Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil

Posted by: Andromaque

Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 08:57 AM

A friend of mine just alerted me to this blog about an incident at Avery Fisher Hall last night.
Apparently someone's cell phone rang during the last bars of Mahler's ninth, leading to a frustrated outcry by Alan Gilbert. He stopped the orchestra and addressed the offender, putting him on the spot for several minutes, and apparently, getting the crowds to engage in some hectoring, before he resumed the playing.
The blogger at Superconductor describes the event in delicious detail, New York style.

Excerpt:

"Mr. Gilbert was visibly annoyed by the persistent ring-tone, so much that he quietly cut the orchestra," the concert-goer reports. She related how the orchestra's music director turned on the podium towards the offender. The pause lasted a good "three or four minutes. It might have been two. It seemed long."

Mr. Gilbert asked the man, sitting in front of the concert-master: "Are you finished?" The man didn't respond.

"Fine, we'll wait," Mr. Gilbert said.

The Avery Fisher Hall audience, ripped in an untimely fashion from Mahler's complicated sound-world, reacted with "seething rage." Someone shouted "Thousand dollar fine."

This was followed by cries of 'Get out!' and 'Kick him out!.' Some people started clapping rhythmically but the hall was quieted down. House security did not intervene or remove the offender.

The ringing stopped. "Did you turn it off?" Mr. Gilbert asked.

The man nodded.

"It won't go off again?"

The man shook his head.

Before resuming, Mr. Gilbert addressed the audience. He said: "I apologize. Usually, when there's a disturbance like this, it is best to ignore it, because addressing it is sometimes worse than the disturbance itself. But this was so egregious that I could not allow it."

"We'll start again." The audience cheered.
Posted by: Minaku

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 09:10 AM

Harsh. But seriously, how hard is it to check your phone to make sure it is off when the stage manager politely asks you to?
Posted by: Jeff Clef

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 10:02 AM

Unfortunately, there are some people that it just does not pay to be too nice to. The expression, "Cast not your pearls before swine," comes to mind.

Swine. Evidently, these people were also around in Biblical times.

The handsome thing for this person to do would be to write a letter to the New York Times (and the symphony) apologizing for his conduct... but it may be asking for more than we're going to get. Let future offenders be warned off, at least. If red ears mean someone is talking about you, this gentleman's ears must be hot as a stove today. As Glenda of the North said to the Wicked Witch of the West, "Be off! Before a house falls on you, too."
Posted by: Andromaque

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 10:07 AM

Originally Posted By: Jeff Clef
If red ears mean someone is talking about you, this gentleman's ears must be hot as a stove today.


Funny. The same visual occurred to me. So fifth grade!! It would be interesting to see if the cell phones will go off again at Mr. Gilbert's classroom /hall..
Posted by: kevinb

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 10:35 AM

If I had been the mobile phone man, I would have beaten the conductor to a greasy stain, and napalmed the audience.

Yes, of course it's bloody irritating when mobile phones go off in performances. We all hate it. But this conductor's response was totally disproportionate. Not as disproportionate as my suggestion of mass murder, I accept, but still completely unacceptable.

I've said it before, but I don't mind saying it again: people who are so intolerant of the failings and errors of their fellow human beings that they think it's OK to hector them in public should just damned well stay at home.

I appreciate that I am in a minority, probably a minority of one, on this issue. But that's fine.
Posted by: rada

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 10:45 AM

There are always at least two viewpoints on the issue....sounds like the conductor admitted he may have taken it too far but that's probably because he had put up with it many times before.....I am married to the guy that will turn around and look at you if you are talking in a theatre.

rada
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 11:13 AM

I wonder what the ring-tone was?
Posted by: carey

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 11:24 AM

Originally Posted By: rada
I am married to the guy that will turn around and look at you if you are talking in a theatre.

rada


My wife is married to that same guy.........
Posted by: jnod

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 11:34 AM

I don't support the death penalty per se but, if I did...
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 11:34 AM

Originally Posted By: carey
Originally Posted By: rada
I am married to the guy that will turn around and look at you if you are talking in a theatre.

rada


My wife is married to that same guy.........



Well, I'm the female version of the guy your wife's married to. Hahaha!

The last time I saw Gergiev and the Kirov, a couple sitting beside us wouldn't shut up during the opening bars of Shost 1 so I shushed them and gave them an evil stare. They stayed quiet after that! I mean, if you'd paid so much money why would you talk (LOUDLY at that, not even whispering!)

But anyway. I can't believe he actually stopped the concert. That's unbelievable - couldn't the guy just turn it off quickly? I've had people's phones go off during my playing, and yes while it's annoying for 3-4 seconds, it's usually forgotten about 20 seconds after that.
Posted by: the nosy ape

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 11:36 AM

Originally Posted By: Andromaque
Mr. Gilbert was visibly annoyed by the persistent ring-tone, ...

He said: "I apologize ... But this was so egregious that I could not allow it."

I would like to know how long the man let his phone ring before he turned it off. The quote makes it seem like it was ringing for many seconds. He should not have had his phone on in the first place - there are usually announcements before the concert starts asking you to turn off your devices - but people do make mistakes and if he immediately turned off the ringing then I would say that there was an overreaction. If he was letting it ring through to voice mail then perhaps the reaction was justified.
Posted by: jnod

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 11:38 AM

I was at a performance of the St. Mathew Passion at Roy Thompson Hall some years ago and there was a woman in the row behind me who was banging her (giant, diamond encrusted) ring arrhythmically and out of time, on her arm rest. Her husband was beside her, head back and snoring.
Posted by: Jeff Clef

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 12:08 PM

"If I had been the mobile phone man..."

Kevin, you would never be that guy... the guy that let his phone ring on for two long minutes. Even as many as three or four rings would have simply been disregarded--- just as you say, chalked up to the errors and failings. He must have been thinking (I can only guess), 'If I keep still, maybe they'll think it's someone else's phone.'

If this is not exactly the strategy of the ostrich which buries its head in the sand, hoping to hide from danger, it's at least a cousin. Frankly, I have always suspected this to be a slander on ostriches, since even an ostrich-sized brain couldn't be that stupid.

Your compassion for the offender is admirable, but let the punishment fit the crime. I thought it did, and unlike the death penalty, it was actually a deterrent.

I have my own mental picture. The front-of-the-house manager makes his way to the gentleman's seat. "May I see your ticket, sir?" The ticket is given; the manager glances at it briefly, then tears it to confetti. He takes the swinish patron by the ear and escorts him to the exit.
Posted by: ClsscLib

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 12:20 PM

Music is nothing more than painting with sound on a canvas of silent time.

To insert noise gratuitously in a music venue where people are paying a lot for perfect performances it like taking an ax to a Leonardo canvas.

I don't blame Gilbert a bit. And yes, my wife is also married to a guy who shushes people at the theater. In fact, I won't even go to movie theaters any more because the audiences are so rude.
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 12:23 PM

I've long had the impression that a concert is where people in the last stages of tuberculosis go to listen (and contribute) to beautiful music before they pass on.
Posted by: wouter79

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 12:39 PM

>But this conductor's response was totally disproportionate.

I don't think so. In the past it might have been normal to even talk during the performance. But these days people expect a top performance competing with a recording.

Maybe they should remove people making lots of noise or that refused to turn off their phone immediately?
Posted by: Dave Horne

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 12:40 PM

Originally Posted By: Jeff Clef
Unfortunately, there are some people that it just does not pay to be too nice to. The expression, "Cast not your pearls before swine," comes to mind.

Swine. Evidently, these people were also around in Biblical times.

The handsome thing for this person to do would be to write a letter to the New York Times (and the symphony) apologizing for his conduct... but it may be asking for more than we're going to get. Let future offenders be warned off, at least. If red ears mean someone is talking about you, this gentleman's ears must be hot as a stove today. As Glenda of the North said to the Wicked Witch of the West, "Be off! Before a house falls on you, too."


Jackie Mason's great, great, great, great, great (you get the idea) grandfather is doing his shtick before an appreciative audience. Out of nowhere the bush behind him starts burning.

Without missing a beat the comic says, Hey, Moses, is that for you?
Posted by: Stanza

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 12:57 PM

The symphony should apply for a federal grant to purchase from a defense contractor some jamming devices for the hall. No signal, no ringing! Problem solved!
Posted by: wouter79

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 01:01 PM

That would solve the phones but the more real problem is people making unwanted noise. How about alarm clocks, calendar reminder beeps, low battery alarms and whatever you can think of?
Posted by: childofparadise2002

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 01:02 PM

I don't normally post here but the title caught my attention and I would like to mention two incidents that I've seen.

One was about cell phone. Someone's phone rang during a symphony concert, and the guy simply ignored it. It rang for a long time, drew lots of turned heads, and someone in the audience eventually shouted "turn the **** thing off!", and the guy turned it off. Was he going to let it ring to the voice message? Or was he thinking that if he pretended that nothing happened that others wouldn't be able to tell whose phone was ringing?

