What are you practicing?

Posted by: Hermanberntzen

What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 12:55 PM

What are you practicing on the piano for the time?
Im trying to get the Contrapunctus No.1 from Bach to sound good.
What about you guys?
Posted by: Kreisler

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 01:55 PM

Stuff for a competition I'm accompanying in January:

Yoshimatsu - Fuzzy Bird Sonata
Swerts - Kotekan
Borne - Fantasy on Themes from Carmen

A recital with a flutist at the end of January:

Piston - Sonata
Taffanel - Andante Pastoral et Scherzettino
Schumann - Op. 94 Romances

Recitals with a Saxophonist in January and February (in St. Louis, Wisconsin, and Minneapolis if anyone's interested in hearing us!)

Schmitt - Legende
Husa - Elegie et Rondeau
Pascal - Sonatine
Boutry - Divirtimento
Faure - Fantasie
Prokofiev - Five Melodies

Luckily, this is all repertoire I've played before. The only new piece is the Taffanel, and it's not too difficult. But I'll be a busy boy for the next few weeks!
Posted by: tomasino

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 02:04 PM

Rzewski, "Down by the Riverside."

Tomasino
Posted by: therapyqueen

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 02:13 PM

I've been practicing the Christmas hymns from the Hymn Book of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It's pretty easy to sight-read and I love being able to have the spirit of Christmas with me!
Posted by: didyougethathing

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 02:33 PM

Still polishing Ravel's Ondine, and I've started Deubssy's Ondine for fun! (Maybe I'll do an all-water themed program one day!).

Also playing with Chopin's Barcarolle and the Moonlight Sonata.
Posted by: gooddog

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 03:09 PM

Same old thing: Beethoven Opus 53, Rondo.
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 03:13 PM

Beethoven Op. 13 2nd movement
Rachmaninoff Sonata 1 1st movement
Posted by: gooddog

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 03:15 PM

Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Beethoven Op. 13 2nd movement
Rachmaninoff Sonata 1 1st movement
OSK, I laughed when I read your signature line. A grand obsession indeed! Her Mozart was wonderful.
Posted by: the nosy ape

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 03:26 PM

This week most of my time is being spent on Bach's C major Fugue from Book I and Brahms' Intermezzo Op. 118 no. 6.
Posted by: BruceD

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 03:30 PM

Brahms: Rhapsody in B minor, Op 79, No 1
- Rhapsody in G minor, Op 79, No 2 (now memorized)
Debussy : Reflets dans l'eau (now memorized)
Haydn : Sonata in F major, Hob XVI:23
Chopin : Polonaise in c minor, Op 40, No 2
Posted by: gooddog

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 04:17 PM

Originally Posted By: BruceD
Brahms: Rhapsody in B minor, Op 79, No 1
- Rhapsody in G minor, Op 79, No 2 (now memorized)
Debussy : Reflets dans l'eau (now memorized)
Haydn : Sonata in F major, Hob XVI:23
Chopin : Polonaise in c minor, Op 40, No 2
I hope you will play the Rhapsody next summer! I can't wait to hear you.
Posted by: AldenH

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 04:34 PM

Hardly anything! Packing to leave for Cali and then on the road... thank goodness most of the hotels have pianos, but in the historic Southwest, most of the pianos are in historic Southwest conditions ='[

In the long car ride, I'm doing finger exercises on hardcover books, doing mental practice of a few different kinds, and putting in fingerings in my Mozart concerto, a variety of Chopin pieces, and beginning to muster the strength of will to practice Rachmaninoff when I have some real time at the instrument!

It's great being in the car for so long, though: tons of listening to random things, reading about the history of avant-garde music ( 3hearts ), some theory and composition... all with the desert flashing by. It's lovely!
Posted by: DameMyra

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 05:05 PM

Schubert, D. 664, 3rd movement
Muczynski, Desperate Measures/Paganini Variations
Chopin, Scherzo No. 2, Op. 25, 9 & 12
Posted by: beet31425

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 05:45 PM

Chopin, op.25/1.
Shostakovitch, Eb major prelude and fugue from op.87.

Each is more beautiful than the other.


-J
Posted by: Tim Adrianson

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 05:53 PM

John Harbison Sonata No 2
Paul Schoenfield 3 Intermezzi
William Bolcom 9 New Bagatelles

These are all pieces written after 2000. I'm trying to put together an entire program of pieces written since 2000.

Other candidates:

Fred Hersch 24 Variations on "Because All Men are Brothers"
Libby Larsen Mephisto Rag
Judith Lang Zaimont Hitchin'
Lowell Liebermann Nocturne No 8
Michael Torke Blue Pacific
Dan Welcher Falling Fifths (Prelude for Dani)
Posted by: Praeludium

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 06:44 PM

On the piano :
Tchaikovsky - Old French Song, op39
Schumann - Melodie, op 68
Bach - Invention n°1 BWV 772 and I'll hopefully begin to work on his Sinfonia n°9 BWV 795 soon, voice per voice first.

And those pieces give me plenty of work and are good workout for me now (thumb passage, tone, shadings, hand position, relaxation) q:
I console myself working on Takemitsu, Bach, Henze and Sor on the guitar.
Well, not sure I really console myself.

I'm so jealous of all of you ! Piano has such a wonderful repertoire.
Posted by: PaulaPiano34

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/19/11 07:04 PM

All the things in my signature except that I haven't really started the Beethoven yet and I'm thinking about switching the Chopin concerto to the Beethoven 4.
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 12:07 AM

Brahms 118 complete, 76/1
Beethoven 109, 90
Medtner Reminiscenza sonata
Rachmaninoff 23/6, 23/10, 39/1
Debussy violin sonata
Chopin f- concerto

I was hoping to have a 3 day break, but I can't...
Posted by: AldenH

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 01:14 AM

Originally Posted By: chobeethaninov
All the things in my signature except that I haven't really started the Beethoven yet and I'm thinking about switching the Chopin concerto to the Beethoven 4.


Wow, nice choice! Lots of Ludwig in your future, it seems.
Posted by: imperfection

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 01:15 AM

Beethoven op. 53
Wagner-Liszt "Isolde's Liebestod", from Tristan und Isolde
Posted by: liszt85

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 02:24 AM

Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Brahms 118 complete, 76/1
Beethoven 109, 90
Medtner Reminiscenza sonata
Rachmaninoff 23/6, 23/10, 39/1
Debussy violin sonata
Chopin f- concerto

I was hoping to have a 3 day break, but I can't...


That's a LOT! I wish I was a full time piano student but when I see these lists of stuff that you're working on, and when I see things like "I was hoping to have a 3 day break, but I can't.." I'm not so sure anymore! (Just kidding, I'm pretty sure I would not have minded not having vacations if I could play the piano all day like you guys get to!)Good luck with all that, that's some amazing music you got there.
Posted by: Leland

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 02:47 AM

Schubert 142/1
Mozart A minor Sonata
Posted by: D. S. F.

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 04:14 AM

Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Rachmaninoff Sonata 1 1st movement


Wow! Really? One of my alltime favorites:-)

I enjoyed reading through these. I'm not at the moment practicing so much, but this thread reminded me of this wedding I'm playing a few states away, and next week (!WOOPS!). I never play weddings, but this is a close friend and insidentally the greatest trumpet player I've ever heard.

Prelude:

A Rachmaninov piece of my choice, so...A major Prelude op. 32 no. 9
Bach WTC I C major
Vivaldi Trumpet concerto, 1st movement
Handel Aria con Variazione (trumpet solo with piano accompaniment)

Ceremony:

Moms: Bach Sheep May Safely Graze (Hm...I should probably find the Petri transcription)
Brides maid + 3 children: "I Know that My Redeemer Liveth"
Fanfair for bride: Abblasen Fanfare (trumpet only)
Bride's processional: Trumpet Tune by John Stanley
Recessional: Ode to Joy...I'll play the portion of the Beethoven/Liszt 9th transcription that's after the tenor solo and fugal transition, but I want to try to get the trumpeter to respond with the descending A-G-F#-E!
Postlude: Vivaldi Trumpet Concerto 3rd Movement
Posted by: CanCakmur

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 05:32 AM

Mephisto Waltz No 1
Schubert D 784
Beethoven Op 2 No 3
Chopin Op 10 Nos 1, 8, 9 Op 25 No 12 (I plan to do all Op 10 and 25 them until the summer of 2013)
Brahms Sonata No 3
(occasionally) Brahms Paganini Studies
Posted by: wr

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 05:44 AM

A bunch of etudes plus -

Rach-Mend Scherzo from MSND
Liszt HR 11
Chopin Noc op 62/1
Persichetti Winter Solstice op 165
Chavez Prelude 10

Most of this stuff is way beyond my level, but I'm having fun with it anyway.
Posted by: pianogirl13669

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 06:30 AM

I'm too busy getting Christmas music ready for church so not much else going on.

I'm supposed to be practicing Haydn Sonata in C hob xvi:35, Bach Invention #6, Robert Starer's Crimson, and Traumeri.
Posted by: Jibbers

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 07:38 AM

Bunch of solo pieces plus these ones for fun -
Mendelssohn Piano Trio Op 49
Debussy Piano Trio in G
Ravel Violin Sonata in G
Posted by: Damon

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 07:40 AM

Originally Posted By: chobeethaninov
All the things in my signature except that I haven't really started the Beethoven yet and I'm thinking about switching the Chopin concerto to the Beethoven 4.


Good idea! The Beethoven is much better. smile
Posted by: Hermanberntzen

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 07:54 AM

I wanna learn William Byrd's Pavan but can anyone find it's name?

I was wondering what the Number(name) for this Pavan composed by William Byrd is -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzrToblCM58
It's hard to find it elsewhere when the user just put in the name Pavan because the composer wrote several Pavan's..
Thanks!
Posted by: Jolteon

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 08:24 AM

My WTC Project:
Bach: Prelude and Fugue in C Minor, WTC1

For my next AMEB exam: (Grade 6, aiming to sit in mid February or so.)
Scarlatti: Sonata in F Minor, K466
Beethoven: Bagatelle in G Minor, Op 126 no 2
Chopin: Prelude in Db Major, Op 28 No 15 (Overplayed, but I like it)
Shostakovitch: Fantastic Dance Op 5 No 1

Just for fun:
Debussy: Valse Romantique, L71
Posted by: cubop

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 08:27 AM

I am not sure, but I think the name of this Pavan is: A sad Pavane for these distracted times. A Google search on that might be useful.
Posted by: Elena-Margarita

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 08:38 AM

Bach's Invention No.1 and Handel's Sarabande.
Posted by: Hermanberntzen

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 09:02 AM

Ive tried to Google Search but it's not easy when you just got the lead "Pavan".. When he wrote so many of them! I think Byrd has a very messy way to set he's pieces in order.
Posted by: Kreisler

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 09:13 AM

Originally Posted By: Hermanberntzen
I wanna learn William Byrd's Pavan but can anyone find it's name?

I was wondering what the Number(name) for this Pavan composed by William Byrd is -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzrToblCM58
It's hard to find it elsewhere when the user just put in the name Pavan because the composer wrote several Pavan's..
Thanks!


It's probably in one of the two major collections (Fitzwilliam and Ladye Nevell's). Both are on IMSLP.
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 10:51 AM

Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: chobeethaninov
All the things in my signature except that I haven't really started the Beethoven yet and I'm thinking about switching the Chopin concerto to the Beethoven 4.


Good idea! The Beethoven is much better. smile


I'm not going to take a shot at Chopin here, but just express how wonderful Beethoven 4 is: Yes, it is!
Posted by: Verbum mirabilis

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 11:07 AM

Bach: French suite no. 2 in c minor (my teacher gave me the sheet music yesterday. I like it a lot, hopefully I'll have time to learn the whole suite).
Debussy: Doctor gradus ad Parnassum (memorizing)
MacDowell: In autumn op. 51 no. 4
Mozart: sonata in c major KV 545 (I hadn't played any Mozart sonatas before so my teacher thought it would be a good place to start)
Schubert: impromptu op. 90 no. 4 in a flat major (I'll start working on it once the sheet music arrives)
Chopin: mazurka in a minor, can't remember the opus number (see above)
Some Christmas songs for school: Ave Maria with a flautist (had to make a simplification), Walking in the air (I had to make a bit harder arrangement than the one I had because the one I had was too easy and boring) and a couple of Christmas songs... if I had had time to practise (I got the sheet music a little over a week in advance), I would have asked whether if I could play the organ smile.

That should keep me occupied for a while, I only need a sonata (and possibly an etude) in addition to the list.
Posted by: pianist.ame

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 12:08 PM

still polishing up Schubert Impromptus op.90 no.1,3&4...especially need alot more work on no.1. My teacher from canada just took it a few levels deeper within 2 hours :P (so lots of work ahead)just started Beethoven 32 Variations a few days ago....and working on Czerny op.299 alongside all of that for technique

will carry on with Mendelssohn Piano Concerto no.2/Beethoven Piano Concerto no.3 and Brahms Rhapsody op.79 no.1 once my Beethoven variations are more settled
Posted by: PaulaPiano34

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 04:26 PM

Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: chobeethaninov
All the things in my signature except that I haven't really started the Beethoven yet and I'm thinking about switching the Chopin concerto to the Beethoven 4.


Good idea! The Beethoven is much better. smile


I'm not going to take a shot at Chopin here, but just express how wonderful Beethoven 4 is: Yes, it is!


I have listened to the Beethoven about ten times now (all from different pianists) and I can't begin to tell you how much I am in love with it....
Posted by: ChopinAddict

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 04:37 PM

This morning I have been practicing Beethoven's Op.2 No.2.
Posted by: Hermanberntzen

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 04:51 PM

I have been praticing - J.S Bach - Wtc No.2 BWV.787 Fugue.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 05:48 PM

John Bayless' transcription of White Christmas(see link at bottom):
http://www.amazon.com/White-Christmas/dp/B000VA1TDQ

and a transcription of this song by Libera:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TNgd-kue_Fc
Posted by: Gerard12

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 06:49 PM

Almost impossible to practice; getting the house ready for visiting family, plus I still have some Christmas party jazz gigs to play. But occasionally I'll sneak in snippets of the last movement of Schubert's D.959 and the first movement of Mozart's K310. Ah, sanity.

OT: My Xmas music of choice this year is Juan Diego Florez's "Santos" disc. Absolutely wonderful.............
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 07:13 PM

Lee Luvisi says about this concerto something along the lines of if you can really play the opening few measures of this concerto, you can play the entire thing.

There was a video of many pianists playing the opening of Beethoven 4, kind of like the 16 pianists doing the Tchaikovsky 1st concerto 3rd movement octaves, but I don't know if it's still up on YouTube or not...
Posted by: Chopinlover49

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/20/11 09:12 PM

I'm basically self-taught and that is not the best path to success. I am trying to polish some of the more pop-oriented Christmas carols like "Merry Christmas, Darling" by the Carpenters, "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas", "Christmas Time is Here" from the Charlie Brown Christmas, etc. I also keep trying to add a little jazz flavor to a lot of my favorites from the great American songbooks and play the easier Chopin waltzes, nocturnes, and mazurkas, as well as sections of some of my favorites that are still out of reach like the Fantasy and the Berceuse. I keep trying to stretch myself to play some of the wonderful Busoni transcriptions of Bach as well. I guess I am an optimist in the pieces I work on. I probably never will play well. My apologies to the composers I injure. Merry Christmas to everyone here on Piano World.
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 09:53 AM

Since early November I've been working on Beethoven's "Tempest" sonata, Op 31 #2 for the first time.

I have been working on various "chunks" of the piece, trying to get them musical and up to speed. My piano teacher advises a lot of metronome practice, and working on my articulation. Overall, I've set a challenge to myself to use as little pedal as possible (particularly in Mov 1 and 3).

Progress is slow for me, but I feel, given how I'm able to play certain passages (the last 40 measures or so of Mov 1, for instance, and the "arpeggiated section" of Mov 2) that I'll eventually be able to manage the whole thing in such a way that doesn't send the dogs in my neighborhood cowering under porches.


Here's where I've run up against some challenges so far:

In Movement 1: For me the fortissimo tremolos- two notes/one note- at the start of the development are very tough to pull off cleanly. The transition to the triplet tremolos right at the exposition of the section theme is also very difficult- I have to borrow a little time to pull it off.

