Hauntingly chilling pieces

Posted by: SethW

Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/13/02 11:00 PM

What do you think are the downright scariest, terrifying, or haunting pieces written for piano. I thought this would be a good topic to speculate on seeing the season. Sonata #9 (Or was I thinking of the eigth?) composed by Scriabin, perhaps? "Scarbo" by Ravel? Even Mikrocosmos? go ahead and reveal it. Feel free to name chamber, orchestral, operatic works with piano. Name celesta, organ, and other keyboard works, if you want.
Posted by: Brendan

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/13/02 11:16 PM

I was terrified of "Il Pensiero" from the second book of Annees de Pelerinage and the 17th Hungarian Rhapsody when I was little.

Scriabin's 10th also freaked me out the first time that I heard it.

Edit: Mahler 6 as well.
Posted by: CrashTest

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/13/02 11:29 PM

Liszt's Mephisto Waltz has some chilling moments, quite devilish! Tchaikovsky's 6th Symphony is absolutely immense in sound, it engulfs me in a cataclymsic fury of passion and somberness. A lot of Messiaen's pieces have a relfective, somber mood to them that makes one think while the music plays. The Op. 27, no. 1 Nocturne of Chopin is very gloomy, and the sarcastic middle section only adds to the mysterious mood. Liszt's etude "Paysage" has a very somber and lyrically intense atmosphere, it is a piece that makes me remember things from the far past- this one gets my vote as most atmospheric. Debussy's "Voiles" from preludes Bk. I is also a dark and somberly majestic (what choice of words, but it is very true!), and his feux d'artice is scary in the sense that the piece is very "Cold" emotionally, no real substance besides the various figurations.
Posted by: mkesfahani

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/13/02 11:59 PM

Yes, I second Mephisto Waltz. One song (not piece) that immediately came to mind was Nachtens (Night Visions) by Brahms for SATB choir and piano that I sang last year or so.

Mike
Posted by: jeffylube

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 02:21 AM

Definitely the 2nd movement of the Bartok piano concerto #1...
Posted by: StanSteel

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 03:31 AM

Scriabin's Sonata #6
Posted by: da 6th finger

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 06:11 AM

Liszt's Petrach sonnets 104 and 123
Posted by: mrenaud

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 10:01 AM

Khachaturian, piano concerto, 2nd movement. The melody itself is haunting, and the orchestration enhances that greatly, especially the bass clarinet at the beginning and the flexatone somewhere in the middle.

I'd also mention Mahler's 7th (no piano, but haunting as well).
Posted by: Hank Drake

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 01:12 PM

If you're looking for a work to play for Halloween, then Liszt's arrangement of Saint-Saens' Danse Macabre is a sure fire hit.
Posted by: Hank Drake

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 01:26 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by SethW:
What do you think are the downright scariest, terrifying, or haunting pieces written for piano. I thought this would be a good topic to speculate on seeing the season. Sonata #9 (Or was I thiking of the eigth?) composed by Scriabin, perhaps? "[/b]
I would guess you're thinking of the 9th. I don't consider the 8th to be frightening, although it has a certain eerie beauty. The 6th, for me is the most frightening of Scriabin's sonatas. How 'bout that 23 note rolled chord?
Posted by: Nina

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 02:43 PM

 Quote:
The 6th, for me is the most frightening of Scriabin's sonatas. How 'bout that 23 note rolled chord?
Are we talking about scary to hear or scary to play ? :p
Posted by: jazzyd

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 03:28 PM

The final fugue from Bach's "Art of Fugue".
Posted by: Hank Drake

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 03:34 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Nina:
Are we talking about scary to hear or scary to play ? :p [/b]
BOTH!
Posted by: JBryan

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 03:38 PM

Variations on a Theme of Paganini by Rachmaninoff
Posted by: SethW

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 04:11 PM

 Quote:
I would guess you're thinking of the 9th. I don't consider the 8th to be frightening, although it has a certain eerie beauty. The 6th, for me is the most frightening of Scriabin's sonatas. How 'bout that 23 note rolled chord?[/b]
Your correct. I was thinking of the ninth sonata.