The other was about coughing. We watched the performance of a famous Japanese drum group a while ago, truly exciting. Except that the woman sitting right next to me coughed through the entire performance. There was a bout of cough every minute or so, always when the drummers were playing (so the sound of the cough was covered by the drums), and each time it seemed that the woman was about to cough her lungs out----violent, deep, long-lasting cough. I was seriously worried that whatever she had would get passed on to me or my kids.

Yes, people make mistakes. But sometimes they choose to be inconsiderate.
Posted by: BDB

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 01:26 PM

I have taken to carrying candies to concerts which I hand out to someone coughing near me.
Posted by: Frito

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 02:00 PM

Originally Posted By: BDB
I have taken to carrying candies to concerts which I hand out to someone coughing near me.

Fine, as long as they don't have to be unwrapped!
Posted by: BDB

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 02:06 PM

Would you rather have someone unwrap a candy or cough through a piece?
Posted by: Elena-Margarita

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 02:34 PM

I find it rude and disrespectful when someone leaves their cell phone on during a performance piece. Also, if one is having a coughing fit, why not get up and leave, then return when its under control. Why subject the audience and the conductor to this disruption?
Posted by: David-G

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 04:44 PM

Originally Posted By: rada
... I am married to the guy that will turn around and look at you if you are talking in a theatre.
rada

I am not sure quite how to interpret that. I do not think twice about turning to look at people who are talking during a performance. Glaring at them, in fact. Or motioning people who are reading or sending texts to turn their phone OFF.
Posted by: Otis S

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 04:48 PM

My impression is that the vast majority of people attending New York Philharmonic concerts are reasonably well behaved and would not knowingly create a disturbance for others. The situation described by Andromaque is rare. To me, the key problem is that lesser disturbances such as turning pages in a program or unwrapping a candy can create a disturbance to others, particularly if it occurs during quiet passages. Low levels of ambient noise which might be OK when watching a movie or listening to a a lecture might be totally unsuitable for a classical music performance. Not all of the audience members are attuned to this. If they were, I believe that the noise issue would decrease; the vast majority of people attending such concerts do not want to create disturbances for others. Therefore, I would be in favor of better education so that audiences are aware of the disturbances that even low levels of ambient noise can create. If programs contained a paragraph indicating this, that would be a step in the right direction.
Posted by: Damon

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 04:59 PM

Originally Posted By: Jeff Clef
I thought it did, and unlike the death penalty, it was actually a deterrent.


If he were dead, he would never do it again. Pretty good deterrent if you ask me.
Posted by: ChopinAddict

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 05:17 PM

A fake gun and an evil stare would do. smile
Posted by: liszt85

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 06:10 PM

Originally Posted By: topi
I find it rude and disrespectful when someone leaves their cell phone on during a performance piece. Also, if one is having a coughing fit, why not get up and leave, then return when its under control. Why subject the audience and the conductor to this disruption?


Then the conductor might stop the concert and say "How dare you leave? How disrespectful! I refuse to play here anymore" or one of the audience members might say "How dare you block my view? How dare you leave when your seat is not the aisle seat? You have to inconvenience 20 others to get out of here and then you want to come back? Not happening!" What does one do then? Just curious.. I'm not saying I like people coughing or whispering, I hate that too. However, I just don't see any reasonable solution for things like coughing (when its involuntary. I know some people here are talented and can suppress coughs, they probably can suppress fevers too.. I can't).
Posted by: BruceD

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 06:10 PM

Originally Posted By: David-G
Originally Posted By: rada
... I am married to the guy that will turn around and look at you if you are talking in a theatre.
rada

I am not sure quite how to interpret that. I do not think twice about turning to look at people who are talking during a performance. Glaring at them, in fact. Or motioning people who are reading or sending texts to turn their phone OFF.


Some (clueless?) people have no idea how distracting - in a darkened theatre or concert hall - the lit blue screen from a silent cell phone can be. Whenever it catches the corner of my eye, I, alas! am constantly drawn to it and my concentration on and enjoyment of the music are ruined.

Regards,
Posted by: newport

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/11/12 11:54 PM

Originally Posted By: Brad Hoehne
I've long had the impression that a concert is where people in the last stages of tuberculosis go to listen (and contribute) to beautiful music before they pass on.


Only in USA and especially Carnegie Hall.
Posted by: nycplayer

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 12:56 AM

Originally Posted By: Otis S

If programs contained a paragraph indicating this, that would be a step in the right direction.

I'm sure the programs from Lincoln Center and/or Carnegie Hall include a section on concert etiquette. I know I have read it in the past. And yet, I also know all too well that phones ringing, candies unwrapped and all kinds of other nuisance behavior have occurred in both venues. I wish what you wrote were true, but I must disagree. Sure, maybe a bunch of people have the best of intentions but I also feel that many others are simply too inconsiderate or selfish to care.

In fact, from "The Concert Experience" on Carnegie Hall's website:

"A concert at Carnegie Hall is memorable, and we want everyone to enjoy their time here.

We ask that you please turn off your cell phone and other electronic devices before entering the Hall, and refrain from taking pictures.

There's no dress code, and we have a coat check. We want you to be comfortable.

Just be considerate of others. Be subtle with perfumes and scents, and please turn off your cell phone and other electronic devices before entering the Hall.

Tapping, humming, and singing along can be lots of fun—but not necessarily for the person sitting next to you. We love to see children in the audience; please remind them that being courteous of others is part of the experience.

If you need any help or have any questions, please feel free to talk with one of our helpful, friendly ushers. And please help yourself to the free Ricola cough drops (remember to unwrap them before the music starts)."

http://www.carnegiehall.org/Information/Concert-Experience/
Posted by: Andromaque

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 02:10 AM

Originally Posted By: Frito
Originally Posted By: BDB
I have taken to carrying candies to concerts which I hand out to someone coughing near me.

Fine, as long as they don't have to be unwrapped!


The ones that used to be given away for free at Carnegie Hall are wrapped in "silent" wax paper. They are (used to be) in big jars outside the hall. I have not seen them in a while though.


For what it's worth, Mr. Gilbert has spoken to the NY Times . I excerpt his version below. Apparently it was the annoying Marimba tone that rang relentlessly, and it must have been am alarm and not an actual phone call, thus the length of the disturbance. The thing would have gone on and on had the guy not finally turned it off.

From the NY Times:
Mr. Gilbert, the orchestra’s music director, said he turned to the area of Avery Fisher Hall where the sound was coming from, in one of the front rows, and asked the unknown miscreant to turn off the phone. (It was an individual who apparently failed to heed the recorded announcement from the actor Alec Baldwin to silence cellphones that is played before the Philharmonic’s performances.)

“Nothing happened,” Mr. Gilbert said in a telephone interview on Wednesday. “Nobody was owning up to it. It was surreal.” The phone kept ringing – the iPhone’s marimba ring-tone, according to the music blogger Paul Pelkonen, who wrote about the incident.

Mr. Gilbert said audience members pointed out two people sitting where the sound was coming from. “They were staring at me resolutely,” he said of the couple. Eventually, the man put his hand in his pocket and the ringing stopped. “It was so weird,” Mr. Gilbert said. “Did he think he could just bite his lip and soldier through?”

The conductor said he asked the man if he was sure the device was quieted. “Then he nodded his head,” Mr. Gilbert said. Guilty!

People in the hall had been shouting for the sound to stop. Mr. Pelkonen reported that they yelled: “Thousand-dollar fine!” “Kick him out!” “Get out!” Another blogger, who was present, Max Kinchen, wrote, “They wanted blood!”

Mr. Gilbert, in the interview, said: “It was so shocking what happened. You’re in this very far away spiritual place in the piece. It’s like being rudely awakened. All of us were stunned on the stage.”

The conductor then apologized to the audience for stopping, saying that usually it’s best just to ignore such a disruption, but this case was too much. The audience cheered and applauded. He then started the music again, picking a loud passage leading into the tranquil final minutes to begin.

Ringing cellphones are a common scourge of live performances, and indeed, most musicians soldier on. “Usually it’s not Mahler Nine you’re playing,” Mr. Gilbert said, “and usually it’s not the most emotionally wrought part of Mahler Nine, and usually people deal with it.”

He said he was convinced the sound was an alarm because of its continuous nature.

The policy at Avery Fisher Hall, run by Lincoln Center, where the Philharmonic is a tenant, is for ushers to approach the owners of ringing phones and ask them discreetly to turn off the devices, said Eric Latzky, the orchestra’s spokesman. “In this incident, unfortunately the policy was not followed,” he said.

Betsy Vorce, a spokeswoman for Lincoln Center, said officials were talking to the ushers involved. “This is one incident where the policy wasn’t followed,” she said. “We’re investigating it. We’ll take corrective action if necessary.”