The "fantasia-like" section (triplets again) at the end of the development was pretty tough for me, especially because it features "triplet sixteenths"- the fastest notes in the piece. But then, on the advise of members of this forum, I split up the workload of the hands differently and it got considerably easier.

Overall this movement is not as tough as I imagined it would be. It's very fun to play.

In movement 2: Most the hand crossovers are tricky, especially when in the sections where one is playing those quick little tremolo octaves twice- once low, once high. Mentally, it's tough to keep the beat when making the crossover. Moreover, it's hard to play those tremolos pianissimo and still sound all the notes. The arpeggiated section takes a while to learn, but it flows nicely. Overall it's hard to play much of this movement quietly when called for especially in those awkward sections where the one has to perform a lot of finger swaps to maintain legato.

Interpretation of the whole movement is a challenge- as the tempo is quite slow and the emotional arc has to be held very carefully to be maintained.

In movement 3: The overall tempo is quite tough. (I'm shooting for ~80 bpm per measure) The leaps in the left hand are often hard to pull off without borrowing a tiny bit of time. Thinking of the measures with these leaps as syncopated, which they clearly are (as the notes are held) makes it a bit easier.

I find the octave sections (especially that early one on the C-chord and its transposed companion later on) challenging. The trills also go by quite quickly; I find I have to "mash" them to get them at tempo.

The movement is quite long and the development is very homogeneous, making it difficult to interpret and to memorize.

I've referred to this movement several times as "Fur Elise on Steroids" because of the way it feels under the hands.
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 10:12 AM

Originally Posted By: Tim Adrianson
John Harbison Sonata No 2
Paul Schoenfield 3 Intermezzi
William Bolcom 9 New Bagatelles

These are all pieces written after 2000. I'm trying to put together an entire program of pieces written since 2000.




Wow. I'd watch that. I've always enjoyed programs of contemporary classical music that I've never heard before.
Posted by: Arghhh

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 11:07 AM

Originally Posted By: Brad Hoehne
Since early November I've been working on Beethoven's "Tempest" sonata, Op 31 #2 for the first time.

Here's where I've run up against some challenges so far:

In Movement 1: For me the fortissimo tremolos- two notes/one note- at the start of the development are very tough to pull off cleanly.


Have you tried this section blocking the 2+1 notes together, so that you play 4 chords per measure? It should make it much cleaner if you pay attention that your fingers land directly on the keys, and focus on where the chord changes. When this is solid, use mostly rotation to get your ff tremolo.

Originally Posted By: Brad Hoehne

Overall this movement is not as tough as I imagined it would be. It's very fun to play.


Funny, I had most of my problems on the two-note slurs on the first page, and you didn't mention that at all.
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 11:42 AM

Originally Posted By: Arghhh


Have you tried this section blocking the 2+1 notes together, so that you play 4 chords per measure? It should make it much cleaner if you pay attention that your fingers land directly on the keys, and focus on where the chord changes. When this is solid, use mostly rotation to get your ff tremolo.


I'll give that a try. The thing I have most trouble with in those tremolos is getting the two note "chords" to play together when I'm rolling the tremolo. The 5 finger has more distance to cover than 3 when I roll my forearm. If I am, for instance playing the chord with fingers 3,5 and the single note with 1, I tend pivot on my 3 finger a bit and simply play 1-5-1-5-1 instead of 1-35-1-35-1 etc,.


Quote:

Funny, I had most of my problems on the two-note slurs on the first page, and you didn't mention that at all.


Sitting down with it for the first time, I too had thought that it would be the most problematic part, but, ironically, it's fallen under my hand without too much trouble. Perhaps this is because I had, earlier in the year, played the (much easier) Chopin waltz Op 62 #2, and practiced some of the runs in this same slurred fashion.
Posted by: Arghhh

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 11:42 AM

What am I practicing?
- Schumann Kreisleriana
- Rachmaninoff "Spring Waters" (vocal accompaniment)
- Menotti Trio (piano, clarinet, violin)
- orchestra reduction of Grieg concerto

My teacher nixed my ambitious plan to play Liebermann Gargoyles or a Carl Vine sonata, and suggested instead Rzewski's "Down by the Riverside", or a Terry Riley set. (sigh) That's not at all the same kind of piece, so maybe I'll try for the Vine Bagatelles.
Posted by: Arghhh

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 11:47 AM

Originally Posted By: Brad Hoehne
Originally Posted By: Arghhh


Have you tried this section blocking the 2+1 notes together, so that you play 4 chords per measure? It should make it much cleaner if you pay attention that your fingers land directly on the keys, and focus on where the chord changes. When this is solid, use mostly rotation to get your ff tremolo.


I'll give that a try. The thing I have most trouble with in those tremolos is getting the two note "chords" to play together when I'm rolling the tremolo. The 5 finger has more distance to cover than 3 when I roll my forearm. If I am, for instance playing the chord with fingers 3,5 and the single note with 1, I tend pivot on my 3 finger a bit and simply play 1-5-1-5-1 instead of 1-35-1-35-1 etc,.



Ah, I see. Then I would also advise practicing the tremolo, but skip the 5th finger until the 1-3 part is working well. If the paired notes aren't coming together, look for a slightly different curve of the fingers so that it is easier to play together.
Posted by: liszt85

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 12:09 PM

Brad, you might find my blog helpful as I'm working on the tempest too. Check it out: http://pianisticdevelopment.blogspot.com/
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 12:23 PM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Brahms 118 complete, 76/1
Beethoven 109, 90
Medtner Reminiscenza sonata
Rachmaninoff 23/6, 23/10, 39/1
Debussy violin sonata
Chopin f- concerto

I was hoping to have a 3 day break, but I can't...


That's a LOT! I wish I was a full time piano student but when I see these lists of stuff that you're working on, and when I see things like "I was hoping to have a 3 day break, but I can't.." I'm not so sure anymore! (Just kidding, I'm pretty sure I would not have minded not having vacations if I could play the piano all day like you guys get to!)Good luck with all that, that's some amazing music you got there.


Apparently Scriabin 2 just got added to the list. Not sure about the Medtner anymore...

Btw we don't just practice all day, haha - you have to take into account performances - concerts, recitals etc, rehearsals (whether for work or non-paid ones), coachings, class, gigs, masterclasses, teaching, your own lessons. And, well, sometimes you do mind not having vacations - but then again, there will always be enough gin in the world =)
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 12:27 PM

Originally Posted By: chobeethaninov
Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: chobeethaninov
All the things in my signature except that I haven't really started the Beethoven yet and I'm thinking about switching the Chopin concerto to the Beethoven 4.


Good idea! The Beethoven is much better. smile


I'm not going to take a shot at Chopin here, but just express how wonderful Beethoven 4 is: Yes, it is!


I have listened to the Beethoven about ten times now (all from different pianists) and I can't begin to tell you how much I am in love with it....


Why not, instead of listening to a recording, just open up the score and read it/play it in your head?
Posted by: PaulaPiano34

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 12:59 PM

Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: chobeethaninov
Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: chobeethaninov
All the things in my signature except that I haven't really started the Beethoven yet and I'm thinking about switching the Chopin concerto to the Beethoven 4.


Good idea! The Beethoven is much better. smile


I'm not going to take a shot at Chopin here, but just express how wonderful Beethoven 4 is: Yes, it is!


I have listened to the Beethoven about ten times now (all from different pianists) and I can't begin to tell you how much I am in love with it....


Why not, instead of listening to a recording, just open up the score and read it/play it in your head?


Good idea! smile
Posted by: liszt85

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 01:17 PM

Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: liszt85
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Brahms 118 complete, 76/1
Beethoven 109, 90
Medtner Reminiscenza sonata
Rachmaninoff 23/6, 23/10, 39/1
Debussy violin sonata
Chopin f- concerto

I was hoping to have a 3 day break, but I can't...


That's a LOT! I wish I was a full time piano student but when I see these lists of stuff that you're working on, and when I see things like "I was hoping to have a 3 day break, but I can't.." I'm not so sure anymore! (Just kidding, I'm pretty sure I would not have minded not having vacations if I could play the piano all day like you guys get to!)Good luck with all that, that's some amazing music you got there.


Apparently Scriabin 2 just got added to the list. Not sure about the Medtner anymore...

Btw we don't just practice all day, haha - you have to take into account performances - concerts, recitals etc, rehearsals (whether for work or non-paid ones), coachings, class, gigs, masterclasses, teaching, your own lessons. And, well, sometimes you do mind not having vacations - but then again, there will always be enough gin in the world =)


At least, its all music, so really it is practice in some form or the other! wink I'm not really complaining though, I like what I'm doing. Its just that my path is probably toward becoming a jack of all trades and master of none (I don't think its necessarily bad being Jack). laugh
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 01:29 PM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
Brad, you might find my blog helpful as I'm working on the tempest too. Check it out: http://pianisticdevelopment.blogspot.com/


Oh, wait... I know you! We met at the Clintonville school. I was the guy that botched up the 3rd movement of the Pathetique. (It's come together since then.)

To confess: You're the reason I started working on the Tempest! I remembered after your (and Hector's) performance of it that enjoyed it! (In other words, you've created a monster.)

And, yes, the blog is interesting and helpful.
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 01:42 PM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
Brad, you might find my blog helpful as I'm working on the tempest too. Check it out: http://pianisticdevelopment.blogspot.com/


Interesting notes about the 3rd movement. I might try your 5-1-3-2 fingering for the A chord at the beginning. Right now, I've been playing 5-4-2-1 for both the D and the A with a little skip and a bit of emphasis on the second sixteenth note in each measure.

I'm still trying to settle articulation of each four note figure in the right hand. I've heard some pianists play the first the stacatto note as a distinct marcato- a bit louder. Some I've heard play it as a "dying" lift off. Others pedal the thing and/or hold it down. Some play the second note of the figure as the loudest.

I'm far from having notes down as well as you- though, in my defense, I am tackling all three movements at the same time. And I did start about a week after Hector's masterclass.
Posted by: liszt85

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 02:04 PM

Awesome. I mean, the name was so very familiar..I should have guessed it was you! Well, its nice to meet you here on the forums! smile

Barenboim seems to use 5-5-2-1 for the D minor and 5-4-2-1 (as you've been doing) for the A major.

Try out different fingerings and decide what sounds/feels the best. My teacher pedals the whole thing down but I've decided not to do that. Good luck!
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 02:10 PM

Originally Posted By: chobeethaninov
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: chobeethaninov
Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: chobeethaninov
All the things in my signature except that I haven't really started the Beethoven yet and I'm thinking about switching the Chopin concerto to the Beethoven 4.


Good idea! The Beethoven is much better. smile


I'm not going to take a shot at Chopin here, but just express how wonderful Beethoven 4 is: Yes, it is!


I have listened to the Beethoven about ten times now (all from different pianists) and I can't begin to tell you how much I am in love with it....


Why not, instead of listening to a recording, just open up the score and read it/play it in your head?


Good idea! smile


I don't have anything to say here, I just wanted to see how many levels deep the "quote nesting" could go before things descend into chaos.
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 02:15 PM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
Awesome. I mean, the name was so very familiar..I should have guessed it was you! Well, its nice to meet you here on the forums! smile

Barenboim seems to use 5-5-2-1 for the D minor and 5-4-2-1 (as you've been doing) for the A major.

Try out different fingerings and decide what sounds/feels the best. My teacher pedals the whole thing down but I've decided not to do that. Good luck!


Yeah, Hector, as I recall, suggested minimal pedaling. I tend to agree, since a lot of the musicality of the movement seems to be tied up in, well, the ties - or, should I say, the contrast between "tied chords" and plain arpeggiation. I think Beethoven is making contrasting sections by choosing to tie certain arpeggiated chords, and not tie others. Too much pedal blurs this distinction. (At least that's my justification...)

I watch the Barenboim videos as well- and they're great for fingering/technique pointers since the image is so clear when focused on his hands.

I've noted that Barenboim seems to do a lot of things that I don't think I'll be able to pull off- like playing the "fantasia-like" measures at the end of the development in time without breaking the arpeggios into two hands. Too bad the Kempf videos only show his face... I'd like to see how he does it.
Posted by: DameMyra

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 02:54 PM

Originally Posted By: Arghhh
What am I practicing?
- Schumann Kreisleriana
- Rachmaninoff "Spring Waters" (vocal accompaniment)
- Menotti Trio (piano, clarinet, violin)
- orchestra reduction of Grieg concerto

My teacher nixed my ambitious plan to play Liebermann Gargoyles or a Carl Vine sonata, and suggested instead Rzewski's "Down by the Riverside", or a Terry Riley set. (sigh) That's not at all the same kind of piece, so maybe I'll try for the Vine Bagatelles.


I got one of those teacher looks when I asked about doing a Vine Sonata. I wonder what kind of look I will get if I asked about Dutilleux?
Posted by: Apsara

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 05:15 PM

Bach - Italian Concerto, 3rd movement
Chopin - Ballade no 1
Chopin - Ballade no 3

The Italian Concerto and the 3rd Ballade are my latest pieces, which I'll be diligently working on throughout the winter holidays before my next lesson in January. As for the 1st Ballade, that's a piece I've last seriously studied in 2009... decided to revive it, ever since I met someone who absolutely loves this piece. (Coolest guy I've ever met - opera singer and actor.. He's too old for me though, boohooo)

I also occasionally practice Chopin's Nocturne op 48 no 1, in preparation for my teacher's student recital in January. We'll be playing on a Fazioli! Though I prefer Bosendorfer, this will be just fine...
Posted by: Gerard12

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 06:32 PM

Originally Posted By: Brad Hoehne
Originally Posted By: Tim Adrianson
John Harbison Sonata No 2
Paul Schoenfield 3 Intermezzi
William Bolcom 9 New Bagatelles

These are all pieces written after 2000. I'm trying to put together an entire program of pieces written since 2000.


Wow. I'd watch that. I've always enjoyed programs of contemporary classical music that I've never heard before.


+5,000!! I can't believe that I missed Tim's post the first time around. One look at his list of pieces ( and alternates ) and my mouth started watering and my pulse quickened.........(I'm calm now).
Posted by: carey

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/21/11 11:24 PM

Currently working on and hoping to record in 2012:

Bach/Busoni - Toccata and Fugue in D minor BWV 565
Schubert - Sonata in A major Opus 120
Chopin - Etude Opus 25 No. 12
Chopin - Etude Opus 25, No. 9
Chopin - Polonaise Opus 53
Chopin - Ballade No.2
Schumann/Liszt - Widmung
Brahms - Rhapsody Opus 79, No.1
Brahms - Intermezzo Opus 118 No. 2
Brahms - Ballade Opus 118 No. 3
Prokofiev - Sonata No. 3
Posted by: ChopinAddict

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/22/11 12:08 AM

I just cannot stop playing Ludwig at the moment. tiki
Posted by: Minaku

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/22/11 09:57 AM

Not much "serious" practicing happening here; I've been working on the Bach Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue and Schumann Fantasie very casually (it's a wonder I remember anything at from session to session). I've been building a repertoire of video game and anime music in the meanwhile. My transcription of Angry Birds was a huge hit at my piano party so now I have to get it written down and make it a lot more complicated. Katamari Damacy was popular as well; I didn't get to play the original Thomas theme. Oh well!
Posted by: Dachshund

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/23/11 12:14 AM

Right now, I am currently working on:
Bach: Prelude & Fugue BWV 851 in d minor
Bartok: Rondo no.2
Schumann: Aufschwung (from Fantasiestücke)
Haydn: Sonata hob XVI 23 (all movements)

-Will
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/23/11 09:34 AM

James P.Johnson:Snowy Mornin Blues
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwuxpsEzXE4&feature=related
Posted by: cagal

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/23/11 01:24 PM

Bach - Fantasia in C minor (just assigned and going MUCH better than French suite pieces already - see next)
Bach - French suite Allemnade and Gigue (Allemande almost fully memorized but giving up memorizng gigue; just want to polish) I just can't seem to "get" these pieces
Mozart - Sonata in Eflat major K282 (mvmt one memorized so moving to memorizing second mvmt) Third mvmnt is work in porgress but coming along well
Schubert - Moment Musical Op94/No.2 May start memory work here too

Giving up on Debussy Arabesque #1 for immeidate future; was partly memorized but not really going anywhere. Nice piece but not right for my abilities. My teacher is thinking about either a Rachmaninoff piece or a Chopin Nocturne but I'll have to wait for New Year.
Posted by: gooddog

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/23/11 01:47 PM

Finishing up my first round with the Waldstein, (I think I figured out how to do the glissandos!), and was just assigned 2 Chopin etudes: Opus 25 #1 and #12.

