Music Schools/Conservatories in the US

Posted by: Brendan

Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/02/06 11:29 PM

Since this topic has come up several times recently, here are some quick links to some conservatories in the US that have recognized piano departments. Feel free to add any ones that I might have forgotten.

Juilliard - http://www.juilliard.edu
Curtis - http://www.curtis.edu
Manhattan - http://www.msmnyc.edu/
Mannes - http://www.mannes.newschool.edu/index.jsp
Cincinnati - http://www.ccm.uc.edu
Oberlin - http://www.oberlin.edu
CIM - http://www.cim.edu
Eastman - http://www.esm.rochester.edu/
Indiana - http://www.music.indiana.edu/
Rice - http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~musi/
TCU - http://www.music.tcu.edu/
UMKC - http://conservatory.umkc.edu/default.asp
KU - http://www.ku.edu/~sfa/mad/
USC - http://www.usc.edu/music/
UCLA - http://www.music.ucla.edu/
UT Austin - http://www.music.utexas.edu/
UNT - http://www.music.unt.edu/
Stony Brook - http://naples.cc.sunysb.edu/CAS/Music.nsf
Colburn - http://www.colburnschool.edu/about.htm
Peabody - http://www.peabody.jhu.edu/home.php
Yale - http://www.yale.edu/yalemus/
Boston Conservatory - http://www.bostonconservatory.edu/
Arizona State University - http://music.asu.edu/
Ann Arbor - http://www.music.umich.edu/
Posted by: Opus_Maximus

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/03/06 12:18 AM

NEC - www.newenglandconservatory.edu
Posted by: PianoJohn

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/03/06 12:32 AM

Lynn University (Harid Conservatory) www.lynn.edu/music
University of Maryland www.music.umd.edu
Utah State University www.usu.edu/music (Gary Amano is here)
Posted by: curry

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/03/06 05:57 PM

Shenandoah University- www.su.edu
Posted by: Monsieur_Pichon

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/03/06 07:10 PM

This forum is entire USA? just curiosity...
Posted by: Kreisler

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/03/06 10:08 PM

No, it's just that we've had a lot of requests regarding US schools. We do have members all over the world, though.
Posted by: Derulux

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/04/06 03:11 PM

Yeah, we've got people from Sweden, South America, Australia and New Jersey, just to name a few. :p ;\)
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/04/06 11:50 PM

Meadows School of Music at SMU (Southern Methodist in Dallas). Their top piano professor won a national award for teacher of the year at the collegiate level.
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/04/06 11:54 PM

A correction, please. After checking back at their website, Carol Leone was honored as the top teacher in Texas. So I stand corrected -- it was not national. Next time I'll be sure to double check before I post anything!
Posted by: Stormcrow

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/04/06 11:55 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Derulux:
Yeah, we've got people from Sweden, South America, Australia and New Jersey, just to name a few. :p ;\) [/b]
Maybe we should do a poll and see exactly how many there are.
Posted by: virtuoso_735

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/05/06 07:33 PM

San Francisco Conservatory of Music - http://www.sfcm.edu/index.aspx
Posted by: PianoMuse

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/14/06 04:25 PM

Wow, I can't believe some of you guys are still on here!
I wouldn't count my school as "internationall recognized", but I went to Eastern University.

eastern
Posted by: kokomo61

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/16/06 09:35 PM

What about Berklee?

Berklee School of Music

Musicians Institute

MI
Posted by: Lemon Scented

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/19/06 06:05 AM

Seems like I often see Northwestern (Evanston IL)on these lists:

http://music.northwestern.edu/indexf.html
Posted by: lol_nl

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/22/06 11:46 AM

Which do you think are the best and how good do you have to be to enter them?

I have heard of Juillard as a very good conservatory, as well as Curtis. And I heard Leon Fleisher teaches at Baltimore.
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/22/06 07:33 PM

Of course Curtis is considered the best - and not only is the faculty top-notch, but if you are accepted, then it is a full-ride, tuition free for as long as you are there. All you need to do is figure out your living arrangements, and I think they assist you with that (they have no dorms). Julliard is probably the next in line, right up there. However, I believe the reputation has gone down just slightly since they have lost some of the most famous teachers in recent years. Also, many schools are gaining in reputation and giving Julliard some competition. Eastman and Peabody are also top of the line. As far as gaining entrance...in piano you would be expected to pretty much know most or all Chopin Etudes, numerous Beethoven Sonatas and have studied all Bach P&F's. Then just add on to that many major works by Chopin, Brahms, Liszt, Schubert, Schumann, and 20th century composers, not to mention Debussy & Ravel. You get the picture. The competition for these schools is brutal. But that doesn't mean you can't work toward it! I will say that (and this is from a violin professor) that if you haven't been admitted to Curtis by the time you are a teenager - even as early as 14, 15 or 16, you may as well forget it. Oh, and except for Curtis they are very expensive to attend. What is encouraging is there are so many other very good schools in the US with fantastic teachers and very good programs. You can make alot of progress there - and then follow your dream and attend grad school at Julliard, Eastman or another top conservatory.
Posted by: lol_nl

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/23/06 11:17 AM

I see. But are Eastman and Peabody etc. not also of "high quality"? Isn't it hard to enter them? If they require that you should be able to play all Chopin etudes, I can forget it...

Could you compare some US conservatories with some European (preferably Dutch)?
Posted by: BassoonyPianoKevn

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/23/06 11:39 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by lol_nl:
I see. But are Eastman and Peabody etc. not also of "high quality"? Isn't it hard to enter them? If they require that you should be able to play all Chopin etudes, I can forget it...

Could you compare some US conservatories with some European (preferably Dutch)? [/b]
Oh boy. I just had my audition at Peabody and I only know one Chopin etude which I prepared for my auditon that day. I wouldn't think that you would need to know all of them, but maybe more than one? Well I have to admit I felt kind of sick because one of pieces the undergrad candidate after me was playing the Berg Sonata.

Well My teacher talked to his old teacher who was there judging and he said I played good, but of course there are many others I am willing to bet played much better than I did.
Posted by: pianojerome

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/26/06 01:03 AM

Disclaimer: I'm young, unexperienced, and slightly naive.

I don't believe that one could say, for all people, that School X is the best school. It is very personal. Here are some factors that, at least for me, are important (in no particular order):

-- location
-- faculty
-- living arrangements
-- practice facilities
-- size
-- social atmosphere
-- intellectual atmosphere
-- tuition / financial aid


So, what if you can't stand living in the city? What if you can't stand living in a "cut-throat", intensely-competitve community? Then are Juilliard and Curtis really good schools for you?

What if you really don't feel like you could do well practicing on carpy pianos all the time? Then is Eastman really a good school for you?

What if you really like a smaller school, with a more friendly environment? What if you want to be on a very liberal campus? Then maybe is Oberlin a good choice?

What if you want to be on a really big campus that's maybe more conservative?

What if you met one of the professors at, say, Northwestern University, and you really clicked? What if you met one of the professors at, say, Cleveland Institute of Music, and you couldn't stand each other?

What if your family lives on the West Coast, and you know that you really will be miserable and you won't do well far from home? What if your family lives on the East Coast?

What if you will work best far away from your family?

What if you hate the cold weather, and you love hot weather? What if you hate the hot weather, but you love cold weather?


There are so many factors. Again, I'm very young and inexperienced, and probably very naive, but I just don't agree that "This school is the best" and "That school is better than this other school" for everybody.

Who knows? Maybe for certain people Juilliard and Curtis would be the worst[/b] schools to go to. Or maybe for certain other people, they really would be the best. It really depends on the student.
Posted by: lol_nl

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/26/06 08:13 AM

And what if ONLY looking at the teaching skills there, so how good the professors are etc.?
Posted by: pianojerome

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/26/06 10:22 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by lol_nl:
And what if ONLY looking at the teaching skills there, so how good the professors are etc.? [/b]
It's very personal. Professor X may be a really great professor, but if you don't get along with him, he's the worst professor in the world for you. Professor Y may be considered a really great professor, but if he's very dogmatic about his interpretations, and you have very different interpretations, then you aren't going to benefit from him as much as you could from a more leniant professor. Professor Z may teach at a school that is not even on this list, but if he really bonds with the student, and he has a way of explaining things that is perfectly clear to the student, and he knows how to assign pieces well and explain different ways of practicing that are suitable for this particular student, then actually he may be the best teacher for this student, or at least much better than those teachers at Juilliard, Curtis, etc.


The professors are people, just as the students are people. It's really important (I think) that the professor and the student are a right match for each other.


(I also think that it is a little naive to think that there are a handful of professors who are better than the (I'm guessing this number) hundreds of thousands of other piano teachers around the country, just because they teach at Juilliard or Curtis. In fact, there are many, many, many good teachers who don't teach at those two schools, who may be just as "good" in general, and who may even be, for a particular student, "better".)
Posted by: Kreisler

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/26/06 12:36 PM

Teaching skill isn't on a linear scale.

I had a discussion with Ann Schein once where she mentioned that she only works with students who are already technically and musically proficient. She said she does that because she doesn't know how to teach those who aren't. Some teachers are good at getting students from S to W - that's Ann Schein. But if you're at J, then it takes a completely different kind of teacher to get you to S.

Unfortunately, the teachers who do best at building technique and musicality tend to be less known than teachers who are more comfortable refining it.
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/28/06 12:48 PM

PianoJerome -- very excellent points and everyone considering higher education in music should keep your list in mind.
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/28/06 12:52 PM

I would like to clarify my earlier post -- I was in a hurry and so didn't really edit it properly. I didn't mean to say that one had to *know* all of the Chopin Etudes, but I think those who end up at Julliard or one of the other top schools have probably studied all or most of them at some point in their years at the piano.
Posted by: SillySushiBear

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/28/06 10:01 PM

Has anyone heard of Wichita State University as presitigious for music?
Posted by: patlou

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/01/06 03:15 PM

http://www.conservatoire.gouv.qc.ca/montreal/index.asp
Posted by: patlou

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/01/06 03:17 PM

Oups sorry, I just saw that it was US only..!
Posted by: Heretic

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/01/06 11:09 PM

Someone said Curtis is the most prestigious in the world even beyond Juilliard but from my experience I have known of several people transferring from Curtis to Juilliard but never the opposite way around. This seemed to suggest to me that Juilliard is #1 but I don't know, maybe it just has that reputation from being in NYC.

I mean don't get me wrong both are probably #1 and #2 in my opinion and I have heard horror stories about entrance to Curtis, for example they do call backs and sometimes you have to audition as many as 3 times, but I just think that Juilliard is still considered/viewed by most as the epitome of musical conservatories in the world.

I wonder what you all think?
Posted by: pianojerome

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/01/06 11:16 PM

For what it's worth, in terms of undergrad, I've heard that Cleveland Institute of Music is more prestigious/better than Juilliard.

