Henle editions of chopin etudes

Posted by: TrueMusic

Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 05:08 PM

My current edition of the etudes is starting to fall apart, and since it's the schirmer edition anyways I was considering buying another edition instead of getting it rebound....I was looking at the henle editions on amazon and found multiple different types....anyone able to tell me the difference? I found the urtext, the music folio, and the study score editions all by henle, and I'm not sure what the difference and distinction is between them to know which I want to purchase.
Posted by: Mark_C

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 05:18 PM

Why not rather check out the National Edition, which seems more and more widely to be considered the best?
Posted by: TrueMusic

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 06:38 PM

Well I hadn't heard of it before! I'll check it out, thanks.
Posted by: Mark_C

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 06:53 PM

It's a little hard to get (the only place I've been able to get that edition from is Theodore Presser and they're sometimes out of stock for a while) and it's also expensive -- but so is Henle. I think the National is the one that's most worth getting -- if you can.
Posted by: DonaldLee

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 07:06 PM

You should get the Ekier edition. I had the complete Chopin works in Schirmer, then I "upgraded" to Henle, but then I discovered the Ekier edition. I'm currently replacing all of my Henle with the Ekier, and I currently own the Ballades, Sonates, and Etudes in this edition. It's rather pricey, but it's worth it. You can tell the engraving isn't done by hand though, and it's slightly harder to read than the Henle (I think I only notice that because I stare at various Henle editions from 6+ hours daily). With that aside, the scholarship alone makes it worth it. Here are a couple of places that you can get it:

http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/Etudes/3774888
http://www.boosey.com/shop/prod/Chopin-Fr-d-ric-Etudes-Op-10-Op-25-Urtext-Ekier/921080
Posted by: jdhampton924

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 08:11 PM

I have been wanting the Ekier Edition for sure. I have some of his music in Schirmer, and the etudes I have a Dover Edition with the preludes, as well as the Cortot edition. Which I love reading all the intro and exercises before each etude.
Posted by: Minnesota Marty

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 08:25 PM

I agree with Mark C - I vote for the National Edition. Aren't these the same as the Ekier editions? I believe they are one and the same.

Here's a link to check it out.

http://www.presser.com/marketing/keyboard/chopin/ekier.htm
Posted by: BruceD

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 08:39 PM

My only problem with the National Edition (compared to the Henle) is that the (only) two copies I have are not bound well and they resist lying flat on the music stand. Don't take that to imply that I think all National Edition Chopin scores have this flaw. For most of us who are not ultimate Chopin scholars, shouldn't the Henle Urtext suffice and - in some cases - win over because of its greater "user friendliness?" It depends one one's priorities, I guess.

My other big complaint about the new National Edition (Ekier) - and this is not an issue with the Etudes - is that they have two "Series": Series A : Works published during Chopin's lifetime and Series B : Works published posthumously.

This means that if you want all four of the Impromptus, all the Waltzes, all the Mazurkas and all the Polonaises, you have to buy two volumes for each genre; a total of eight volumes whereas other publishers will give these same works to you in four.

I paid $43.95US for the Polonaises, Series A, but never bothered to check the price of the Series B volume of the Polonaises. This production quirk, to me, just smacks of publisher's greed.

The Henle "study scores" are small-print (pocket-book size) versions of the standard-sized scores, meant for ease of handling while studying the score (from a recording or during a performance) but not practical to be played from.

Regards,
Posted by: DanS

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 08:47 PM

If you're replacing the etudes because your edition fell apart, I'd stay away from Henle. All my Henles that have gotten heavy use are in shambles. I have the Alfred's Masterworks edition of the Etudes. It's held up great and is easy to read. I like it better that Dover ed or Paderewski editions that I have.
Posted by: BruceD

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 08:51 PM

Originally Posted By: DanS
If you're replacing the etudes because your edition fell apart, I'd stay away from Henle. All my Henles that have gotten heavy use are in shambles. I have the Alfred's Masterworks edition of the Etudes. It's held up great and is easy to read. I like it better that Dover ed or Paderewski editions that I have.


Strange observation - to me. My Henle Chopin Etudes was purchased in 1970 as was my Henle WTC, Bk I. Both have had constant use and both are still "sound as a dollar" - the dollar - or so - I paid for them then!

That said, I'll be the first to admit that publishing practices and techniques have changed over the years, but my new Henles seem just as stalwart and reliable as the old.

Regards,
Posted by: DanS

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 08:58 PM

Hmm, maybe they changed their manufacturing techniques. My Henle Debussy Images (both books) and L'isle joyuese are in terrible shape (all from the 90s). I wish I went with a different ed.