The plan is to work on the Waldstein another month or so. Let it rest for a month or two and then really polish it up. Meanwhile, my teacher wants me stretching my technique - thus the etudes.
Posted by: Kuanpiano

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/23/11 01:49 PM

Beethoven's op.110, and Liszt's 2nd Ballade. I think the Liszt is better than all 4 Chopin ballades put together. It's so amazing....!!
Posted by: timmyab

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/24/11 07:31 AM

Originally Posted By: cagal

Mozart - Sonata in Eflat major K282 (mvmt one memorized so moving to memorizing second mvmt) Third mvmnt is work in porgress but coming along well
Schubert - Moment Musical Op94/No.2 May start memory work here too

I'm working on both of these at the moment as well.
Also Schubert Moment Musical no 4 and Mozart concerto K.488 (not likely to finish the concerto).
Posted by: PaulaPiano34

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/24/11 10:31 AM

Switch Done! smile Beethoven 4 here I come! Yay!!!
Posted by: daviel

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/24/11 10:53 AM

Pieces du jour: Moment Musicale in 4 flats, Solace, Brahams' variations on a theme by Haydn, waltz in C#m chopin, reading through several of his nocturnes trying to decide. {I invented a warm-up, playing rhythm changes through all the keys, and kind of drill on that along with scales, too}
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/24/11 11:44 AM

Originally Posted By: daviel
Pieces du jour: Moment Musicale in 4 flats, Solace, Brahams' variations on a theme by Haydn, waltz in C#m chopin, reading through several of his nocturnes trying to decide. {I invented a warm-up, playing rhythm changes through all the keys, and kind of drill on that along with scales, too}


You better figure out what key that musical moment with 4 flats is in....!

Also, the Brahms Haydn variations for two pianos of the Brahms Handel variations (for solo)??
Posted by: daviel

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/24/11 01:08 PM

Ab, maybe? Nope, Fm [tritone down] Aww, I don't worry about no keys, I just play it laugh

The Brahms is Op 56a, solo arr by Ludwig Stark. I bought the sheet music a long time ago after I heard the piece on the radio. I hadn't the ability to learn it until lately.
Posted by: ChibiSF

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/24/11 03:25 PM

I just started Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 11, Opus 22, so most of my practice today was devoted to that.
Posted by: Ferdinand

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/24/11 11:43 PM

Bach Partita #4. My favorite. First attempted it a couple of years ago, found it intimidating, put it aside. Now I think there's a good chance of making a passable rendition.
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/25/11 12:28 AM

I can't practice for 3 days because the school isn't open. It's only day 1 but I already feel weird not practicing.... I just want to play!!! (and I have so much stuff to learn argh). Serious withdrawal symptoms.....
Posted by: Ferdinand

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/25/11 12:42 AM

So you are practicing patience.
Posted by: jeffreyjones

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/25/11 03:58 AM

Still working on my competition pieces, the Bach G minor P&F from WTK II and Mazeppa, slowly and patiently. Also working in some of the Debussy etudes. There really isn't anything in the literature that can prepare you for these.. they require a technique all their own.
Posted by: beet31425

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/25/11 04:00 AM

Originally Posted By: jeffreyjones
Still working on my competition pieces, the Bach G minor P&F from WTK II and Mazeppa, slowly and patiently. Also working in some of the Debussy etudes. There really isn't anything in the literature that can prepare you for these.. they require a technique all their own.


What competition is that? I didn't know.

-J
Posted by: beet31425

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/25/11 04:02 AM

Today I began Chopin's F minor etude, op.10/9. A nice benefit of a teacher with smallish hands: she knows lots of good fingerings for people with smallish hands.

-J
Posted by: pianoanne

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/25/11 04:02 AM

Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Beethoven's op.110, and Liszt's 2nd Ballade. I think the Liszt is better than all 4 Chopin ballades put together. It's so amazing....!!


Me too! I have played them both before but am planning them as part of a recital I am preparing for the summer. I will pair the Liszt with En Reve, and Valse Oubilee No. 1. Also, I will include some lesser known Ravel pieces such as Menuet on the Name of Haydn and Menuet Antique along with 3 Scarlatti Sonatas.
Posted by: jeffreyjones

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/25/11 04:07 AM

Originally Posted By: beet31425
Originally Posted By: jeffreyjones
Still working on my competition pieces, the Bach G minor P&F from WTK II and Mazeppa, slowly and patiently. Also working in some of the Debussy etudes. There really isn't anything in the literature that can prepare you for these.. they require a technique all their own.


What competition is that? I didn't know.

-J


A small local competition, the USOMC. I don't do many competitions because I don't like the high-stakes nature. I just need something to commit me to improving..
Posted by: Composer888888

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/25/11 11:18 AM

Bonus Festivus to all! ~
my menorah is firing overtime, since we're down in the 30s here in Arizona.

To Tim Adrianson: If you're up for the Harbison 2nd Sonata, then look into my WIZARDS or Jupiter's Moons (instead of the little Hitchin' - a travellin' groove. [ WIZARDS gets it formal Carnegie Hall premiere in early March, at debut recital by Young-Ah Tak. It's also on the 2012 Kapell rep list.]

A New Year's note: my 2009 CONCERTO for Piano and Wind Orchestra 'Solar Traveller' gets its Midwest Premiere in February, in Minneapolis. Tim Lovelace is soloist.

-- And what am I practicing? For upcoming chamber music recitals ...Medtner 3 Nocturnes (vln. + pno.) and the Mendelssohn d minot Piano Trio. For myself: Tombeau de Couperin, and the CF Peters collection "Waltz Project".
(Just played the Poulenc 4-hands Sonate last week - that first movement is a riot.)

Good wishes from the USA ~
Judith L. Zaimont
Posted by: Tim Adrianson

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/26/11 12:06 PM

Well, I'll certainly take a look at "Wizards" and/or "Jupiter's Moons", in response to your specific suggestion. I would agree that "Hitchin'" is not a major statement, but I have a special fondness for ingratiating, interesting, well-crafted minor pieces, and "Hitchin'" definitely falls into that category.
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/26/11 01:12 PM

Brahms 1st concerto. smile
Posted by: Piano Person16

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/27/11 07:56 PM

Schumann Fantasy mvts 2+3, Haydn Sonata no. 50 mvts. 2+3, Bach prelude and fugue in g minor, Beethoven concerto 4. All at once!
Posted by: How you doing?

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/27/11 08:22 PM

Schumann/Liszt Widmung
Rachmaninoff op. 16 no. 6 (Bringing this back after having some trouble before)
Schumann's Carnaval

I've quit lessons because of the lack of time frown and also cause I've realized my teacher taught me all she could. Anyway, I feel a duty to play some non late romantic pieces! I'm looking at something Debussy or early Beethoven. Maybe L'isle Joyeuse or the Pagode not sure
Posted by: jeffreyjones

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/27/11 08:41 PM

Originally Posted By: Composer888888
Bonus Festivus to all! ~
my menorah is firing overtime, since we're down in the 30s here in Arizona.

To Tim Adrianson: If you're up for the Harbison 2nd Sonata, then look into my WIZARDS or Jupiter's Moons (instead of the little Hitchin' - a travellin' groove. [ WIZARDS gets it formal Carnegie Hall premiere in early March, at debut recital by Young-Ah Tak. It's also on the 2012 Kapell rep list.]

A New Year's note: my 2009 CONCERTO for Piano and Wind Orchestra 'Solar Traveller' gets its Midwest Premiere in February, in Minneapolis. Tim Lovelace is soloist.

-- And what am I practicing? For upcoming chamber music recitals ...Medtner 3 Nocturnes (vln. + pno.) and the Mendelssohn d minot Piano Trio. For myself: Tombeau de Couperin, and the CF Peters collection "Waltz Project".
(Just played the Poulenc 4-hands Sonate last week - that first movement is a riot.)

Good wishes from the USA ~
Judith L. Zaimont


Thanks for dropping by!! Really liked your Impronta Digitale when I heard Olga Kern play it..
Posted by: Sam Rose

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/27/11 10:59 PM

In progress:
Chopin Ballade no 1
Beethoven Moonlight Sonata 3rd movement
Chopin Nocturne 9/1

Long finished but still touching up:
Chopin Nocturne in C-sharp minor
Chopin Fantaisie Impromptu

Started but on hold for now:
Debussy Arabesque #1
Chopin Waltz in C-sharp minor (64/2)
Pirates of the Caribbean (Jarrod Radnich arrangement)
David Nevue Sweet Dreams and Starlight

Other:
Sight reading exercises (occasionally)
Scales
Some arpeggios
Posted by: liszt85

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/27/11 11:07 PM

Finished learning Debussy's Prelude 1 (book 1)! I'm getting more efficient at learning pieces, this took me about a week (with an hour on average spent on this each day). I know, this is still slower than what many people here would take, but this is a personal improvement for me. Got to polish it now before my lesson on Thursday.

Hey Sam, I just started working on Ballade 1 too! Its a great piece of music, have fun with it! I'm still amazed that you are working on somewhat advanced repertoire after just one year of playing. Do you have a teacher (I know I've asked you this question before)?
Posted by: Sam Rose

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 01:49 AM

liszt85, I just got one a few weeks ago. I've had two lessons, and he is fantastic, so things are looking good on that front. I already have most of the Ballade memorized, but I started learning it when I didn't know the difference between a half note and an eight note, didn't know what a tie was, etc. So we are going to go through the piece and polish it up.


Even though I wasn't up to it, I had to skip ahead and learn the Presto con Fuoco section, and now I can't get enough of it. I might record it in the next few weeks. It's so exciting to play.

I can't wait to hear you playing the Ballade! I'm sure by now you can learn pieces so much faster than I can. My reading is far better now than it was a couple months ago, so that really speeds up the learning process for me, but it's still pretty slow.
Posted by: liszt85

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 02:32 AM

All I can say, yet again, is that its unbelievable to me that you could even learn the piece without knowing what half notes and eighth notes were (I'm guessing you used the score mainly to figure out what the notes were, and you used your ear to put the rest together). I'm pretty sure you've learned many things wrong (if I'm wrong about that, you must be some kind of mad genius, which is of course a possibility! ;)), but I commend your effort! With your new teacher, you will hopefully do things more systematically to build your technique to a level where you can tackle these pieces more satisfactorily than you have been doing so far.

Good luck!
Posted by: Sam Rose

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 06:32 AM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
All I can say, yet again, is that its unbelievable to me that you could even learn the piece without knowing what half notes and eighth notes were (I'm guessing you used the score mainly to figure out what the notes were, and you used your ear to put the rest together). I'm pretty sure you've learned many things wrong (if I'm wrong about that, you must be some kind of mad genius, which is of course a possibility! ;)), but I commend your effort! With your new teacher, you will hopefully do things more systematically to build your technique to a level where you can tackle these pieces more satisfactorily than you have been doing so far.

Good luck!


Yes, when I first started learning the piece I just cracked open my friend's book with the Ballades and tried to figure out the first few notes for fun. Then I got sucked into it. So at the beginning, I was using the way I've heard the piece played to decide how to play it. As I went along, I picked up the notation, so most of the piece is not sloppy like the first page. And it didn't take very long to fix up the sloppiness. So I wouldn't say I've learned many things wrong.

The teacher said it was very good; it's just some of the nuances we needed to work on (on the first page for example, there are notes that need to be held and I was letting them go too early). He's having me do the first couple pages with counting (no rubato) and then I can add that back in later. He said it's important to really know the score first before adding that kind of expression (of course it is, but I didn't know the difference when I started learning that! smile )

How long do you think it will take you to learn?
Posted by: liszt85

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 10:02 AM

If I worked on it everyday for an hour, it will probably take me a month or two. Still not as efficient as I'd like to be because I waste a lot of time playing through what I've already learned just because it sounds good. :P
Posted by: Sam Rose

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 10:43 AM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
If I worked on it everyday for an hour, it will probably take me a month or two. Still not as efficient as I'd like to be because I waste a lot of time playing through what I've already learned just because it sounds good. :P


I've been learning it on and off for over a year while figuring out my technique, learning other pieces, learning how to read better, etc. on the side. My reading is still not very good because I haven't focused on it enough, but my memorization is getting faster. I guess as long as I'm seeing steady improvement I'm satisfied. I think I'm in a good place considering the amount of time I've been playing.
Posted by: liszt85

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 10:59 AM

Originally Posted By: Sam Rose
Originally Posted By: liszt85
If I worked on it everyday for an hour, it will probably take me a month or two. Still not as efficient as I'd like to be because I waste a lot of time playing through what I've already learned just because it sounds good. :P


I've been learning it on and off for over a year while figuring out my technique, learning other pieces, learning how to read better, etc. on the side. My reading is still not very good because I haven't focused on it enough, but my memorization is getting faster. I guess as long as I'm seeing steady improvement I'm satisfied. I think I'm in a good place considering the amount of time I've been playing.


thumb
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 11:06 AM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
If I worked on it everyday for an hour, it will probably take me a month or two. Still not as efficient as I'd like to be because I waste a lot of time playing through what I've already learned just because it sounds good. :P


This is so understandable. The music is just fantastic, isn't it? However, the best teacher I've ever worked with (I only had two lessons with her, wish I could have more) told me that you must treat your practice time like it is sacred. It's something I had to work on a lot, but I realized how much more I could get accomplished when I caught myself wanting to play through what I've already learned just because I like the music.

I've also found when I am truly engaged in the music while practicing (which is much more often than it used to be!), I enjoy learning new parts of the music or finding specific things to work on in what I've already learned even more than just playing through what I've already learned.

Sorry if it sounds like I'm getting onto you... I really don't mean to! This just caught my eye and I wanted to throw this out because I think it's vital to your artistic development. You know I only wish all the best for fellow pianist students. laugh
Posted by: liszt85

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 11:36 AM

Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Originally Posted By: liszt85
If I worked on it everyday for an hour, it will probably take me a month or two. Still not as efficient as I'd like to be because I waste a lot of time playing through what I've already learned just because it sounds good. :P


This is so understandable. The music is just fantastic, isn't it? However, the best teacher I've ever worked with (I only had two lessons with her, wish I could have more) told me that you must treat your practice time like it is sacred. It's something I had to work on a lot, but I realized how much more I could get accomplished when I caught myself wanting to play through what I've already learned just because I like the music.

I've also found when I am truly engaged in the music while practicing (which is much more often than it used to be!), I enjoy learning new parts of the music or finding specific things to work on in what I've already learned even more than just playing through what I've already learned.

Sorry if it sounds like I'm getting onto you... I really don't mean to! This just caught my eye and I wanted to throw this out because I think it's vital to your artistic development. You know I only wish all the best for fellow pianist students. laugh


OSK, I completely understand what you're saying and I've been telling myself for some time now that I NEED to do that. Its a real battle, I can tell you that much!
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 11:43 AM

Keep a practice journal. Write down what you want to accomplish before you practice, and what you've accomplished after you finish. That's what I used to do. It helped a lot. I have stopped doing that, but I will start again.
Posted by: liszt85

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 11:49 AM

Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Keep a practice journal. Write down what you want to accomplish before you practice, and what you've accomplished after you finish. That's what I used to do. It helped a lot. I have stopped doing that, but I will start again.


Hmm, good idea (I've known of it, but its probably laziness that prevented me from doing it so far)..I'll try that because the 1-1.5 hrs that I (barely) get every day are precious! Thanks.
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 11:49 AM

Man, you guys impress me. It takes me forever to learn new material. Just the other day, for instance, I decided that I wanted to learn all the the Bach Inventions that I hadn't played before (which meant about 11 of them) one at a time. I sat down at one of the easiest, #4, and gave it my best. It took three days of pretty intense practice (perhaps three sixty minute sessions) to simply get the notes under my fingers- and that's for an easy two-page piece.