Not that that really means much. There are lots of "best" "most prestigious" schools, depending on whom you ask, and whom they have asked.
Posted by: Heretic

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/02/06 12:02 AM

Yea definitely all of those top schools like Oberlin, NEC, Peabody etc are all highly prestigious and its not to put anything bad on them but it was just my 2 cents worth that from m personal experience from talking to accomplished pianists over the years that Juilliard seems to be king, I have lurked for a while here and I think the guy Koji Attwood who posts here himself went to Curtis and then transferred to Juilliard where he is still studying.
Posted by: Lemon Pledge

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/03/06 10:44 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Heretic:
Someone said Curtis is the most prestigious in the world even beyond Juilliard but from my experience I have known of several people transferring from Curtis to Juilliard but never the opposite way around. This seemed to suggest to me that Juilliard is #1 but I don't know, maybe it just has that reputation from being in NYC.

[/b]
Curtis is more selective than Juilliard. The lack of pianists "transferring" from Juilliard to Curtis can be explained by the fact that Curtis tends to admit younger students and has no graduate program in piano.

Interesting fact about Juilliard: as much as people complain about the place, no one seems to leave voluntarily. Undergrad pianists auditioning for Masters programs, or graduate pianists auditioning for DMA programs, they all stayed at the Jailyard if they were accepted. I can only think of one exception (a woman who switched to Peabody for her Masters to study with Fleisher) out of 20 or 30 cases. Also, as far I could tell, it seemed rare for a student accepted at Juilliard to be rejected by another North American conservatory (except Curtis).

But none of that really matters. Here's the important point: it's extremely unhealthy to worry about prestige when you're selecting a school. So many students obsess over it; they feel they need that validation from a famous and selective institution, to prove their worth to themselves and others. It's easy to empathize with this attitude, given the competitive realities of the profession, but it can be very harmful if it prevents the student from making good choices. Over the long run, the esteem of alma mater doesn't matter. Don't worry about which school is "best." Ignore rankings. Find the combination of instructor, environment, cost, location and student body that is most conducive to your personal and professional growth. Easier said than done, of course. Good luck.
Posted by: Igor Stravinsky

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/03/06 05:09 PM

http://www.musicinst.org
This is where my son studies the piano -- and this is the moment to say thank you to Kreisler who recommended a teacher there. We are more than happy.
(BTW Kreisler, I tried to thank you personally but your PM box was full and rejected my message.)
Posted by: Heretic

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/03/06 10:00 PM

Lemon you're actually absolutely right...I forgot about 3 important things:

1. Curtis does not accept applicants over age 21 I believe it is? That means every single person in Curtis must be under that age

2. Curtis has no graduate program and

3. Juilliard's graduate program is FREE (as far as I know) which means I assume it's natural for someone to transfer from Curtis (free) after they're done with their undergrad to Juilliard Grad School (free) for a fully free education of the highest order. I am assuming that is what Koji did...
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/04/06 07:59 PM

I would like to share a music conservatory/university where if you get accepted as a music performance major and therefore are probably awarded a nominal scholarship, you get in-state tuition, even if you are not a resident of that state. It is University of North Texas, which has one of the top music schools in the country.
Posted by: Heretic

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/05/06 02:03 AM

How hard is it to get in opus??

by the way is your name referring to Brahm's amazing opus by any chance
Posted by: Shosti

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/05/06 01:24 PM

Heretic- careful with the word 'transfer-' I know what you really mean, but transferring usually refers to leaving in the middle of a degree, a few years into it, and finishing somewhere else, whereas Koji I believe just got a degree at Curtis and then went to Juilliard for graduate work.
Posted by: Heretic

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/05/06 02:33 PM

you're right shosti
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/05/06 09:36 PM

oh yes, Heretic. Opus 119 is my fav. Univ. of North Texas is not easy to get into. I think it depends on what major you are. They are No. 1 in Jazz in the country. But their classical music dept. is also very well respected and they have some great teachers. It is a huge school -- around 1,600 music majors! Yikes. So always something to listen to or a group to play in. My violinist son is most likely going to attend there, and he'll be paying what a Texas native pays. Pretty good deal!
Posted by: Piano World

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/05/06 09:46 PM

http://www.pianoworld.com/music-schools.htm
Posted by: CarlosKleiberist

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/08/06 05:31 PM

it looks like most of the top music schools are listed already...

but let's not forget some of these top notch professors who may not be at those world class institutes.

http://www.scu.edu/cas/music/facultyandstaff/hans_boepple.cfm - Hans Boepple at Santa Clara University

http://www.music.ucsb.edu/MusicFaculty/Asche01.htm
- Charles Asche at University of California, Santa Barbara
Posted by: Prophetic

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/10/06 05:12 PM

How is Sarah Lawrence? Wesleyean? (2 on the top of my list right now)

Thanks for compiling this list.
Posted by: lol_nl

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/11/06 05:02 PM

Do you also have to learn other subject at conservatory, such as English, Maths, History, etc.? Wouldn't that be a lot and very difficult to combine?

What do you all have to learn at conservatory (weekly private lessons, theory, chamber music, and?)
Posted by: pianojerome

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/12/06 12:16 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by lol_nl:
Do you also have to learn other subject at conservatory, such as English, Maths, History, etc.? Wouldn't that be a lot and very difficult to combine?
[/b]
University of Michigan requires (for a piano performance major):

1 semester of College Writing (4 credits)
1 semester of Argumentative Writing (3-4 credits)
2 semesters of French, German, or Italian (8 credits)
At least 15 credits of other non-music courses
Posted by: WCSMinorCircuit

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/12/06 11:32 PM

Most conservatories are making the requirements include what Sam said (more or less). Depends where you go really. Usually if you go to a school associated with a university you'll have to do courses that don't necessarily pertain to music.
Posted by: curry

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/13/06 06:59 PM

If the school meets state and national accredation for colleges and universities, then the academic course work is the same as for any other undergraduate degree. You will have to take credits in Math, English language, Sciences, Humanities, P.E, Liberal Arts, etc.
I went to a college and conservatory of music for my under grad degree, and had to take all of the above in addition to the core music program for music ed/piano performance, and that was back in 1982.
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/13/06 07:23 PM

It really varies from school to school. The best way to get a feel for what courses are required (both in music and general education courses) is to go to the conservatory or university website and search for the coursework for your particular instrument and degree path. A Bachelor of Music is very different from a Bachelor of Arts, for example.
Posted by: musicsdarkangel

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/24/06 08:44 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Prophetic:
How is Sarah Lawrence? Wesleyean? (2 on the top of my list right now)

Thanks for compiling this list. [/b]
I applied and got into Cleveland, Indiana, Oberlin, Lawrence, Northern, and Wesleyan, and had about 1-2 teachers from each school to have a lesson with, and found by far my favorite at Illinois Wesleyan.

I am currently studying there now with Lawrence Campbell.

He is truly remarkable... as amazing of a teacher as a pianist! I see internationally renowned pianists come here and perform all the time, and I have not seen one concert as impressive or musical as his was last year. If you want to know more, e-mail me sranney@iwu.edu or kingsha@yahoo.com
Posted by: computerpro3

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 04/19/06 08:51 PM

how about the Benjamin T. Rome School of music? One of their professors, Marilyn Neeley was a Cliburn and Geneva medalist.....I will be visiting there tomorrow

http://music.cua.edu/

Neeley:

 Quote:
Marilyn Neeley (B.M., M.A., University of Southern California), professor of piano and faculty adviser in chamber music and vocal accompanying. Prize winner in the Van Cliburn, Leventritt, Michaels, and Geneva International Competitions with solo appearances with over one hundred symphony orchestras, including the Chicago Symphony, the Boston Symphony, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Recipient of the Outstanding Alumna of the School of Music and Distinguished Alumna of the University awards from the University of Southern California. Recent Convention Artist for the Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Georgia, Oregon, and Alabama State Music Teachers Associations. Recent lectures for Cleveland, Savannah, West Virginia, California, and Philadelphia Music Teachers Associations, Georgia Music Educators, and The Juilliard School. Recorded the complete Beethoven violin and piano sonatas with Robert Gerle and received an Emmy award for their videotape of these for Public Television. Released a compact disc of solo piano music of Brahms, Mozart, Debussy, and Liszt. Teaches on the summer faculty of Brevard Music Center in North Carolina.
And their Assistant Piano Professor

 Quote:
Ivo Kaltchev (D.M.A. Rutgers University; M.M. Yale University; B.M., Sofia State Academy of Music; additional study at F. Liszt Hochschule für Musik, Weimar, Germany), assistant professor of piano. Adviser for the M.M. in Piano Performance degree program. Faculty member of the World Piano Pedagogy Conference. Visiting piano professor, China Conservatory of Music, Beijing, China. Bösendorfer artist. Prizewinner of international piano competitions in Italy, United States, and Bulgaria. Critically acclaimed recital and solo concerto appearances in leading musical centers throughout the world, including Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, Kennedy Center, Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory Hall, Beijing China Conservatory of Music, St. Petersburg State Philharmonic Hall, Warsaw National Philharmonic Hall, Tel Aviv Museum Recanati Auditorium, Mendelssohn Hochschule für Musik (Germany), Teatro di Verdi (Italy), Bulgaria Great Hall, Cooper Union Great Hall, and Richardson Auditorium of Princeton University. Performances at the Sofia Music Weeks International Festival, Toledo International Music Festival (Spain), First Mozart International Music Festival (Frankfurt, Germany), French Music Festival at Lincoln Center, and Rutgers SummerFest, and others. Has been a featured artist at New York’s WNYC and WQXR radio stations, Radio Free Europe, Radio Moscow, Bulgarian National TV and Radio, among many others. Has collaborated as a chamber musician with pianist Ilana Vered, tenor Frederick Urrey, Essex Quartet, and members of the New York Philharmonic, the Boston Symphony, the National Symphony Orchestra, and Royal Concertgebouw. Recording artist for the Bulgarian label GEGA NEW. Discography includes an all-Charles Griffes compact disc (hailed by the French magazine Diapason as “the most accomplished interpretation known until now”) and a compact disc with the world premiere of piano works by Florent Schmitt, in addition to other recordings for Yamaha Disklavier, MSF Records, and World Music Marimba labels. Recipient of pedagogy awards for teaching excellence from the Piano Teachers Society of America and the Princeton Steinway Society. Active as an adjudicator and has presented lectures, workshops, and master classes in Europe, China, Virgin Islands, and the United States. Has served on the faculties of Westminster Choir College, Sofia State Academy of Music, and Sofia State University (Bulgaria).

anyone know anything about the school?
Posted by: wk

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 05/04/06 07:39 AM

I taught at Wichita State and know several of the
instrumental faculty there. It is a fine department, but I would not call it prestigious. Julie Bees teaches piano there, a merititious pianist.
Posted by: ejsauter

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 05/26/06 01:26 PM

Notre Dame at http://www.nd.edu/~music/
Posted by: B flat

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/05/06 09:42 PM

Westminster Choir College. http://www.rider.edu/westminster

It's got an accredited piano department. I don't know how it stacks up next to the other schools mentioned, but I think it has a decent reputation.

