to learn how to appreciate something. Life's too short. You like it or you don't. For example, do you like tuna testicles? Because that's what I saw the host of Bizarre Foods eat on the Travel network. He didn't seem to like it even after an explanation of how good it is for you.

Originally Posted By: Mostly
I really have nothing against you, but your close-mindedness is a widespread plague, and apparently a cure has yet to be found.

Widespread plague?

Originally Posted By: Mostly
Likewise, much of classical music require an ear (that is to say : a brain) trained to perceive what makes it good. Because it is a complex object, and at best, trying to perceive it as a whole "as is", you would only hear a blurred mess.

No brain required here either. You either like it or not. For example, I just was turned on to George Crumb right on this forum. Never heard of him before. I listened to this 'classical' music and liked it immediately. All that is required is to listen.
Posted by: Mostly

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 02:13 PM

*sadface*
Posted by: eweiss

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 02:18 PM

My wife dragged me to an art museum with one of her friends. Her friend went up to one of the docents and asked "what can you tell me about this painting?"

As if she couldn't learn all she needed by just looking at it and evaluating it on her own. There's no need to look to an external source when 'evaluating' art. Trust your initial reactions. Something people have a hard time with because they think they're supposed to think or feel a certain way. Usually the way the 'experts' tell them to.
Posted by: apple*

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 02:25 PM

to each his own
Posted by: Keith D Kerman

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 02:59 PM

Originally Posted By: eweiss
My wife dragged me to an art museum with one of her friends. Her friend went up to one of the docents and asked "what can you tell me about this painting?"

As if she couldn't learn all she needed by just looking at it and evaluating it on her own. There's no need to look to an external source when 'evaluating' art. Trust your initial reactions. Something people have a hard time with because they think they're supposed to think or feel a certain way. Usually the way the 'experts' tell them to.


If someone's initial reaction to an explanation about art is one of enjoyment, should they dismiss it because an expert told them that is not the way to enjoy art? How about if someone regularly notices that they more deeply enjoy art, even art they already enjoy, once they know more about it? Should they then dismiss those feelings because an expert tells them they shouldn't experience art with any external insight beyond the art itself?
Posted by: eweiss

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 03:01 PM

Originally Posted By: Mostly
You obviously have no clue.
Having a weird feeling, I checked your post history, and saw a few points you tried to make on this forum ; then it all came back to me.

Checked your post history too. Now it all makes sense.
Posted by: eweiss

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 03:05 PM

Originally Posted By: Keith D Kerman
If someone's initial reaction to an explanation about art is one of enjoyment, should they dismiss it because an expert told them that is not the way to enjoy art?

Of course not. But why bother with that when the painting is hanging right in front of you.

Originally Posted By: Keith D Kerman
How about if someone regularly notices that they more deeply enjoy art, even art they already enjoy, once they know more about it? Should they then dismiss those feelings because an expert tells them they shouldn't experience art with any external insight beyond the art itself?

I can only tell you how I would approach it. For example, I mentioned liking the music of George Crumb. Never heard of him before. Never read about him. I listened to his music and liked it. Now, if I want to learn more, I can without bringing in an 'experts' bias telling me why I should or shouldn't like it. smile
Posted by: btb

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 03:18 PM

One wonders whether Dale Hendersen isn’t giving classical music a bad name ... his scraping of the cello with his dismal Bach repetitions are an insult to the world of classical music ...
the cello has been used to grand effect in so many masterpieces ... one thinks immediately of the works of Dvorak (or the familiar Swan in Saint-Saens Carnival of the Animals.)

Or is Dale just practising in company to get the feel the stage prior to an examination ?
Posted by: Keith D Kerman

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 03:34 PM

I once tasted a cheese that I thought was terrible. An expert told me to try that cheese again with a specific wine. The combination was sublime.
I hated sushi upon first trying it. I tried it again and still hated it. Because I was dating a girl that loved sushi, I kept trying it. About the 7th time I tried sushi, something shocking happened. It became deliceous. It is now one of my favorite foods.

