Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire?

Posted by: pianoloverus

Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 07:33 PM

I'm really talking about largest and broadest repertoire that was actually performed in concert. So I wouldn't choose Leslie Howard, for example, because of his emphasis on Liszt and Romantic composers.

I would choose Richter. He played large chunks of Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Rachmaninov, Shostakovitch, Prokofiev, Debussy, Ravel, Scriabin, etc.

The figures compiled in the Monsingeon book on Richter are almost impossible to believe: 833 works(a work being anything from a single Rachmaninov Prelude to the Beethoven Diabelli Variations to a Concerto but not including around 600 songs), 3600 concerts in 1000 different places(hard to believe that?). There were years where Richter played over 200 works with 20 of them new to his repertoire He gave 851 concerts in Moscow alone.

Other candidates?
Posted by: BDB

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 07:34 PM

Gerald Moore.
Posted by: currawong

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 08:01 PM

Originally Posted By: BDB
Gerald Moore.
thumb
Posted by: bennevis

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 08:13 PM

I'd vote for Daniel Barenboim.

Not only has he played (and recorded) Bach's WTC, he's also played Boulez and conducted Schoenberg, Mahler, Bruckner as well as Boulez. Not to mention Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen and Mozart's operas.

Oh, and he also plays the old warhorses like Chopin, Schumann, Brahms and Tchaikovsky concertos. As well as all the Mozart and Beethoven ones. And all their piano sonatas. And.......
Posted by: evilpacman18

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 08:20 PM

I think it's pretty obviously Hamelin.
Posted by: BDB

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 08:24 PM

J. Lawrence Cooke also had quite a repertoire.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 08:27 PM

Originally Posted By: BDB
Gerald Moore.
I'm assuming this is because each song counts as a piece but remember the figure i gave for Richter didn't include the about 600 songs he accompanied. So, including songs, Richter would have a total of 1433 pieces.
Posted by: argerichfan

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 08:47 PM

Originally Posted By: BDB
Gerald Moore.

Hmmm... no.

Moore is best known for the sheer amount of songs he accompanied, but that does not necessarily mean he had the largest repertoire. I would think that honour would go to Michael Raucheisen.

This guy had a working knowledge of German Lieder which far surpassed Moore. He played for many great singers- Hans Hotter, Frida Leider, Erna Berger, Karl Erb, and the great Schwartzkopf.

Raucheisen, in addition to playing the usual fare, went deeply into the lieder of Pfitzner, Marschner, and Loewe (another easy 500 examples), which Moore only tangentially sampled.

Nothing against Moore of course -a great inspirational hero of mine, and a man I would have loved to have met and share a brew with- but he did not have quite the wide range of Raucheisen.

Oddly enough, in Moore's highly readable autobio, he makes no reference to Raucheisen, but he certainly worked most of those same singers.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 08:55 PM

For clarity's sake this thread was not for pianists who play popular music, pianists who are primarily accompanists, or non piano works in this discussion.
Posted by: BDB

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 08:57 PM

Or pianists whose first name is not Sviatoslav. That makes it much simpler.
Posted by: Orange Soda King

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 08:59 PM

John Ogdon's repertoire was unbelievably large. Reading his biography, it is quite astonishing what all he actually played.
Posted by: argerichfan

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 09:12 PM

Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
For clarity's sake this thread was not for pianists who play popular music, pianists who are primarily accompanists, or non piano works in this discussion.

That is what I thought too, but since BDB brought up Moore -which was clearly incorrect- I thought it was worth a response.

Otherwise, I have no idea about solo pianists, nor it is particularly important to me. Who cares who can play the most stuff?
Posted by: argerichfan

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 09:25 PM

Originally Posted By: Orange Soda King
John Ogdon's repertoire was unbelievably large. Reading his biography, it is quite astonishing what all he actually played.

The sheer amount of British concertos he played, astonishing for any pianist.

Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 09:50 PM

Originally Posted By: argerichfan
Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
For clarity's sake this thread was not for pianists who play popular music, pianists who are primarily accompanists, or non piano works in this discussion.

That is what I thought too, but since BDB brought up Moore -which was clearly incorrect- I thought it was worth a response.