Has anyone heard of the Makrokosmos (pardon the minor spelling mistake in the earlier post) for amplified piano? Besides being a really good piece, it has some of the strangest notation I've seen. I don't have a recording, so are their any recommendations if you have knowledge concerning this piece?
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 06:41 PM

Scriabin: Sonata No. 9
Schumann: Haunted Place from Waldscenen
Liszt: Funerialles, Dante Sonata
Chopin: B minor Scherzo, D minor Prelude, Finale from B minor Sonata
Ravel: Le Gibet
Posted by: anor

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 07:07 PM

oh, the beggining of the Liszt sonata in B minor is just so !!!

also the petrouchka's transcription (petrouchka's room) have some very cool rapid passages...

and finally the great scarbo and there`s a ligeti etude called "vertige" that really makes you feel "vertige"
Posted by: kdurling

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 07:34 PM

"Makrokosmos" are by George Crumb. Fascinating composer. Pretty sure they've been recorded, but I don't recall by whom.
Posted by: SethW

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 08:44 PM

You nailed it! I'll see what recordings are available.

Back on topic, Ligeti seems to write lots of stuff that meets the criteria. His Requiem defnitely ranks up there. Organ works by Vierne and Messiaen ( e.g, the "Livre du Saint- Sacrement" [?]) deserve mention.
Posted by: JS

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 10:12 PM

The Makrokosmos has been recorded several times. The recording I know is by (I believe) Paul Jacobs.

If you're just starting out, I'd suggest looking at "Dream Images" - it's one of the easier ones to play, and doesn't require much preparation of the piano.

I'd also suggest George Crumbs "Five Pieces for Piano" and "Little Suite for Christmas" - both are shorter and a bit less daunting than the Makrokosmos, but both are fantastic sets.

Other "scary" pieces might include the Emma Lou Diemer toccata, the Prokofiev Diabolic Suggestion, and a few Bartok pieces. (The third movement from the Op. 14 suite and the last movement of the "Out of Doors" suite come to mind...)
Posted by: .rvaga*

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/14/02 10:51 PM

Berlioz "Symphonie Fantastique"

and. . .

"The Ghost and Mr. Chicken" for pipe organ.

:p
Posted by: aznxk3vi17

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/15/02 12:47 AM

Scarbo, yes, is truly a haunting piece for the piano, both to hear and play. At the end, the FFF climax is truly a vision to behold...

But what about Le gibet? The repeated Bb notes, mimicking the toll of a bell as the corpse of a man hangs in the setting sun... I find that Le gibet is more frightening to hear than Scarbo. The quiet ppp sections with the strange chords that descend is very scary, and the middle section with the despairing melody... truly scary.
Posted by: Ted2

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/15/02 04:28 AM

In 1970 I wrote a group of piano pieces after reading "Lord of the Rings". One in particular, "The Ascent of Mount Doom", sits at the bottom of the pile of my scores in a cupboard. I never play it; it has terrible associations for me and was conceived after a ghastly personal event. I played it privately for five people close to me and terrible misfortunes occurred to each of them. Silly rot I know, but if such coincidences happen a number of times the most hardened sceptics among us become uneasy. It's the only superstition I allow myself.
Posted by: StanSteel

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/16/02 01:01 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Hank Drake:
 Quote:
Originally posted by SethW:
What do you think are the downright scariest, terrifying, or haunting pieces written for piano. I thought this would be a good topic to speculate on seeing the season. Sonata #9 (Or was I thiking of the eigth?) composed by Scriabin, perhaps? "[/b]
I would guess you're thinking of the 9th. I don't consider the 8th to be frightening, although it has a certain eerie beauty. The 6th, for me is the most frightening of Scriabin's sonatas. How 'bout that 23 note rolled chord?[/b]
#6 was also the most frightening according to Scriabin himself, who refused to play it in public for this precise reason.
Posted by: Palindrome

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/16/02 11:52 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Ted2:
In 1970 I wrote a group of piano pieces after reading "Lord of the Rings". One in particular, "The Ascent of Mount Doom", sits at the bottom of the pile of my scores in a cupboard. I never play it; it has terrible associations for me and was conceived after a ghastly personal event. I played it privately for five people close to me and terrible misfortunes occurred to each of them. Silly rot I know, but if such coincidences happen a number of times the most hardened sceptics among us become uneasy. It's the only superstition I allow myself.[/b]
In one of his autobiographical books, Artur Rubinstein recounts a performance of Chopin's 2nd Sonata which revealed to one of the audience that he was dying. After that, Rubinstein never performed the piece in a private residence.