Pianojerome, great points! Some of your points are reasons that I am studying where I am.
Posted by: JOEJAZZ

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/07/06 01:12 PM

I am so surprised that the very best school is not part of any of your lists. The one that should have been the first Berklee College of Music. The very Best in the whole world
Posted by: Hugh Sung

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/17/06 01:04 AM

Just a quick note to correct the poster who said that 21 was the absolute cutoff age for Curtis applicants - that's not quite correct, as we do accept vocal students up to age 26, opera students and composers up to age 28, and several other instruments like organ, harp, viola, etc. at a slightly higher age bracket (age 23). Also, master degrees are offered in the opera department. Please refer to our catalogue for complete admission details, available as a PDF download from our site at www.curtis.edu.
If anyone has any Curtis-related questions, please feel free to either post them here in the forum or email me directly. I'm the Director of Student Recitals and Instrumental Accompaniment here at Curtis. Looking forward to making many of your acquaintances here on the forum!
All the best,
Hugh Sung

Posted by: Thracozaag

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/24/06 03:45 PM

How old were you when Madame S. started torturing you there? Nine? \:D

koji
Posted by: Maximus

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 07/12/06 04:15 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by computerpro3:
how about the Benjamin T. Rome School of music? One of their professors, Marilyn Neeley was a Cliburn and Geneva medalist.....I will be visiting there tomorrow

http://music.cua.edu/

Neeley:

 Quote:
Marilyn Neeley (B.M., M.A., University of Southern California), professor of piano and faculty adviser in chamber music and vocal accompanying. Prize winner in the Van Cliburn, Leventritt, Michaels, and Geneva International Competitions with solo appearances with over one hundred symphony orchestras, including the Chicago Symphony, the Boston Symphony, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Recipient of the Outstanding Alumna of the School of Music and Distinguished Alumna of the University awards from the University of Southern California. Recent Convention Artist for the Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Georgia, Oregon, and Alabama State Music Teachers Associations. Recent lectures for Cleveland, Savannah, West Virginia, California, and Philadelphia Music Teachers Associations, Georgia Music Educators, and The Juilliard School. Recorded the complete Beethoven violin and piano sonatas with Robert Gerle and received an Emmy award for their videotape of these for Public Television. Released a compact disc of solo piano music of Brahms, Mozart, Debussy, and Liszt. Teaches on the summer faculty of Brevard Music Center in North Carolina.
And their Assistant Piano Professor

 Quote:
Ivo Kaltchev (D.M.A. Rutgers University; M.M. Yale University; B.M., Sofia State Academy of Music; additional study at F. Liszt Hochschule für Musik, Weimar, Germany), assistant professor of piano. Adviser for the M.M. in Piano Performance degree program. Faculty member of the World Piano Pedagogy Conference. Visiting piano professor, China Conservatory of Music, Beijing, China. Bösendorfer artist. Prizewinner of international piano competitions in Italy, United States, and Bulgaria. Critically acclaimed recital and solo concerto appearances in leading musical centers throughout the world, including Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, Kennedy Center, Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory Hall, Beijing China Conservatory of Music, St. Petersburg State Philharmonic Hall, Warsaw National Philharmonic Hall, Tel Aviv Museum Recanati Auditorium, Mendelssohn Hochschule für Musik (Germany), Teatro di Verdi (Italy), Bulgaria Great Hall, Cooper Union Great Hall, and Richardson Auditorium of Princeton University. Performances at the Sofia Music Weeks International Festival, Toledo International Music Festival (Spain), First Mozart International Music Festival (Frankfurt, Germany), French Music Festival at Lincoln Center, and Rutgers SummerFest, and others. Has been a featured artist at New York’s WNYC and WQXR radio stations, Radio Free Europe, Radio Moscow, Bulgarian National TV and Radio, among many others. Has collaborated as a chamber musician with pianist Ilana Vered, tenor Frederick Urrey, Essex Quartet, and members of the New York Philharmonic, the Boston Symphony, the National Symphony Orchestra, and Royal Concertgebouw. Recording artist for the Bulgarian label GEGA NEW. Discography includes an all-Charles Griffes compact disc (hailed by the French magazine Diapason as “the most accomplished interpretation known until now”) and a compact disc with the world premiere of piano works by Florent Schmitt, in addition to other recordings for Yamaha Disklavier, MSF Records, and World Music Marimba labels. Recipient of pedagogy awards for teaching excellence from the Piano Teachers Society of America and the Princeton Steinway Society. Active as an adjudicator and has presented lectures, workshops, and master classes in Europe, China, Virgin Islands, and the United States. Has served on the faculties of Westminster Choir College, Sofia State Academy of Music, and Sofia State University (Bulgaria).

anyone know anything about the school? [/b]
Kalchev is good friends with my professor. I don't know much about him, but hear that he's a little odd...he's also apparently very close to his doctoral professor at yale, Boris Berman. So that connection is very powerful.
Posted by: TheMadMan86

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 07/20/06 11:37 AM

How does Chicago College of the Performing arts rank?????????? the CCPA
Posted by: jollyroger

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 07/20/06 11:44 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by JOEJAZZ:
I am so surprised that the very best school is not part of any of your lists. The one that should have been the first Berklee College of Music. The very Best in the whole world [/b]
Right on Joejazz. I'm a graduate from 1976 with a degree in composition. Berklee is indeed a fine school, and not limited to jazz alone. As part of my degree program, my graduation portfolio contained many chorales, madrigals, motets, fugues, a piano sonata, a full orchestral piece and numerous other classical works in addition to all of my small, mid and large ensemble jazz creations.

Best regards,
Roger
Posted by: Sokolov_thelegend

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 07/23/06 11:29 AM

what are the most inspiring professors in the schools like Yale, Indiana, Eastman or Peabody?
What are you guys opinions?
Posted by: CarlosKleiberist

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 07/29/06 06:05 AM

Boris Berman at Yale... Menahem Pressler at Indiana... Nelita True at Eastman... Leon Fleisher at Peabody... no?
Posted by: Sokolov_thelegend

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 07/29/06 02:23 PM

IC. THx. BUt I always think that people go to Yale because of Professor Claude Frank~ I like Pressler too. But I have also heard of Andre Watts teaching at Indiana...
Posted by: Brendan

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 07/29/06 03:23 PM

If showing up three times a semester counts as teaching, then yeah.
Posted by: Sokolov_thelegend

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 07/29/06 04:58 PM

I understand it, Brendan~~~ ^^
Mr Watts must be very busy!
Posted by: starlightjenny

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/01/06 12:34 AM

I would like to enquire on the following questions in general:

1) When should I apply for scholarship or financial support in the process as an international student in US? At the time I apply for admission? Or, after the university receive me? Or, after I pay for the full studying fee?

2) What should I prepare for the above process?

Thank you for your help.
Posted by: Brendan

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/01/06 12:53 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by starlightjenny:
I would like to enquire on the following questions in general:

1) When should I apply for scholarship or financial support in the process as an international student in US? At the time I apply for admission? Or, after the university receive me? Or, after I pay for the full studying fee?

2) What should I prepare for the above process?

Thank you for your help. [/b]
1) Different schools have different deadlines, but, generally speaking, try to have your financial documents ready to submit along with your application for admission.

2) For international students, I think your parents have to have a certain amount of money in assets (regardless of the scholarships you get) in order for them to be allowed to accept you. Bank statements, tax forms, etc. might be needed for submission.

Your best bet is to get all of the info you need from the schools you are interested in. The chances are they that all have similar procedures and financial requirements for international students.
Posted by: Sokolov_thelegend

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/01/06 01:33 AM

oh, Jenny, are u from HK?
Studying in the local University or conservatory?
I am a piano student from Shengzhen~
Posted by: starlightjenny

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/01/06 08:53 AM

Hello, Sokolov_thelegend, (are you asking me?)

Nice to talk with you. Not so lucky as you are; I am just a student of a piano teacher by private tutoring.

By the way, I join Martha's concert in HK. Do you enjoy her music? (Though the orch cannot catch up with her standard....)
Posted by: Sokolov_thelegend

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/01/06 06:30 PM

Sure. I enjoy her music enormously.
Posted by: Stormcrow

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/05/06 01:10 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Hugh Sung:
Just a quick note to correct the poster who said that 21 was the absolute cutoff age for Curtis applicants - that's not quite correct, as we do accept vocal students up to age 26, opera students and composers up to age 28, and several other instruments like organ, harp, viola, etc. at a slightly higher age bracket (age 23). Also, master degrees are offered in the opera department. Please refer to our catalogue for complete admission details, available as a PDF download from our site at www.curtis.edu.
If anyone has any Curtis-related questions, please feel free to either post them here in the forum or email me directly. I'm the Director of Student Recitals and Instrumental Accompaniment here at Curtis. Looking forward to making many of your acquaintances here on the forum!
All the best,
Hugh Sung

[/b]
Very cool to see someone from Curtis here. But is 21 still the cut off age for piano then? I mean I'm sure that there will exceptions though, if they feel like it. Correct?

Thanks
Posted by: wanghuey

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/08/06 12:58 PM

The Hartt School, University of Hartford
Posted by: hockeyguy

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/13/06 10:28 PM

Hello--
I'm fairly new here,and have a question...
My situation is somewhat different and perhaps unusual..
Would a music conservatory even consider admitting someone in their 50's? I have played piano all of my life, and accomplished, espec. during high school, when I was in statewide piano competitions. My life and career took a different path, and I subsequently went to Medical School. I am having a very successful career (a subspecialty surgeon) and am now 46 yrs old.
Due to various factors, I hope to retire from medicine at some point in my early 50's (stress, burnout, paperwork, quality of life, etc.).
I have though seriously of taking up piano as a second "career", more for personal growth and fulfillment obviously, than for becoming a performer or professor. I hope to be in a position to move anywhere and be financially secure.
I am not interested in a regular undergrad program, but instead a true conservatory.
Would they even consider letting an old geezer in his 50's enter their school? Would the teachers there give me a lot of "attitutude" and not treat me the same as their "serious" students, whose lifer careers will hopefully be in music?
Some friends think I'm nuts, others say, sarcastically, that a few years of nice donations and the ability to pay cash for tuition will go a long way....but I really feel that taking up music more seriously will fulfill a life ambition.
Posted by: hockeyguy

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/13/06 10:38 PM

sorry about all of the typos..I'm a terrible typist.
BTW, I realize many schools have age limits, and of couse require rigorous auditions...

It might be more realistic for me to find a very accomplished teacher, perhaps at a fine institution, and pay him/her a handsome fee for private lessons...
Posted by: Codetta

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/15/06 11:46 AM

This is only my second post but I had to add my my school:

California State University Fullerton
http://www.fullerton.edu/arts/music/index.htm
Posted by: ClassicMusic

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/15/06 04:47 PM

I was told that in order to audition for the top conservatories such as Curtis and Julliard, you really need some inside connection. In other words, if you just go there "cold" (ie, without having the master class or couple of private lessons with some teachers), your chance of acceptance is not really high. Can someone shed some light on this? I certainly hope that's a rumor. Thanks.
Posted by: otacon

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/16/06 09:22 AM

I was looking into a music production/technology major. Are there any universities (not conservatories) that have a good technology major?
I know the Ithaca has a program like that, but what other schools are there?
Posted by: Brendan

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/17/06 04:19 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by ClassicMusic:
I was told that in order to audition for the top conservatories such as Curtis and Julliard, you really need some inside connection. In other words, if you just go there "cold" (ie, without having the master class or couple of private lessons with some teachers), your chance of acceptance is not really high. Can someone shed some light on this? I certainly hope that's a rumor. Thanks. [/b]
Well, it's not always true, but connections do help at most schools. In the end though, someone who comes in cold and plays an amazing audition has a better chance than someone who knows a faculty member but plays a terrible audition. Admission is based on a group consensus.
Posted by: CarlosKleiberist

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/18/06 06:02 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by ClassicMusic:
I was told that in order to audition for the top conservatories such as Curtis and Julliard, you really need some inside connection. In other words, if you just go there "cold" (ie, without having the master class or couple of private lessons with some teachers), your chance of acceptance is not really high. Can someone shed some light on this? I certainly hope that's a rumor. Thanks. [/b]
Don't listen to Brendan!