Otherwise, I have no idea about solo pianists, nor it is particularly important to me. Who cares who can play the most stuff?
The size of pianist's repertoire is not an uncommon question. Obviously, at least one person cares just because it's interesting if not particularly important.
Posted by: BDB

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 10:21 PM

Well, the question went from "Other candidates?" to something else which is much less interesting.
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/30/13 11:09 PM

My piano teacher, who is a Horowitz fanatic, claimed that Horowitz had a working repertoire of over 800 pieces. Don't know how true this is.
Posted by: Derulux

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 12:45 AM

Originally Posted By: Brad Hoehne
My piano teacher, who is a Horowitz fanatic, claimed that Horowitz had a working repertoire of over 800 pieces. Don't know how true this is.

While this may be true, I believe, from all accounts I've read, that what he chose to perform throughout his career was much narrower.
Posted by: Olivero

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 01:53 AM

In Barenboim's view, it was the great Chilean pianist Claudio Arrau who had "probably the widest repertoire of any pianist, past or present." Certainly it was wider than most of his peers. Writing in A Life in Music, Barenboim argues that Arrau not only was at home with a vast range of composers and periods (Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Chopin, Liszt, Debussy, Albeniz, Busoni, Reger, Schoenberg) but that he also had an extraordinary mastery of these diverse styles, and the ability to channel his virtuoso technique in a way that allowed him to carry them all off persuasively and idiomatically. In part Barenboim attributes this pianistic breadth to Arrau's equally wide-ranging interests beyond the piano: literature, philosophy, opera, art, history, anthropology, dance, psychology. These varied interests, intensely pursued over his entire career, fed his musical sensibilities and gave his performances their uniquely powerful combination of intelligence and imagination.
Posted by: theJourney

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 04:43 AM

Originally Posted By: argerichfan
Who cares who can play the most stuff?


The author of this thread, apparently.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 08:57 AM

Originally Posted By: theJourney
Originally Posted By: argerichfan
Who cares who can play the most stuff?


The author of this thread, apparently.
And Daniel Barenboim apparently. Many pianist biographies also list the pianist's repertoire at the end to the book.
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 10:41 AM

Originally Posted By: Derulux
Originally Posted By: Brad Hoehne
My piano teacher, who is a Horowitz fanatic, claimed that Horowitz had a working repertoire of over 800 pieces. Don't know how true this is.

While this may be true, I believe, from all accounts I've read, that what he chose to perform throughout his career was much narrower.


I'm too lazy to count the number of works in this list, but it seems pretty diverse. Definitely not in the 800 range though:

http://vladimirhorowitz.hostzi.com/1_12_Repertoire.html
Posted by: jeffreyjones

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 11:18 AM

Originally Posted By: evilpacman18
I think it's pretty obviously Hamelin.


His recording repertoire is extremely large, but you only get bits and pieces of it in his performing repertoire, and understandably, he often plays his own compositions. I think the encyclopedic nature of his discography is kind of at odds with what he really wants to do as a musician.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 11:25 AM

Originally Posted By: Brad Hoehne
I'm too lazy to count the number of works in this list, but it seems pretty diverse. Definitely not in the 800 range though:
http://vladimirhorowitz.hostzi.com/1_12_Repertoire.html

This is quite interesting because my impression is that this list has a lot of works Horowitz played before 1940 or 1950 that he rarely played later in his career.
Posted by: ronde des sylphes

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 11:31 AM

I don't know how much of his vast recording repertoire he actually performed, but Michael Ponti might be worth a mention.
Posted by: GeorgeB

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 12:06 PM

I would like to nominate my teacher. He's performed or recorded over 100 concerti and recorded all the Beethoven sonatas and a huge chunk of chamber music.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 01:07 PM

Originally Posted By: GeorgeB
I would like to nominate my teacher. He's performed or recorded over 100 concerti and recorded all the Beethoven sonatas and a huge chunk of chamber music.
Who is he? 100 concerti seems astronomical!
Posted by: BruceD

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 01:43 PM

Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
Originally Posted By: GeorgeB
I would like to nominate my teacher. He's performed or recorded over 100 concerti and recorded all the Beethoven sonatas and a huge chunk of chamber music.
Who is he? 100 concerti seems astronomical!


Are there "over 100" (piano) concerti that would have been performed and/or recorded? Would this not have to include some pretty obscure works? Where would one find the orchestra - or even the scores - for such obscure works?

What am I missing in this "over 100" list?