Having worked on the Beethoven Tempest for the past six weeks or so, I still don't have the whole thing "note learned"- and I'm barely up to speed in the parts I have got down. It'll be another three or four months before I can sorta' play it. (It took me about 5 months to learn, reasonably well, the Pathetique.)

Moreover, if past performance is any guide, after I finish "note learning" it, I'll likely forget most of it in short order. smile
Posted by: liszt85

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 11:55 AM

Originally Posted By: Brad Hoehne
Man, you guys impress me. It takes me forever to learn new material. Just the other day, for instance, I decided that I wanted to learn all the the Bach Inventions that I hadn't played before (which meant about 11 of them) one at a time. I sat down at one of the easiest, #4, and gave it my best. It took three days of pretty intense practice (perhaps three hour long sessions) to simply get the notes under my fingers- and that's for an easy two-page piece.

Having worked on the Beethoven Tempest for the past six weeks or so, I still don't have the whole thing "note learned"- and I'm barely up to speed in the parts I have got down. It'll be another thee or four months before I can play it. Moreover, after I finish "note learning" it, I'll likely forget most of it in short order. smile


Brad, I think that's because most of us are guilty to varying degrees of wasting practice time. I suspect you might be wasting a lot of your practice time just playing through sections you've already learned, and at tempo! This seriously hampers progress and I myself am victim of this tendency. I'm pretty sure I can halve the time I need to learn pieces if I could get myself to be systematic and efficient during practice and if I can do it, so can you. I'm going to try what OSK suggested, I will start a practice journal soon.
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 12:05 PM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
I think that's because most of us are guilty to varying degrees of wasting practice time. I suspect you might be wasting a lot of your practice time just playing through sections you've already learned, and at tempo!


But it's so fun. smile

I think this is probably right, to a point. I justify it because it feels to me like "solidifying" or "putting in context" material that I've already worked on.

My general practice scheme is to work from the end of a work forward. Doing this, I have a tendency, when practicing the next chunk of music I'm on, to simply keep going until the end. Perhaps caving into this tendency too much is a wee bit inefficient.
Posted by: Sam Rose

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 03:00 PM

This may be blasphemy here, but I don't personally find that I'm ever wasting my practice time, so long as I am playing. It doesn't matter if I'm playing through stuff I already know; if I'm enjoying myself it is never a waste of time. I think this might be because many of you here have different goals when it comes to playing piano. If your goal is to be a public performer / world class pianist it's important that you learn as much as possible and as fast as possible. I just want to be a good player and have some beautiful pieces under my fingertips.

I feel it's important that practicing always be something enjoyable and never a chore. Music is so beautiful and making it into just another routine to get through is a terrible thing. I do hear where you guys are coming from, but I can't really relate. I suppose if I could learn a new piece in just a couple weeks I might be willing to cut out the playing of stuff I already know and just get the new stuff. But since my learning is so slow, I may as well enjoy myself. smile
Posted by: ChopinAddict

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 03:35 PM

Yesterday I played a lot of Debussy (in particular Claire de Lune), in the past few days I played in particular Beethoven's Op.27 No.1 and 2 (complete). + Some technical exercises (my way to start the day with energy ha)!
Posted by: Kuanpiano

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 03:37 PM

Liszt's 1st concerto...so many cadenzas....and octaves....ughh.

At least I have a while to learn it, so it's not all bad laugh.
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 03:47 PM

@SirSardonic, I just looked at your channel on YouTube and, holey moley (!!), you've only been playing for a year-ish? The pieces are certainly not technically perfect, but you've developed a heck of a lot of technique for so little study time. I started as a youngster, and I haven't worked up to that sort of finger-work level yet. I want a cup of whatever protein shake you're drinking every morning.
Posted by: Sam Rose

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 03:58 PM

Thanks Brad laugh

The encouragement is much appreciated. No protein shake in the morning; I'm not much of a morning person and I sleep in far too much.

The technique in my videos is pretty bad, but those were all taken before starting lessons, and I'm already playing much better with just slight changes (sitting up straight, relaxing shoulders instead of holding them up, which I was doing a lot of subconsciously, etc.) we've worked on over the two lessons I have had so far. In the Fantaisie Impromptu video, my fingers are doing all the work instead of my arms, due to that tension. Hopefully it will continue to get better, because this is my favorite hobby I've had so far (and I've had a LOT of hobbies).
Posted by: stores

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 06:32 PM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
... I waste a lot of time playing through what I've already learned just because it sounds good. :P


At least you realize what you're doing and that's a good thing. It's something that most everyone does until they realize how much time they HAVE wasted that they'll never get back and more importantly they learn HOW to utilize their practice time. I learned the first ballade when I was 15 or 16 while at Interlochen for the summer and I remember being guilty of the same thing. I'd play so many areas (especially the last few pages) repeatedly, because I loved hearing it and then I heard someone (I can't remember who now) play the ballade as part of a recital and remember thinking that I needed to do a LOT of work! That summer I learned a lot about practicing and how to efficiently use my time.
Posted by: liszt85

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/28/11 10:45 PM

Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: liszt85
... I waste a lot of time playing through what I've already learned just because it sounds good. :P


At least you realize what you're doing and that's a good thing. It's something that most everyone does until they realize how much time they HAVE wasted that they'll never get back and more importantly they learn HOW to utilize their practice time. I learned the first ballade when I was 15 or 16 while at Interlochen for the summer and I remember being guilty of the same thing. I'd play so many areas (especially the last few pages) repeatedly, because I loved hearing it and then I heard someone (I can't remember who now) play the ballade as part of a recital and remember thinking that I needed to do a LOT of work! That summer I learned a lot about practicing and how to efficiently use my time.


Yep, I'm fully aware of it. I now need to put my words/thoughts to action and that's the difficult part (but I'm sure its just some kind of Psychological block and once I get over it, it should become routine and should feel natural).
Posted by: AnDieMusik

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/29/11 12:41 AM

liszt85, I have the same problem, though I would attribute it to my state of mind. I have a very hard time focusing my attention on learning a new piece; it's really hard for me. It's so much easier for me to play through pieces I already know, so that is what I normally do. There are days when I can get down to business, and I'm extremely productive on these days. Ughh, if I could only magically turn my brain on to this mode whenever I wanted; I would progress so much faster. It doesn't help that I haven't had lessons in about 1 1/2 years due to going away for school. I find I am much more dedicated when taking lessons.

Anyways, I have been working on:

Bach's Prelude and Fugue in F-Sharp major bwv 858. This is my first prelude and fugue (I have learned some preludes before, but never a fugue (very daunting, but extremely exciting)). I find I have the hardest time memorizing Bach compared to any other composer; I can see that the fugue is going to take me a while. By the way I absolutely LOVE this piece!

Scriabin Op. 11 no. 11. This piece is sort of a guilty pleasure of mine (definitely out of the range of my technical ability). About a year ago I heard it for the first time and was completely taken away. I had never heard anything like this coming from a piano; it's so beautiful. I tried it back then but there was noooo way. I found the sheet music about a month ago and decided to try it again, and to my surprise I could see it being a possibility. I now have it memorized and am just working on playing it better. I'm actually very happy with how it is going; it's very rewarding. This is my favorite recording I have yet to hear (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHO4Ucw9zL4). In this video she plays many pieces, but it is conveniently the first one! A bit off topic, but his Op. 11 no. 15 in D-Flat major is incredible too. I highly suggest you guys check it out if you're not familiar with it. This is coming from someone who thinks baroque<classical<<<romantic. There is just something about these pieces.

Scarlatti K 119 sonata in D major. Similar to the Scriabin as in the first time I heard it I was completely enamored. If anyone is interested, here is the recording I listened to when I heard it for the first time (it's still my favorite): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oiebZLfvIhA.

These are the three main pieces I am working on. Unfortunately, I also mess around with a bunch of other pieces (I just can't help it-there is so much good music out there). I say unfortunately because I think this is one of the reasons why I have such a hard time learning new material (all of the music I am working on is so overwhelming, and as a result I just revert back to playing pieces I already know).
Posted by: Dachshund

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/30/11 03:17 AM

Originally Posted By: AnDieMusik
liszt85, I have the same problem, though I would attribute it to my state of mind. I have a very hard time focusing my attention on learning a new piece; it's really hard for me. It's so much easier for me to play through pieces I already know, so that is what I normally do.

I'm kind of the opposite. Once I finish a piece, I get kind of bored of it and stop playing it. I really like starting new pieces. That's why I don't have a very extensive repertoire.

-Will
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/03/12 02:39 PM

Beethoven Pathetique middle movement. Here's some progress I've made:

http://www.box.com/s/dgrtjbusl4m5v2qnvuck

What do you guys think?
Posted by: Hakki

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/03/12 02:53 PM

Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Beethoven Pathetique middle movement. Here's some progress I've made:

http://www.box.com/s/dgrtjbusl4m5v2qnvuck

What do you guys think?


I prefer a softer melody line.
You accent the melody line too much. I felt as if I am being slapped at the face.

regards,
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/03/12 03:46 PM

My piano at my house is extremely tinny. I'm actually playing much softer than you think I am.
Posted by: Hakki

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/03/12 04:07 PM

Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
My piano at my house is extremely tinny. I'm actually playing much softer than you think I am.


It is not the quality of the sound I am referring to. But the initial attack that is present in the melody line.

It is just a guess but I feel as if you are hitting these notes with an increased finger velocity. Which in return gives them a brittle sound.

I would advice gradually sinking into the keys with a flexible up-down wrist/arm motion. This way you can achieve a rounder and fuller sound, but with less initial attack in the sound.

regards,
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/03/12 04:36 PM

I'm barely pushing down, my friend. If you could be in my house you would be very, very surprised. I promise you. I'm using my weight to slowly drop into the keys. "Attack" almost wouldn't even describe how I'm playing.
Posted by: Hakki

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/03/12 04:45 PM

Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
I'm barely pushing down, my friend. If you could be in my house you would be very, very surprised. I promise you. I'm using my weight to slowly drop into the keys. "Attack" almost wouldn't even describe how I'm playing.


OK, then.
Maybe you can post another recording played on a decent grand, recorded with a better setup.

Currently, this recording is not justifying your playing.

regards,
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/03/12 04:48 PM

Originally Posted By: Hakki

OK, then.
Maybe you can post another recording played on a decent grand, recorded with a better setup.


And that's the number 1 reason I can't wait to go back to University!
Posted by: ChopinAddict

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/03/12 05:05 PM

What piano did you play on? You do deserve a better piano doing justice to your dynamics.
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/03/12 05:45 PM

It is a Kolher and Campbell baby grand. I agree, but it's fine to practice on.

Don't worry. I'll have three 9 foot Steinways and a 9 and a half Bosie Imperial at my selection in a few days. wink
Posted by: jeffreyjones

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/03/12 09:31 PM

I played the G minor prelude from WTK II at a marking of 60 per sixteenth note, to get all of the holding and releasing down. It was a shock to find how difficult it was even at that speed. After about 15 minutes of it, though, I had it down solid. Then I did a similar thing with the fugue, that still needs some work.

Followed it up with a run of Mazeppa, which sounded better than it ever has at full speed. Bach is good for you, people!
Posted by: beet31425

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/03/12 09:34 PM

Originally Posted By: jeffreyjones
It was a shock to find how difficult it was even at that speed... After about 15 minutes of it, though, I had it down solid.

This almost seems like a contradiction. smile

I've never considered anything "difficult" which I then had solid after 15 minutes. Almost by definition.

-J
Posted by: DameMyra

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/03/12 09:34 PM

Originally Posted By: jeffreyjones
I played the G minor prelude from WTK II at a marking of 60 per sixteenth note, to get all of the holding and releasing down. It was a shock to find how difficult it was even at that speed. After about 15 minutes of it, though, I had it down solid. Then I did a similar thing with the fugue, that still needs some work.


Love that P & F!
Posted by: jeffreyjones

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/03/12 09:35 PM

Originally Posted By: beet31425
Originally Posted By: jeffreyjones
It was a shock to find how difficult it was even at that speed... After about 15 minutes of it, though, I had it down solid.

This almost seems like a contradiction. smile

I've never considered anything "difficult" which I then had solid after 15 minutes. Almost by definition.

-J


Only at that slow speed! It will still take some time to scale it up and still get all of the durations right. It's a four-voice overture, and the repetitive nature of it makes it easy to slip and take a wrong turn..
Posted by: Brendan

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/04/12 12:24 AM

For the next few weeks:

Rach Cello Sonata
Beethoven A major Cello Sonata

Then back to Liszt transcriptions for early Feb., Chopin op. 22 and some two-piano stuff for March, and about a billion accompanying/chamber recitals through April/early May.

I'm thinking of doing a jazz/rock/improv-themed recital next year:

Radiohead/O'Riely - 3 or 4 song transcriptions
Kapustin - Variations, op. 41
Vine - Sonata #1
-intermission-
Bach, C minor Toccata
Rzewski, Winnsboro Cottonmill Blues
David Cutler, Superpower (Hilarious piece! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9AEiQyPzzk)

I might swap out the Vine, but since everything else is new/unperformed I need something that I've played before and know I that can dropkick.
Posted by: PaulaPiano34

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/04/12 01:19 AM

Beethoven, Beethoven, Beethoven Waldstein!!!!! The piece is turning out to be trickier than I thought...it's so, so, so hard to find what to do with all those repeating patterns

Good News: I might have a recording of the Liszt up soon!

and a little PS: I'm dying for a recital opportunity. I haven't had a recital since early December, and I miss performing...I might not have another chance until, yikes!, February!
Posted by: ChibiSF

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/04/12 05:58 PM

Originally Posted By: chobeethaninov
Beethoven, Beethoven, Beethoven Waldstein!!!!! The piece is turning out to be trickier than I thought...it's so, so, so hard to find what to do with all those repeating patterns

Good News: I might have a recording of the Liszt up soon!

and a little PS: I'm dying for a recital opportunity. I haven't had a recital since early December, and I miss performing...I might not have another chance until, yikes!, February!


That reminded me of this Peanuts' comic:


I'm working on Beethoven Op. 22, and I'm also working on the piano part of Beethoven's Violin Sonata #5.
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/04/12 06:49 PM

Originally Posted By: ChibiSF

I'm working on Beethoven Op. 22


thumb

That is an EXCELLENT piano sonata. It BAFFLES me why it is so underrated. It's easily my favorite sonata from his early period. It's also very, very difficult...
Posted by: gooddog

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/04/12 06:52 PM

Originally Posted By: chobeethaninov
Beethoven, Beethoven, Beethoven Waldstein!!!!! The piece is turning out to be trickier than I thought...it's so, so, so hard to find what to do with all those repeating patterns
Tell me more! I've been working on it since June. My biggest challenge is to stay focused and not tense up. I found the first movement tricky but doable. The Rondo is mostly easy but there are places that are murder!
Posted by: pianojosh23

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/04/12 07:05 PM

Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Originally Posted By: ChibiSF

I'm working on Beethoven Op. 22


thumb

That is an EXCELLENT piano sonata. It BAFFLES me why it is so underrated. It's easily my favorite sonata from his early period. It's also very, very difficult...


Interesting. I never was too fond of op. 22. Of his early ones I much prefer Op 2/3, 7, 10/3, 13, 26, 27 1/2. To each his own, though smile
Posted by: Minaku

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/04/12 08:04 PM

I practiced an Octave Chemieux waltz for about 45 minutes today for my Random IMSLP project. What a name, Octave Chemieux.
Posted by: ChibiSF

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/05/12 03:39 PM

Originally Posted By: pianojosh23
Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Originally Posted By: ChibiSF

I'm working on Beethoven Op. 22


thumb

That is an EXCELLENT piano sonata. It BAFFLES me why it is so underrated. It's easily my favorite sonata from his early period. It's also very, very difficult...


Interesting. I never was too fond of op. 22. Of his early ones I much prefer Op 2/3, 7, 10/3, 13, 26, 27 1/2. To each his own, though smile


Interesting. Of all the Beethoven Sonatas I have played, all of them are on the list you just mentioned. And I love Op 22.

But then again, I share the same opinion of Beethoven as dear Schroeder above.
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/05/12 05:49 PM

I haven't practiced in 5 days. I think that's the longest break I've taken in a really, really long time!
Posted by: babama

Re: What are you practicing? - 01/06/12 05:59 PM

At the moment Scriabin Op. 11 No. 24, Chopin Op. 25 No. 1 and Rachmaninoff Op. 3 No. 1.
Posted by: chuasm

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/28/12 04:11 PM

Shall revive this!