It's all true! If you want to get into the top studio at a top conservatory, you better have your connections, otherwise you are screwed!

Unless, like Brendan states, you play AMAZINGLY! But usually, yea you should definitely go meet and have a lesson or two with the teacher. It helps GREATLY if your current teacher is friends with these professors.
Posted by: CarlosKleiberist

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/18/06 06:05 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by hockeyguy:
Hello--
I'm fairly new here,and have a question...
My situation is somewhat different and perhaps unusual..
Would a music conservatory even consider admitting someone in their 50's? I have played piano all of my life, and accomplished, espec. during high school, when I was in statewide piano competitions. My life and career took a different path, and I subsequently went to Medical School. I am having a very successful career (a subspecialty surgeon) and am now 46 yrs old.
Due to various factors, I hope to retire from medicine at some point in my early 50's (stress, burnout, paperwork, quality of life, etc.).
I have though seriously of taking up piano as a second "career", more for personal growth and fulfillment obviously, than for becoming a performer or professor. I hope to be in a position to move anywhere and be financially secure.
I am not interested in a regular undergrad program, but instead a true conservatory.
Would they even consider letting an old geezer in his 50's enter their school? Would the teachers there give me a lot of "attitutude" and not treat me the same as their "serious" students, whose lifer careers will hopefully be in music?
Some friends think I'm nuts, others say, sarcastically, that a few years of nice donations and the ability to pay cash for tuition will go a long way....but I really feel that taking up music more seriously will fulfill a life ambition. [/b]
I'm not sure about a top flight conservatory, although if you're AMAZING, they might take you. Keep in mind that by taking up that space at a music school, you might be taking away a young student's spot who probably will have a career in music. So from that stand point the faculty might veto your acceptance. I don't know, that's just my thought. But I know of a great teacher who specializes in adult students. Someone like Milton Stern in Los Angeles, works with mostly adult students such as yourself. And in terms of learning how to play the piano, what difference does it make if you study with a great teacher privately or with a teacher at a conservatory?

Many concert pianists never went to a school...
Posted by: Contrapunctus

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/24/06 04:23 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by CarlosKleiberist:
Don't listen to Brendan!

It's all true! If you want to get into the top studio at a top conservatory, you better have your connections, otherwise you are screwed!

Unless, like Brendan states, you play AMAZINGLY! But usually, yea you should definitely go meet and have a lesson or two with the teacher. It helps GREATLY if your current teacher is friends with these professors. [/b][/QUOTE]

That is true even for university. If you want to go to private university with a conservatory- like setting, you do best to get in contact with as many teachers and administrators as possible. Go to orientation meetings, meet with counselors, talk with counselors over the phone, get in contact with the piano teacher, and try to 'move yourself in' so to speak. That is what I am trying to do at Chapman University. It is hard, and you still don't know if you get in.
Posted by: bukopaudan

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/04/06 01:46 PM

Wow..

Anyone know of any near or around New Jersey?
How about Princeton or University of Pennsylvania?
Posted by: Brendan

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/04/06 05:32 PM

 Quote:
That is true even for university. If you want to go to private university with a conservatory- like setting, you do best to get in contact with as many teachers and administrators as possible. [/b]
That's what I said originally - connections help, but they are not the only determining factor. I've known people who didn't get into a DMA or MM program at the same school where they did their BM or MM. You've got to have a connection and[/b] play well, but the more important of the two is playing well.
Posted by: Sokolov_thelegend

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/05/06 01:44 AM

By the way, which music schools are top in their DM piano programs? Juilliard? Indiana? Yale?
Posted by: Pumpkinhead

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/06/06 11:51 PM

Well, I dont think it's entirely true about connections either. My current teacher got into both Curtis and Juilliard without a single connection or winning any semi-large competitions. He just went in and played the **** out of Chopins third scherzo, Bach's Second English Suite, and Scubert's A minor sonata.
Posted by: Sokolov_thelegend

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/07/06 03:18 AM

Cool... who is ur teacher? Pumkinhead
Posted by: Pumpkinhead

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/07/06 05:31 AM

Mark Richman. And here's the funny part. He turned down both Juilliard Curtis to study at UCLA with Aube Tzerko. He says that he learned more from that man than any institution could give. I guess that certain posters on here are completely right. Pursue the teacher!
Posted by: Sokolov_thelegend

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/07/06 09:40 PM

That sounds cool~
Posted by: EHpianist

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/09/06 08:42 AM

I'm surprised no one has mentioned Carnegie Mellon, or I may have missed it since I was just browsing through.

http://www.cmu.edu/cfa/music/

Elena
www.duoscarbo.com
Posted by: ASBpiano

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/09/06 03:51 PM

I realize this school isn't in the US, but any word on McGill? I've read that it is the top music program in Canada. I'm interested in doing a double major, and a school known as "the Harvard of the North" will certainly be considered (at under $15,000/year!). I'm just hoping the piano department is a good one...
Posted by: Seneca

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/16/06 11:01 PM

pianojerome--
you say you are young and naive, but your comments are very wise. If you can stay naive as you gain more experience and get older, you will do very well indeed.
Thumbs up and good luck!
Posted by: Requiem Aeternam

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 10/29/06 01:44 AM

what's the top conservatories specifically for piano not just music, in the world? Juilliard and Curtis are often quoted as the best in general but what would you guys say are the premiere conservatories for studying piano performance? Are juilliard and curtis still at the top?
Posted by: hpc1234

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 11/03/06 04:29 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by CarlosKleiberist:
Boris Berman at Yale... Menahem Pressler at Indiana... Nelita True at Eastman... Leon Fleisher at Peabody... no? [/b]
 Quote:
Originally posted by Sokolov_thelegend:
IC. THx. BUt I always think that people go to Yale because of Professor Claude Frank~ I like Pressler too. But I have also heard of Andre Watts teaching at Indiana... [/b]
yah, but these top teachers might have so meny students or activities that they might not have much time and energy to work with you as an undergrad. It might also be very hard to get into their studio as a freshman. Can anyone share some info about other piano teachers at these schools, especially Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University? Comments from those who have experience with these schools are especially welcome. Thanks.
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 11/05/06 09:49 PM

Curtis: impossible for 99%
Why do people even mention Curtis? It's free tuition for as many years as it takes for you to graduate. Yes, housing costs some money, but my understanding is that there are private homes who host students and they are building new dorms to open soon. The bottom line is this: Curtis is probably the ultimate music school in the US, and it just not realistic for most students to even add them to a list. And don't forget... Curtis is not for only US residents, it's for anyone and everyone from all over the world. Being a US resident doesn't help you at all. Better to investigate other options.
Posted by: Mary-Rose

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 11/07/06 05:29 AM

Requiem Aeternam wrote:
"what's the top conservatories specifically for piano not just music, in the world? Juilliard and Curtis are often quoted as the best in general but what would you guys say are the premiere conservatories for studying piano performance? Are juilliard and curtis still at the top?"

Please remember that top in America is not necessarily the same as top in the whole wide world....
Posted by: -Frycek

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 11/08/06 11:40 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by maryrose:
Requiem Aeternam wrote:
Please remember that top in America is not necessarily the same as top in the whole wide world.... [/b]
:D
Posted by: NancyM333

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 11/13/06 09:54 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by otacon:
I was looking into a music production/technology major. Are there any universities (not conservatories) that have a good technology major?
I know the Ithaca has a program like that, but what other schools are there? [/b]
I know a freshman at University of Alabama that was recruited for a program just like that. I think Florida State also recruited him, so they may have a competing program.

Nancy
Posted by: lol_nl

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 11/26/06 04:48 PM

Does anyone know if there are music programs in normal universities/colleges in US? So you can study something else as a major and music as a minor or something likely? Does that exist?
Posted by: CarlosKleiberist

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 11/26/06 05:11 PM

yea... hundreds...

the best ones?

Northwestern
Indiana
USC
Michigan
Rice

but keep in mind, most conservatories ALSO offer University/2nd major option...

Cleveland Institute with Case Western Reserve University
Juilliard with Columbia University
Peabody with Johns Hopkins University
etc.

ANY school you go to pretty much, you can major in a 2nd field. With exception of VERY few small conservatories, such as San Francisco Conservatory...
Posted by: pmpiano

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 11/26/06 06:33 PM

If you want to major in something else and take music as a minor, I think most major universities and many private colleges will have something for you. If you are really serious about music, there is rarely time for anything else like a second major!
Posted by: U S A P T

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 11/26/06 06:49 PM

I plan on going to IU if I ever retire from the music industry. I've done a lot in it but never had the piece of paper.
Posted by: Sokolov_thelegend

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 11/28/06 01:27 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by USAPianoTrucker:
I plan on going to IU if I ever retire from the music industry. I've done a lot in it but never had the piece of paper. [/b]
IU has the most wonderful piano faculty in the states.
Good luck~
Posted by: Iain

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 12/08/06 09:52 AM

Why would a department have a cut-off age? What possible use could that serve other than giving it an elitist air?
Posted by: asherf

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 12/08/06 10:11 AM

what's the deal with Mannes New School of Music in New York?

does anyone know how good it is, the competition of getting in and all? I didn't see it mentioned yet.
Posted by: Music Lover

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 12/28/06 04:58 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by pianojerome:
Professor X may be a really great professor, but if you don't get along with him, he's the worst professor in the world for you. Professor Y may be considered a really great professor, but if he's very dogmatic about his interpretations, and you have very different interpretations, then you aren't going to benefit from him as much as you could from a more leniant professor.
There is more than one way to look at things.

If the reasons you don't get along with Professor X are your own lack of discipline and maturity, he may actually be the best instructor for you--if he is able to make you realize that you need to grow in those areas.

Many of the so-called "dogmatists" are often great instructors, because they instill the necessary self-discipline in their students. Something many "lenient" instructors are not very adept at.
Posted by: sushibear

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 01/16/07 11:26 PM

An argument that Curtis is "the ultimate school of music" can certainly be made, but I think that argument could be made for other institutions, as well.

"Important U.S. conservatories include the Curtis Institute of Music, the Eastman School, and the Juilliard School." Britannica online

Britannica on line lists the three above as "important," but they are listed in alphabetical order. "Best" and "ultimate" are very subjective adjectives. I think a point that has been well made on this thread is that a school which may be the best for one students may not be the best for another.
Posted by: John Dutton

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 01/17/07 12:20 PM

Wow. I just read 5 pages of myths legends and detritus on music schools and conservatories. Categorizing the two or five 'best' schools is like trying to name the 'Big Five' orchestras in the US-it can't reasonably be done with authority because the list changes by whose doing it and what criteria they are applying.
Having attended two of the top schools in the country and had a 24 year (to date) professional performance career, let me give my take on things.