Regards,
Posted by: Brad Hoehne

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 03:02 PM

Originally Posted By: BruceD
Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
Originally Posted By: GeorgeB
I would like to nominate my teacher. He's performed or recorded over 100 concerti and recorded all the Beethoven sonatas and a huge chunk of chamber music.
Who is he? 100 concerti seems astronomical!


Are there "over 100" (piano) concerti that would have been performed and/or recorded? Would this not have to include some pretty obscure works? Where would one find the orchestra - or even the scores - for such obscure works?

What am I missing in this "over 100" list?

Regards,


Well, off the top of my head here is my guess as to what concertos are "commonly" played:

Mozart ~20 are commonly played
5 Beethoven
2 Chopin
2 Brahms
5 Prokofiev
3 Rachmaninov
2 Liszt
1 Grieg
1 Macdowell
1 Glazunov
1 Schumann
4 or so of the Haydn concertos
~10 J.S. Bach concertos of various sorts
3 C.P.E. Bach
2 Tchaikovsky
1 Lutoslawski
2 Ravel
1 Dvorak
Total: 66

Am I missing any?


Posted by: Polyphonist

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 03:36 PM

You've left out quite a bit of common repertoire I can think of; Mendelssohn for one. There are easily orchestras for at least 100 concertos.

Maybe GeorgeB would like to ask his teacher and list them for us? wink
Posted by: Louis Podesta

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 03:49 PM

In that I used to call him every year on his birthday, I list the link to Earl Wild's website. Click on the the three page discography, if you want some idea of the amount of repertoire the man recorded.

It doesn't include a lot of pieces that he played in concert, such as the Schumann Concerto, which he didn't record. The man lived to be 93 years old and was concertizing from the age of 13.

He played it all! And, that includeds many of his own compositions/transcriptions.

Further, he played a wide spectrum of repertoire his entire career unlike others listed here who specialized in only certain composers late in life.

http://earlwild.com/
Posted by: GeorgeB

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 05:59 PM

Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
You've left out quite a bit of common repertoire I can think of; Mendelssohn for one. There are easily orchestras for at least 100 concertos.

Maybe GeorgeB would like to ask his teacher and list them for us? wink


He's got them on his website. Very impressive though several of them are extremely obscure.

If I wanted to disclose who/where I study with I would have said it in my first post.
Posted by: argerichfan

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 08:00 PM

Originally Posted By: Olivero
In Barenboim's view, it was the great Chilean pianist Claudio Arrau who had "probably the widest repertoire of any pianist, past or present."

I think you are correct, at least from what I have read. (Sorry I didn't get on this last night, I had to play an Easter service on the organ at moment's notice.)

The one composer conspicuously missing from Arrau's repertoire is Rachmaninov. I'm sure he must have dabbled in his music at some point, yet in later life he could only say 'Rachmaninov writes for the public'.

Well that seems a bit unfair, if I may so so. I think Arrau could have given us the most noble recording of R's 2nd Concerto, he would have elevated it to Brahms territory, and made us hear it differently than anyone before or since.
Posted by: bennevis

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 08:12 PM

Originally Posted By: argerichfan
I think Arrau could have given us the most noble recording of R's 2nd Concerto, he would have elevated it to Brahms territory, and made us hear it differently than anyone before or since.



That's what I'd be afraid of, if Arrau did play Rachmaninov.

His Chopin - especially the concertante works - are really something of an acquired taste. I think he forgot that Chopin lived most of his life in France, not Germany.......
Posted by: wr

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 08:29 PM

Originally Posted By: BruceD


Are there "over 100" (piano) concerti that would have been performed and/or recorded? Would this not have to include some pretty obscure works? Where would one find the orchestra - or even the scores - for such obscure works?

What am I missing in this "over 100" list?



I don't know how they dig up the scores, but Hyperion's Romantic Piano Concerto series has already gone past the one hundred mark and shows no sign of stopping. And, it's a restricted subset of concertos. There are, I would imagine, at least as many written both before and, especially, after the Romantic era, and many of pretty decent quality.

By the way, another pianist with a vast repertoire is Garrick Ohlsson - he has played far more than just what has appeared on recordings. For example, I remember that he did a Busoni survey that stretched over three solo recitals, but I don't think any recordings of solo Busoni from him have been released.
Posted by: argerichfan

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 08:37 PM

Originally Posted By: bennevis

That's what I'd be afraid of, if Arrau did play Rachmaninov.