I found the recent reconstructed Chopin prlude, supposedly written when he was feverish, to be very evocative of that state.
Posted by: SethW

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/16/02 12:13 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by JS:
The Makrokosmos has been recorded several times. The recording I know is by (I believe) Paul Jacobs.

If you're just starting out, I'd suggest looking at "Dream Images" - it's one of the easier ones to play, and doesn't require much preparation of the piano.[/b]
Thanks, but I'm just trying to get a recording to permantly put in the collection. I took a look at the "Magic Circle of Infinity" and another from the second set and decided that reading the music is challenging enough.

 Quote:
I'd also suggest George Crumbs "Five Pieces for Piano" and "Little Suite for Christmas" - both are shorter and a bit less daunting than the Makrokosmos, but both are fantastic sets.
[/b] I heard the 'Suite' at the last Cliburn, and it was indeed an interesting piece. Perhaps I will look at that one someday. It appears to be a good piece to learn the art of "plucking."
Posted by: StanSteel

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/16/02 09:16 PM

(non-piano)
Cesar Franck: Le Chasseur Maudit
Posted by: Hank Drake

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/18/02 10:34 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Hank Drake:
The 6th, for me is the most frightening of Scriabin's sonatas. How 'bout that 23 note rolled chord?[/b]
OOPS! I meant the 7th Sonata, that's the one with the rolled chord.

My bad. I must be going senile.
Posted by: Stanza

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/21/02 05:21 PM

Lots of scary ones:

The Erl King. A father rides hard with his sick son through a storm. The "Erl King" voice is in the wind calling to the boy to come to him (die). The boy pleads with his father to save him. At the end the boy dies. I did a sequenced arrangement of this once. It freaked out my kids.

Much of Pictures at an Exhibition.

The Oxcart (visions of cattle straining at the yoke and being whipped to pull harder)
The Gnome
The Old Castle
The Catacombs
and With the Dead in the Tongue of the Dead (the title alone is pretty creepy)

Fingles Cave Overture

"Mars, the bringer of war " from "The Planets" is scary from a "Thousands of soldiers are coming to kill you" point of view.

Finally, for something REALLY scary: "Kenny G plays Barry Manilow's Greatest Hits"

:p
Posted by: CrashTest

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 10/21/02 06:56 PM

Carmina Burana by Carl Orff has some chilling and beautiful moments in it, it is a great adventure in sound. Gregorian chant also has some interesting sounds that can be quite scary when you listen to it late at night! Sometimes I go to sleep listening to Chopin's nocturnes (Claudio Arrau) and some of the hauntingly beautiful melodies creep into my unconscience to the point that I often stay with that piece in my head all day!
Posted by: BeethBaChopin

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 11/19/02 05:09 PM

If I may ask a basic question, why are the pieces you're mentioning scary? How do they scare you? Do they scare everyone? I am guesiign they do since human nature is common, and chords or notes have the same psychological effect (joy, sadness) on people. Or is it the unexpected nature of the progression of the piece that is so terrifying? If not, then what is it?
Posted by: BeethBaChopin

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 11/19/02 05:12 PM

I was thinking to myself and seem to have found a clue to my question of why some pieces scare us. I think it the nature of the chords or nootes combined with an unsettling tempo, like the ones they use in horror movies. If you would like to add, go ahead.
Posted by: BeethBaChopin

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 11/19/02 05:15 PM

Beethove's Appassionata scares me. It bursts into suddern loadness at several unexpected (to a new listener especially) moments.
Posted by: Ted

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 11/19/02 05:47 PM

I find the chord changes e.g. D minor - Bb minor - F# minor, essentially a change of minor harmony four semitones apart, have a very haunting effect on me. Put it this way, if I were to write the equivalent of a ghost story in piano music I would use these changes. These chords also lie on the notes of the bare augmented harmony, which I also find sometimes (though not always) chilling. What a splendidly ominous effect it has in Liszt's Funeral Gondolas.
Posted by: pepper

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 11/21/02 05:54 PM

Prokofiev Piano Concerto #2 -- The end of the first movement, when the orchestra finally returns and pretty much murders the pianist.
Posted by: PianoMuse

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 11/21/02 07:43 PM

Pepper..
Yes! I so much agree! Every time I hear that part I get massive goosebumps. That part is so awesome.