Currently working on bach partita no. 6, chopin sonata no. 3, chopin ballade no. 4, chopin etudes op. 25 no.s 10&12, kreisleriana, mozart's lacrymosa smile

Having a blast too!
Posted by: gooddog

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/28/12 04:34 PM

Originally Posted By: chuasm
Shall revive this!
Okay, I liked this thread:

Liszt Sonetto del Petrarca 104
Beethoven Opus 53
Rachmaninoff Etude Tableaux #6
Chopin Ballade #3.
Posted by: Cinnamonbear

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/28/12 04:51 PM

Me, too!

Handel, Keyboard Suite No. 13 in Bb Maj. (the whole thing)
Chandler, "Consolation"
Bach, "Solo per il Cembalo" from LNAMB
Davis/Akst, "First, Last and Always (I Love You): Ballad Fox Trot (1923)
Kahn/Donaldson, "Beside a Babbling Brook" (Song), (1923)
Egan/Whiting, "The Japanese Sandman" (1920)

today, anyway...

--Andy
Posted by: emilypianist89

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/28/12 05:04 PM

Brahms Sonata for Piano and Violin in G major
Beethoven Sonata for Piano and Violin No. 4 in A minor

Chopin Fantasie in F minor
Kutnowski Tango Etudes
Balakirev Islamey
Posted by: Kuanpiano

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/28/12 05:12 PM

Originally Posted By: gooddog
Originally Posted By: chuasm
Shall revive this!
Okay, I liked this thread:

Liszt Sonetto del Petrarca 104
Beethoven Opus 53
Rachmaninoff Etude Tableaux #6
Chopin Ballade #3.

Which Rachmaninoff Etude tableaux?? The op.33 one (which is either the short E flat minor or the E flat major march), or the A minor op.39 one? I don't understand the appeal of the A minor etude tableau, I think it seems to mostly turn out as a bad showpiece.

As for me, I'm trying to finish up learning the third movement of Rach 2, and then start polishing the whole concerto. I'm also sorta working through the Tombeau. The Vine sonata and the Chopin ballade aren't getting as much attention, though I've performed the Chopin before.
Posted by: gooddog

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/28/12 06:30 PM

Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Originally Posted By: gooddog
Originally Posted By: chuasm
Shall revive this!
Okay, I liked this thread:

Liszt Sonetto del Petrarca 104
Beethoven Opus 53
Rachmaninoff Etude Tableaux #6
Chopin Ballade #3.

Which Rachmaninoff Etude tableaux?? The op.33 one (which is either the short E flat minor or the E flat major march), or the A minor op.39 one?
Oh, sorry. It's opus 33 E flat major. (I've also been messing with Op 33 #4 because I like it. I may prepare it as a present for my teacher.) And I forgot, in a little over a week a friend and I are performing the Andante from Mozart's sonata for 2 pianos K448.
Posted by: Kuanpiano

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/28/12 06:37 PM

The D minor is fantastic!! It's extremely hard to voice though. It's my favourite of the bunch, aside from the other D minor in op.39.
Posted by: Gould

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/28/12 09:17 PM

I've been practicing Liszt's 2nd Legend (which my ignorant self choose to learn instead of the Beethoven 4th Concerto. Regrets now but oh well. :P), man I really need to strengthen and discipline my left hand and Schubert A minor Sonata from the op.143 I think and entitled D784, perhaps my favorite Schubert sonata I have ever encountered.
Posted by: currawong

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/28/12 10:05 PM

Granados: Los Requiebros

And a pile of ensemble stuff about a metre high - brass, string, wind, vocal. Some pretty straightforward pieces, others very far from being so.
Posted by: Okiikahuna

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/28/12 10:39 PM

Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
The D minor is fantastic!! It's extremely hard to voice though.


I've been struggling with this one myself. That inner melody that pokes out around bars 11-12 and (I think) 32-33 is giving me quite a bit of grief. Any suggestions on how to practice this?

There is a youtube video by, I think, Debrucey where he does a nice job of bringing this part out.
Posted by: Brendan

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/28/12 10:55 PM

I'm almost ready to go on my jazz/rock/improvisation-themed recital program for next year:

Radiohead/O'Reily: Karma Police, Subterranean Homesick Alien, and Let Down
Kapustin: Variations, op. 41
Miguel del Aguila/Kinsella: Conga Line in heck
Bach: Toccata in c minor, BWV 911
Rzewski: Winnsboro Cotton Mill Blues
David Cutler: Superpower (hilarious piece!)

The Bach, Radiohead, and Cutler are good to go. Rzewski will take some reviving, and I've just got to learn the last variation of the Kapustin. I might sub out my transcription of Conga Line in heck for Vine's First Piano Sonata (a golden oldie for me) because I'm not sure if I can play it or not. smile

An excerpt:


Posted by: didyougethathing

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/29/12 12:09 AM

Pretty much done with Ondine and Scarlatti K. 531

Working on:

Ravel's Sonatine
Scarlatti K. 239 and K. 517 (that one is a bit much for me though)
Chopin's Military Polonaise and Nocturne in Eb (never learned it, so I figured I'd get it in)

Barely working on:
Moleiro - Joropo
Lecuona - Gitanerias

If you haven't heard the last two pieces:
Joropo
Gitanerias
Posted by: Damon

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/29/12 01:06 AM

Karn Evil 9 - Emerson Lake, and Palmer
Toccata - Prokofiev
Wedding day at troll-whatever - Grieg
Land of Confusion - Genesis
Posted by: Mozart'sGal

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/29/12 10:26 AM

Mozart's 21st Concerto Mov. 3
The Entertainer (arranged and adapted by Gunther Schuller)
Arranging hymns
laugh
Posted by: wr

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/30/12 05:13 AM

Originally Posted By: Brendan
I'm almost ready to go on my jazz/rock/improvisation-themed recital program for next year:

Radiohead/O'Reily: Karma Police, Subterranean Homesick Alien, and Let Down
Kapustin: Variations, op. 41
Miguel del Aguila/Kinsella: Conga Line in heck
Bach: Toccata in c minor, BWV 911
Rzewski: Winnsboro Cotton Mill Blues
David Cutler: Superpower (hilarious piece!)

The Bach, Radiohead, and Cutler are good to go. Rzewski will take some reviving, and I've just got to learn the last variation of the Kapustin. I might sub out my transcription of Conga Line in heck for Vine's First Piano Sonata (a golden oldie for me) because I'm not sure if I can play it or not. smile



I'm confused about the del Aguila - is that the same piece (or something close to the same piece) that started life as solo piano piece by him simply called "Conga"?
Posted by: Brendan

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/30/12 08:21 AM

Yeah, that's it. The solo piano piece is pretty sparse, so I'm basically fleshing it out based on the orchestral score. smile
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/30/12 09:17 AM

Originally Posted By: Brendan

An excerpt:

Very interesting. Have you done any other transcriptions?
Posted by: wr

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/30/12 04:51 PM

Originally Posted By: Brendan
Yeah, that's it. The solo piano piece is pretty sparse, so I'm basically fleshing it out based on the orchestral score. smile


Cool! Reminds me somehow of Busoni doing a transcription of the orchestral Mephisto Waltz. It's nice to see some interest in del Aguila - his 2nd piano sonata is a great fun, too.
Posted by: dolce sfogato

Re: What are you practicing? - 06/30/12 06:11 PM

a quick review of Bach/Liszt fantasy and fugue in g, Szymanovsky op.4 and Reger op.134, thought is would be a walk-over, it wasn't..
Posted by: Gerard12

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/01/12 10:30 AM

Originally Posted By: Damon
Karn Evil 9 - Emerson Lake, and Palmer......


All 3 movements?....that's so cool.....


On the jazz side: Duke Ellington's Caravan & Jaco Pastorius's Liberty City.

Otherwise yesterday, it's all final movements of:

Schubert's Sonata, D959, Mozart's Sonata K310, & Schoenberg's 3 piano pieces, Op 11 (just started - it's been roughly 30 years since I touched it. I figure that I'd do the last - hardest - piece first.....Help......)
Posted by: Damon

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/01/12 01:29 PM

Originally Posted By: Gerard12
Originally Posted By: Damon
Karn Evil 9 - Emerson Lake, and Palmer......


All 3 movements?....that's so cool.....




No, the rock stuff is for my band, so it will be the 2nd half of the first movement (the part that got radio airplay). I already know the second movement and part of the third but won't be playing it in front of people.
Posted by: apple*

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/01/12 03:08 PM

I am stuck on that Arabesque.. it really is just gorgeous and i can already play it pretty well... might as well get it performance ready just in case.

Always working on the Goldbergs.

A couple Bach/Lizst prelude and fugue transcriptions.. these are great pieces.. particularly the A minor and the E minor,

Leonard Cohen's Hallelujah.. i am trying to teach the teenagers to sing.

Prelude 14, Book 2 WTC.. i just love this piece.. dreamy yet hard.
Posted by: wower

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/02/12 02:28 PM

As of yesterday, Bach's Sinfonias.
Posted by: wr

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/04/12 05:45 AM

Mostly, for the Unsung Heroes e-cital, the last seven of Koechlin's first set of Esquiesses (the first five were on the program last year).

On the back burner, some pieces that may or may not end up getting added to this year's Unsung - an etude by Bacewicz, a skazka by Medtner, an etude by Friedman, a Gavot by Thuille, and Alkan's Nocturne op. 57, no. 1 and maybe a prelude or two of his. Some of them feel close to "ready".
Posted by: pianist.ame

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/06/12 02:07 AM

Haydn Sonata in A flat major XVI:48
Haydn Variations Hob.6
Bach Toccata BWV 911
Beethoven 32 variations
Liszt Paysage from Transcendental Etudes
Mozart Piano Concerto no.25
Czerny op.299
supposed to find more to fill in my time if needed...have been practicing but not really practicing, doing short sessions where I focus intensly but was so used to my previous teacher dumping pieces on me whenever I voiced that I had time...currently for my teacher now we are only working on the Haydn and he takes his time which is bad for me cause I do end up doing the same, the rest is for my LRCM exam next June. My mentor said it's because I'm at a transition stage
Posted by: Debbusyist

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/06/12 02:28 AM

Practicing what is in my sig, as well as other non-classical pieces, eg. anime theme songs, pop songs, etc. wink
Posted by: wr

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/26/12 06:22 AM

Originally Posted By: wr
Mostly, for the Unsung Heroes e-cital, the last seven of Koechlin's first set of Esquiesses (the first five were on the program last year).

On the back burner, some pieces that may or may not end up getting added to this year's Unsung - an etude by Bacewicz, a skazka by Medtner, an etude by Friedman, a Gavot by Thuille, and Alkan's Nocturne op. 57, no. 1 and maybe a prelude or two of his. Some of them feel close to "ready".


Some of the back burner items have fallen by the wayside for now - the Friedman, for sure, and probably the Medtner. Too bad about the Medtner (it's op. 34, no. 2) - it would be the perfect thing to honor Tozer, but man, that left hand part is so hard (for me, anyway)!! Still working on the other stuff - it is coming along.
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/26/12 02:17 PM

Bach-Busoni Chaconne. laugh

Ibert Saxophone Concerto accompaniment. crazy
Posted by: trigalg693

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/26/12 02:39 PM

Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Bach-Busoni Chaconne. laugh

This piece is amazing when played well laugh

@wr sorry to hear about the Medtner, it's a shame Medtner is so hard to play! I still dream of doing Sonata Minacciossa someday, but Hamelin said it was one of the hardest things he ever recorded...so who am I, a low life, to be playing that? frown

Working on Mazeppa, Scriabin 5. Need to revive Scriabin 2 before it's too late, I have to perform it soon. Teacher told me to learn WTC Book 1 no.4, Beethoven op.2 no.3, haven't gotten around to those. Wanted to start Liszt Sonata but Mazeppa is really bothering me.
Posted by: DameMyra

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/27/12 11:42 AM

For an upcoming recital: (Have performed all but the Muczynski before)
Bach: Fantasy in c minor
Schubert: Sonata in A major, D. 664
Muczynski: "Desperate Measures"
Chopin: 2nd Scherzo

Learning:
Bach: e minor Toccata
Mozart: Sonata in D major, K. 576
Posted by: Singing Shortstop

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/28/12 12:00 AM

Since I just recently upgraded to a grand from a spinet, I'm planning a piano party, asking friends to come and play something prepared. I'm working on a few pieces:

Bach Invention #8
Chopin Minute Waltz
Brahms Intermezzo in A
Joplin Bink's Waltz
My Funny Valentine, arr. Doug McKenzie

Once the party is past, I'll be tackling a Schubert Impromptu, Debussy's Clare de Lune, and the second Gershwin prelude.
Posted by: Bobpickle

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/28/12 02:34 AM

identifying the different church modes by ear eek
Posted by: JoelW

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/28/12 02:36 AM

The piano.
Posted by: ruvido

Re: What are you practicing? - 07/28/12 05:03 AM

Prokofiev 2nd Concerto
Scriabin Sonata No. 2
Liszt Mephisto Polka

On the side: Bach Inventions and Scarlatti Sonatas
Posted by: Dachshund

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/12/12 01:21 PM

Right now I am working on perfecting Scarlatti's Sonatas K 159 and K 309 for a performance next week.
I am also working on Seguidillas by Albeniz, all movements of Beethoven's Sonata op. 14 no. 1, I'm teaching myself some Antheil pieces which I am preparing to record in the next few days for the Unsung Heros III E-cital and I am working on several ragtime pieces.
Posted by: trigalg693

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/12/12 02:09 PM

Originally Posted By: ruvido
Prokofiev 2nd Concerto
Scriabin Sonata No. 2
Liszt Mephisto Polka

On the side: Bach Inventions and Scarlatti Sonatas



Scriabin 2 <3

Working on Mazeppa, and starting to learn Bach WTC book 1 no.4 BWV 849. Love the fugue.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/12/12 02:11 PM

Bach-Fryer:Sarabande, R.Strauss-Reger:Morgen, Brahms-Brahms:Hungarian Dance No.10, R.Strauss-Fiorentino:Waltzes from der Rosenkavalier, Faure-Attwood:Les Berceux

Maybe I should change may name to Pi-a-no-lov-er-us.
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/13/12 09:48 AM

Focusing on Rachmaninoff 1st sonata. 1 page left from the 1st movement.... such a pity that people choose to ignore this great, great (and massive) sonata...
Posted by: ScriabinAddict

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/13/12 10:04 AM

Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
such a pity that people choose to ignore this great, great (and massive) sonata...


It's certainly a masterpiece that is sadly overshadowed by the 2nd sonata. I've grown to enjoy the 1st far more.
Posted by: gooddog

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/13/12 11:31 AM

I'm focused on removing all unnecessary tension, controlling my tempo and eliminating my tendency to speed up. I am working uncharacteristically slowly and the metronome is getting a workout. I've also developed a slight case of tendonitis in one of my thumb extensors, (darn small hands), so I'm being very careful, especially when I play anything over a 7th.

Rachmaninoff Etude Tableaux Op 33 #6 (or 7) E flat major
Chopin Ballade #3
Chopin Etude 10/5

To reward myself at the end of a slooooow practice session, I'm reviving old pieces. Now: Schumann's Aufschwung.
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/14/12 12:31 AM

Originally Posted By: ScriabinAddict
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
such a pity that people choose to ignore this great, great (and massive) sonata...


It's certainly a masterpiece that is sadly overshadowed by the 2nd sonata. I've grown to enjoy the 1st far more.


Me too! But I've only played the revised second.. studied the original a lot too, though. But there is something almost perishing in the first sonata... It's very intriguing.
Posted by: Kuanpiano

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/14/12 12:32 AM

Trying to wrap up Rachmaninoff's 2nd concerto, but the second movement fast part and half of the third movement are proving to be extremely tricky...
Posted by: beet31425

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/14/12 12:38 AM

Mostly the Polonaise-Fantaisie and the 1st Scherzo these days. Both are beginning to feel very much "there". The secret to the Scherzo turned out to be playing most of it between p and mf!