1. Target your music education to your music goals. Schools like Curtis, Julliard, the performance departments at Northwestern, Ind Univ, New England Cons, are just that-performance. If you don't have a high level of technical achievement it is unrealistic to apply for those programs. One of the best things I did was attend one of these schools and stack myself up against my fellow classmates. The pressure cracks more than a few but thats ok because the world is harsh if that is how you want to earn your living.
Note: Even amongst the performance studies graduates of all these schools, most don't end up earning their living from strictly performing.

2. It takes connections to get in. What a load of hooey. Again, I studied at two of the schools you all have listed as among the most prestigious and I didn't know anyone. It is related to ability and preparation. See 1.

3. Auditions. The audition process is in print for all these schools. They will have a required/recommended list to use or some will allow equivalent substitutions. You will not have to play from the collected works of all time. You will be expected to sight read which is a learnable and desirable skill[/b]. There is no secret cabal. The audition person(s) has to listen to a ton of applicants and most will just not have practiced or studied enough. I've sat on the other side and seen it myself. Practice auditioning & performing[/b]. They are skills like playing scales and arpeggios. Use and abuse your friends for that purpose.

4. Some students get in because the teacher pulls strings. It's true. It's an ugly little fact. It does happen even at the prestigious schools like Curtis & Julliard & Northwestern & all the rest. These students are still not slackers. They have demonstrated skills to the private instructor that while not really developed are seen as having a great deal of potential.

5. Age limits. With the exception of Curtis, most schools don't have an age limit per se. School do target 17-20 yo's for scholarships however. Apply for all the scholarships you can and don't write the cooresponding essay like it's a "What I did Last Summer" assignment from freshman english.

6. You have to go to school "X" to be someone. What a load of hooey that is and I too selected my schools on that basis. In the real performing world what school you went to is a tidbit of info. How you play and for big teaching jobs the depth of your pedagogical knowledge is by far what counts. Pedagogical knowledge is at an all time low among the 'best and brightest' these days. There are exceptions but not many. I think that this is because it takes hard work to study and gain that knowledge and our society has too many distractions.

7. I don't need to speak/write well because I'm a musician. Like it or not, how we present ourselves on paper is the majority of the decision these learning institutions will make. Proof read everything and read it out loud to yourself.

8. Show up on time always and know your music and all the terms in it. It is really easy to ruin a reputation but hard to regain it. Some folks consider being late twice to be a chronic problem.

9. While you are sleeping, someone else is practicing. True. Very true. But are they practicing properly. Constantly refine your practice skills so that you can get done in 30 minutes what took you 45 minutes a year or two ago.

10. School reputations. Many schools gained their reputations decades or more ago. Marketing departments spend oodles of money to maintain those reputations. As with any thing however there is a cycle of great to good to (hopefully not) mediocre back to great. Some schools cycle less than others. Student body at 'prestigious' schools is a self selecting creme of the crop provided the reputation holds up. Good solid educations can be received at other schools as well.



This is just a list of things off the top of my head. Many of the things I read are the same rumor mill stuff I heard twenty years ago too. I wish someone had given me some straight poop all those years ago.
Posted by: Pianos_N_Cheezecake

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 01/20/07 10:24 PM

Brandon School of Music! It's in Canada...
Posted by: Sokolov_thelegend

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 01/21/07 01:26 AM

THere are so many good schools around. But I think the teacher whom you are going to study with is far more important than the school itself.
How about the great piano teachers? Any ideas?
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 01/21/07 02:29 PM

Sokolov - I totally agree with you. Many high school students dream of attending Julliard, Curtis, etc. but really have no clue about the faculty. Granted, since they are so prestiguous, the caliber of teaching is no doubt very high. But there's so much more to consider when deciding with whom to study: Personality, style of playing and teaching, dedication, availability (many concert artist/teachers are gone half the time, leaving their students in the hands of either grad students or other teachers). There are hundreds of very good schools with incredible teachers. I may have suggested this before under a different topic, so forgive my repeating myself. If you have the time, start 'googling' pianists, starting with competition winners and articles about local classical music events (and you can discover the artists educational background). I recall looking up the bios on Cliburn competitors and it was interesting to see where they were studying -- not all were from Julliard or Curtis. An example would be: Park University. I had never heard of it. I looked it up - there is a formidable Russian heading up the piano dept. (his name slips my mind). His students are winning competitions. This is just one example. On a personal note..my son attends University of North Texas, and they have an excellent piano faculty. The list of schools at the beginning of this thread is a great place to start. Just get on the website and read the bios of teachers. Some might wish to study with a Russian teacher, someone else might prefer an American approach. There IS a perfect fit for everyone at every level.
Posted by: Sokolov_thelegend

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 01/22/07 02:09 AM

Opus 119, I think the Russian or more precisely, the Uzbekistanian that you are talking about should be Stanislav Ioudenitch. He was the Gold medalist in the 2001 Cliburn competition. I don't know he has started teaching already. He is a very intellectual pianist and a good musician.
Posted by: Thefiredigger

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 01/23/07 09:51 PM

Does anyone know anything about The Wheaton College Conservatory ( http://www.wheaton.edu/Conservatory/ ) or Houghton College's Greatbach School of music. ( http://campus.houghton.edu/orgs/music/ ) I have heard good things said about Wheaton but the people who I have heard this from are like me, they too have heard good things about Wheaton.
Posted by: Kreisler

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 01/24/07 09:52 AM

A friend of mine teaches at Wheaton and another friend of mine attended. Both have good things to say about the school.
Posted by: ananas

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 01/26/07 07:19 AM

I agree with Sokolov_thelegend, too.

I know too many 'ordinary' people who went to J...
It really does not mean much at all.
Posted by: Sokolov_thelegend

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 01/26/07 10:29 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by ananas:
I agree with Sokolov_thelegend, too.

I know too many 'ordinary' people who went to J...
It really does not mean much at all. [/b]
Definitely....
Posted by: Ruminer Sonatina

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/09/07 08:42 AM

Louisiana - McNeese University
Louisiana - Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts
Posted by: Hugh Sung

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/12/07 03:32 PM

Just to throw in my two cents - i didn't want to participate too deeply into this discussion, given my direct relationship to Curtis, but i did want to offer a few views of "the forest" as opposed to the two or three (or five) "trees" that seem to always block sight-lines during audition season for music schools:

1. No matter which school you attend, you will not get very far if you don't apply good business skills to your art.[/b] I've seen Curtis and Juilliard graduates flounder very badly, simply because they haven't learned some basic business tools like networking, prompt communication, and even something as simple as managing a schedule book! Too often i've seen jobs and opportunities lost because of procrastination and poor etiquette. It may seem like a hard thing to swallow, as we musicians love to live "for the art", but today's reality demands a more responsible demeanor from today's young artists, especially in the classical music arena!

2. Learn from everyone everywhere[/b] - many students get fixated on hooking up with that one magical teacher, thinking that doors of opportunity will open or that their playing will be radically transformed...well, perhaps the second may come into play more readily, but the student who is open to learning from disciplines outside their own, from colleagues, even from other teachers with differing points of view, will more often than not progress far better than the cloistered student who holds a myopic view of his or her master teacher's capabilities.

3. Take initiatives![/b] i get blamed for not saying the "No" word enough, but the truth is that saying "yes" to opportunities - no matter how stressful or risky they may seem (see my latest "yes" story here) will really open artistic possibilities that you simply cannot pre-plan or imagine ahead of time! I'm amazed at how many students say "no" to opportunities, simply because they don't feel "ready enough" or are simply too lazy to take on another burden!

4. Define yourself.[/b] The business world calls this 'brand marketing' - a quick look at the thousands of musicians listed in MySpace.com, for example, will quickly reveal how difficult it can be to really stand out in an artistic crowd. What makes you unique? What will make people really want to hear YOU as opposed to a hundred other pianists? Taking the time to ask these difficult questions - and forging an answer that you can feel excited about - will reap tremendous benefits, not only for your decisions on where or who to study with, but more importantly with regard to how you will shape your artistic identity in the years following your graduation. Too many music students go into conservatories blindly without thinking through the possible career paths that are out there - or that need to be created from scratch!

Sorry for the long-winded post - best wishes to all the auditionees out there during this difficult time!

Hugh Sung


HughSung.com - Music Meets Tech
Posted by: cerulean5

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/14/07 10:36 PM

Thanks Hugh for an awesome post!

--c5
Posted by: JBiegel

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/21/07 03:43 PM

It was nice to see the reference to Stanislaw Ioudenitch. I was on the jury in New Orleans when he was awarded the first prize--I enjoyed him very much, and we've stayed in touch--a fine man and musician!

I will add that I am on faculty at the Conservatory of Music at Brooklyn College, where we have been attracting international students more regularly, and many of the transfer students come from some of the big three from New York City. It is simply me with Michael Rogers, another Adele Marcus pupil, on faculty for piano. We also have piano class once a week--alphabetically, everyone takes their turn and plays in the recital hall for the 90 minute class, and after 4 or 5 students play their pieces, we do an open master class, and one week I teach it, the next week, Michael Rogers. It creates an open environment for all the students in both classes to learn from both of us. We see eye-to-eye musically, having been Adele Marcus students, so it is a wonderful comradry that we share.
Posted by: guidovivaldi

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/25/07 02:46 PM

I don't want to appear ignorant, but what 17 year old Junior of Senior can play several Beethoven Sonatas, all of the Chopin sonatas and the Bach P&Fs. I can understand playing 3 or 4 Beethoven's, the easier of the Chopin (I use the word easy lightly) and the Bach P&Fs, but are there really enough prodigies to fill up all of the music schools now a days?
Posted by: JBiegel

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/25/07 03:00 PM

I hate to say it, but that's nothing. I would say by 17, one would have several Beethoven, Mozart, haydn sonatas, a few Schubert, several Schumann works, many Bach Preludes and Fugues, a Chopin Ballade or two, 3 or 4 Polonaises, several mazurkas, atleast a dozen Waltzes--get the picture? Oh--it wouldn't hurt to have 5+ concerti either. My Juilliard audition at that age was:
Bach: Partita no. 2 in c minor, Beethoven 'Waldstein', Chopin 'Scherzo no. 3', Liszt 'Hungarian Rhapsody no. 11', Rachmaninoff 'Prelude in G Major', Liszt's 'Feux-follets', and Scriabin's 'Etude in D-flat Major' (the staccato double note one). And this was the norm in 1979 for everyone trying out.
Posted by: guidovivaldi

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/25/07 04:24 PM

And it has only increased I suppose?

What baffles me though is that (as a saxophone player also) you can learn play one Sonata (Creston ext...) or maby a concerto (Robert Ward's for Tenor if played well would get you in anywhere) and get into the better music schools. If you know your way around scales you are shoe in for most jazz performance degrees, and at the good schools a little intuition will get you a long ways. There are a decent amount of prodigies on the saxophone, but I guess it doesnt get the same prodigal treatment as piano. I don't know that any of the "band" instruments are like this. This is a different topic all together but I couldn't help but mentioning it.
Posted by: op30no3

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/02/07 07:05 PM

Basically everywhere, prodigies are the rule, not the exception.