Rachmaninoff's Etude No. 6, op. 39. If you know it is a little red riding hood and the wolf, you can hear er terror, her heart fluttering in the piece. It really is quite frightening, if you think of it from her perspective..
Posted by: PianoMuse

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 11/21/02 08:07 PM

Also, "Threnody for the victims of Hiroshima".

This is honestly the most terrifying, Heart-pounding, frightening piece of music I have heard. My professor played it for class...by the end half of the class were crying out of fear, one girl had to leave the room, and I thought i was honestly going to have a panic attack. It is the most intense music I have ever heard...ecspecially one part, when the violins make it sound like someone shouting "NO! NO!" and it sounds like planes overhead, and sirens,and people shreiking, and your ears are ringing, and things falling...oh god, i cant even begin to describe it.
Posted by: appassionata9

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/16/06 09:55 PM

I think that the first movement of Rachmaninoff's Second (Concerto) is pretty haunting, especially the last few minutes, where the music is wandering in a way. Haunting but gorgeous! I'd expect that kind of thing, since it was a piece composed after he was lifted from his depression. \:\(
Posted by: Kelana

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/17/06 03:13 AM

Allegri's Miserere. Sung by a chamber choir in candlelight in a 13th century chapel in perfect* harmony. Followed by Faure's requiem with an ancient organ and the strings in the antechapel.


*i.e. not tempered
Posted by: Rach.3Freak105

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/17/06 12:50 PM

Lets see...some organ works,
1.Bach's "Fantasia in c minor BWV 562"

2. Bach's Prelude and fugue in f minor BWV 534

3. Arr. Reinhart "I want Jesus to walk with me".

I play "I want Jesus to Walk with Me" and it still gives me the chills when the trumpets on the organ bellow out the melody in sanctuary.

As for piano I have to say Ravel's Le Gibet and rachmaninoff's prelude in c sharp minor and prelude in g sharp minor.
Posted by: -Frycek

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/17/06 04:47 PM

Posted by: apple*

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/17/06 04:50 PM

i wondered what you were going contribute \:D
Posted by: -Frycek

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/17/06 05:03 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by apple*:
i wondered what you were going contribute \:D [/b]
Seriously, William seems to think Chopin's scherzo no 1 is pretty scary. The first few bars (after the big chords) do remind me of evil little clawed creatures scambling to hide themselves in the leaves.
Posted by: kathyk

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/17/06 10:46 PM

I love how these old threads mysteriously revive themselves from time to time.
Posted by: gabytu

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/17/06 11:15 PM

Rachmaninoff's " Isle of the Dead." It never fails to send shivers up and down my spine. I understand it is based on the Dore painting.
One can hear the piercing howls of the dead souls as they are being rowed across the river Styx toward Hades. Magnificent work---but not for the faint of heart. Gaby Tu
Posted by: Arabesque

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/18/06 07:10 AM

Gyorgi Ligeti was comissioned to write some very evocative choral music for the film 2001 a space Oddysey. These compositions for orchestra including chorus are chilling enough for me and anyone else. Listening to this music is like being transported through space in all it's awe, dread and loneliness. The incorporation of the music in the film was masterful and never to be outdone for eery effect.
Posted by: mrenaud

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/18/06 12:08 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Arabesque:
Gyorgi Ligeti was comissioned to write some very evocative choral music for the film 2001 a space Oddysey.[/b]
No, he wasn't, these were originally (and are still) concert works. Kubrick just used them (and without permission, too).
Posted by: I'm Liszt's coffee pal.

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/18/06 12:51 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by JS:
The Makrokosmos has been recorded several times. The recording I know is by (I believe) Paul Jacobs.

[/b]
I have a recording by Robert Shannon, from the George Crumb edition vol. 8.


Oh and good point, because Kubrick got in a spot of trouble for doing that haha
Posted by: kathyk

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/18/06 04:31 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mrenaud:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Arabesque:
Gyorgi Ligeti was comissioned to write some very evocative choral music for the film 2001 a space Oddysey.[/b]
No, he wasn't, these were originally (and are still) concert works. Kubrick just used them (and without permission, too). [/b]
Are you sure about that? Unless he somehow had previously acquired the rights to the music, that would be a law suit waiting to happen and a breach of what most any filmmaker know is basic law - don't use other's materials without first acquiring the right. BTW, Kubrick also used his music in Eyes Wide Shut and The Shining (two other hauntingly chilling movies).
Posted by: Arabesque