Perhaps it's because they're all thin scores, held together only with staples (not thick enough to be glued).
Posted by: DonaldLee

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 09:05 PM

I can attest that the Ekier editions do not lay flat easily. As far as making sure that my editions stand the test of time, I always put them into an urtext protecter.
Posted by: Mark_C

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 10:20 PM

Originally Posted By: Minnesota Marty
....I vote for the National Edition. Aren't these the same as the Ekier editions? I believe they are one and the same....

Just to help clarify: YES. smile

The official name (I think) is National Edition, sometimes referred to as "Polish National Edition," which is what I usually call it, because I think it makes it more clear. Ekier is the chief editor, and so it's sometimes called the Ekier edition, which I think is clearer than "National Edition" too.
Posted by: Ralph

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/30/12 10:48 PM

The older I get, the more Henle I use.
Posted by: btb

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/31/12 04:07 AM

What's the difference chaps?

Surely none of the editions leaves out any of the notes.

I've got the Peters Edition which has served me well for many moons.
Posted by: Mark_C

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/31/12 11:42 AM

Originally Posted By: btb
What's the difference chaps?

Surely none of the editions leaves out any of the notes....

For the benefit of the uninitiated, you better let them know that you don't exactly mean most of what you say. grin

Oh -- I guess I just did. ha
Posted by: RonaldSteinway

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/31/12 03:22 PM

Originally Posted By: DonaldLee
I can attest that the Ekier editions do not lay flat easily.


Agree!
Posted by: Mark_C

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 12/31/12 04:20 PM

Originally Posted By: BruceD
My only problem with the National Edition (compared to the Henle) is that the (only) two copies I have are not bound well and they resist lying flat on the music stand....

Interesting how different things are important or not for different people. I know that you've mentioned a number of times that this is a big consideration for you. I've never noticed such an issue with these Chopin volumes, and I certainly wouldn't say they're not bound well.

The "lying flat" thing is never much of a conscious issue for me with any scores, probably because I think nothing of bending the heck out of a volume to make it lie however I want it to; I almost don't notice that I'm doing it. Sometimes of course this makes the volume fall apart -- it has happened particularly with my Longo Scarlatti volumes -- but there has never been any such problem with these Chopin National Edition volumes.
Posted by: albynism

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 01/02/13 12:26 PM

Henle, bought the etudes in the 90s and the book still held up well. Get the urtext edition. Recommend! The book is not stapled it's stitched.
Posted by: dolce sfogato

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 01/05/13 11:27 AM

for me it's Paderewsky, esp. for the very good fingerings.
Posted by: DanS

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 01/08/13 02:48 PM

Originally Posted By: BruceD
Originally Posted By: DanS
If you're replacing the etudes because your edition fell apart, I'd stay away from Henle. All my Henles that have gotten heavy use are in shambles. I have the Alfred's Masterworks edition of the Etudes. It's held up great and is easy to read. I like it better that Dover ed or Paderewski editions that I have.


Strange observation - to me. My Henle Chopin Etudes was purchased in 1970 as was my Henle WTC, Bk I. Both have had constant use and both are still "sound as a dollar" - the dollar - or so - I paid for them then!

That said, I'll be the first to admit that publishing practices and techniques have changed over the years, but my new Henles seem just as stalwart and reliable as the old.

Regards,


Not to beat a dead horse, but I just pulled out my Henle Mendelssohn Ausgewahlte Kalvierwerke and it is really quite beat up. It had split down the middle and I had to use packing tape to put it back together. It's one of the thicker books, which I'm guessing is sewed together.

My Mozart Sonatas have held up better, but they haven't seen the same level of use.

I will say that I love the look of the Henles. They're very readable.
Posted by: Ralph

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 01/08/13 04:34 PM

Originally Posted By: DanS
[quote=BruceD][quote=DanS]
I will say that I love the look of the Henles. They're very readable.


Especially for 53 year old eyes needing bifocals. I do like the fingerlings in the Paderewski edition so have both.
Posted by: buladscot

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 01/08/13 08:21 PM

I'm currently replacing all of my Henle with the Ekier, and I currently own the Ballades, Sonates, and Etudes in this edition.
Posted by: BDB

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 01/08/13 08:27 PM

No need to replace. There is no law restricting people to one edition.

I have three editions of the Etudes: Friedheim, Schmitz and Paderewski. Even so, they do not answer all of my questions.
Posted by: Mark_C

Re: Henle editions of chopin etudes - 01/08/13 10:14 PM

Originally Posted By: BDB
No need to replace. There is no law restricting people to one edition.....

That's right! Depending on the size of the bookcase of course. smile

Bulad: What are you doing with those Henle volumes?
Don't get me wrong, I'm not angling for them. ha
Just wondering. I'm sure you're not using them for firewood. Or at least I'm pretty sure you're not. grin