-J
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/14/12 12:38 AM

Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Trying to wrap up Rachmaninoff's 2nd concerto, but the second movement fast part and half of the third movement are proving to be extremely tricky...


The development of the 2nd mvt is VERY annoying to learn, but after you put in all those painfully long hours, it will start to kind of "play itself"..
Posted by: Kuanpiano

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/14/12 12:43 AM

Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Trying to wrap up Rachmaninoff's 2nd concerto, but the second movement fast part and half of the third movement are proving to be extremely tricky...


The development of the 2nd mvt is VERY annoying to learn, but after you put in all those painfully long hours, it will start to kind of "play itself"..

Well, the part where the piano plays all of the nice melodies is fine, just the part that enters after that huge whirl up the keyboard including the cadenza is just ridiculous. The rest is comfortable, just requires shaping a loong loong melodic line that accompanies the woodwinds.
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/14/12 12:48 AM

Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Trying to wrap up Rachmaninoff's 2nd concerto, but the second movement fast part and half of the third movement are proving to be extremely tricky...


The development of the 2nd mvt is VERY annoying to learn, but after you put in all those painfully long hours, it will start to kind of "play itself"..

Well, the part where the piano plays all of the nice melodies is fine, just the part that enters after that huge whirl up the keyboard including the cadenza is just ridiculous. The rest is comfortable, just requires shaping a loong loong melodic line that accompanies the woodwinds.



Are you talking about the middle section, or after the climax of the middle section, or/and after the recap, so the coda?
Posted by: Kuanpiano

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/14/12 12:55 AM

Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Trying to wrap up Rachmaninoff's 2nd concerto, but the second movement fast part and half of the third movement are proving to be extremely tricky...


The development of the 2nd mvt is VERY annoying to learn, but after you put in all those painfully long hours, it will start to kind of "play itself"..

Well, the part where the piano plays all of the nice melodies is fine, just the part that enters after that huge whirl up the keyboard including the cadenza is just ridiculous. The rest is comfortable, just requires shaping a loong loong melodic line that accompanies the woodwinds.



Are you talking about the middle section, or after the climax of the middle section, or/and after the recap, so the coda?

After the climax, when the piano plays in quick sextuplets that almost sound like trills flying around is the tricky part. The rest seems manageable...
Posted by: peterws

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/14/12 04:44 AM

I`m trying to get my head round some stuff I played in restaurants, and develop a unique style based not on skill, but making mistakes sound good . . . if you hit sufficient notes, some will invariably be correct.
Though maybe not in the correct order . . . .
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/14/12 11:41 AM

Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Trying to wrap up Rachmaninoff's 2nd concerto, but the second movement fast part and half of the third movement are proving to be extremely tricky...


The development of the 2nd mvt is VERY annoying to learn, but after you put in all those painfully long hours, it will start to kind of "play itself"..

Well, the part where the piano plays all of the nice melodies is fine, just the part that enters after that huge whirl up the keyboard including the cadenza is just ridiculous. The rest is comfortable, just requires shaping a loong loong melodic line that accompanies the woodwinds.



Are you talking about the middle section, or after the climax of the middle section, or/and after the recap, so the coda?

After the climax, when the piano plays in quick sextuplets that almost sound like trills flying around is the tricky part. The rest seems manageable...


Yes! Very annoying to learn. Take your time with it!
Posted by: Brendan

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/14/12 12:28 PM

This week's project: tightening up Beethoven 3rd and Stravinsky's Concerto for Piano and Winds. Both are somewhat unpianistic in their own ways!
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/14/12 01:47 PM

Originally Posted By: Brendan
This week's project: tightening up Beethoven 3rd ...
Piano Concerto or Violin Sonata or ? I'm kind of assuming you mean his PC and, if so, do you have a performance coming up?
Posted by: beet31425

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/24/12 12:17 AM

Scriabin's 10th.

Much of it is readable, but there are deep mysterious pits of complexity. I just spent a half hour on a particular ten measures, mostly working out the rhythms. Yikes.

-J
Posted by: Derulux

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/24/12 01:17 AM

Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Trying to wrap up Rachmaninoff's 2nd concerto, but the second movement fast part and half of the third movement are proving to be extremely tricky...


The development of the 2nd mvt is VERY annoying to learn, but after you put in all those painfully long hours, it will start to kind of "play itself"..

Well, the part where the piano plays all of the nice melodies is fine, just the part that enters after that huge whirl up the keyboard including the cadenza is just ridiculous. The rest is comfortable, just requires shaping a loong loong melodic line that accompanies the woodwinds.



Are you talking about the middle section, or after the climax of the middle section, or/and after the recap, so the coda?

After the climax, when the piano plays in quick sextuplets that almost sound like trills flying around is the tricky part. The rest seems manageable...

I'm assuming you're talking about pg 32-34 here? I honestly hate learning those passages.. I find it such tedious work. (One of the reasons I never took a real stab at the Rach 3--lots of passages like this.) Fortunately for most of them, there is a repetitive pattern within the passages, and once you identify it, it becomes far easier to learn. Then you just practice the pattern and you have the passage, no matter where it goes on the keyboard. I think in this section, there are seven patterns, 6-7 individual beat-long breaks from the pattern (some are only a half-beat), and then a quick run at the end. Once you break it down, I think you'll find it much easier to get through. smile
Posted by: ChopinAddict

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/24/12 01:58 AM

Mendelssohn's Andante Cantabile and Presto Agitato. 3hearts
Posted by: -Frycek

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/24/12 02:14 AM

Learning Chopin's 9/3. Polishing a lot of stuff.
Posted by: wr

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/24/12 05:06 AM

Now that Unsung III is all done, I'm playing through stuff to see what I want to work on next.

Obvious choice, the last three of the set of 12 Esquisses by Koechlin - they were, in fact, getting fairly far along before I ditched them to concentrate on the ones I did manage to upload. There were a couple of other things I started for Unsung III but dropped - a Bacewicz etude and a gavotte by Thuille. I think I'll keep working on them.

I have been having educational fun with Rach's arrangement of the MSND Scherzo, even though it's wildly beyond my reach. For some reason, I don't know why, it is teaching me how to relax, which has been a big issue for me. So I'm practicing it every day.

The A minor P&F from WTC II - it seems doable and is interesting. I may have learn it for real.

Other things I practiced in the last couple of days - some Clementi sonata movements, some chunks of Chopin op. 22, Rach prelude in G major from op. 32, Prokofiev's "Landscape" from his 3 pieces, op. 59 and the second of his op. 54 sonatinas (more and more, I'm liking some things from the more obscure corners of his oeuvre).
Posted by: Gerard12

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/24/12 09:04 AM

Originally Posted By: wr
......I have been having educational fun with Rach's arrangement of the MSND Scherzo, even though it's wildly beyond my reach. For some reason, I don't know why, it is teaching me how to relax, which has been a big issue for me. So I'm practicing it every day.......


Good for you. If I'm reading (into) this correctly - and calling into account my past experiences with similar pieces of difficulty - this piece will not be wildly beyond your reach for too long.

(Though I'm not sure of how to define "long." :))
Posted by: apple*

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/24/12 10:01 AM

prelude and fugue on a theme of Ponce.. it is fantastic

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehDuUNAGZsw

especially the fugue.. pretty hard too. ok - I can't play the fugue no way, I can hardly play the prelude, but i can work on it and pretend I am a concert pianist.

pic coming soon.
Posted by: Schmoe

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/24/12 10:09 AM

Chopin's Ocean Etude
Copland's Piano Variations
Bach's Prelude and fugue No. 4 in C# minor from the Well-Tempered Clavier Book 1
Mozart's Sonata No. 17 K570

Well then, I best get back to practicing.
Posted by: Tim Adrianson

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/24/12 11:07 AM

apple, just a quick note -- if anybody belongs in the Unsung Heroes event, it is Manuel Ponce! The compositions I've heard of his have all been written beautifully for the piano, and his conceptions sensitive and elegant.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/24/12 11:21 AM

R.Strauss-Fiorentino:Waltzes from Der Rosenkavalier
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZiaz5R7N5g
Posted by: Tim Adrianson

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/24/12 11:48 AM

Well, for me, two categories:

Bach -- Partitas in G Maj and C Min, for a Bach Around the Clock event that MAY happen in 2013 in Madison, WI (the woman who started it left the area for greener pastures, so we'll see).

My "REALLY" contemporary program, for the 2013 Boston Amateur Competition. Several of the Boston "contingent" were in Chicago for the Chicago Amateur this past May, and I informed them of my intention to foist...uh, present this literature to my adoring public. I say REALLY contemporary, incidentally, as a reaction to the fact that at the Colorado Competition several years back, I won prizes for the best "Contemporary" selections: but these were pieces drawn from the American piano literature of 1930 - 55; i.e., now 60 - 80 years old!

First round:

John Harbison -- On an Unwritten Letter (1999)
Milton Babbitt -- The Old Order Changeth (1999)**
Paul Schoenfield -- Boogie, from Peccadillos (1997)

**In memoriam; I really have no business trying to play him!

SemiFinal round:

Augusta Read Thomas -- Fire Walts (Homage to Bartok) (2003), or
Joan Tower -- Holding a Daisy (1996)
Katherine Hoover -- Toccata (2011)
Libby Larson -- Mephisto Rag (2003), or
Judith Zaimont -- Wizards - Three Magical Masters (2004)

Final round -- really up for grabs (I'll never get that far, anyway):

Steven Paulus -- Sprightly, and Rollicking, from Five Preludes for Piano (1993)
Richard Danielpour -- Elegy, from Enchanted Garden II (2008)
and Night, from Enchanted Garden I (1993)
Lowell Liebermann -- Nocturne No 8 (2004)
Michael Torke -- Blue Pacific (2006)

I've been working heavily on these over this past year, among others written over the past 20 years or so -- but this is the final cut! Obviously, not much time for anything else, although I do plan to dust off a few more, uh, contemporary American pieces from the 30s through the 50s for next year's Unsung Heroes (if there is one, of course).
Posted by: Gerard12

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/25/12 09:55 AM

Originally Posted By: Tim Adrianson
.....My "REALLY" contemporary program..... I've been working heavily on these over this past year, among others written over the past 20 years or so -- but this is the final cut!....


Didn't I see Derek Bermel's Turning on a previous list? Did that one not make the final cut due to length? (Just curious. I just picked up the score a couple days ago - have yet to dig in.)
Posted by: apple*

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/25/12 12:23 PM

Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
Bach-Busoni Chaconne. laugh



that's hard enough!
Posted by: Tim Adrianson

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/25/12 02:22 PM

Yes, you did Gerard12 -- and yes, the "problem" really was length -- but it is an excellent introduction, if you will, to several new "musics", and well worth working on. I particularly like the "Kowie at Dawn" segment, which (as Bermel indicates) is a pianistic evocation of various African percussion instruments. Just an incidental anecdote: Bermel wrote the work for Christopher Taylor in 1996, and Taylor has taught here at the Univ of Wisc Madison for several years now. He holds one free recital per year, and last year he performed "Turning", along with a couple of other contemporary selections. That guy can truly play anything and everything, and has proved it over the years!
Posted by: trigalg693

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/26/12 05:18 AM

Bach BWV 849 smile (WTC book1 no.4 C# minor)
You have to play this piece to appreciate Bach's greatness. Been 1 week since I started the fugue, have 2 pages down pretty solid, last/next 2 pages sorta can play yay.
Posted by: ScriabinAddict

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/26/12 05:30 AM

Finishing up the Bartok Sonata and some other stuff for comps. Fun piece to play. grin
Posted by: Works1

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/26/12 05:52 AM

Scarlatti K87
Chopin Op.25/9
Faure Op.17/3

Posted by: fnork

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/26/12 09:16 AM

Current projects -

Bartok: Etudes op. 18 - have played the 2nd and just memorized the other too, but they're frightening to play and almost impossible for me to get up to tempo!
Debussy: Etudes, book 1 - Performing all of these later this fall in a Debussy festival, they keep presenting new and fascinating challenges to me. Pieces worth studying, for sure!
Beethoven - Hammerklavier, once again. The fugue is a pain in the butt every time I pick it up - some spots just don't have ANY plausible/comfortable solutions regarding fingerings and so on.

Trying to decide what else to focus on this fall, I have hardly ever looked at the Brahms concerti and would love to work on one of them...
Posted by: jmcintyre

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/26/12 11:03 AM

Roughly in descending order of "doneness":

Haydn Sonata Hob. XVI:23
Mendelssohn Songs Without Words: Nos. 25, 33 and 34
Brahms Op. 118, Nos. 2 and 3
Chopin Op. 27 No 2
Posted by: woodog

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/26/12 12:12 PM

Restarting lessons at age 54, after 20 or so years of not having an acoustic instrument. My teacher assigned
Brahms, Op. 76, #1 (scares me)
Prokofiev, Op.12, #3 (Rigaudon)
Bach French Suite #2, Allemande, Courante, Sarabande.

exciting and scary, yes.

Forrest
Posted by: Playagain

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/26/12 03:49 PM

Enjoy your lessons, Woodog!

Working on:
Chopin Nocturne in E minor, Op. 72 no. 1
Chopin Nocturne in C# Minor (Posthumous)
Beethoven Op. 13 (Pathetique) Adagio Cantabile
Beethoven Sonata in F Minor Op. 2 No. 1

Kathy
Posted by: Debbusyist

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/27/12 06:18 AM

Polishing my pieces for my Diploma!!

Bach Partita#1 Sinfonia

Beethoven Sonata Op2 no1 (dear lord I despise making the melody in double forths hear-able and that 4th movement just doesn't want to sound melodic)

Brahms Intermezzo from Ballades Op10

Debussy Prelude Book 2 Broulliards

Messiaen's Regard de l'etoile (just trying to make it more scary)
Posted by: dannylux

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/27/12 07:20 AM

Originally Posted By: apple*
prelude and fugue on a theme of Ponce.. it is fantastic

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehDuUNAGZsw

especially the fugue.. pretty hard too. ok - I can't play the fugue no way, I can hardly play the prelude, but i can work on it and pretend I am a concert pianist.

pic coming soon.

Apple,

I play a lot of Ponce, and his "Prelude and Fugue on a Theme of Handel" is one of my favorites.

I like Jorge Federico Osorio's performance, on his Balada Mexicana CD:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YI8upuGf8U4


And how about his Estudio de concierto VIII Preludio Galante:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=64qKxvVh2Wk

PM me if you want a copy of the extremely rare score.



Mel
Posted by: wr

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/27/12 05:30 PM

Originally Posted By: Brendan
This week's project: tightening up Beethoven 3rd and Stravinsky's Concerto for Piano and Winds.


First Jeffrey Jones, and now you - the Stravinsky is climbing the charts!! I love it that one of my very favorite underplayed concertos is getting some attention.
Posted by: pianist.ame

Re: What are you practicing? - 08/28/12 01:27 AM

For an exam& 2 competitions back in Canada from May-June 2013:
Bach Toccata in c minor BWV 911,Mozart Sonata in c minor K.457, Mozart Piano Concerto in C major K.503, Liszt Transcendental Etude no.3 'Paysage' and Chopin Etudes op.10 nos.2&4

for technique/ to build my rep:
Hanon The Virtuoso Pianist Part 3, Bach Italian Concerto 3rd mvt and going to start Mendelssohn's Variations Seriesus op.54
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 10:47 AM

Bumping this fun thread. Yesterday, I tried to impersonate Marc-Andre Hamelin/Stephen Hough. I found my project over the summer for my university's concerto competition wink

https://www.box.com/s/9f1urgdvaq3a5ekkri1i
Posted by: JoelW

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 11:20 AM

A Chopin scherzo and a Beethoven sonata.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 11:46 AM

Faure-Attwood:Les Berceux(no recording available but here is the original song with its amazing lyrics and melody)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxdIr0gu9rQ

Bach-Fryer:Sarabande fron Cello Suite
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITbcJMKVmts

Piazzolla-Mortensen:Milonga del Angel(piece starts around 3:10)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RLZBgLH7H8&feature=related

Rodgers-Hough:Hello Young Lovers(not the best recording)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4wnBamEehc

Porter-Walter:Begin the Beguine
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFRsmNwMJlw

Kern-Jarrett:Old Man River
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFRsmNwMJlw





Posted by: fnork

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 12:25 PM

Learning:

Nielsen suite op. 45
Dvorak Piano quintet
songs by Strauss and Szymanowski

Re-learning:

Chopin op 10 nr 8-10, 3rd scherzo
Schumann Humoreske
Posted by: Goldberg

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 12:37 PM

Just started: Chopin Preludes, Beethoven 31/1, Sciarrino Anamorfosi and other uncommonly heard "water" pieces. Continuing work on Rach 3 for upcoming concerto competition.
Posted by: riley80

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 12:43 PM

Mendelssohn Op 7 No. 6 "Sehnsuchtig"

Bach "Ich Ruf' zu Dir" -for both piano and organ.
Posted by: RealPlayer

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 12:46 PM

I agree it's nice to see the Stravinsky Piano & Winds concerto on this thread. One of my favorites as well.