The ushers do not answer directly to orchestra management, and Mr. Gilbert said no ushers were in sight at the time of the ringing. “I heard this morning that ushers in the hall claimed they didn’t hear it, which sounds ridiculous to me,” he said. “Everybody could hear it.”
Posted by: kevinb

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 03:22 AM

Originally Posted By: Jeff Clef
Kevin, you would never be that guy... the guy that let his phone ring on for two long minutes. Even as many as three or four rings would have simply been disregarded--- just as you say, chalked up to the errors and failings. He must have been thinking (I can only guess), 'If I keep still, maybe they'll think it's someone else's phone.'
[...]
Your compassion for the offender is admirable, but let the punishment fit the crime. I thought it did, and unlike the death penalty, it was actually a deterrent.


You're right -- I wouldn't be that guy. Nobody I know would. The issue is, as you say, one of fitting the punishment to the crime.

I suspect the reason mobile phones arouse so much wrath is because the problem described in the OP happens all the time.

If the story referred to in the OP is correct, then it's describing a public response to what ought, normally, to be a minor irritation as similar to the outrage that might be expected if it were discovered that the man were a child-abuser or a rapist. It's as if some poor devil has been made the scapegoat for all the countless times that we've all be irritated by mobile phones.

It may be an understandable reaction but, in a civilised society, it isn't one that should be condoned.
Posted by: stores

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 04:06 AM

Originally Posted By: kevinb

the outrage that might be expected if it were discovered that the man were a child-abuser or a rapist.



I hardly find the outrage described similar to that reserved for rapists and child abusers. That said, the violator shouldn't be allowed to enter the premises again as far as I'm concerned. The idiot just sat there even after being outed. Either not too bright or simply doesn't care, but if I had my way he'd certainly care. By the way, I don't think the thread aptly titled. Obviously, this person was not humiliated.
Posted by: ando

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 05:05 AM

Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: kevinb

the outrage that might be expected if it were discovered that the man were a child-abuser or a rapist.



I hardly find the outrage described similar to that reserved for rapists and child abusers. That said, the violator shouldn't be allowed to enter the premises again as far as I'm concerned. The idiot just sat there even after being outed. Either not too bright or simply doesn't care, but if I had my way he'd certainly care. By the way, I don't think the thread aptly titled. Obviously, this person was not humiliated.


Or he was so humiliated that he couldn't face the "walk of shame" with everybody watching. I doubt he'd be appearing there again any time soon.
Posted by: Otis S

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 09:52 AM

Originally Posted By: nycplayer
Originally Posted By: Otis S

My impression is that the vast majority of people attending New York Philharmonic concerts are reasonably well behaved and would not knowingly create a disturbance for others. The situation described by Andromaque is rare. To me, the key problem is that lesser disturbances such as turning pages in a program or unwrapping a candy can create a disturbance to others, particularly if it occurs during quiet passages. Low levels of ambient noise which might be OK when watching a movie or listening to a a lecture might be totally unsuitable for a classical music performance. Not all of the audience members are attuned to this. If they were, I believe that the noise issue would decrease; the vast majority of people attending such concerts do not want to create disturbances for others. Therefore, I would be in favor of better education so that audiences are aware of the disturbances that even low levels of ambient noise can create. If programs contained a paragraph indicating this, that would be a step in the right direction.


I'm sure the programs from Lincoln Center and/or Carnegie Hall include a section on concert etiquette. I know I have read it in the past. And yet, I also know all too well that phones ringing, candies unwrapped and all kinds of other nuisance behavior have occurred in both venues. I wish what you wrote were true, but I must disagree. Sure, maybe a bunch of people have the best of intentions but I also feel that many others are simply too inconsiderate or selfish to care.

In fact, from "The Concert Experience" on Carnegie Hall's website:

"A concert at Carnegie Hall is memorable, and we want everyone to enjoy their time here.

We ask that you please turn off your cell phone and other electronic devices before entering the Hall, and refrain from taking pictures.

There's no dress code, and we have a coat check. We want you to be comfortable.

Just be considerate of others. Be subtle with perfumes and scents, and please turn off your cell phone and other electronic devices before entering the Hall.

Tapping, humming, and singing along can be lots of fun—but not necessarily for the person sitting next to you. We love to see children in the audience; please remind them that being courteous of others is part of the experience.

If you need any help or have any questions, please feel free to talk with one of our helpful, friendly ushers. And please help yourself to the free Ricola cough drops (remember to unwrap them before the music starts)."

http://www.carnegiehall.org/Information/Concert-Experience/


I am well aware of these types of rules of etiquette. My point was that the statement from the Carnegie Hall Web site quoted in your note as well as similar rules of etiquette in program guides are not sufficient regarding refraining from making noise. Much of what is stated on the Carnegie Hall Web site would be applicable for other public events where sound is not critically important. As I stated in my earlier post, it is critical to emphasize that classical music concerts are more prone to sound disturbances than other public events such as movies and lectures. It needs to be communicated to the audience that at a classical music concert, sound is paramount. Music is unamplified with many quiet passages. The sound of pages being turned in a program or candy being unwrapped may not be problematic in a movie theatre but could very well be a problem in a classical music concert. People who have a deep appreciation for classical music are generally aware of this. However, not everyone who attends a classical music concert falls into this category, and such people may benefit from an explanation of why audiences should try to be as quiet as possible.

Originally Posted By: nycplayer

I wish what you wrote were true, but I must disagree. Sure, maybe a bunch of people have the best of intentions but I also feel that many others are simply too inconsiderate or selfish to care.


My post contains several statements, and the fact that you have an awareness and sensitivity to the noise distractions I referred to indicates agreement with at least part of what I wrote. Perhaps you are referring to my first two sentences:

Originally Posted By: Otis S

My impression is that the vast majority of people attending New York Philharmonic concerts are reasonably well behaved and would not knowingly create a disturbance for others. The situation described by Andromaque is rare.


I stand by this. People creating major noise disturbances are in a distinct minority (undoubtedly below 50% of all concert goers. If that were false, New York Philharmonic concerts would have much considerably higher levels of ambient noise). If the situation described by Andromaque were a common occurrence, then no one would be surprised by what happened and there would not have been publicity for this incident nor this discussion on Piano World.

We have no reliable way of estimating what percentage of people are "too inconsiderate or selfish to care." but it is certainly a distinct minority of concert attendees. The vast majority of people are trying to be quiet; however, not everyone in the audience has the same sensitivity or awareness of ambient noise levels. I believe that a sizeable portion of those making low levels of ambient noise could be encouraged to be quieter through proper education. This will not totally solve the problem but could improve things. Regarding the situation during the Mahler symphony, I agree that better education may be insufficient to curb behavior such as this. Fortunately, incidents as blatant as this are not that common.
Posted by: Damon

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 11:36 AM

Originally Posted By: kevinb
...then it's describing a public response to what ought, normally, to be a minor irritation as similar to the outrage that might be expected if it were discovered that the man were a child-abuser or a rapist.


That's the response you would have to a child abuser or a rapist? Mine would be considerably harsher, particularly for the child abuser.
Posted by: Nikolas

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 11:42 AM

Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: kevinb
...then it's describing a public response to what ought, normally, to be a minor irritation as similar to the outrage that might be expected if it were discovered that the man were a child-abuser or a rapist.


That's the response you would have to a child abuser or a rapist? Mine would be considerably harsher, particularly for the child abuser.
There is a tiny gap to the analogy here: Is the child rapist remorse? Sentenced, gone to jail and back in society? someone we just know was accused and not much else? Someone who's guilty and gone to fish children (in a classical concert unlikely).

I do feel that anyone has a right to stray off the 'right' path and be reinstituted to society, so I'm not sure it's right to know that someone was sentenced for a rape in the 1980s and now he still carries the burden of being accused wherever he goes just for that...

On the other hand if someone recently did it, there are no doubts, etc, then he can very well go to heck, not just get a bit uncomfortable for what he did in a concert hall!
Posted by: Damon

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 11:55 AM

Originally Posted By: Nikolas
Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: kevinb
...then it's describing a public response to what ought, normally, to be a minor irritation as similar to the outrage that might be expected if it were discovered that the man were a child-abuser or a rapist.


That's the response you would have to a child abuser or a rapist? Mine would be considerably harsher, particularly for the child abuser.
There is a tiny gap to the analogy here: Is the child rapist remorse? Sentenced, gone to jail and back in society? someone we just know was accused and not much else? Someone who's guilty and gone to fish children (in a classical concert unlikely).

I do feel that anyone has a right to stray off the 'right' path and be reinstituted to society, so I'm not sure it's right to know that someone was sentenced for a rape in the 1980s and now he still carries the burden of being accused wherever he goes just for that...

On the other hand if someone recently did it, there are no doubts, etc, then he can very well go to heck, not just get a bit uncomfortable for what he did in a concert hall!