One gets tired of the celebration of a prodigy. I feel like I look around and say "he was a prodigy... he'll get in, but, oh yea, so is he, and him, and him, and her, and him, and him, and her, and her, and him, he just had his debut with the NY Philharmonic, she's 8 and can play all the Chopin etudes..." and I think to myself, "What in the world am I doing auditioning at these places? I didn't start till I was almost nine, and I had small town teacher who teaches kids that think Rondo alla turca is an extremely advanced piece (played horribly), and then she said I should go to another teacher, mainly I think because I didn't practice, and I am now with a 73 year old teacher who has practically never performed, and has maybe an music education degree from a local college with an almost non-existant piano program... And i'm supposed to compete with the kid over there whose mother is a concert pianist, and father is the conductor of some big symphony, and started playing piano when he was one and a half?"

It's just nuts.

*Excuse some slight exaggeration \:D
Posted by: JBiegel

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/03/07 06:34 AM

Don't look to the left, don't look to the right, just look straight ahead where YOU are going. (That's what Adele Marcus said to me when I got accepted to Juilliard in 1979). She also said, 'There will be people who play better than you when you enter, worse than you, and as well as you.' I also say to my students, 'You're competing with yourself, not anyone else. You're the only one on that stage when you play.'
Posted by: hotkeys

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/17/07 11:13 PM

 Quote:
Louise,

There is nothing wrong with nominating Canadian Schools. In fact, I knew some people who attended the University of Western Ontario (UWO) for piano studies (i am a University of Windsor Graduate; they have a good music school too). Don't forget Angela Hewitt came from Ottawa; I always regard her piano playing as a celebration. And world class!

- Mark
Posted by: hotkeys

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/17/07 11:29 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by ASBpiano:
I realize this school isn't in the US, but any word on McGill? I've read that it is the top music program in Canada. I'm interested in doing a double major, and a school known as "the Harvard of the North" will certainly be considered (at under $15,000/year!). I'm just hoping the piano department is a good one... [/b]
I had friends who went to McGill, and heard it is a great school for musicians. Others went to UWO (The University of Western Ontario), UW (University of Waterloo), and Wilfred Laurier University (also in Waterloo). The University of Ottawa also has a good reputation. Note it may be more expensive for a foreigner today; back in 1981, I paid $1500/yr tuition at the University of Windsor when I was studing engineering.

- Mark
Posted by: JBiegel

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/18/07 11:24 AM

At Brooklyn College, we pride our department on a faculty that's on the level of the best names and the tuition is definitely lower. This has attracted pupils to my studio from the 'names' to get their master degrees with me, and also transfer students. The wisest replies above refer to picking your teacher as top priority--that's what we all did. The piece of paper will always be the piece of paper when you graduate--it's the result of your artistry and ability to make money that's goin to count. I remember my wife's teacher said to her, 'You can put DMA" on your license plate--I believe what he meant was that you need to think about the effect of the DMA in the long term. That was certainly before DMAs were a prerequisite for job searches.
Posted by: ASL

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 05/04/07 03:28 PM

Ok I have a question. I want to go to Eastman this summer. Has anybody here gone there? I see what you are saying about it, but I want to know if any body has gone there and what they thought.
Posted by: Troy M.

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 05/06/07 09:12 PM

Hi,

I am Young (14) and am interested in going to a Music college to improve my skills. Now I do not plan on making my career a career in music. I am actually planning on becoming and airline pilot. But i really dont need a degree in flying to be a pilot, just a degree in something, and alot of hours. \:D

So, Is there any music colleges in Texas, preferably Houston? Really I am open to any college in the states, mater of fact, any wear in the world.

Sorry if this has been brought up before in this thread, but I really don't have time to go though 5 pages!
Posted by: Beacon Chris

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/02/07 11:42 AM

Troy,

I think it's great that you are interested in music and flying airplanes! The great thing about music is that you can make as many mistakes as you want and the consequences are not (quite) as severe as piloting an aircraft!!!

Seriously, I am a professional concertising musician (classical music), and I chose an affordable state undergraduate program to get started where I had an outstanding teacher whom I liked and also a wonderful academic program - theory, history, ect...

Graduated without debt, and in position to take up music at the graduate level at a conservatory - Manhattan School of Music.

You may want to look at North Texas or U of Texas at Austin. I know teachers at both places (not in the piano dept.) but in other departments who are excellent. I'm rather certain that you could graduate without the debt monkey on your back and the go to flying school or whatever you choose. Also, make sure you take a lot of interesting electives. I did undergrad in Colorado, and my geology and natural science courses were wonderful.

Had I not gone into music, Today I'd probably be on the side of a Volcano somewhere looking at rocks!

Have fun.

BC \:\)
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/03/07 09:36 PM

Troy, I second BC's suggestion of sticking with a state school, especially if you are in Texas. UNT and UT both have excellent music departments. The piano faculty at UNT is exceptional, as is the entire music program. And it's very affordable. I recommend it to anyone who struggles with issues re: cost vs. quality. If you are talented and determined, you will perhaps be awarded a music scholarship at UNT. It doesn't amount to much (maybe $1,500 a year). However, that scholarship entitles you to 'in-state tuition', no matter where you are from - and so the cost of attending is very cheap. Tuition and fees for a music performance major run around $5,600 a year (plus living expenses). If you are interested in flying, the Dallas/Ft. Worth area would be full of opportunities as well. Good luck with your search.
Posted by: Troy M.

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/12/07 10:29 PM

What about The Music branch as ASU http://music.asu.edu/ Is that a decent school? Some one told me that its not that great of a school.

Remember im not looking at music as a career, (atleast not now) just something to give me formal training as a pianist. and Concert Pianist would be nice.


Thanks for your replies!
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/16/07 04:51 PM

Do you know about Jon Nakamatsu? His undergraduate major was German. His graduate degree from Stanford was in education. He had the same piano teacher for years and years. He studied theory privately. I think it is the teacher that counts along with your skill and motivation. Although I admit when I moved to a new area I sought the best teacher I could find. He happened to be a professor at a public university. It cost me less to enroll in the university to take a few music classes and take private lessons than it would have cost me to study with him privately. Good Luck.
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/17/07 01:56 PM

Best in the world?

How about the Paris Conservatory....I don't know the answer....but I thought this was way up there.
Posted by: John Pels

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/19/07 12:59 AM

I don't know about the best conservatory, but I will say that I got my Masters at University of Houston. I studied with Abbey Simon. I count this experience as one of the most significant in my life. He is an incredible player, and an absolutely incredible teacher. He's getting up in years, but heard his recital last year which was a BIG program and he played marvelously. It would be an honor for ANYONE to study with him. He is one of the few that can claim at this point a direct descendancy from the golden age of pianism, namely Josef Hoffman. He studied at Curtis in his youth with Hoffman. I enjoy very much watching Classic Arts Showcase and seeing Hoffman play, noting that many things technical and aesthetic have indeed been passed down from Hoffman. An absolute "trip to the mountain", and if any of you have the opportunity I heartily advise you to seek out one of the grand masters ...before it is too late. Note however, he has a very strong personality. I still chuckle about some of the comments he made to me at the time, in a slightly less PC world. He will generally leave your testicles intact, but his opinion will be known. And...in case you are female he's just as tough on the fairer sex. All of this is in pursuit of musical perfection, and the standard is exceedingly high...as it should be. For what it is worth, I have ex roomates that studied at Peabody, IU, and Catholic U that note that the training I received from him was comprehensive.What they really meant to say was despite my strong personality, he managed to whup up on me long enough to make me a halfway decent musician. Despite his concert schedule at the time I had lessons every other day when he was in town, which was fine for my learning style.
John Pels
Posted by: Troy M.

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/20/07 08:11 PM

Well, now that I know that University of Houston Has a school of music. Im pretty excited.

Is the Moores School of Music a recommended school? I am not looking for the best and most challenging school in music. Just a decent one.
Posted by: John Pels

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/20/07 10:15 PM

Troy, if you are only 14, you have plenty of time to make up your mind. My son is presently getting his private pilot's license, ostensibly to make a go of it in the Air Force. It has always been an interest of mine as well. In fact, I have an unbuilt kitplane in the garage. U of H (Moores) is a wonderful school. Check out their International Piano Festival in November. A nice lineup of players as always. We had Olga Kern last year, along with Abbey Simon and a professor from Peabody whose name escapes me. I think the big draw this year is Jean Philippe Collard, and a young Argentine pianist that just won a major contest whose name escapes me as well. There is a website.
John Pels
Posted by: Inga

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/21/07 08:47 AM

Troy - just for your interest, I read music at University and studied with a professor from the Royal Academy of Music (in the UK) until I was 21. I then joined the Royal Air Force as a pilot. 16 years later I am now leaving the RAF at my initial exit point, and going back to a Music Conservatoire to do a Masters in Piano Performance, with the aim of picking up a career of sorts in music. If that doesn't work, then I have the option of joining the airlines.

So you're not that strange!!
Posted by: Troy M.

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/21/07 06:33 PM

I dont think im strange,. Just trying to figure out how to go about my career plan!

thanks for the help guys!
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/21/07 06:52 PM

I was studying music at the University for 2.5 years. I got nervous thinking the purpose of the university was to study something to find a JOB. So I got my degree in BACTERIOLOGY and then spent a year in graduate school in PHARMACOLOGY. Then I did research for 5 years. For me the whole thing SUCKED. I am going this fall at the age of 53 to complete my piano major. If I had it to do over again it would be piano all the way. But I have to admit....I did not know it at the time..........now I am more motivated and happier to play the piano.......
Posted by: Cherub Rocker

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/17/07 01:52 AM

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro has an excellent School of Music. The UNCG School of Music graduate program has been recognized by U.S. News and World Report as one of the top 15 music institutions in the nation associated with colleges and universities.

http://www.uncg.edu/mus
Posted by: I. Bruton

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/31/07 05:29 PM

UNCG is quite good, as is East Carolina University.

For what it's worth, I graduated from Campbell University's music program. It was a great experience to say the least.
Posted by: Cherub Rocker

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/02/07 12:04 PM

Yes, East Carolina University and the North Carolina School of the Arts are good schools, but UNC Greensboro is the only school in NC that has a Doctoral program in music.
Posted by: Ralph

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/06/07 02:42 AM

Here's an example of the high quality of playing that goes on in a place like Curtis for those interested future applicants.