I am in a rut, shall we say, in that I'm working on material for a new CD to be recorded in June, and so practicing for that to the exclusion of everything else. Well, almost. There's a performance of the Cage/Hiller HPSCHD coming up in New York in early May, and I'm playing three of the Solos (two other pianists play the others).

For the CD:

Michael Byron, Book of Horizons
Julius Eastman, Piano 2
"Blue" Gene Tyranny, The Drifter
Stuart Saunders Smith, Fences, in Three Tragedies
Posted by: gooddog

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 01:26 PM

OSK, thanks for reviving this thread. It's interesting to see what people are working on.

Me:
Polishing: Chopin Ballade #3 (Hope to perform this at piano camp recital this summer).
Reviving: Mozart Sonata #14, K457 (Also hope to perform this at camp.)
Learning: Beethoven Sonata #18, Opus 31 #3
For fun: Rachmaninoff Morceaux de Salon Opus 10, No 1 (For my piano group, maybe this Thursday.)
Posted by: Vid

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 01:48 PM

I'll bite. (looking forward to hearing the Ballade Deborah!)

Polishing (to be performed at an upcoming festival):
Chopin Nocturne Op. 48 1
Beethoven Tempest Sonata
Brahms Intermezzo Op 117 1

Learning:
Rachmaninoff Preludes Op. 23, 5 & 6
Bach P&F in A-b major, Bk 2
Posted by: mermilylumpkin

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 02:51 PM

I am playing the gigue and the gavotte from Bach's French Suite no.5 and the prelude and fugue in C minor from WTC1 and March from "Seasons" by Tchaikovsky.

Rappel des Oiseaux by Rameau and allemande from the French Suite are in the queue. And then the rest of the suite. Then about 10 other Bach things.
Posted by: TrueMusic

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 04:42 PM

Fun thread!

I'm practicing these for an upcoming performance and Jury:
Rachmaninoff opus 32 no 10
Chopin opus 25 no 1
Beethoven Opus 27 no 1

All these I'm doing refinements and in depth shaping on

I'm also "mentally practicing", or these but will be going at them full force over the summer:
Rachmaninoff opus 32 no 13
Kapustin variations opus 41
Chopin opus 27 no 1, opus 10 no 4, opus 25 no 5
Bach WTC book II in am
Liszt "Un Sospiro"

Now, I probably won't actually perfect that big list of stuff I'm gonna take on over the summer, but I'm going to start through them and see which ones start to really take hold.
Posted by: -Frycek

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 05:10 PM

Chopin 28/24
Posted by: Tim Adrianson

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 05:13 PM

Here is my update for the Boston Amateur Competition, coming up 19 - 23 Jun 13 --

First Round

John Harbison On an Unwritten Letter (1999)
Milton Babbitt The Old Order Changeth (1999)
Steven Paulus Rollicking, from Five Preludes (1993)

SemiFinal Round

Katherine Hoover Toccata (2011)
Richard Danielpour Elegy (2009)
Judith Zaimont Wizards (2003)

Final Round

Either
John Harbison Sonata No 2 (2001)
Or
Fred Hersch 24 Variations on a Bach Chorale (2004)
Michael Torke Blue Pacific (2006)

As you can see, all these pieces have been written over the past 20 years, and I consider them ALL reasonably "accessible" -- even the Babbitt! In these Amateur Competitions, I've sort of made seldom-heard literature my "shtick" -- and certainly virtually all solo piano contemporary compositions fit into that category.

Needless to say, I'll be shifting back and forth between all of these for the next couple of months.
Posted by: fnork

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 05:31 PM

Wow Tim, that looks like a serious program you're working on! I don't know any of the pieces, and not all of the composers either. Fred Hersch, is it the same guy who is more known as a jazz pianist, or is this someone else?
Posted by: didyougethathing

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 06:22 PM

STILL trying to perfect every note of Ondine.

Mostly through the Waldstein 1st movement. I had it to memory, but took a lot of time off from it recently.

Working through Ginastera's unbelievable first sonata.

Finishing up the Chopin C# minor waltz. The D-flat section gives me the most trouble to memorize! Lots of syncopation.

Thinking about picking up another Scarlatti sonata, maybe K.9 or K.12
Posted by: gooddog

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 07:19 PM

Originally Posted By: Vid
I'll bite. (looking forward to hearing the Ballade Deborah!)

Polishing (to be performed at an upcoming festival):
Chopin Nocturne Op. 48 1
Beethoven Tempest Sonata
Brahms Intermezzo Op 117 1

Learning:
Rachmaninoff Preludes Op. 23, 5 & 6
Bach P&F in A-b major, Bk 2
Can't wait to hear you too. Which do you think you'll perform?
Posted by: AnneJ

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 11:14 PM

working on:
Beethoven Sonata #17, Opus 31 #2 (2nd mvt)
Bach 3rd French Suite
Posted by: Polyphonist

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/16/13 11:30 PM

Originally Posted By: -Frycek
Chopin 28/24

I'm also working on that.
Posted by: stores

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/17/13 04:20 AM

Patience.
Posted by: Tim Adrianson

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/17/13 10:23 AM

Hi, fnork -- Yes, that is indeed the jazz pianist Fred Hersch. He took it upon himself to compose an extended work in the Classical style -- although some of the variations clearly are informed by a jazz sensibility. The Bach Chorale in question is a setting of Hans Leo Hassler's "O Sacred Head, Now Wounded", which also was used as the melody for the contemporary '60s folk hit "Because All Men are Brothers". That's pretty much why Hersch thought it was an especially appropriate choice for a set of solo piano variations. I think he provided a really effective vehicle to hear both jazz-based and classically-based variations.

Just out of curiosity, which of the composers had you not heard of previously? I admit to not knowing much of anything of some of the European composers you've presented (Szymanowski, Lindberg). The composers are not widely known American composers, in the sense of a Gershwin or Bernstein, but they are all (IMO) pretty well known in the Classical Music world here in the US.
Posted by: Polyphonist

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/17/13 10:45 AM

Originally Posted By: stores
Patience.

Who are you addressing and why?
Posted by: beet31425

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/17/13 11:04 AM

First movement of the Appassionata. I'm playing it for my teacher's conservatory students this Friday. Carving out 2h of practicing in the morning before work.


-J
Posted by: fnork

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/17/13 11:41 AM

Originally Posted By: Tim Adrianson
Just out of curiosity, which of the composers had you not heard of previously?

Babbitt and Harbison are of course very familiar names, Judith Zaimont rings a bell somehow, but the other names are unknown for me. I'll check them out though.
Posted by: Vid

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/17/13 01:56 PM

Originally Posted By: gooddog
Can't wait to hear you too. Which do you think you'll perform?


I will probably try to fit in all of the polished ones (Tempest, Brahms Intermezzo and Chopin Nocturne 48 1). The Chopin is a beast but would like to attempt it on the concert grand :P
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/17/13 03:41 PM

Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Originally Posted By: stores
Patience.

Who are you addressing and why?


I would assume the weather! wink
Posted by: PianoHarry

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/17/13 06:36 PM

Jazz standards, Charlie Parker Omnibook

I don't have any classical music in my repertoire or my practise regimen. Should I?
My performance goals are exclusively jazz and blues oriented
Posted by: stores

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/17/13 09:29 PM

Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Originally Posted By: stores
Patience.

Who are you addressing and why?


The question was "What are you practicing?"
Posted by: Polyphonist

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/18/13 12:30 AM

Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Originally Posted By: stores
Patience.

Who are you addressing and why?


The question was "What are you practicing?"

Ah, I see. Thanks for clarifying. smile
Posted by: wr

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/19/13 07:05 AM

Measure 49 of Chopin's Andante spianato.

Also am digging around in Alkan, too, hoping to find something short and sweet I could do for his anniversary this year. I had a physical issue that prevented me from signing up for the e-cital, but it seemed to have faded sufficiently into the background that now I think I may be able to participate just a bit.
Posted by: Schubertslieder

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/19/13 08:55 AM

Originally Posted By: wr
Measure 49 of Chopin's Andante spianato.

Also am digging around in Alkan, too, I had a physical issue that prevented me from signing up for the e-cital, now I think I may be able to participate just a bit.


Hi,

I couldn't help but to notice the word "e-cital" in your post and I wondered if it was a typo or an actual word. If it is an actual word, would you describe it? As you can see, I am kinda new.
Posted by: patH

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/19/13 10:19 AM

I recently started practising Beethoven's sonata in C minor op. 10/1.
Posted by: Polyphonist

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/19/13 11:47 AM

Originally Posted By: Schubertslieder
Originally Posted By: wr
Measure 49 of Chopin's Andante spianato.

Also am digging around in Alkan, too, I had a physical issue that prevented me from signing up for the e-cital, now I think I may be able to participate just a bit.


Hi,

I couldn't help but to notice the word "e-cital" in your post and I wondered if it was a typo or an actual word. If it is an actual word, would you describe it? As you can see, I am kinda new.

It's a forum event where members submit recordings through the site and they are compiled to form the "e-cital". smile It's like how e-mail is mail sent over the Internet.
Posted by: Thracozaag

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/19/13 01:20 PM

Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
Faure-Attwood:Les Berceux(no recording available but here is the original song with its amazing lyrics and melody)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxdIr0gu9rQ


How flattering that you thought enough of the transcription to learn it yourself! laugh
There is a recording available, as part of the Husum festival compilation:
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Danacord/DACOCD689
And I do have an MP3 recorded at a friend's house, if anyone would like it--be happy to provide a copy.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/19/13 02:21 PM

Originally Posted By: Thracozaag
Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
Faure-Attwood:Les Berceux(no recording available but here is the original song with its amazing lyrics and melody)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxdIr0gu9rQ


How flattering that you thought enough of the transcription to learn it yourself! laugh
There is a recording available, as part of the Husum festival compilation:
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Danacord/DACOCD689
And I do have an MP3 recorded at a friend's house, if anyone would like it--be happy to provide a copy.
Besides thanking you for making such a beautiful transcription, I should thank you for introducing me through your transcriptions to the song literature which I am still almost totally unfamiliar with.

I usually just ignore the "original versions" of lieder in favor of the piano transcriptions, but after listening to Janet Baker's recording of Les Berceux and even more so when I got the English translation of the lyrics, I was overwhelmed by its beauty.


Posted by: Schubertslieder

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/19/13 11:23 PM

Polyphonist, thanks for clarifying "e-cital".
Posted by: Polyphonist

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/19/13 11:27 PM

Originally Posted By: Schubertslieder
Polyphonist, thanks for clarifying "e-cital".

No problem. smile
Posted by: cefinow

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/20/13 12:29 PM

My teacher is out of town for several weeks. My initial inclination was to go wild with trying out new pieces. Finally I have decided to go back and review everything I've learned in the last year. (Plus dabbling in some new pieces.) There are passages of Mozart that seem to absorb endless amounts of practice time, and now I've got the time and opportunity to devote myself to that. I also don't want to forget the Bach inventions and Chopin nocturnes.
Posted by: currawong

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/20/13 07:06 PM

Songs by Poulenc, Argento, Walton; my usual Bach P&F for the day (today's is D minor book II); Granados Los Requiebros (still...); Goldberg variations. smile
Posted by: gooddog

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/20/13 07:23 PM

Last night I had the pleasure of hearing live chamber music. My teacher was on the piano. After listening to his playing very carefully, I have decided to spend an entire week practicing a simple Bach minuet with the goals of conquering dynamic control, tension and expression without having to worry about difficulty. I also intend to learn how to create differences in color. The Chopin and the Beethoven and the Mozart will sleep this week.
Posted by: lam132

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/20/13 10:26 PM

I'm returning to the piano after a pretty long (over a year) hiatus. What I have decided to work on for now:

Mozart Fantasia K 475
Haydn Concerto in D (practicing the last movement first)

I think I may pick out a Chopin Nocturne too. Pretty standard repertoire. Just getting back into piano, I feel a little lost as far as what to work on, but I've picked these pieces to start with. I used to be very interested in exploring less familiar rep, so I've really enjoyed reading through this thread.

I had a lot of technical limitations before that I still have to work on, so I wouldn't mind finding less technically demanding pieces. I find that my knowledge of less demanding, intermediate-ish rep is pretty lacking. We'll see how this goes.
Posted by: RealPlayer

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/20/13 11:16 PM

Earlier I mentioned music I'm learning for an upcoming CD. Some of it is so difficult it is giving me fits. It would be nice afterwards to settle into some major Liszt or something just to relax.
Posted by: wr

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/21/13 05:58 AM

Originally Posted By: Schubertslieder
Originally Posted By: wr
Measure 49 of Chopin's Andante spianato.

Also am digging around in Alkan, too, I had a physical issue that prevented me from signing up for the e-cital, now I think I may be able to participate just a bit.


Hi,

I couldn't help but to notice the word "e-cital" in your post and I wondered if it was a typo or an actual word. If it is an actual word, would you describe it? As you can see, I am kinda new.


I think someone here came up with the word, and we still use it. It's not really clearly defined other than being some kind of virtual recital. If you want to see an example of how they can work, check out this thread over in the ABF. It's about to go live. Most aren't that huge, though.

Here's the thread regarding the Alkan one I was talking about.
Posted by: Schubertslieder

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/21/13 07:16 AM

Originally Posted By: wr
Originally Posted By: Schubertslieder
Originally Posted By: wr
Measure 49 of Chopin's Andante spianato.

Also am digging around in Alkan, too, I had a physical issue that prevented me from signing up for the e-cital, now I think I may be able to participate just a bit.


Hi,

I couldn't help but to notice the word "e-cital" in your post and I wondered if it was a typo or an actual word. If it is an actual word, would you describe it? As you can see, I am kinda new.


I think someone here came up with the word, and we still use it. It's not really clearly defined other than being some kind of virtual recital. If you want to see an example of how they can work, check out this thread over in the ABF. It's about to go live. Most aren't that huge, though.

Here's the thread regarding the Alkan one I was talking about.


Thank you for the info. I wondered if someone can tell me where is ABF. I would love to see that concert.
Posted by: wr

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/21/13 07:26 AM

Originally Posted By: Schubertslieder

Thank you for the info. I wondered if someone can tell me where is ABF. I would love to see that concert.


ABF is just another forum here at PianoWorld - the initials stand for "Adult Beginners Forum". The link I gave takes you to a thread that is in that forum.
Posted by: Schubertslieder

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/21/13 07:38 AM

Wr thanks. I heard others saying they will be performing today on ABF. I wondered where I can get a hold of that show.
Posted by: wr

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/21/13 07:50 AM

Originally Posted By: Schubertslieder
Wr thanks. I heard others saying they will be performing today on ABF. I wondered where I can get a hold of that show.


I think all you need to do is just check back on the thread occasionally - I expect they'll give a link to it.

It's not really a "show" - once online, it'll be there for you to hear whenever you want, for a good long while.
Posted by: Schubertslieder

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/21/13 07:57 AM

Originally Posted By: wr
Originally Posted By: Schubertslieder
Wr thanks. I heard others saying they will be performing today on ABF. I wondered where I can get a hold of that show.


I think all you need to do is just check back on the thread occasionally - I expect they'll give a link to it.

It's not really a "show" - once online, it'll be there for you to hear whenever you want, for a good long while.



