Mozart

Posted by: CrashTest

Mozart - 11/13/01 08:55 PM

I was taking a look at the Henle version of the Mozart Fantasy k. 397, and noticed the 4th note, a D, is not tied like it is in the other edition, but it is played as an octave. How could I verify which one is the correct (tie or not)? Also, In music where the composer put few marks of expression besides a p or f here or there, to what extent can one put in crescendos and the like without leaving from the intention? (This seems like one of those unanswerable questions that depend on taste, but there must be some limit on the freedom).

What is a good edition for the Mozart Concerti? I don't think Henle has them, so where should I look for a urtext-type quality edition? Which concerti have cadenzas written by Mozart, or do none of them have this feature? Thanks!
Posted by: MacDuff

Re: Mozart - 11/14/01 01:19 PM

The Broder edition of the D Minor Fantasy, K. 397, gives the ties in parentheses for measures 1-6. In measure seven, the lowest notes are held or "finger pedalled." The editor, therefore, is of the opinion that this concept should have been applied to the opening measures, also. I would tend to use pedal for the whole passage, which obliterates any finger pedalling.

I feel the performer should add his own dynamics to Mozart's indications within "good taste." (Now, define good taste!)

For the concerti, the Schirmer editions are commonly used. Peters has several versions of most of the concerti, some labelled as "urtext" in their catalog. Many people feel the orchestral reductions are arranged better in the Peters editions than the Schirmer ones.

I'm not sure, but there may be a hard-bound "critical edition" by Henle of Mozart's works that would have the concerti as a conductor's score with full orchestra parts (this kind of edition is only found in large music libraries). If so, you could check the solo piano part of other editions against this one.

[ November 14, 2001: Message edited by: MacDuff ]
Posted by: Vid

Re: Mozart - 11/14/01 01:19 PM

Several concertos do have cadenzas written for them by Mozart(I just don't happen to remember which). Some do not, and have had cadenzas written for them by such composers as Beethoven and Brahms. Be aware that some additions will insert a cadenza not written by Mozart. I believe there are bonafide Mozart cadenzas published in one volume out there somewhere. For fun why not try writing your own? ;\)
Posted by: SR

Re: Mozart - 11/14/01 02:03 PM

If you are near a university library try the Nueve Mozart Ausgave (NMA) I'm not sure of my spelling on this. It is a 20 or so volume set of books containing everything known to be by Mozart and some questionable compositions also. It is taken from the original manuscripts in most cases or from the earliest known hand written or published copy where the manuscript in Mozarts hand has disappeared. It is considered by Mozart scholars and the Mozarteum to be the bible.

Regards

Steve