If you are going to combine child abuse and rape, I would be harsher still. If my child were raped, I would not rest until the perpetrator was dead. I can't see doing that to a person with a cell phone, but he would certainly get a comment and a glare. mad
Posted by: kevinb

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 11:59 AM

Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: kevinb
...then it's describing a public response to what ought, normally, to be a minor irritation as similar to the outrage that might be expected if it were discovered that the man were a child-abuser or a rapist.


That's the response you would have to a child abuser or a rapist? Mine would be considerably harsher, particularly for the child abuser.


I'm not talking about penalties, I'm talking about the sudden rush of anger and the corresponding unwillingness to allow a suspected person any opportunity to explain. It's the same kind of mob response that led to a London paediatrician's house being vandalised a few years ago, because people were unable to stop and think about whether there might be other words beginning with 'paed-' than 'paedophile'.

We all put up with inconsiderate and careless behaviour from one another, all the time. Nobody, I feel sure, is guiltless in this respect -- certainly not me. But there's something about mobile phone irritation which seems to spark an irrational and disproportionate wrath.
Posted by: Damon

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 12:07 PM

Originally Posted By: kevinb
But there's something about mobile phone irritation which seems to spark an irrational and disproportionate wrath.


I'd like to see some device similar to a walk-through metal detector, that would completely wipe the contents of a cellphone and render it useless, installed at the entrance of concert venues and movie theaters.
Posted by: Nikolas

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 12:20 PM

Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: kevinb
But there's something about mobile phone irritation which seems to spark an irrational and disproportionate wrath.


I'd like to see some device similar to a walk-through metal detector, that would completely wipe the contents of a cellphone and render it useless, installed at the entrance of concert venues and movie theaters.
There are such devices... The ones that cancel any signal inside a certain area... I know because here in Greece some venues still use it, but it's unfrair and dangerous in all honesty. Can you imagine the 1 urgent situation that requires a cell phone and that not working (eg... your child is not well and the baby sitter is trying to call you... Can you really think that this does NOT require a cell phone and picking it up even if it means disrupting a recital? Although I'd do my best NOT to disrupt anything... )
Posted by: Damon

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 12:29 PM

Originally Posted By: Nikolas
Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: kevinb
But there's something about mobile phone irritation which seems to spark an irrational and disproportionate wrath.


I'd like to see some device similar to a walk-through metal detector, that would completely wipe the contents of a cellphone and render it useless, installed at the entrance of concert venues and movie theaters.
There are such devices... The ones that cancel any signal inside a certain area... I know because here in Greece some venues still use it, but it's unfrair and dangerous in all honesty. Can you imagine the 1 urgent situation that requires a cell phone and that not working (eg... your child is not well and the baby sitter is trying to call you... Can you really think that this does NOT require a cell phone and picking it up even if it means disrupting a recital? Although I'd do my best NOT to disrupt anything... )


Unfortunately, that is just the world people have created for themselves. I was able to get along just fine before cellphones existed. The obvious answer to that situation is to have an adult backup (like we used to do). If you are one those people who have not cultivated the adequate network to do this, stay home. I'm not concerned with anyone's cellphone dependency.
Posted by: Andromaque

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 01:35 PM

Damon, so extreme!
Can you imagine if a child or someone you care about, needed help while you were indulging in a Wagnerian extravaganza, and people could not reach you for several hours! In the meantime decisions about medical care had to be made without you. Sure, we lived without cell phones before, but why not embrace the technology and modulate its use. I always silence my phone and look at it only if it vibes, but very discretely. I have had occasionally to leave the concert hall for something that could not - and thankfully did not- wait.
As for invoking rape and abuse, that is really inappropriate and should not be discussed in the same thread.

I think that cell phones will remain an irritant until someone invents a remote silencing (not signal canceling) technology. This particular incident was egregious due to the duration of the ring, which apparently was an alarm. I really think that the phone owner was mortified and too self conscious to reach out to his device. The conductor reacted unusually due to the persistence of the nuisance.
The need to "educate" audiences is obvious but the effectiveness of available non-overreaching means is questionable. In some halls, the MC will make an announcement about cell phones (and hearing aids) and ask the audience to turn off their phones "now" then pauses for 30 seconds to drive the message home. I don't know if it works better than the pre-recorded or projected announcements to do so.


As for those who say that the offender was not "humiliated" enough, I wonder what else they would have done if they were there (Stores??).
Posted by: Jeff Clef

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 01:55 PM

"...Is the child rapist remorse[ful]? Sentenced, gone to jail and back in society? someone we just know was accused and not much else?..."

An interesting point; accusations (many fabricated) of child molestation are, if not a standard tactic in divorce and child custody cases, still a very common ruse of an angry ex, and are brought with an ulterior motive in mind. Consider Casey Anthony's child murder trial, where accusing the dad (and not very convincingly) of child rape was used as a get-out-of-jail-free card. One of my neighbors has written to the HOA Board three separate times accusing neighbors (twice) and the landscape management company (once) of child molestation; two of these shells were lobbed over a dispute about a parking space. And now it's become a PianoWorld punchline, made in reference to an inconsiderate concertgoer.

Be careful with this. We've become more aware in recent years, partly because of research studies, of how really serious this is for a young person. It is a serious mistake to trivialize it.
Posted by: Damon

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 02:09 PM

Originally Posted By: Andromaque
Damon, so extreme!
Can you imagine if a child or someone you care about, needed help while you were indulging in a Wagnerian extravaganza, and people could not reach you for several hours!

I think about it all the time, one of the disadvantages of being a parent I think. It is in that interest that I seldom indulge myself at all and when I do, it is for shorter duration. I make sure the people I care about are covered.

Originally Posted By: Andromaque

As for invoking rape and abuse, that is really inappropriate and should not be discussed in the same thread.


I agree and I'm glad you started a new paragraph albeit without the extra space. Thank Kevin for that.

Originally Posted By: Andromaque

I think that cell phones will remain an irritant


I agree. smile
Posted by: David-G

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 02:26 PM

Originally Posted By: Andromaque
As for invoking rape and abuse, that is really inappropriate and should not be discussed in the same thread.

I agree 100%.

Originally Posted By: Andromaque
I really think that the phone owner was mortified and too self conscious to reach out to his device.

I am afraid that I cannot agree with you. Whatever the mortification of reaching to the phone and turning it off, the mortification of leaving it ringing would surely be far greater. At least for a normal person. If this person was actually aware that his phone was ringing, I do not think he could have felt mortified at all.
Posted by: David-G

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 02:30 PM

Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: Andromaque
Damon, so extreme!
Can you imagine if a child or someone you care about, needed help while you were indulging in a Wagnerian extravaganza, and people could not reach you for several hours!

I think about it all the time, one of the disadvantages of being a parent I think. It is in that interest that I seldom indulge myself at all and when I do, it is for shorter duration. I make sure the people I care about are covered.

I am with Damon on this. If someone attends a concert or an opera, their cellphone should be TURNED OFF during the performance. Of course, the phone can be on in the interval(s).
Posted by: Andromaque

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 02:35 PM

Well david, your countryman Lebrecht has the answer for you. Check it out here : It is a combination of ignorance and mortification. Apparently the poor man's name is now known (he is a long term subscriber)!!!!

From "Slipped Disc":
Here’s the story (and you read it here first): they guy had just bought himself an i-phone. No longer in the first flush of youth, he was not quite sure how the darned thing worked but he knew his etiquette well enough to shut it off before the concert started.

What he did not shut off was a preset alarm. When it gave a marimba ring, he thought it must be someone else and looked around in irritation. Then he found it was him, and the conductor was glaring at him like a schoolboy who’d let off a stinkbomb. Mortified? Our guy didn;t know where to look.

He’s gone to ground, maybe Florida, and will never live down the shame.

I’m not going to be the one to disclose his name.

But it does make a case for concertgoers, especially the over-50s, to be asked to check in their phones with their coats. Right?
Posted by: AZNpiano

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 02:35 PM

You know you have a slow news day when this stupid story turned up in the local news update at 10:00 AM. Is it even newsworthy??
Posted by: Nikolas

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 02:40 PM

Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: Andromaque
Damon, so extreme!
Can you imagine if a child or someone you care about, needed help while you were indulging in a Wagnerian extravaganza, and people could not reach you for several hours!

I think about it all the time, one of the disadvantages of being a parent I think. It is in that interest that I seldom indulge myself at all and when I do, it is for shorter duration. I make sure the people I care about are covered.
Are you a parent Damon? (I think not from the reads of it)...

I'll tell you a couple of stories...

1. I was in Tescos with both my sons, aged then 1 and 3. The 3 year old could walk (of course he could) and could run around. I could NOT put both children on the cart, so I had the 1 year old on and the other one with me, who was already talking and making decisions on his own.