Music and art can be that way.
Posted by: Victor25

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 03:38 PM

eweiss, your opinion is respected just like any other here, but I'm starting to see a pattern here. You are free to express your opinion, but this is starting to turn into a fight... AGAIN.
Posted by: Andromaque

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 04:29 PM

Originally Posted By: Nikolas
... So it's not that weird that people haven't heard the Bach cello suite! In fact I haven't and I don't feel that bad with myself!




Nikolas, you can't be serious.. Are you??
Posted by: Nikolas

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 05:54 PM

Originally Posted By: Andromaque
Originally Posted By: Nikolas
... So it's not that weird that people haven't heard the Bach cello suite! In fact I haven't and I don't feel that bad with myself!




Nikolas, you can't be serious.. Are you??
Actually I am... I don't think I've heard the piece, unless it's also transcribed to a number of different instrumentations (which is the case to some Baroque or earlier works for semi-obvious reasons).

And, yes, I don't feel that bad that I don't know a single work pointed out...

Angelina: Bach vs little 'ol me? heh... I think I'd love any help I could get, but anyhow let's not get into this.

Let me rephrase myself, because I probably went a little too far: A nice gesture, that's for sure. I don't think any music genre is dying, and certainly not Bach's music. At the same time I think that the story is not news worthy, while it is extremely nice. That's all I think. The Joshua Bell, as I said, was aiming at the opposite idea (that nobody actually took notice), and as such it was interesting as an experiment. Not to mention that Joshua did it for a couple of days I think, or maybe a week, while this guys is doing it for a long time apparently!
Posted by: eweiss

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 06:19 PM

Originally Posted By: Keith D Kerman
I once tasted a cheese that I thought was terrible. An expert told me to try that cheese again with a specific wine. The combination was sublime.
I hated sushi upon first trying it. I tried it again and still hated it. Because I was dating a girl that loved sushi, I kept trying it. About the 7th time I tried sushi, something shocking happened. It became deliceous. It is now one of my favorite foods.

Music and art can be that way.

That was a good analogy. I'm starting to bend. smile
Posted by: Keith D Kerman

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 06:48 PM

Originally Posted By: eweiss
Originally Posted By: Keith D Kerman
I once tasted a cheese that I thought was terrible. An expert told me to try that cheese again with a specific wine. The combination was sublime.
I hated sushi upon first trying it. I tried it again and still hated it. Because I was dating a girl that loved sushi, I kept trying it. About the 7th time I tried sushi, something shocking happened. It became deliceous. It is now one of my favorite foods.

Music and art can be that way.

That was a good analogy. I'm starting to bend. smile


Soon my analogy will have you spending time with music you hate while dining on brussel sprouts! Muahahaha!!
Posted by: eweiss

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 07:11 PM

Originally Posted By: Keith D Kerman
Soon my analogy will have you spending time with music you hate while dining on brussel sprouts! Muahahaha!!

Perhaps later.



Right now I'm stroking my kitty.
Posted by: Andromaque

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 07:19 PM

Actually my favorite recipe for brussel sprouts is to saute them (cut in half and face down) in garlic butter then simmer them in good white wine.. Very delectable..

Nikolas, there are 5 cello suites, each made out of six "movements".. May I recommend Eric Siblin's book about them and Isserlis' recording. They are not just any "piece". They are heavenly masterpieces that every music lover should know. You are right about the availability of transcritions for differnet instruments including the piano. But they were written originally for solo cello with the 6th written probably for a 5 string cello (Isserlis uses one in his recent disc. he produces magical sounds). Sorry if you already knew that..
Posted by: Drunk3nFist

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 07:28 PM

How he manages to play in such an environment, I do not know. But I tip my hat off to the man, for such consistency.
Posted by: fuzzy8balls

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/23/10 09:18 PM

Why does he think classical music will die out in 100 years? Just about every Asian kid learns an instrument and enrollment in music schools is not dropping.
Posted by: Nikolas