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/19/06 12:03 PM

Yes, I stand corrected. The music was not composed specifically for Mr Kubrick's film. Perhaps this may help explain if I may quote from Keyboard magazine:

 Quote:
Ligeti is best known for his extremely beautiful and adventurous choral music, an excerpt of which was featured in the Stanley Kubrick film, 2001: A Space Odyssey. Interestingly, the composer was unaware of the inclusion of his Requiem in the film score until he saw the film in a theater. His use of vocal tone clusters pushed choral technique to the limit, and his awareness of the possibilities of the piano is similarly deep. “On top of Ligeti’s piano were piles of piano etudes, by everyone, from Czerny, Debussy, Chopin, and even Alkan, who was a huge influence on Ligeti,” says Lin. “For a composer to be so familiar with all the literature and still able to compose things that haven’t been done before is amazing to me. It shows that his curiosity is enormous. He expanded into all kinds of styles and techniques, and he found something of his own.”

[/b]
I wonder if any one on the boards has actually studied the forementioned etudes and wether they may be obtained as scores. Where might one listen to performances. I should definitely be interested in this composer's piano works as he aimed to be representative of the piano tradition and yet was interested in the cosmic sciences.

I like that part about him going to the film and suddenly realising it was his music. Did Mr Kubrick get his wrist slapped over that one I wonder? Probably a reimbursed ticket was in order.
Posted by: paul kenyon

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/21/06 12:27 AM

Cowell's Banshee is particularly spooky if you are close to the piano. Fingernails along the windings of the bass strings are spine tingling or something like that.
Posted by: Julia van Beginner-toveen

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 08/21/06 03:13 PM

Yay! First Post!

I'm surprised no one has mentioned "The Sunken Cathedral". I think it's scary.
Posted by: dolce sfogato

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/20/10 07:21 PM

most defenitely 'das Wirtshaus', Winterreise by Schubert, makes me want to run away and enjoy life for as long as it lasts...
Posted by: Brandon_W_T

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/20/10 09:35 PM

We were studying modern composers in music theory.

We listened to "threnody for the victims of Hiroshima"

That was hands down the most terrifying piece of music I have ever listened to!

You can literally hear the bomb sirens, and the explosion, and the screams of women and children... All through the orchestra. It doesn't get more eery than that.
Posted by: Brandon_W_T

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/20/10 09:44 PM

Ah yes for organ.

Dont leave out Bach's Passacaglia in C minor!
Posted by: Kuanpiano

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/20/10 10:10 PM

Creepy:
Scriabin's 9th sonata, Vers la flamme
Liszt:transcendental etude 6 "vision" sometimes...


Sad:
Chopin's C minor nocturne op.48 no.1,
Rachmaninoff's 3rd musical moment
Scriabin's prelude op. 11 no.12
Posted by: Schubertian

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/20/10 10:59 PM

From the piano literature:
Liszt: Nuages gris; La lugubre gondole; Am Grabe R. Wagner
Schumann: Vogel als Prophet
and of course Le Gibet:

Richter, Ravel, Le Gibet

But if you're going for creepy you want the Lieder tradition:

Schubert: Der Zwerg (the all time winner)

Schumann: Die alten, bosen Lieder (I'm conflicted whether this is truly creepy or just extremely bitter)

Der arme Peter (genuinely creepy)

Der Zwerg
bosen Lieder
Der arme Peter
Posted by: jeffreyjones

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/21/10 01:29 AM

Chopin Second Ballade! When the main theme comes back after the explosive Presto, and then just stops.. it's the most unnerving moment of complete mystery. It's easy to lose that by becoming too familiar with it..

Also the middle of Schubert's D. 959 slow movement, in which the music as we know it is suddenly completely abandoned..
Posted by: Samuel1993

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/21/10 01:48 AM

What about Chopin's 'Devil Trill' Prelude? Or Scriabin's Sonata #6?
Posted by: wr

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/21/10 03:36 AM

I find being haunted by long-dead threads full of posts from people I've never heard of to be very creepy.
Posted by: currawong

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/21/10 03:38 AM

Originally Posted By: wr
I find being haunted by long-dead threads full of posts from people I've never heard of to be very creepy.
Me too. And then someone tries to engage one of these long-gone people in conversation and there's no answer...
Posted by: babama

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/21/10 04:20 AM

something in category "other keyboard works" :P

Posted by: ChopinAddict

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/21/10 06:07 PM

Originally Posted By: Samuel1993
What about Chopin's 'Devil Trill' Prelude?