You can imagine the terror of loosing sight of him for just 30 secs?!?!? Can you?!? (this is all based to the assumption that you are not a parent, right?). I was terrified. I started calling for him and got no reply. I looked to the one corridor and the next and no reply. Then I reached for my bag as an instinct (to call his mother? She was at work), and there he was behind my bag...

but the terror of loosing my son was almost too much.

2. Still in the UK, with a cell phone when it rang. I was at home, so no problem there really. It's my mother and she had a scary tone: My father was in the hospital. So I packed my things, got a ticket in easyjet (VERY expensive if you book the last instance) and got into the plane.

My father is still fine, but it was scary.

In the drive to the airport (Gatwick: had to take a cab to South Ealing Station head over center and grab the Gatwick express), I managed, after quite a few attempts to locate both the nursery, where my children were kept (that was the easy part and they were very understanding), and my wife (that was the hard part, since she kinda disregards the existance of HER cell phone).

I think that it's obvious that in some cases a cell phone IS needed and in some cases it IS helpful. Playing games on a phone is not a necessity, ringing out loud is not a necessity when in concert, logging in PianoWorld every 2 minutes in your smart phone is almost a necessity (... ) but I think you get the picture.

___________________

Still, the guy in question was awful:

1. Turn the bloody thing off once you hear it ringing. You can silence it later on, see what it's about and text the ringer back.
2. Have the damn thing turned off before the concert. It's common sense, and even if you're forgetful, you are bound to get a warning from somewhere, unless you're already dreaming...
3. Say you're sorry if the actual concert stops for your shake! Don't nod your head like you lost your voice. Your cell phone was loud enough, you can't be the same?
Posted by: kevinb

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 02:43 PM

Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: Andromaque
Damon, so extreme!
Can you imagine if a child or someone you care about, needed help while you were indulging in a Wagnerian extravaganza, and people could not reach you for several hours!

I think about it all the time, one of the disadvantages of being a parent I think. It is in that interest that I seldom indulge myself at all and when I do, it is for shorter duration. I make sure the people I care about are covered.

Originally Posted By: Andromaque

As for invoking rape and abuse, that is really inappropriate and should not be discussed in the same thread.


I agree and I'm glad you started a new paragraph albeit without the extra space. Thank Kevin for that.


It seems appropriate enough to me -- I was simply highlighting situations where people are inclined to be viciously judgemental without being in full possession of the facts. Nobody knows why the fellow in the OP did not switch off his phone, or could not silence it when it went off. Maybe it was a new phone and he didn't recognize the ring-tone, thinking it was somebody else's. Maybe he thought he'd left it at work, but one of his colleagues had helpfully slipped it into his coat pocket.

We don't know -- but nobody asked. There's was just an immediate and relentless leap to judgement. This kind of attitude is normally engendered only by people who get accused of vicious and abhorrent crimes. Hence my analogy.
Posted by: RealPlayer

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 02:48 PM

Have the ushers collect all cell phones as patrons are being led to their seats. They can be returned after the concert.

(Well, I can dream, anyway.)
Posted by: Damon

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 03:03 PM

Originally Posted By: David-G
....some stuff....


Never mind. smile
Posted by: Damon

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 03:18 PM

Originally Posted By: Nikolas
Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: Andromaque
Damon, so extreme!
Can you imagine if a child or someone you care about, needed help while you were indulging in a Wagnerian extravaganza, and people could not reach you for several hours!

I think about it all the time, one of the disadvantages of being a parent I think. It is in that interest that I seldom indulge myself at all and when I do, it is for shorter duration. I make sure the people I care about are covered.
Are you a parent Damon? (I think not from the reads of it)...


I thought that emboldened sentence kind of established that I am a parent. smile I've also experienced the horror of my son slipping my sight at a busy amusement park. An extremely nauseating 15 minutes of my life. My phone was no help (and I don't turn it off for amusement parks)
Posted by: Nikolas

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 03:23 PM

Ok... Sorry... didn't get it... Again sorry about that...
Posted by: Andromaque

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 03:43 PM

Damon,
You deserved a new paragraph but not a space because you responded to Kevin's comment.
Also I still do not get how you can have things "covered". Sure an adult could be in charge but wouldn't you rather get a (vibe) call or text and get the heck out of there if need be, the conductor non-withstanding? If I could not be reached during concerts, I would definitely not go as frequently as I do now.

Kevin, we know why he could not turn it off. See my last response. As always, it was a complicated situation: the "human" factor does not always fit pre-set patterns.
Posted by: Damon

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 03:57 PM

Originally Posted By: Andromaque

Also I still do not get how you can have things "covered". Sure an adult could be in charge but wouldn't you rather get a (vibe) call or text and get the heck out of there if need be, the conductor non-withstanding? If I could not be reached during concerts, I would definitely not go as frequently as I do now.


Here in the sticks, we call it family. I don't feel a pressing need to be available 24/7 and consider it one of the evils of modern technology that I'm expected to be.
Posted by: David-G

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 04:16 PM

Originally Posted By: Damon
And thanks for removing all space between this comment and my name.

Apologies! That was unintended, I mismanaged the quote. I have edited the post.
Posted by: David-G

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 04:23 PM

Ever since I discovered, to my astonishment, that the alarm on my phone could ring even if it was switched off, I have made a point of never using the alarm on the phone. I would be too worried that the alarm might just be set to ring during a concert.
Posted by: Damon

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 04:31 PM

My phone is my alarm clock. I've never tested it's use when it's off, but I always leave it at home or in the car when I don't want interruptions.
Posted by: Fugue14

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 04:33 PM

I'm known as the "Cell Phone Nazi" at my high school! If I catch anyone using a phone in any manner during class, I send them to the office and suspend them from class! (Unless they have a family emergency, such as an ill family member and they might need to be contacted--they must tell me in advance.) I have no problem dealing with people using phones in movie theaters, either. Last week, I was trying to enjoy The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and some morbidly obese woman in front of me kept taking out her phone to check for messages or something, and since the theater was pitch black, the screen light was very annoying. After the 4th or 5th time she did it once the movie started, I tapped the beached whale on the shoulder and said, "If you take out your phone one more time, I'll have an usher remove from the theater. So, put it away once and for all." (The last line was uttered in a Dirty Harry "Do you feel lucky, punk" tone of voice.)
Fortunately, she didn't test me.
Posted by: David-G

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 04:49 PM

Originally Posted By: Andromaque
Well david, your countryman Lebrecht has the answer for you. Check it out here : It is a combination of ignorance and mortification. Apparently the poor man's name is now known (he is a long term subscriber)!!!!


Thanks for this Andromaque! Very interesting explanation, though perhaps still leaving one a bit mystified, as one of the comments on Lebrecht's post points out.

By the way, and totally OT, your name always reminds me of the character Andromaque in Berlioz's opera "Les Troyens". The scene in which she presents her son Astyanax to Priam the king, after her husband Hector has been killed, is to me one of the most moving in all opera. It seems as though all the sorrows of war are in it. And she doesn't sing a note.
Posted by: Andromaque

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 05:43 PM

Originally Posted By: David-G
Originally Posted By: Andromaque
Well david, your countryman Lebrecht has the answer for you. Check it out here : It is a combination of ignorance and mortification. Apparently the poor man's name is now known (he is a long term subscriber)!!!!


Thanks for this Andromaque! Very interesting explanation, though perhaps still leaving one a bit mystified, as one of the comments on Lebrecht's post points out.

By the way, and totally OT, your name always reminds me of the character Andromaque in Berlioz's opera "Les Troyens". The scene in which she presents her son Astyanax to Priam the king, after her husband Hector has been killed, is to me one of the most moving in all opera. It seems as though all the sorrows of war are in it. And she doesn't sing a note.


Beautiful! smile
But my inspiration was the gorgeous French "tragedy" written in verse by Jean Racine in 1667, but of course inspired by Greek mythology. It has some wonderful poetry and it very much feels like one of the late Beethoven sonatas in my imagination.
Posted by: Andromaque

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 05:46 PM

Originally Posted By: Damon


Here in the sticks, we call it family.


We have that too, believe it or not, but I will leave it at that.
Posted by: ando

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 05:52 PM

I think it's worth noting that the idea that this cell phone was ringing an alarm, due to its "persistent nature" is merely the opinion of the conductor who was irritated by it. The truth is he would have no idea whether it was an alarm or not. You can assign any tone to any function on most phones. If the user had his voice mail turned off, the phone could easily ring out until it was answered. I don't use voice mail and my phone will ring out for well over a minute if I don't pick it up. It's actually the network which determines how long a phone rings unanswered before it self-cancels.