Why do you say that, my friend?

Quote:
His Chopin - especially the concertante works - are really something of an acquired taste.

Well, perhaps, he might have left Chopin well enough alone. I have never warmed to the concertos, nor anything else of Chopin. His Bb minor Prelude confronts the difficulties with a stoic resolve, no bluster and smear, but also no kinetic energy on the level of an Argerich.
Posted by: bennevis

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 08:59 PM

Originally Posted By: argerichfan
Originally Posted By: bennevis

That's what I'd be afraid of, if Arrau did play Rachmaninov.

Why do you say that, my friend?



Rachmaninov has his moments of grandeur but also lots of filigree writing, which I don't think suits Arrau (judging by his Feux follets and Chopin). So, on balance, the moments of appropriate gravitas that he might bring to Rach's Big Tunes, will likely not compensate for inappropriate heaviness elsewhere.
Posted by: Auntie Lynn

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 09:27 PM

En fin, mes amis, all your top performers have to be able to play everything in the book. Not only that, they have to learn some things overnight. In fact, I believe that's part of the Cliburn competition - they give you something new and you have to set yourself down and read it cold...
Posted by: Thracozaag

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 09:46 PM

In their prime/early years, I'd argue Rubinstein (Anton), Josef Hoffman, and Horowitz.
Recently, my insane friend Mei-ting has performed the complete works of Chopin, all the Beethoven sonatas (including the violin and cello), and complete Brahms (solo and chamber) eek
Posted by: argerichfan

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 10:01 PM

Originally Posted By: Auntie Lynn
En fin, mes amis, all your top performers have to be able to play everything in the book. Not only that, they have to learn some things overnight.

Ah yes, Auntie, did it this morning, played a church service with about 12 hours notice. Spent most of it practising, sorry to boast, but this was BIG for me and put me on the substitute circuit.

Sometimes you cannot look back, there is no time, and everything needs to be attacked as if your life depended upon it.
Posted by: Derulux

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 03/31/13 10:33 PM

Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
Originally Posted By: Brad Hoehne
I'm too lazy to count the number of works in this list, but it seems pretty diverse. Definitely not in the 800 range though:
http://vladimirhorowitz.hostzi.com/1_12_Repertoire.html

This is quite interesting because my impression is that this list has a lot of works Horowitz played before 1940 or 1950 that he rarely played later in his career.

Yeah, I haven't looked at the list yet, but I would have guessed this straightaway. Many critics' accounts that I've read indicated that he chose to play the same composers and the same pieces far more frequently in his 'mature' career.
Posted by: Gomtorus

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/01/13 07:18 AM

To my knowledge, Richter didn't completely memorise music but played it from the score, so that might explain his large repertoire.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/01/13 08:27 AM

Originally Posted By: Gomtorus
To my knowledge, Richter didn't completely memorise music but played it from the score, so that might explain his large repertoire.
That was only near the very end of his career.
Posted by: Hakki

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/01/13 10:54 AM

Originally Posted By: pianoloverus

Other candidates?


Biret ?
Posted by: Tim Adrianson

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/01/13 11:07 AM

One that hasn't been mentioned is Grant Johannesen. Frankly, I don't know how large his entire repertoire is, but I always admired his predilection for programming and recording lesser-known but still high-quality piano repertoire, such as that of Chabrier and de Severac.
Posted by: sophial

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/01/13 11:28 AM

Originally Posted By: argerichfan
Originally Posted By: Auntie Lynn
En fin, mes amis, all your top performers have to be able to play everything in the book. Not only that, they have to learn some things overnight.

Ah yes, Auntie, did it this morning, played a church service with about 12 hours notice. Spent most of it practising, sorry to boast, but this was BIG for me and put me on the substitute circuit.

Sometimes you cannot look back, there is no time, and everything needs to be attacked as if your life depended upon it.


Congratulations! That is super, Jason!! It sounds as though this may lead to other opportunities for you- hope so!

Sophia
Posted by: ronde des sylphes

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/01/13 08:18 PM

There is always this: http://www.arturcimirro.com.br/repertoire.htm shocked
Posted by: carey

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/01/13 10:16 PM

Originally Posted By: Tim Adrianson
One that hasn't been mentioned is Grant Johannesen. Frankly, I don't know how large his entire repertoire is, but I always admired his predilection for programming and recording lesser-known but still high-quality piano repertoire, such as that of Chabrier and de Severac.