Or the piece that inspired its nickname, Giuseppe Tartini's violin sonata...

Chopin's Suicide Prelude (Op.28 No.18) is also pretty haunting...
Posted by: dolce sfogato

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/22/10 06:04 PM

Brahms op.118/2 in A, pfff, Chopin Prélude op.45, id., and funnily enough: Liszt Les jeux d'eau à la Villa d'Este, finally, Statius Muller Despedida, from Antillian Dances, wow
Posted by: Mark_C

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/22/10 06:33 PM

Originally Posted By: wr
I find being haunted by long-dead threads full of posts from people I've never heard of to be very creepy.

Maybe the answer is for people to stay around longer. smile
Posted by: lisztonian

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/23/10 03:07 AM

None of you have even come close to this -


Posted by: Pogorelich.

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/23/10 12:06 PM

God I hate black angels. For me, personally, it's one of the worst pieces of.. I can't even call it music.. ever written.

Of course that's just me. Every time I try to listen to it (to understand) it feels like somebody is sticking needles into my brain and ears. Ugh.
Posted by: stores

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/23/10 01:07 PM

Originally Posted By: AngelinaPogorelich
God I hate black angels. For me, personally, it's one of the worst pieces of.. I can't even call it music.. ever written.

Of course that's just me. Every time I try to listen to it (to understand) it feels like somebody is sticking needles into my brain and ears. Ugh.


I agree wholeheartedly.
Posted by: Brandon_W_T

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/23/10 02:09 PM

I too, dislike it. Its very bad sounding. It sure is a workout to play, but just isn't very musical.
Posted by: babama

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/23/10 07:05 PM

"Classical instruments" being used in such a way as above always makes me laugh a bit.

It's like.. there's a whole world of electronic music out there, but these people just HAVE TO use dry "classical instruments" to get some kind expirimental sound effects... I guess to make it appear more 'serious' than by using electronic tools... but the result is simply unlistenable noise.
Posted by: wr

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/24/10 01:56 AM

Originally Posted By: babama
"Classical instruments" being used in such a way as above always makes me laugh a bit.

It's like.. there's a whole world of electronic music out there, but these people just HAVE TO use dry "classical instruments" to get some kind expirimental sound effects... I guess to make it appear more 'serious' than by using electronic tools... but the result is simply unlistenable noise.


Strange how people actually do listen to the unlistenable.
Posted by: lisztonian

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/25/10 01:03 AM

Originally Posted By: wr
Originally Posted By: babama
"Classical instruments" being used in such a way as above always makes me laugh a bit.

It's like.. there's a whole world of electronic music out there, but these people just HAVE TO use dry "classical instruments" to get some kind expirimental sound effects... I guess to make it appear more 'serious' than by using electronic tools... but the result is simply unlistenable noise.


Strange how people actually do listen to the unlistenable.



If your being sarcastic, I agree.
Posted by: Capricorn

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/25/10 04:11 AM

I think Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C#m is pretty freaky.
Posted by: Hedgeman26

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/25/10 10:04 AM

Speaking of Rach, I would place his Op.23 No. 7 Prelude in C minor near the top of my "hauntingly chilling" list.
Posted by: hophmi

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/25/10 11:12 AM

Solo piano: Scriabin 9, Scriabin, Op. 74 preludes (especially No. 2), Chopin Prelude Op.28, No.2, Chopin Winter Wind, Chopin last movement of the Bb minor Sonata, beginning of the Liszt B minor Sonata, second movement of Haydn D major sonata (usually No. 35 in the old editions), Prokofiev Vision Fugitive No.1 and 10. Just off the top of my head.
Posted by: Mark_C

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/25/10 01:26 PM

Originally Posted By: hophmi
.....second movement of Haydn D major sonata (usually No. 35 in the old editions)....

Good get!
I'm assuming you mean the one that's now usually called #35 or Hob. XVI (had to look it up to know that).

We wouldn't usually think of that movement because the rest of the sonata is so 'light.' It was the first Haydn sonata I played, and yes, the slow movement is pretty weird. smile
"Haunting" fits it to a T. It's the first piece that ever made me feel entranced while I was playing it.

P.S. I take it nobody is too spooked out any more by this good old thread. ha
Posted by: Damon

Re: Hauntingly chilling pieces - 05/25/10 08:10 PM

What, no Chopin sonata?!