I believe the guy was receiving a phone call and was hoping the person calling would hang up but they didn't. If he had an alarm that wouldn't stop, he would have rushed to turn it off because he would know that it wouldn't stop until he canceled it. The man's behaviour is consistent with an embarrassed man hoping the caller would quickly hang up and he could pretend it was somebody else. Unfortunately for him, his caller was quite determined!
Posted by: Andromaque

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 07:06 PM

But apparently it is now known that the man had a new iphone and switched it off but was not aware that the alarm was on etc. (discussed a few posts above).
I wonder if he will be outed.
Posted by: Quaver Pyjama

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 07:12 PM

Posted by: ando

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 07:15 PM

Originally Posted By: Andromaque
But apparently it is now known that the man had a new iphone and switched it off but was not aware that the alarm was on etc. (discussed a few posts above).
I wonder if he will be outed.


If he's that clueless about his new phone, he probably still thought it was going to stop ringing whether it was a call or an alarm.

In any case, I think he's been punished enough. It would have been supremely humiliating to have the conductor and audience dressing you down. I don't think he needs to be outed.
Posted by: Piano*Dad

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 07:19 PM

Originally Posted By: ando
I think it's worth noting that the idea that this cell phone was ringing an alarm, due to its "persistent nature" is merely the opinion of the conductor who was irritated by it. The truth is he would have no idea whether it was an alarm or not. You can assign any tone to any function on most phones. If the user had his voice mail turned off, the phone could easily ring out until it was answered. I don't use voice mail and my phone will ring out for well over a minute if I don't pick it up. It's actually the network which determines how long a phone rings unanswered before it self-cancels.

I believe the guy was receiving a phone call and was hoping the person calling would hang up but they didn't. If he had an alarm that wouldn't stop, he would have rushed to turn it off because he would know that it wouldn't stop until he canceled it. The man's behaviour is consistent with an embarrassed man hoping the caller would quickly hang up and he could pretend it was somebody else. Unfortunately for him, his caller was quite determined!


My impression is quite different. I think he froze, a la the deer in the headlights. He did not know what to do when the alarm went off because he didn't understand the phone. Silly technophobe.

I know that's quite a speculation, but it's as good as any other, given the "facts" as they are known.

In any case, I'm not going to blame the conductor here. I think I would be more than irritated in his case.
Posted by: ando

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 07:23 PM

Originally Posted By: Piano*Dad
Originally Posted By: ando
I think it's worth noting that the idea that this cell phone was ringing an alarm, due to its "persistent nature" is merely the opinion of the conductor who was irritated by it. The truth is he would have no idea whether it was an alarm or not. You can assign any tone to any function on most phones. If the user had his voice mail turned off, the phone could easily ring out until it was answered. I don't use voice mail and my phone will ring out for well over a minute if I don't pick it up. It's actually the network which determines how long a phone rings unanswered before it self-cancels.

I believe the guy was receiving a phone call and was hoping the person calling would hang up but they didn't. If he had an alarm that wouldn't stop, he would have rushed to turn it off because he would know that it wouldn't stop until he canceled it. The man's behaviour is consistent with an embarrassed man hoping the caller would quickly hang up and he could pretend it was somebody else. Unfortunately for him, his caller was quite determined!


My impression is quite different. I think he froze, a la the deer in the headlights. He did not know what to do when the alarm went off because he didn't understand the phone. Silly technophobe.

I know that's quite a speculation, but it's as good as any other, given the "facts" as they are known.

In any case, I'm not going to blame the conductor here. I think I would be more than irritated in his case.


It might be as you said. There's a fair bit of conjecture going around. I can say that I had an iPhone briefly (which I sold). It came with that "marimba" ringtone set as default for phone calls. The default alarm tone was quite different.

We won't know unless the guy comes forward and offers himself up for an interview. Even then.. he could make up a story that damages him the least. He definitely was a deer in the headlights though!
Posted by: liszt85

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 08:30 PM

What's the big deal? He got a call, he had a new iphone, so it rang though he had the right intentions (he thought he had put it on silent, etc). It rang, the conductor being a d*** stopped the concert. The distinguished members of PW in addition demand that the guy be "outed". I really don't have a clue why. The world is a strange place.
Posted by: Kuanpiano

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 09:16 PM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
What's the big deal? He got a call, he had a new iphone, so it rang though he had the right intentions (he thought he had put it on silent, etc). It rang, the conductor being a d*** stopped the concert. The distinguished members of PW in addition demand that the guy be "outed". I really don't have a clue why. The world is a strange place.

IMO, I don't think calling the conductor a d*** is really called for..I mean, think about it. You listen to almost the entirety of an entire symphony, at almost the very end of the piece, when it gets super quiet, a cell phone goes off. Then the cell phone keeps ringing. I think it's perfectly understandable to not want to end the entire piece with a ringing phone. I'd argue that almost nobody here would want to do that as well - and would agree it's valid to stop the piece and try again. Regardless of whether you agree with how the audience member was addressed by the conductor, I think that you would agree the action of choosing to stop and try again is probably the best action, given the situation.
Posted by: liszt85

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/12/12 09:26 PM

Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Originally Posted By: liszt85
What's the big deal? He got a call, he had a new iphone, so it rang though he had the right intentions (he thought he had put it on silent, etc). It rang, the conductor being a d*** stopped the concert. The distinguished members of PW in addition demand that the guy be "outed". I really don't have a clue why. The world is a strange place.

IMO, I don't think calling the conductor a d*** is really called for..I mean, think about it. You listen to almost the entirety of an entire symphony, at almost the very end of the piece, when it gets super quiet, a cell phone goes off. Then the cell phone keeps ringing. I think it's perfectly understandable to not want to end the entire piece with a ringing phone. I'd argue that almost nobody here would want to do that as well - and would agree it's valid to stop the piece and try again. Regardless of whether you agree with how the audience member was addressed by the conductor, I think that you would agree the action of choosing to stop and try again is probably the best action, given the situation.


Yea..you're right. Being a d*** had nothing to do with stopping the concert, that was probably the right thing to do. Then addressing the audience member in the way he did was what I find a problem with. I would probably be pissed off too but I would just restart and apologize to the audience (and justify starting over again citing musical reasons. That was unprofessional behavior on his part.

The people on PW are also being unreasonable by wanting to know his identity. I don't understand for what purpose. You should all go back to practicing the piano and stop maligning somebody you don't even know.. nobody even knows the exact details of what happened that day. If it really was an honest mistake (new iphone, etc), that guy doesn't really deserve any of these discussions devoted to him on the internet (including people making comparisons with child molesters!! WTH?!). So I find some of the posts here more disgusting than what happened that day at the concert.
Posted by: jazzyprof

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 12:55 AM

The NYT just published an interview with "Patron X" :

"Actually, Patron X said he had no idea he was the culprit. He said his company replaced his BlackBerry with an iPhone the day before the concert. He said he made sure to turn it off before the concert, not realizing that the alarm clock had accidentally been set and would sound even if the phone was in silent mode.

“I didn’t even know phones came with alarms,” the man said.

But as Mr. Gilbert was glaring in his direction, he fiddled with the phone as others around him did, just to be sure, pressing buttons. That was when the sound stopped. It was only in the car going home that his wife checked the settings on his phone and found that the alarm had been set."
Posted by: liszt85

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 01:01 AM

Originally Posted By: jazzyprof
The NYT just published an interview with "Patron X" :

"Actually, Patron X said he had no idea he was the culprit. He said his company replaced his BlackBerry with an iPhone the day before the concert. He said he made sure to turn it off before the concert, not realizing that the alarm clock had accidentally been set and would sound even if the phone was in silent mode.

“I didn’t even know phones came with alarms,” the man said.

But as Mr. Gilbert was glaring in his direction, he fiddled with the phone as others around him did, just to be sure, pressing buttons. That was when the sound stopped. It was only in the car going home that his wife checked the settings on his phone and found that the alarm had been set."


Now hang him, says PW.
Posted by: beet31425

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 01:51 AM

Some more from that recent NYT article, enough to make you feel really bad for the guy:

Quote:
“You can imagine how devastating it is to know you had a hand in that,” said the man, who described himself as a business executive between 60 and 70 who runs two companies. “It’s horrible, horrible.” The man said he had not slept in two days.

The man, called Patron X by the Philharmonic, said he was a lifelong classical music lover and 20-year subscriber to the orchestra who was friendly with several of its members. He said he himself was often irked by coughs, badly timed applause — and cellphone rings. “Then God, there was I. Holy smokes,” he said.

“It was just awful to have any role in something like that, that is so disturbing and disrespectful not only to the conductor but to all the musicians and not least to the audience, which was so into this concert,” he said by telephone.

“I hope the people at that performance and members of the orchestra can certainly forgive me for this whole event. I apologize to the whole audience.”



And... here is surely the best reaction tweet. smile

-J
Posted by: wuxia

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 03:45 AM

'Why so serious?'
Posted by: David-G

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 04:06 AM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
The distinguished members of PW in addition demand that the guy be "outed".