Funny you should mention Johannesen. I had the opportunity to play for him in 1976 (briefly) when he was a guest artist at the University of Nebraska. I recall I performed excerpts from the Symphonic Etudes - and he provided helpful suggestions. Very nice gentleman - and a wonderful pianist. He was known as an interpreter of French piano music and I understand he recorded the complete solo piano works of Gabriel Fauré.
Posted by: carey

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/01/13 10:22 PM

Originally Posted By: argerichfan

Ah yes, Auntie, did it this morning, played a church service with about 12 hours notice. Spent most of it practising, sorry to boast, but this was BIG for me and put me on the substitute circuit. Sometimes you cannot look back, there is no time, and everything needs to be attacked as if your life depended upon it.


Now that you're on the substitute circuit - you're going to be very very busy !!! Great news - Congrats !! thumb
Posted by: Polyphonist

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/02/13 12:09 AM

Originally Posted By: GeorgeB
Originally Posted By: Polyphonist
You've left out quite a bit of common repertoire I can think of; Mendelssohn for one. There are easily orchestras for at least 100 concertos.

Maybe GeorgeB would like to ask his teacher and list them for us? wink


He's got them on his website. Very impressive though several of them are extremely obscure.

If I wanted to disclose who/where I study with I would have said it in my first post.


Seems a little shady, if you ask me. Why would you tell us about your amazing teacher and then refuse to disclose who he/she is? Wouldn't you be proud to study with someone who supposedly has such a huge performance repertoire?
Posted by: Bobpickle

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/02/13 03:01 AM

Originally Posted By: ronde des sylphes


Posted by: ronde des sylphes

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/02/13 06:08 AM

I'm sure I read somewhere that Grant Johannesen learnt a piano/orchestra version of the Beethoven violin concerto at a day's notice as an emergency stand-in.
Posted by: Tim Adrianson

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/02/13 07:29 AM

ronde -- actually, I remember that event -- and, you're close, but no cigar! The pianist in question was Gunnar Johansen, a Danish pianist and student of Busoni, who was both professor of piano and artist-in-residence at the University of Wisconsin, here in Madison. In addition to pulling that off (I believe with Ormandy and the Philadephia Orchestra), he recorded ALL the piano music of Bach and Busoni, in some cases using a special two-manual piano that he himself directed to be built. Very well could be a candidate for the largest performing repertoire, now that I think about it.
Posted by: ronde des sylphes

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/02/13 06:03 PM

Originally Posted By: Tim Adrianson
ronde -- actually, I remember that event -- and, you're close, but no cigar! The pianist in question was Gunnar Johansen, a Danish pianist and student of Busoni, who was both professor of piano and artist-in-residence at the University of Wisconsin, here in Madison.


Ah, thanks for the correction. My memory was a little sketchy!
Posted by: pianojosh23

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/03/13 06:07 AM

Originally Posted By: Tim Adrianson
ronde -- actually, I remember that event -- and, you're close, but no cigar! The pianist in question was Gunnar Johansen, a Danish pianist and student of Busoni, who was both professor of piano and artist-in-residence at the University of Wisconsin, here in Madison. In addition to pulling that off (I believe with Ormandy and the Philadephia Orchestra), he recorded ALL the piano music of Bach and Busoni, in some cases using a special two-manual piano that he himself directed to be built. Very well could be a candidate for the largest performing repertoire, now that I think about it.


He also recorded 53 LPs worth of Liszt.
Posted by: wr

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/03/13 07:47 AM

Originally Posted By: pianojosh23
Originally Posted By: Tim Adrianson
ronde -- actually, I remember that event -- and, you're close, but no cigar! The pianist in question was Gunnar Johansen, a Danish pianist and student of Busoni, who was both professor of piano and artist-in-residence at the University of Wisconsin, here in Madison. In addition to pulling that off (I believe with Ormandy and the Philadephia Orchestra), he recorded ALL the piano music of Bach and Busoni, in some cases using a special two-manual piano that he himself directed to be built. Very well could be a candidate for the largest performing repertoire, now that I think about it.


He also recorded 53 LPs worth of Liszt.