WHYY Arts and Culture channel is broadcasting the Curtis student recital concerts on monday, wednesday and friday nights. I justed watched the first one (Stephanie Jeong with Hugh Sung) and it's a blast. Here are a few links to help you find it.

http://www.whyy.org/about/report03/arts.html

http://www.curtis.edu/html/10000.shtml

http://www.curtis.edu/html/21194.shtml
Posted by: shroeder

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/07/07 09:33 PM

everyone keeps talking about UT Austin as a good school for piano... but who's a good teacher there? someone mentioned Anton Nel, but it doesn't seem like he's there much...

my young sis is applying to music schools for piano performance undergrad right now, but our family is very concerned about cost... unfortunately she would like to leave texas if she can... people mention private schools here and there that have a great teacher, but which schools would you consider the best of the private univ's, i.e. not conservatories or state/public univs) (eg. boepple/santa clara, campbell/illinois wesleyan, ioudenitch/park, bonaventura/boston)...

lastly, does CCM give full scholarships based on music, not academic?
Posted by: shroeder

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/07/07 09:43 PM

also, people have recommended Viardo and Paul at UNT, but do they take in a lot of undergrads or not? how do they compare to Ungar/TCU and Weems/Houston? and does Abbey Simon at Houston teach undergrads?

i'm also concerned about the safety of campuses. i haven't read too much talk about that here. people have warned me about the crime surrounding Houston, Baltimore/Peabody, and CCM/Cincinnati. is this a valid concern? i'd prefer my sister to go to a campus where she can walk around safely at night.
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/07/07 11:44 PM

UNT has a number of exceptional teachers. Joseph Banowetz is supposed to be an amazing teacher. I was just reading an interview with him, and one of his teachers was a pupil of Clara Schumann, and he also studied with Gyorgy Sandor (sp?) who was a pupil of Bartok. His specialty is romantic literature. You bring up a good point re: many of the highly-respected teachers pretty much only teach grad students. Probably not the case everywhere, however. Your sister should start contacting some teachers she's interested in and ask some questions. My son is a violin major at UNT and he is happy with the music program (he went there for his teacher, but also the excellent program overall). The University itself is huge. Denton is a suburb of Dallas, but I believe the crime rate is not particularly high. My son has never felt unsafe, and he used to practice until 2 a.m. and walk to his dorm from the music building. Your sister needs to be cautious about walking around ANY college campus after dark, even in a quiet, safe neighborhood. Unfortunately, campus crimes and assaults can happen anywhere. In fact, some of the safest campuses are in areas that are known to be crime-ridden, because the security and campus police are a huge presence. A quiet, supposedly safe campus can give students a false sense of security.
Posted by: pianowhirr

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/12/07 10:51 PM

I just wanted to add another Conservatory to the list. It is in the Midwest though, but I have a friend who goes there and she says the musical atmosphere and the level of professors there are amazing. it is an undergraduate school and all professors are concentrated on teaching the undergrads only, so you won't have to go to an assistant while your professor is busy teaching the masters and doctoral degree people. The name is Lawrence Conservatory of Music in Appleton, Wisconsin. That school is very expensive, but you can also get a double-degree in music and science, or music and some other humanity discipline. I heard they just had Claude Frank for a recital and masterclasses there, and most of the faculty have very strong connections with their teachers in grad schools around the country. They have three piano professors - an American, a Canadian, and a Russian. Sounds like a good mix to me :3hearts:
Posted by: Russdaman

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 10/06/07 01:06 PM

Hi. I want to do a post grad, and I want to go to the best place! Where should I go? Should I study somewhere in the US? Or maybe at the RAM in London? Any replies would be much appreciated. Thanks
Russ.
Posted by: jazzyclassical

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 10/22/07 07:11 PM

Has anyone heard if the New School in NYC or NYU's music Department is any good? My brother is going to be a guitar major and he is interested in New York. He's majoring in Jazz Guitar BTW but I'm just interested in the music department in general. Perhaps if anyone has been to these schools or knows of anybody that has gone there.
Posted by: Amy J

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 10/28/07 03:50 AM

SillySushi, I haven't heard of Wichita State as a prestigious music school, but it wouldn't surprise me.

Park University, near KC, is really great, but unknown. My daughter takes lessons there and they have incredible students, from what I've seen and heard coming from the practice rooms. There are an unusually high amount of Russian-speaking students and I'm not entirely sure how they all ended up there, but I think it is related to Stanislav Ioudenitch, the '01 Van Cliburn winner, teaching there. They have masters classes that are great, yet you never hear anything about them.

My daughter wants to be a veterinarian, but loves the atmosphere in the music department at Park, which doesn't offer vet school. Her plan, last I heard (she's only 10) was to go there, undergrad, so she could continue piano there.
Posted by: Thunester

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 12/10/07 05:49 PM

Hi! I'm Sarah, I'm a junior in high school, and I figured it was about time to start thinking about where I should go to college. I absolutely love piano and am pretty sure it's what I want to do with my life. Are any of you familiar with a Christian or Lutheran school that has a good piano program? Thanks!
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 12/11/07 06:41 PM

Pacific Lutheran in Tacoma, WA has a fairly decent music department. St. Olaf is probably one of the better known schools for music, especially choral music. I believe it is a Lutheran university as well.
Posted by: WAR

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/09/08 01:46 PM

Troy:

I am both a pilot and a pianist, and therefore feel especially qualified to answer your question. Ask yourself why you want to become a pianist and why you want to be a pilot. Think about it carefully, take your time. Then write it down on paper. The written word is very powerful, Troy.

Both of these aspirations will take tremendous dedication but for different reasons.

You can become a pilot and a concert pianist both. It is not impossible, I can guarantee you that. I know people other than just myself who have done it. The question is are you willing to do what it takes to achieve this?

Flying itself is easy, I don't care what anyone says. But it takes a lot of work, a lot of studying and a lot of dedication. You can be a doctor with a practice in the same time it will take you to get hired into a major airline. Add at least another decade to that to become a Captain (again, I'm talking about the majors).

Being an airline pilot it certainly isn't what it used to be. If it's glamor you're after, then fly in another country, because as far as the passengers go, you're just another bus driver here in the States. The attitude towards pilots and the fringe benefits are going down the garbage shoot. Meanwhile, the FAA (Folks Against Aviation) and the TSA (Thousands Standing Around), make regulations that continually diminish the pilot's quality of life while increasing his responsibilities and liabilities.

And you have to get accepted with a Major Airline to enjoy all this first!

Depressing?

Do you want me to get started on what it is like to try and make a living as a musician? A concert pianist? The insane competition out there?

Am I trying to discourage you? NO! After you have read this post, look at what you wrote on your piece of paper and ask yourself if it is worth it. If your answer is "I don't care what the obstacles are, I want to be a pilot and a pianist both", then read on.

First of all, you are right, you need a degree and they don't theoretically care what the degree is in. They want to see that you can commit yourself to something, giving your time and money and attention for four years. Many airlines will also consider your greats for every single course you take. An aviation related degree is better, and it doesn't have to be from Embry-Riddle. Since you are talking about a college, and the piano, I'm assuming you are thinking of going the civilian route. You still could be considering ROTC with the Air Force, but not if you are in any way serious about the piano.

I have a schedule which allows me to be home three to four days a week. That's a major advantage to being a pilot. I don't do the 9-5 thing. (I did for a few years before I became a pilot to pay for my piano studies, but I hated it.) During my says off, I practice the piano up to six hours a day. Had I joined the Air Force, I would have had to stop the piano cold and for a few years at least. You cannot afford to stop playing for more than a few days at a time or your technique will suffer to say the least.

So the civilian route is your only option. ASU is an excellent university and I happen to know the folks at the music department. I've attended all the ASU International Piano competitions since they first started in 2006. I strongly recommend you get in touch with the ASU music school now. If you are talented, a professor there will take you on as a student right now. I have flown with a pilot whose child was very gifted and was taken under the wing on one of the ASU piano professors. She was exactly your age, too.

There isn't much you can do right now on the flying side (unless you take up gliding), but now is the time to really work on your repertoire and make major strides at the piano.

You can be a music major and still get a job as a pilot. Better still, you could be a double major and get both a degree in piano performance and in aviation management or something aviation related. (I say this because you might be able to get a student loan for that every expensive flight training). Also, Mesa Airlines has some program for taking in ab initio pilots. Southwest Airlines requires 1500 hours of turbine PIC. That means turbo-props too, so if you get into the Mesa Airlines program, you could eventually find your way into Southwest.

Airlines will be hiring and then they'll slow down and stop and even start furloughing. You'll see a lot of that as you start along your long path to getting your degree and the minimum tickets (Commercial and ATP) and hours (1500) required before you'll even be considered by an commuter.

Remember, even if they say they are laying off pilots, one day that will change and they'll hire again. Don't let anything stop you. There's no technical challenge at the piano you cannot over come. And you can eventually become a pilot for a major airline no matter what the economy is doing, because unless they develop teleportation, or completely automated airplanes, or the world runs out of kerosene to fuel airplanes, there will still be a demand for pilots.

It just takes time and perseverance.

I wish you the best from the bottom of my heart. If you have any questions, feel free to send me a personal message anytime.
Posted by: Roger R Sethmann

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/26/08 06:35 PM

Shenandoah University and Conservatory of Music
Winchester, Virginia.
Out of that whole list, I am surprised nobody mentioned Shenandoah. It is an outstanding Conservatory with an outstanding reputation and Faculty.
I received my BMC and MM degrees from there.
Roger R Sethmann
Posted by: Jelena

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 04/17/08 11:47 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Troy M.:
What about The Music branch as ASU http://music.asu.edu/ Is that a decent school? Some one told me that its not that great of a school....
Thanks for your replies! [/b]
Troy, kudos to you for thinking ahead and planning!

But, I must tell you - whoever told you that ASU Herberger College's School of Music is not a great school is a complete dolt and an idiot, I dare say! And, that's putting it mildly! I really take offense at such uninformed, arbitrary statement of that "someone."

The school is fantastic, and so is the piano faculty! For Christ's sake, people come from all over the world to study with several of the piano teachers there! You should make a point of meeting professors there, research their bios on the website, listen to their recordings and you will know how GOOD it is. I would point to three people: Dr. Baruch Meir (my prof and he is exceptionally GOOD), Robert Hamilton and Caio Pagano. That's for starters, many other good ones there.

Now, I can say this with FULL authority as I studied in some of the best music schools in the world and with legends of piano pedagogy. Still, I am doing my doctorate at ASU, I chose to do so, although I could've gone literally anywhere in the world again!

If money is not a problem, you can go to Oberlin, Manhattan School of Music, North Western (not Juilliard for undergrad, but yes for grad studies!), or any other super expensive private schools. However, you have a treasure of a School of Music right in your own back yard!

Plus, being an in state student and considering how many students get full rides and partial scholarships based on their auditions ... why would you even think of going anywhere else???

That's my 2 cents worth ... keep the change. :p :p
Posted by: czernylavion

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 04/18/08 04:47 PM

Ultimately, what you get out of your music education, reg. of what your emphasis is, rather it's piano performance, music tech. etc. is what you put into it. Yes, it's great to be able to get into Jailyard but ultimately, it's what you do _after_ you get out. I studied with a former concert pianist who went to St. Louis Conservatory back in the 1950s. I've also coached with a graduate of the Manhattan School of Music and am currently studying the Taubman method with a graduate of the Oberlin Conservatory. Each school has it's merits. I got my degrees in music from public universities and had a piano scholarship from one of them.
Looking back, each school was the right enviroment for me at that time, and at that stage of my life. At both places, I had great teachers who are not very well known. Dr. Timothy Woolsey at Texas State University and Joan Allison at Texas A&M Corpus Christi.

You need to look at where you are now, where you hope to be in 4 or 6 years, what your financial situation is, and what your needs are. Good luck!
Posted by: Troy M.

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 04/19/08 01:09 PM

Thanks for you reply Jelena. Was wandering if it would be possible to go to ASU after completing a 4 year degree at another college in something completely unrelated to music, then go to another college and study music?