I may not have read the thread thoroughly enough, but have many/any people here demanded the guy's identity?
Posted by: stores

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 04:27 AM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Originally Posted By: liszt85
What's the big deal? He got a call, he had a new iphone, so it rang though he had the right intentions (he thought he had put it on silent, etc). It rang, the conductor being a d*** stopped the concert. The distinguished members of PW in addition demand that the guy be "outed". I really don't have a clue why. The world is a strange place.

IMO, I don't think calling the conductor a d*** is really called for..I mean, think about it. You listen to almost the entirety of an entire symphony, at almost the very end of the piece, when it gets super quiet, a cell phone goes off. Then the cell phone keeps ringing. I think it's perfectly understandable to not want to end the entire piece with a ringing phone. I'd argue that almost nobody here would want to do that as well - and would agree it's valid to stop the piece and try again. Regardless of whether you agree with how the audience member was addressed by the conductor, I think that you would agree the action of choosing to stop and try again is probably the best action, given the situation.


Yea..you're right. Being a d*** had nothing to do with stopping the concert, that was probably the right thing to do. Then addressing the audience member in the way he did was what I find a problem with. I would probably be pissed off too but I would just restart and apologize to the audience (and justify starting over again citing musical reasons. That was unprofessional behavior on his part.

The people on PW are also being unreasonable by wanting to know his identity. I don't understand for what purpose. You should all go back to practicing the piano and stop maligning somebody you don't even know.. nobody even knows the exact details of what happened that day. If it really was an honest mistake (new iphone, etc), that guy doesn't really deserve any of these discussions devoted to him on the internet (including people making comparisons with child molesters!! WTH?!). So I find some of the posts here more disgusting than what happened that day at the concert.


Who wants to know his identity? Who cares? I don't see anyone asking to know WHO he is. Why am I not the least bit surprised that you of all people would take the stance you have?

Posted by: stores

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 04:31 AM

Originally Posted By: beet31425
Some more from that recent NYT article, enough to make you feel really bad for the guy:

Quote:
“You can imagine how devastating it is to know you had a hand in that,” said the man, who described himself as a business executive between 60 and 70 who runs two companies. “It’s horrible, horrible.” The man said he had not slept in two days.

The man, called Patron X by the Philharmonic, said he was a lifelong classical music lover and 20-year subscriber to the orchestra who was friendly with several of its members. He said he himself was often irked by coughs, badly timed applause — and cellphone rings. “Then God, there was I. Holy smokes,” he said.

“It was just awful to have any role in something like that, that is so disturbing and disrespectful not only to the conductor but to all the musicians and not least to the audience, which was so into this concert,” he said by telephone.

“I hope the people at that performance and members of the orchestra can certainly forgive me for this whole event. I apologize to the whole audience.”



And... here is surely the best reaction tweet. smile

-J


Good for him for owning up to it. He understands, unlike some people here.
Posted by: Otis S

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 08:13 AM

Here is an updated article from the New York Times on the incident:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/13/nyregi...sists.html?_r=1

It was a very unfortunate incident. While the cell phone greatly disrupted the concert, it was an accident. The article indicates that no one felt worse about the situation (and suffered more, not having slept for 2 days and counting) than the patron who caused the disturbance.
Posted by: liszt85

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 08:29 AM

Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: liszt85
Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Originally Posted By: liszt85
What's the big deal? He got a call, he had a new iphone, so it rang though he had the right intentions (he thought he had put it on silent, etc). It rang, the conductor being a d*** stopped the concert. The distinguished members of PW in addition demand that the guy be "outed". I really don't have a clue why. The world is a strange place.

IMO, I don't think calling the conductor a d*** is really called for..I mean, think about it. You listen to almost the entirety of an entire symphony, at almost the very end of the piece, when it gets super quiet, a cell phone goes off. Then the cell phone keeps ringing. I think it's perfectly understandable to not want to end the entire piece with a ringing phone. I'd argue that almost nobody here would want to do that as well - and would agree it's valid to stop the piece and try again. Regardless of whether you agree with how the audience member was addressed by the conductor, I think that you would agree the action of choosing to stop and try again is probably the best action, given the situation.


Yea..you're right. Being a d*** had nothing to do with stopping the concert, that was probably the right thing to do. Then addressing the audience member in the way he did was what I find a problem with. I would probably be pissed off too but I would just restart and apologize to the audience (and justify starting over again citing musical reasons. That was unprofessional behavior on his part.

The people on PW are also being unreasonable by wanting to know his identity. I don't understand for what purpose. You should all go back to practicing the piano and stop maligning somebody you don't even know.. nobody even knows the exact details of what happened that day. If it really was an honest mistake (new iphone, etc), that guy doesn't really deserve any of these discussions devoted to him on the internet (including people making comparisons with child molesters!! WTH?!). So I find some of the posts here more disgusting than what happened that day at the concert.


Who wants to know his identity? Who cares? I don't see anyone asking to know WHO he is. Why am I not the least bit surprised that you of all people would take the stance you have?



There were people here wondering if he would reveal his identity and if he did, would he come up with a defensive story, etc. Who cares? Exactly, but apparently some people do. Others in this thread have led the discussion on to child rapists and such. Me of all people taking the stance that I did? What stance did I take? Did you understand it in the first place? The stance I took was not that it was appropriate for the phone to have rung.
Posted by: liszt85

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 08:32 AM

Originally Posted By: stores

Good for him for owning up to it. He understands, unlike some people here.


We have been getting along somewhat alright for some time now. If you want to keep that going, I suggest you don't make such statements without completely understanding what I had to say. Not that I care too much, just wanted to put it out there.
Posted by: Entheo

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 09:19 AM

i've not waded thru all the comments here, but simply want to note that this episode made the NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams.
Posted by: Jeff Clef

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 09:52 AM

"...this episode made the NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams."

And Scott Pelley gave it a mention on the CBS Evening News. It would be easier at this point to make a list of who hasn't carried the item, rather than who has.

The gentleman made a very handsome apology, and I hope that is good enough for everyone.
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 11:15 AM

Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: Andromaque

Also I still do not get how you can have things "covered". Sure an adult could be in charge but wouldn't you rather get a (vibe) call or text and get the heck out of there if need be, the conductor non-withstanding? If I could not be reached during concerts, I would definitely not go as frequently as I do now.


Here in the sticks, we call it family. I don't feel a pressing need to be available 24/7 and consider it one of the evils of modern technology that I'm expected to be.


Actually, I agree with that, even though I'm relatively young (20). I absolutely hate the fact that I have a phone sometimes. But I need it for work (gigs). I didn't grow up with a cell phone, and I didn't know what internet was until I was 15.. life was in a way more enjoyable. Just different.

I really don't think anyone would suffer so greatly if they didn't have their phone for 2 hours.
Posted by: PianoStudent88

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 11:52 AM

Originally Posted By: David-G
Ever since I discovered, to my astonishment, that the alarm on my phone could ring even if it was switched off, I have made a point of never using the alarm on the phone. I would be too worried that the alarm might just be set to ring during a concert.
I discovered this ring-through property of the alarm just recently (of course, during a movie and it happened twice: the first time I didn't understand why it had gone off). After that I completely turned off the phone, instead of merely silencing it. I should run some tests to verify that completely turning off the phone really does silence the alarm.

Piano*Dad, I don't think I'm a technophone, but with a new phone I might fumble for a bit to figure out how to turn off an alarm or a ring.
Posted by: Damon

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 04:53 PM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
Originally Posted By: jazzyprof
The NYT just published an interview with "Patron X" :

"Actually, Patron X said he had no idea he was the culprit. He said his company replaced his BlackBerry with an iPhone the day before the concert. He said he made sure to turn it off before the concert, not realizing that the alarm clock had accidentally been set and would sound even if the phone was in silent mode.

“I didn’t even know phones came with alarms,” the man said.

But as Mr. Gilbert was glaring in his direction, he fiddled with the phone as others around him did, just to be sure, pressing buttons. That was when the sound stopped. It was only in the car going home that his wife checked the settings on his phone and found that the alarm had been set."


Now hang him, says PW.


I think we should burn him at the stake and televise it. laugh
Posted by: Damon

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 04:59 PM

Originally Posted By: Pogorelich.
Originally Posted By: Damon
Originally Posted By: Andromaque

Also I still do not get how you can have things "covered". Sure an adult could be in charge but wouldn't you rather get a (vibe) call or text and get the heck out of there if need be, the conductor non-withstanding? If I could not be reached during concerts, I would definitely not go as frequently as I do now.


Here in the sticks, we call it family. I don't feel a pressing need to be available 24/7 and consider it one of the evils of modern technology that I'm expected to be.


Actually, I agree with that, even though I'm relatively young (20). I absolutely hate the fact that I have a phone sometimes. But I need it for work (gigs). I didn't grow up with a cell phone, and I didn't know what internet was until I was 15.. life was in a way more enjoyable. Just different.