Thanks. Regarding "listening to it good long while", it all depends on if they do a good job. If not, that good long while might turn into "good short while".
Posted by: Cinnamonbear

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/21/13 11:09 PM

This coming Thursday, I am playing "background atmosphere music" for a Chamber of Commerce "Business After Hours" event being held at the Conover Square Mall (the old Schiller Piano Factory in Oregon, IL), where I have been working this past winter (my "off" season) at bringing some old pianos, which were built at that factory and recently collected for display there, back to practical playability. For the event, I'll be playing a 1925 Conover grand, and this, in order, is the playlist:

Click to reveal..
"April Showers," DeSylva/Silvers, 1921
"Prisoner of Love," Robin/Gaskill/Columbo, 1931
"Smoke Gets In Your Eyes," Harbach/Kern, 1933
"Aren't You Glad You're You," Burke/Van Heusen, 1945
"Veil Dance," Wright, 1925
"Cuddle Up A Little Closer," Harbach/Hoschna, 1918/1932
"Deep Purple," Parish/DeRose, 1934/1939
"Ole Buttermilk Sky," Carmichael/Brooks, 1946
"Moonlight Becomes You," Burke/Van Heusen, 1942
"First, Last and Always (I Love You) (Fox-trot)," Davis/Akst, 1923

From "Jazz Favorites," arranged by Bill Boyd:
"Alice In Wonderland," Hillard/Fain, 1951
"April In Paris," Harburg/Duke, 1932
"How High The Moon," Hamilton/Lewis, 1940
"In A Sentimental Mood," Ellington/Mills/Kurtz, 1935

From "George Shearing Interpretations for Piano, No. 3":
"Blue Moon," Hart/Rodgers, 1934

From "Jazz Favorites," arranged by Bill Boyd:
"My Favorite Things," Hammerstein/Rodgers, 1959
"The Nearness of You," Washington/Carmichael, 1937/1940

"It Only Happens When I Dance With You," Berlin, 1947
"Lover," Hart/Rodgers, 1933
"And Then You Kissed Me," Cahn/Styne, 1944
"Ivy," Carmichael, 1957

From "The Gem Dance Folio for 1927":

"Tell Me You Love Me (Fox-trot)," Hare/King, 1926
"Spring Is Here (Fox-trot)," Bennett/Carlton, 1926
"Keep Your Skirts Down, Mary (Fox-trot)," Sterling/King/Henderson, 1926
"Somewhere (Alone With You) (Fox-trot)," Davis/Greer, 1926
"Why Aren't Yez Eatin' More Oranges? (From Cal-i-for-NI-ay) (Fox-trot), Gaskill/Brown, 1925
"South Sea Dream Girl (Hawaiian Waltz)," White, 1926
"Lo-Nah (Fox-trot)," Green/Stept, 1926

"The Japanese Sandman," Egan/Whiting, 1920
"Nagasaki," 1928

From "The Wizard of Oz," Harburg/Arlen, arranged by David Nelson, 1939/1967:
"Over the Rainbow,"
"The Merry Land of Oz,"
"If I Only Had A Brain,"
"Munchkinland,"
"Lullaby League and Lollypop Guild,"

From "Mary Poppins Souvenir Song Album," Sherman/Sherman, 1965
"Jolly Holiday,"
"Feed the Birds,"
"I Love to Laugh,"
"Let's Go Fly A Kite"


The list has shaped into a pleasant flow of keys and tempi. Many of these pieces are ones that I have been playing at for a while, others are new to me, but this is the first time I've worked so hard at polishing them up for that "once and done" level of play. It's been an interesting month, and I found I need to really buckle down in the B sections. I did a "dress rehearsal" of sorts today at a senior center where I play regularly, and half-way through my play list, someone requested "Fur Elise." I cracked up inside and obliged. grin

I've also been working on Handel Keyboard Suites Nos. 13 and 15, which I hope to record soon and post to Member Recordings, to mollify Hakki with something that comes from me other than vintage American pop music. wink

--Andy
Posted by: Polyphonist

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/22/13 12:59 AM

I have a request for you: Balakirev Oriental Fantasy. grin
Posted by: Cinnamonbear

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/22/13 01:12 AM

Not at this time. Would you settle for Rimsky-Korsakov "Song of India," as popularized by Herbie Kay and his orchestra? smile
Posted by: Polyphonist

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/22/13 01:19 AM

How about Liszt's Feux Follets?
Posted by: Brendan

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/22/13 08:00 AM

Recital in Austin this coming weekend! A Frescobaldi Toccata, Waldstein, some Rzewski, and the Dante Sonata are on the menu.
Posted by: Cinnamonbear

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/22/13 08:55 AM

Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
How about Liszt's Feux Follets?


No can do. At least (as I said before) not at this time. wink You'll have to spend you tip money at someone else's jar. grin

Break a leg at your recital, Brendan!!! thumb
Posted by: -Frycek

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/23/13 05:35 PM


Re ecital - -
Originally Posted By: wr
I think someone here came up with the word, and we still use it.


That was me.
Posted by: btb

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/24/13 02:13 AM

It’s not easy playin’ pianner wid a broke leg.
Posted by: cefinow

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/24/13 01:00 PM

Originally Posted By: btb
It’s not easy playin’ pianner wid a broke leg.


Sorry to hear that! (I'm assuming it's you, not the piano with a broken leg.

Edit: oh never mind. A broken leg is a good thing in this case.
laugh
Posted by: Kuanpiano

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/24/13 01:10 PM

Ondine and Chopin's 3rd Ballade!
Posted by: GeorgeB

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/24/13 01:25 PM

Mozart C minor sonata frown
Posted by: Gerard12

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/25/13 08:12 AM

Originally Posted By: GeorgeB
Mozart C minor sonata frown


Um...why the frown? It's a wonderful piece.
Posted by: jdhampton924

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/25/13 11:19 AM

Just got new repertoire, my Junior recital was a success.

Bach Adagio after a concert from Marcello
Toccata in E minor

Beethoven Sonata in F-Sharp Major Op. 78

Samuel Barber Interludes I+II

Scriabin Prelude In B major Op. 11 No. 11
Etude in C sharp minor Op. 2 no 1
Etude in C sharp minor Op 42 no. 5

Chopin Andante Spianato Et Grande Polonaise

Plus jazz standards, it is going to be a busy and fun summer.
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/25/13 03:58 PM

Been working on Bach WTC Book 1 prelude and fugue in C-minor. Got it memorized and pretty well under my fingers and am working on smoothing out the rough edges, figuring out an interesting interpretation and on speeding up the presto part of the prelude.

Just started Schubert Op 90 #3- the G-flat impromptu after seeing it posted on this forum in several places. Doesn't look to be as difficult as #2, which I used to play sorta' badly.
Posted by: Damon

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/25/13 11:07 PM

Liszt - Au bord d'une source
Chopin - op.10 no.4
Yes - Roundabout
ELP - Karn Evil 9
Genesis - Abacab
Posted by: Kuanpiano

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/26/13 01:36 AM

Originally Posted By: jdhampton924

Scriabin Prelude In B major Op. 11 No. 11
Etude in C sharp minor Op. 2 no 1
Etude in C sharp minor Op 42 no. 5


I LOVE these pieces, I should go back and revisit them!! The op. 42 etude and the prelude always give me the sensation of flight...
Posted by: jdhampton924

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/26/13 09:30 AM

Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Originally Posted By: jdhampton924

Scriabin Prelude In B major Op. 11 No. 11
Etude in C sharp minor Op. 2 no 1
Etude in C sharp minor Op 42 no. 5


I LOVE these pieces, I should go back and revisit them!! The op. 42 etude and the prelude always give me the sensation of flight...


Yeah, they are amazing pieces for sure! Though I am considering switching out Op. 2 No. 1. It is in the same key as the Op. 42, and there is this lovely Etudes, Op. 8 No. 8 in A flat.
Posted by: maestro57

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/27/13 07:49 AM

Currently I am learning/practicing Beethoven's Sonata No. 5 in C minor, Op. 10 No. 1.

I usually do five minutes of scales and Mozart's Andante in C major, K. 1a for warmup.

In my daily upkeep, I practice (so as to not "lose it"):
Chopin - Nocturne No. 13 in C minor, Op. 48 No. 1
Mozart - Fantasy No. 4 in C minor, K. 475
Beethoven - Sonata No. 19 in G minor, Op. 49 No. 1
Liszt - Consolation No. 3 in D-flat major, S. 172

And after finally coming to terms with the fact that I'm not capable of playing Beethoven's Sonata No. 23 in F minor, Op. 57 ("Appassionata"), I now only play certain parts of it - my favourite parts and the parts I can play.

This is, more or less, my daily routine.
Posted by: worov

Re: What are you practicing? - 04/27/13 08:47 AM

I'm currently practising these pieces :







Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 05/05/13 08:56 PM

Spent 30 minutes practicing earlier and got this little excerpt so far:

https://www.box.com/s/b7b3hc55vjdw4cub0hxj

Alkan Symphony for solo piano 3rd movement. This is physically demanding. For some reason, in the section from 0:09 to 0:14 (and in the repeat), it doesn't sound like I'm playing the correct inversions of the b flat minor chords, but trust me, I am. Must be because I used my laptop's built-in microphone, haha... More to come soon!! Thank goodness for summer laugh
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: What are you practicing? - 05/05/13 09:14 PM

Ennio Morricone's Playing Love:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgXW6XDnhXA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzwwijq3V6Q
Posted by: music producer

Re: What are you practicing? - 05/05/13 09:39 PM

A live gig with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra recently put the fear of God in me so as partial preparation I worked a bit on some old pieces that I used to be able to play:

Beethoven's Pathetique Sonata
Chopin Scherzo in Bb minor
Assorted Bach inventions and preludes
Also read through some new preludes and fugues and some Chopin to improve my sight reading.
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: What are you practicing? - 05/05/13 10:31 PM

I FINALLY have time to practice my own rep! Just finished my last collaborative recital for the month. I spent 6 hours today on Rachmaninov 1st sonata today. The recital I'm playing it in got rescheduled for 10 days earlier so it's now next week........ hurray....
Posted by: Polyphonist

Re: What are you practicing? - 05/05/13 10:38 PM

Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
I spent 6 hours today on Rachmaninov 1st sonata today.
And what would your English teacher say?
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
...it got rescheduled for 10 days earlier so it's now next week........ hurray....
I love poetry! grin
Posted by: Cinnamonbear

Re: What are you practicing? - 05/05/13 11:42 PM

Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
I spent 6 hours today on Rachmaninov 1st sonata today.
And what would your English teacher say?


Her English teacher says, "Tutoring and nitpicking will commence after your recital. Until then, do not darken my door. Practice piano, not ESL."
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: What are you practicing? - 05/05/13 11:43 PM

Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
I spent 6 hours today on Rachmaninov 1st sonata today.
And what would your English teacher say?
Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
...it got rescheduled for 10 days earlier so it's now next week........ hurray....
I love poetry! grin


He would say I suck at proofreading. Plus, he'd probably be forgiving considering the fact that English is not my first language. And then he'd say, "Still, you managed to obtain an English minor after only speaking the language for 5 years".

And then he'd shut up.

(also, spending 8 hours in the practice room on a Sunday does something quite special to your brain)
Posted by: hujidong

Re: What are you practicing? - 05/06/13 02:09 AM

Beethoven Op. 111

Prokofiev Sonata No. 6

couple smaller things
Those big ones will take a while sigh.. smile
Posted by: pianist.ame

Re: What are you practicing? - 05/08/13 03:08 PM

For competition& exam:
Mozart Sonata in c minor K.457
Bach Toccata in c minor BWV 911
Liszt Transcendental Etude no. 3 'Paysage'
Mozart Piano Concerto no.25 in C major

For auditions& add rep:
Czerny op.299
Bach Prelude& Fugue in C# major BWV 848
F.Mendelssohn Andante and Rondo Cappriccioso op.14
Ravel Jeux d'eau
Moszkowski Etude op.72 no.2 in g minor
Khachaturian Toccata
Prokofiev Sonata no.3
Posted by: Brendan

Re: What are you practicing? - 05/08/13 04:56 PM

Halfway through The People United!
Posted by: -Frycek

Re: What are you practicing? - 05/09/13 07:56 AM

Learning Samuel Wesley's rondo/variations on God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen. Polishing Chopin's 9/3 and 28/24.

(And Pogo's English is perfectly fine.)
Posted by: im@me

Re: What are you practicing? - 05/09/13 01:20 PM

Bach P and F in G minor WTC1
Beethoven Waldstein op.53, and Andante Favoori
Brahms op.118
Chopin Sonata no.3 (sort of), and Op.22 andante spianato and grande poloniase brilliante
Mendelssohn rondo capriccioso
Liszt second petrarch sonnet
Albeniz Iberia book.2
Selected Chopin, Liszt etudes
Liszt Piano Concerto no.2
Saint-Saens Piano concerto no.2
Mozart piano concerto no.12
And a couple of liszt song transcriptions
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/22/13 03:10 PM

Bump!! Better than making a new thread.

I guess I'll jump on the Kapustin Variations train, too.
https://app.box.com/s/4r8fdu78axle690k6gai
Posted by: Damon

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/22/13 04:00 PM

Practice? What's that?
Posted by: Dwscamel

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/22/13 04:32 PM

Sibelius' Impromptu No.5 in b minor,

Scriabin's etude op.2 no.1 in c# minor, and

a 1-page Bach/Siloti arrangement of a Bach e minor prelude (though nowhere near as good as the b minor Siloti arrangement played by Gilels on YouTube).
Posted by: Francisco Scalco

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/22/13 05:09 PM

Chopin first Scherzo
Ravel Sonatine
Schumann Kinderszenen
Rachmaninoff Prelude op 32 no 10
Guarnieri Ponteios No. 48/49
Posted by: chopinoholic

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/22/13 05:34 PM

Chopin ballade F minor
Mozart sonate kv333
Tchaikovski op. 72 no 14 & 15
Posted by: Scout

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/22/13 06:45 PM

Scarlatti k30 and k296
Beethoven op 109 andante
Chopin nocturne op 9 no 1
although it is hard not to work on Scarlatti k466 and k426 at the same time also
Posted by: albumblatter

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/22/13 09:29 PM

Chopin Ballade 4, Op. 52
Chopin Concerto 1, Op. 11
Chopin Etudes, Op. 10 Nos. 3, 4, 5 & Op. 25 No 11

Janacek In the Mists
Beethoven Sonata Op. 90
Posted by: DanS

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/22/13 10:39 PM

Chopin Impromptu 1
Etudes 10/4, 25/9, 25/12
Polonaises A maj and Cmin

Bach B Maj P&F WTC1

Getting ready for Xmas services...


I know I'm getting some Henle Chopin for Xmas, I think the Ballades...so I'll be working on No4 if that's the case... smile
Posted by: Roland The Beagle

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/22/13 11:48 PM

Originally Posted By: Brad Hoehne
Been working on Bach WTC Book 1 prelude and fugue in C-minor. Got it memorized and pretty well under my fingers and am working on smoothing out the rough edges, figuring out an interesting interpretation and on speeding up the presto part of the prelude.


I feel like in many ways, this piece is the milestone for fast passage technique. If you can truly play the presto section at a tempo of 120 or higher, then you've solved hands together fast passage work for a good long time (and in a sense, for all time).

The key is how you practice of course. If you don't practice the right way you'll never be able to play it up to speed. It will also take at least a year or two of playing in general before you are technically capable, probably.

Someone once told me that it's an easy piece. Hah! They must have skipped the presto section, or stopped at 100bpm and called it a day. Imo it's 10 times harder than the Fugue.

edit:

My favorite instructional interpretation, courtesy of Richter:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JcFHuUJE0mU
Posted by: Roland The Beagle

Re: What are you practicing? - 12/23/13 01:01 AM

For the winter break, the new pieces I am learning are the Danzas Argentinas by Alberto Ginastera, and Haydn' Piano Sonata Hob. XVI: 34 in E Minor.

Pieces I'm continuing to work on are Czerny's Toccata in C Major Op. 92, select bars from Bach Preludes, Fugues, and Inventions, and my forum recital Chopin Mazurka (Op. 6 No. 4 in Eb Minor).

For technique, I'm doing scales and arpeggios in lots of different ways. Nothing more than that at the moment.

I'm also working on a LOT of sight reading! For extra musical fun, I'm composing some solo piano works, working on some solo vocal pieces, and continuing my own study of musical theory (i.e. studying scores.)