And the complete works of Ignaz Friedman, as well as 20 cassettes of his own compositions. Amazing guy.
Posted by: jawhitti

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/09/13 11:44 AM

Sarah Davis Buechner is touring with a repertoire of like 100 pieces.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/09/13 12:42 PM

Of course, after a while a thread usually veers somewhat off topic. But please note in my OP I specified PERFORMING repertoire(not recorded repertoire)and more importantly was interested in pianists who had the BROADEST(widest range of composers and musical periods).

Some of the pianists mentioned may well rival or surpass Richter in these areas, but OTOH some of the pianists mentioned are very limited in either the breadth of their repertoire or have probably not performed much of their recorded rep in concert.
Posted by: Kuanpiano

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/09/13 02:37 PM

Though he only dabbled in the more "modern" music a bit, Pollini seems to have consistently played all periods pretty well.

(except for his Liszt sonata, yuck !(IMO))
Posted by: Plowboy

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/09/13 03:57 PM

Going to go out on a limb here, as the basis for this answer is just what I read in Amy Fay's memoir, but I believe Franz Liszt is the answer.
Posted by: Hank Drake

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/10/13 08:46 AM

Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
...please note in my OP I specified PERFORMING repertoire(not recorded repertoire)and more importantly was interested in pianists who had the BROADEST(widest range of composers and musical periods).

Some of the pianists mentioned may well rival or surpass Richter in these areas, but OTOH some of the pianists mentioned are very limited in either the breadth of their repertoire or have probably not performed much of their recorded rep in concert.


That's an important distinction. For example, Rubinstein recorded most of Chopin's works except the Etudes - including three sets of Nocturnes, Mazurkas, and Waltzes. But from the concert programs I've reviewed, he only played a selected few in public. But he also played several Etudes which were never recorded.

I think what we'd need is a series of databases that list various pianists and their programs. I only know of a few, such as this (http://gmlile.com/rachdiary/index.aspx) and this (http://vladimirhorowitz.hostzi.com/1_4_Concertography.html).
Posted by: Polyphonist

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/10/13 03:27 PM

Rubinstein never recorded the complete Etudes because he felt there were a few that he could never do justice to. The same thing was true for Horowitz.
Posted by: BDB

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/10/13 04:49 PM

Most pianists of that era felt that they could not do justice to all of the etudes. Nobody felt they could top Lhevinne for the etude in double thirds, for instance, so they did not program it.

Today there are plenty of pianists who cannot play most of them particularly well musically, but feel obliged to play them all, anyway.
Posted by: Polyphonist

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/10/13 10:01 PM

Originally Posted By: BDB
Most pianists of that era felt that they could not do justice to all of the etudes. Nobody felt they could top Lhevinne for the etude in double thirds, for instance, so they did not program it.

Today there are plenty of pianists who cannot play most of them particularly well musically, but feel obliged to play them all, anyway.


Lhevinne's chromatic third technique is astounding even today. smile
Posted by: fledgehog

Re: Which pianist had the largest performing repertoire? - 04/17/13 01:27 AM

Don't know if it' a definitive answer, but I figure Garrick Ohlsson is worth a mention. I believe he has over 80 concerti in his repertoire. He's also recorded the complete works of Chopin, the entirety of the Beethoven sonatas, the entirety of Weber's sonatas, all the Scriabin etudes, the Goldberg variations, substantial amounts of Liszt and Rachmaninoff, the Debussy etudes, a CD of 20th century composers including Bartok, Webern, and I think a few others, and I'm sure a ton of others that have slipped my memory/I'm simply not aware of. And that's just his recorded stuff - he's recorded a fairly small amount of what he's played (for instance, he regularly programs Schubert but no recordings exist of his Schubert).

Artur Rubinstein's repertoire was also rather expansive, although the lack of baroque and his tendency to gravitate towards more conservative/"safe" 20th century repertoire held him back. He (and Horowitz to an extent as well) did give exposure to some composers whose piano pieces weren't given much attention otherwise, like Villa-Lobos and Poulenc, which is admirable. Also similar to Horowitz, he seemed to be less creative and stick more to the warhorses in his old age.

I'd also say Glenn Gould's repertoire was rather extensive, although he played a lot of it begrudgingly and sarcastically (like his dreadful Mozart and Chopin op. 58 recordings).