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 10/24/10 12:04 AM

Originally Posted By: Andromaque
Nikolas, there are 5 cello suites, each made out of six "movements".. May I recommend Eric Siblin's book about them and Isserlis' recording. They are not just any "piece". They are heavenly masterpieces that every music lover should know. You are right about the availability of transcritions for differnet instruments including the piano. But they were written originally for solo cello with the 6th written probably for a 5 string cello (Isserlis uses one in his recent disc. he produces magical sounds). Sorry if you already knew that..
Thanks... smile

Actually once I posted I thought that I probably know at least part of it. It's the best known piece probably for cello (again a huge generalization...). But I did research a tiny bit on youtube and there it was. Ok I know at least part of the suites. And I do think it's great music! smile
Posted by: weldon29

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 11/19/10 02:05 AM

I don't get why people thinks that classical music is dying, there are more listeners of classical music then there ever was.
Posted by: wr

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 11/19/10 04:45 AM

Originally Posted By: weldon29
I don't get why people thinks that classical music is dying, there are more listeners of classical music then there ever was.


I don't know if that assertion is reliable. But anyway...

There are well over twice as many people crowding this planet than were alive when I was born. So there needs to be an equal increase of the number of people listening to classical music simply to keep up. There could be more listeners than ever while still being a smaller proportion of the population.

I think that classical music is, if not exactly dying, undergoing a pretty drastic change from the days when it played a much more vital role in the culture (of the Western countries, at least). I'm not going to try to come up with all the reasons/symptoms, but I think one of the most important is that although some people do listen, they only listen, instead of playing or singing the music themselves. My impression is that in the US a far lower percentage of people actually know how to read music than was true, say, 75 years ago.
Posted by: weldon29

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 11/19/10 07:48 AM

Originally Posted By: wr
Originally Posted By: weldon29
I don't get why people thinks that classical music is dying, there are more listeners of classical music then there ever was.


I don't know if that assertion is reliable. But anyway...

There are well over twice as many people crowding this planet than were alive when I was born. So there needs to be an equal increase of the number of people listening to classical music simply to keep up. There could be more listeners than ever while still being a smaller proportion of the population.

I think that classical music is, if not exactly dying, undergoing a pretty drastic change from the days when it played a much more vital role in the culture (of the Western countries, at least). I'm not going to try to come up with all the reasons/symptoms, but I think one of the most important is that although some people do listen, they only listen, instead of playing or singing the music themselves. My impression is that in the US a far lower percentage of people actually know how to read music than was true, say, 75 years ago.
The only people who listened to classical music back in the days were the royalties of Europe, now, not only has classical music spread to the common man, it has also been spread ed to mush of Asia. Even if we compare the people who were alive to the people who listen to it, I highly doubt that the percentage would be lower.
Posted by: chopin_r_us

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 11/20/10 01:18 PM

In the 19th century (what we call classical music) was more of a middleclass thing and it still is more or less.
Posted by: megadave73

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 11/23/10 08:16 PM

Haha!...I agree with you completely sir! There is far too much psycho-babble going on with regards to this subject. There's plenty of great music that I simply do not enjoy. One day, perhaps my tastes will change, but for now I feel no shame in saying "nope, not for me".
For years ALL I listened to was insane heavy metal music. I had next to NO interest in classical music or the piano. Now, it consumes me...go figure. It has nothing to do with "education" about the genius of Chopin & Mozart. My tastes changed and NOW I like it. Simple. Thank you for defending simplicity
Posted by: fallapart

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 11/24/10 01:38 AM

I heard from a lecture on crimiology that some cities are starting to play classical musics in subways to reduce crime. So, no need to worry as long as there's a practical side of the story.
Posted by: PaintedPostDave

Re: Save the Music - Bach in the Subway? - 11/24/10 10:08 PM

I think it's great. I am a jazz aficionado but I have purchased many classical cds after being exposed to something I had not heard before. If I hear him I might buy a y0-yo-ma cd, etc.

Rather than 59th street at Columbus Circle, I would like to see how he does at, say, the 1-9 stop at Sheridan Square. He would probably expose classical music to a lot more who previously had no exposure. At the 59th street stop he is likely "preaching to the choir". In any case, kudos!