I really don't think anyone would suffer so greatly if they didn't have their phone for 2 hours.


I don't do classical gigs, but my rock gigs are always booked through email these days. Nobody wants to talk anymore.
Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 05:11 PM

Same for my gigs, but texts work too.
Posted by: stores

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 06:18 PM

Originally Posted By: liszt85
Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: liszt85
Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Originally Posted By: liszt85
What's the big deal? He got a call, he had a new iphone, so it rang though he had the right intentions (he thought he had put it on silent, etc). It rang, the conductor being a d*** stopped the concert. The distinguished members of PW in addition demand that the guy be "outed". I really don't have a clue why. The world is a strange place.

IMO, I don't think calling the conductor a d*** is really called for..I mean, think about it. You listen to almost the entirety of an entire symphony, at almost the very end of the piece, when it gets super quiet, a cell phone goes off. Then the cell phone keeps ringing. I think it's perfectly understandable to not want to end the entire piece with a ringing phone. I'd argue that almost nobody here would want to do that as well - and would agree it's valid to stop the piece and try again. Regardless of whether you agree with how the audience member was addressed by the conductor, I think that you would agree the action of choosing to stop and try again is probably the best action, given the situation.


Yea..you're right. Being a d*** had nothing to do with stopping the concert, that was probably the right thing to do. Then addressing the audience member in the way he did was what I find a problem with. I would probably be pissed off too but I would just restart and apologize to the audience (and justify starting over again citing musical reasons. That was unprofessional behavior on his part.

The people on PW are also being unreasonable by wanting to know his identity. I don't understand for what purpose. You should all go back to practicing the piano and stop maligning somebody you don't even know.. nobody even knows the exact details of what happened that day. If it really was an honest mistake (new iphone, etc), that guy doesn't really deserve any of these discussions devoted to him on the internet (including people making comparisons with child molesters!! WTH?!). So I find some of the posts here more disgusting than what happened that day at the concert.


Who wants to know his identity? Who cares? I don't see anyone asking to know WHO he is. Why am I not the least bit surprised that you of all people would take the stance you have?



There were people here wondering if he would reveal his identity and if he did, would he come up with a defensive story, etc. Who cares? Exactly, but apparently some people do. Others in this thread have led the discussion on to child rapists and such. Me of all people taking the stance that I did? What stance did I take? Did you understand it in the first place? The stance I took was not that it was appropriate for the phone to have rung.


It seems to me you felt the conductor was the one out of line. I came to this conclusion after you called him a d***. Of course, I'm clueless and probably don't have the faintest idea of what I'm talking about.
Posted by: liszt85

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 06:30 PM

Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: liszt85
Originally Posted By: stores
Originally Posted By: liszt85
Originally Posted By: Kuanpiano
Originally Posted By: liszt85
What's the big deal? He got a call, he had a new iphone, so it rang though he had the right intentions (he thought he had put it on silent, etc). It rang, the conductor being a d*** stopped the concert. The distinguished members of PW in addition demand that the guy be "outed". I really don't have a clue why. The world is a strange place.

IMO, I don't think calling the conductor a d*** is really called for..I mean, think about it. You listen to almost the entirety of an entire symphony, at almost the very end of the piece, when it gets super quiet, a cell phone goes off. Then the cell phone keeps ringing. I think it's perfectly understandable to not want to end the entire piece with a ringing phone. I'd argue that almost nobody here would want to do that as well - and would agree it's valid to stop the piece and try again. Regardless of whether you agree with how the audience member was addressed by the conductor, I think that you would agree the action of choosing to stop and try again is probably the best action, given the situation.


Yea..you're right. Being a d*** had nothing to do with stopping the concert, that was probably the right thing to do. Then addressing the audience member in the way he did was what I find a problem with. I would probably be pissed off too but I would just restart and apologize to the audience (and justify starting over again citing musical reasons. That was unprofessional behavior on his part.

The people on PW are also being unreasonable by wanting to know his identity. I don't understand for what purpose. You should all go back to practicing the piano and stop maligning somebody you don't even know.. nobody even knows the exact details of what happened that day. If it really was an honest mistake (new iphone, etc), that guy doesn't really deserve any of these discussions devoted to him on the internet (including people making comparisons with child molesters!! WTH?!). So I find some of the posts here more disgusting than what happened that day at the concert.


Who wants to know his identity? Who cares? I don't see anyone asking to know WHO he is. Why am I not the least bit surprised that you of all people would take the stance you have?



There were people here wondering if he would reveal his identity and if he did, would he come up with a defensive story, etc. Who cares? Exactly, but apparently some people do. Others in this thread have led the discussion on to child rapists and such. Me of all people taking the stance that I did? What stance did I take? Did you understand it in the first place? The stance I took was not that it was appropriate for the phone to have rung.


It seems to me you felt the conductor was the one out of line. I came to this conclusion after you called him a d***. Of course, I'm clueless and probably don't have the faintest idea of what I'm talking about.


I had to call someone a d*** (for all the nonsense being said in this thread), if I were to call you a d***, you'd probably ping your friends in high places. Didn't want that.
Posted by: MacMacMac

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/13/12 06:47 PM

Cell phones should simply be prohibited from concert halls.
Take your pick: the concert or the phone. Not both.

I can't take 4 ounces of shampoo onto an airplane. It must be left behind.
So I see no hardship in leaving the phone behind at a concert.

TSA searches at the door would be obnoxious and expensive. So I propose an honor system ... punishable upon violation. You screw up, you're thrown out. No refund. Just my boot print on your butt.
Posted by: Gould

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/14/12 10:03 AM

WOW! It's on Yahoo news!
Yahoo News Article
Posted by: Damon

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/14/12 11:43 AM

Could you edit your post to include only the link? It's messing up the forum view.


Thanks!
Posted by: Jeff Clef

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/14/12 12:15 PM

I wonder if a behind-the-scenes bidding war is going on between news outlets over who gets the scoop and publishes the offender's name--- surely it is known. Sometimes those fifteen minutes of fame are dearly bought. Silence is also sometimes bought for a high price, although blackmailers are notoriously unreliable business partners.
Posted by: Roger Ransom

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/14/12 08:44 PM

Well, as long as you are entertaining an audience of hundreds or even thousands of (unfortunately) imperfect human beings, there are absolutely going to be issues occasionally. I would say that if you can't deal with that possibility you are in the wrong business.

There appear to be many very holy people here, at least they think they are.
Posted by: beet31425

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/24/12 03:52 AM

Follow-up:

Here's a wonderful video that's gone viral (1.2 million views on youtube so far). I think we can at least agree that this is a great way of handling a cell phone interruption. Lukáš Kmiť, violin.

-J

Posted by: lilylady

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/24/12 07:05 AM

A class act!
Posted by: tomasino

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/24/12 07:19 AM

I haven't read all of this very long thread, so maybe the NYT's recent interview with the man in question has already been covered. Anyway, it goes something like this: the man had a new phone with which he was unfamiliar. Unbeknown to him, it had an alarm in it which would ring even if the phone had been turned off, and the alarm would continue to ring until it had been manually turned off. The man knew none of this at the time it went off, but he knew he had turned his phone off. So he just sat there, paralyzed, not knowing what to do, and probably thinking it would eventually turn off by itself. It may have seemed to him, at the time, that his best bet was to sit still, in silent denial that it was his phone, and wait for the situation to go away by itself.

It's sort of like the situation some of us have found ourselves in when we let go with a silent, but highly gaseous flatulence bomb, and we're in a crowd of people, or even friends, and we can't escape. What do you do? You sit there in silence, and when everyone starts looking around and sniffing the air, you look around and sniff the air too.

It could have happened to any of us.

Tomasino
Posted by: Andromaque

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/24/12 07:21 AM

Originally Posted By: beet31425
Follow-up:

Here's a wonderful video that's gone viral (1.2 million views on youtube so far). I think we can at least agree that this is a great way of handling a cell phone interruption. Lukáš Kmiť, violin.

-J



sounds like a viola not a violin to me, no?. I don't like his ring tone variations or his playing.
Posted by: MonkeyMark

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/24/12 08:51 AM

Quote:


sounds like a viola not a violin to me, no?. I don't like his ring tone variations or his playing.


His form was appaling, and no one even answered!
Posted by: David-G

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 01/24/12 03:38 PM

I tested my phone again. (It's an oldish Nokia.) If the alarm is set to ring, it will ring even if the phone is turned fully off (not turned to silent). For that reason I never use the alarm - I would just be too worried in concerts!
Posted by: ChibiSF

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 02/02/12 10:35 PM

Posted by: carey

Re: Public Humiliation for a ringing cell phone owner at N YPhil - 02/02/12 10:44 PM

Originally Posted By: ChibiSF


You've found Chopin's "lost" first draft of the Fantasy Opus 49 !!! Guess he decided it was too visionary for his audiences. grin