I have found a great school (University of North Dakota"UND") that has a great Commercial Aviation program. I am thinking of going there. Afterwards I would like to spend a year or 2 studying music. Whether it be there at UND, or ASU, or UofH or any college for that matter, would it be posisble for me to enroll as a music student for just 2 years with one of these colleges? I would already have my 4 year degree, but I dont want to pursue my Masters, I think that would be to hard seeing how I have not previously studied music, only as a minor.


I hope I made some sense. I am not pursuing a career in music, but I don't want to just forget about music either. I have 2 years to figure it out though...

Thanks.
Posted by: Jerry Groot RPT

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 04/19/08 01:24 PM

Being an airline pilot it certainly isn't what it used to be. If it's glamor you're after, then fly in another country, because as far as the passengers go, you're just another bus driver here in the States. The attitude towards pilots and the fringe benefits are going down the garbage shoot. Meanwhile, the FAA (Folks Against Aviation) and the TSA (Thousands Standing Around), make regulations that continually diminish the pilot's quality of life while increasing his responsibilities and liabilities.[/b]

For what it's worth, I have never thought of pilots in this way, as bus drivers. I always love to gaze in the **** pit and thank the pilots for not making me sick and for the nice flight... It's a tough job from what I can see!
Posted by: RonaldSteinway

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/15/08 11:24 PM

It is not nice to say pilot is a bus driver, but in reality, it is what most people think of pilots. The reason is that these days flying is so common, there is no more excitement of flying for most people, it is just like riding a bus.
Posted by: musicianwwings

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/28/08 02:54 PM

Hi everyone,
I am new here but I have been reading the posts for a while and this is a really cool site. Do any of you have any opinions on University of Texas at Tyler, University of Texas at Arlingtion, or Dallas Baptist Univerisity? I am a sophmore at Richland Community College and I am already teaching piano. I would like to get a degree in piano pedagogy. I am considering these schools because they are close enough to Dallas that I could continue to teach during the weekends. I did not list SMU because one of my music professors said that the music program is not as good as it used to be. Is that true? Thank you for any thoughts you might have!
Posted by: opus119

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 06/28/08 03:28 PM

I don't know anything about the schools you mentioned, although of the three, Arlington probably has the better music dept.

Have you looked into Univ. of North Texas or Texas Christian? Both of those have excellent piano faculties and music departments in general. I understand that there is free commuter bus service between downtown Dallas and UNT daily (free for UNT students!)

Welcome to the forum!
Posted by: musicianwwings

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 07/13/08 02:19 PM

Thanks for the comments! I really appreciate it!
Posted by: annifirst

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 07/26/08 08:15 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Thefiredigger:
Does anyone know anything about The Wheaton College Conservatory ( http://www.wheaton.edu/Conservatory/ ) or Houghton College's Greatbach School of music. ( http://campus.houghton.edu/orgs/music/ ) I have heard good things said about Wheaton but the people who I have heard this from are like me, they too have heard good things about Wheaton. [/b]
Posted by: annifirst

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 07/26/08 08:17 PM

Sorry about the blank reply.

I lived in Wheaton in the 1970's and learned that the College is a very conservative Protestant environment. I know nothing of its conservatory, but make sure you would feel comfortable on such a campus before considering it.
Posted by: andrevazpereira

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/16/08 09:23 PM

I`m a new member of Piano World and just started to post videos one youtube. I also have a myspace Internet page (also new)!!

This is my first youtube video with a portuguese windband (Sociedade Musical Gouveense) and the maestro Helder Abreu. The concerto is the Richard Addinsell "Warsaw Concerto" (the hard version in this case) that i had the pleasure to record recently. The video doesn't start in the beginning of the concerto. The CD is on sale too (of course is a much better version than this live performance... but i guess that is normal).

So here are the links and be free to comment. I hope i can comment all your videos and recordings soon...

Warsaw Concerto - André Vaz Pereira (youtube)

http://br.youtube.com/watch?v=_bOD0Qt1FXM

myspace

www.myspace.com/andrevqazpereira
Posted by: Vonette

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/20/08 04:32 PM

Anyone interested in Wheaton's Conservatory should look at this thread:
http://www.pianoworld.com/ubb/ubb/ultimatebb.php?/topic/2/18479.html

As a former student there, I have nothing but positive things to say about the school and the Conservatory.
Posted by: Thunester

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/25/08 01:21 PM

Hey..sorry i haven't been on here for a while but thanks opus119 for answering my question! Since my last post i have become pretty interested in the manhattan school of music..how good to you have to be to get in? (sort of a dumb question, i know..but better questions aren't forming in my head. it's one of those days.)
Posted by: liszt85

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/27/08 08:17 PM

Hi, I'm from India. I am presently in my final year of a 5 year integrated Master of Science program in Physics at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India. I've been playing the piano for about 8 years now. I went to vienna to study under a Slovenian pianist and composer, Prof Blazenka Arnic from May-July 2008. It was there that I decided that I had to pursue music seriously once I graduate from IIT. So I've decided to take off one year after I graduate (in May 2009) to prepare for auditions. I am interested in piano performance (I'm just beginning to understand and appreciate jazz.. I'd like to go to a school which emphasizes and overall development than just classical though all my training has been in classical music) and also am interested in singing (popular music, I had my own rock band for a few years and I write my own songs). So I've decided to audition fr Berklee in 2010. The drummer in my band got through and his dad is rich enough to pay for his education there. In my case, I don't have a penny to pay for it.

So I need advice from you guys about these:

1) A list of good universities/conservatories which offer good chances to international students for a substantial financial aid packet.

2) I have just started on my first sonata (completed movement I of the tempest by Beethoven, will start the third movement shortly, working on Chopin Etude Op 25, No 2, and the prelude and fugue by Bach in C minor. I am also working on fine tuning my Fantasy Impromptu.) Keeping all this in mind, and considering that I have had no good teacher so far in India and my playing level is not all that good, advice me on my chances of getting into a good piano school. I intend to take off one year and devote 6-7 hrs everyday to my piano practice.

Thank you for your time!

-Vishnu
Posted by: liszt85

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/27/08 08:19 PM

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=723510 You can listen to my attempts..but these recordings were made one year ago and I believe I'm a little better now. Will post new recordings when I've done them.
Posted by: liszt85

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 08/27/08 08:22 PM

Oh and btw, since I would have done a masters degree by then, I would not exactly like to go for a BM which would require me to do a lot of courses other than performance related courses.. So please also suggest schools that have diploma courses for people like me. I'm 22 now and I know I'm kinda late but its never too late to start, is it?
Posted by: DangerPiano

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 09/05/08 03:06 PM

What about the piano forum one used by ubb. I think...
Posted by: xxmynameisjohnxx

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 10/28/08 02:57 AM

Hey, I'm wanting to attend UCLA for Piano Performance and composition, has anyone on this board attended UCLA? What you suggest I do to prepare for auditions in 2010 to increase my chances of acceptance?
Posted by: Cherub Rocker

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 10/28/08 10:03 PM

Is anyone here familiar with the Schools of Music at the University of South Carolina and the University of Georgia? I'd like to know how good is the faculty at those schools and if they are good about providing students with financial aid.

I am finishing my master's at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and would like to get started on a DMA next year. As much as I like my current school, I'm wondering if it might be best to go somewhere else for a doctorate.

I would also consider moving to Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, or Michigan. What other great schools are in these states besides Cleveland Institute of Music, Cincinnati Conservatory, University of Michigan, and Michigan State?
Posted by: Turn-Table

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 11/16/08 11:19 AM

My post is not to recommend a particular school, but just to offer a comment on what I observed recently that I think--and hope--is an interesting and helpful trend for people doing research on picking music schools. Some schools have capitalized on high technology by uploading interesting video clips about faculty members where teachers talk about themselves, their teachings and their students.

I still remember how difficult it was when I was in high school, trying to narrow down potential schools and teachers. This was the 80s, before Internet and Piano World ;\) . My teacher at the time was a good player, but surprisingly provincial and limited in her knowledge about the "scene." I will spare you the heartaches that I went through, except to emphasize that information did not come easily. Reading biographies of teachers in print school catalogues left me overwhelmed and without any clearer understanding. It could be argued that these new video clips are also marketing tools and just as calculated as printed words. Nevertheless, the chance to see these teachers in motion, hear their voice, would surely enliven the search process.

Anyway, from the University of Southern California:

Daniel Pollack (scroll down to the bottom for video links):
http://www.usc.edu/schools/music/private/faculty/dpollack.php

Kevin Fitz-Gerald:
http://www.usc.edu/schools/music/private/faculty/kfitzger.php

(Too bad no videos are available on John Perry.)

From Oberlin College:

http://www.oberlin.edu/con/divinfo/keyboard/piano.html

Click on the left of the page, then names of these teachers' individual page that feature video clips: Duphil, Frumkin, Rutstein, Takacs.
Posted by: Matt Horwitz

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 11/22/08 01:56 PM

Hey,
look at this article:

http://www.musicouch.com/Genres/Classical/Showing-Virtuosity-in-60-Seconds.357351

It's a breath of fresh air in my life- I hope you enjoy it \:\)
Posted by: Deux Arabesques

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 11/25/08 08:57 PM

Hi! Junior in HS wondering if there are any Western Washington University graduates here? I'm actually looking to become a composition major, and WWU itnerested me greatly... would like to stay in Washington if possible.
Posted by: NathanW

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 12/10/08 09:03 AM

Hi, I'm a pianist currently in Peace Corps Ukraine. I'm currently exploring options after Peace Corps.
I was wondering what the best option for Applied Piano or Piano Performance is in the pacific northwest. I'm looking into either public or private universities. I grew up in the Portland/Vancouver area, and when I return to the states I would like to go to school somewhere close.
Posted by: etcetra

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 01/14/09 10:24 AM

I had friends who did undergrad at a very unknown college.. they practiced 8hrs+ a day, they worked really hard.. everyone single one of them went to grad school.. getting a big scholarship or sometimes full scholarship from USC, Eastman ..etc.

I know a friend of mine who went to the same school for jazz piano..the program wasn't that great but he practiced hard.. and he was finalist at the prestigious Theoloneous Monk competition couple of years ago.

I really think a lot of is really up to the individual dedication.. and studying with the right teacher.. there are a lot of excellent teachers that are not famous.

I don't know if I am qualified to give suggestion, but I personally think that ppl shouldn't get too hung up on whether they get accepted at school x or not.. everyone has different path in music.. and in the end the people who are dedicated in what they do usually go somewhere in life.
Posted by: Ringer

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/03/09 08:13 PM

Well, I have to add a shoutout to my very first piano teacher here and the University of Houston! Professor Weems taught me when I was just starting out at 6 years old. It turns out this was during the few years in her life when she wasn't teaching college-aged pianists! She still is my favorite teacher after all this time!

http://www.music.uh.edu/people/weems.html
Posted by: verywellmister

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 02/15/09 05:31 PM

I'm curious about the Juilliard audition requirements. They say:
"A substantial composition by Chopin, Schumann, Brahms, Liszt, or Mendelssohn."

Does that mean major works byRachmaninoff, Franck, or early Scriabin have to be the substantial work of the applicant's choice?
Posted by: Betty Patnude

Re: Music Schools/Conservatories in the US - 03/15/09 08:08 PM

How is Crane School of Music in Potsdam, New York doing these days?