The slower, darker stuff :)

Posted by: James Youn

The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/14/07 12:39 PM

What's your favorite slow/dark/sad/menacing/etc... song for the piano?

I have a hard time finding music I like to play because I tend to lean towards the more obscure stuff. So, no bright, cheery, fluffy ballet-music, please!
Posted by: pianojerome

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/14/07 12:45 PM

Shostakovich, Prelude in E-Flat Minor, Op. 34 No. 14.

Another good one is Prokofiev, Despair, Op. 4 No. 3[/b] (not the famous #4, which is also menacing but much faster).


For something a bit lonely, try Shostakovich's Prelude Op. 34 No. 22. It's not menacing. It's very lonely music.
Posted by: L'echange

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/14/07 12:57 PM

Very slow and dark in a different way - Messiaen Regard #1

Ravel - Le Gibet from Gaspard

Schumann - Theme from symphonic etudes and some of the variations

Not piano,,, but drone metal bands like Earth, Weed Eagle, and Sleep. They have a very dark, VERY slow, sometimes sad (earth), and usually menacing sound.
Posted by: vanityx3

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/14/07 01:07 PM

Lots of Scriabin is dark and menacing. go to pinaosociety.com and listen to some of his preludes and things. He has lots of haunting melodies.
Posted by: Shellman

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/14/07 01:14 PM

L'exchange, in that case you need to investigate William Sterndale-Bennett as the Op.13 theme comes from a work of his (can't remember which at the moment though...)

I would personally nominate Liszt's La Lugubre Gondola (version 2)
Posted by: Janus K. Sachs

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/14/07 01:31 PM

Second vote for Scriabin -- check out the Sixth and Ninth ("Black Mass") Sonatas. Scriabin himself was scared of the Sixth (he never performed it). If you like the earlier, more romantic Scriabin, check out the last movement (a funeral march) from the First Sonata.
And if you are feeling really adventurous, try Schoenberg's Piano Pieces, Op. 11, specifically #1 and #2 (but not #3, which is a cry of despair).
Faure's late Nocturnes (nos. 9-13) are indeed dark. #12 is a favorite of mine and an unknown gem.
One of most desolate pieces I know is the Sarabande from Bach's Fifth Suite for solo cello (C minor). It's not piano music, but you can easily read through it on the piano. A great way to be expressive with just a single line with no accompaniment.
Posted by: bryan s

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/14/07 02:05 PM

Chopin - Prelude 2 in Am
Ornstein - Sonata 4, 2nd movement ('semplice')
Scriabin - 6th and 9th Sonatas
Alkan - Concerto 2nd movement
Beethoven - Hammerklavier slow movement
Godowsky - Java Suite: "In the Kraton"
(If you haven't heard the Java Suite, get it!)
Posted by: Robert Kenessy

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/14/07 03:26 PM

Alkan's 'chanson de la folle au bord de la mer' ("song of the crazy woman at the sea shore") for piano solo. Enjoy! (if that's the right word)
Posted by: cheez_5

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/14/07 03:37 PM

Brahms's first ballade op. 10 no. 1 is a good choice too. It is very dark, yet noble.
Posted by: Ferdinand

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/16/07 12:03 AM

Speaking of Brahms -
Intermezzo opus 118 #6 in e flat minor
Intermezzo opus 116 #2 in a minor
Posted by: Kreisler

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/16/07 12:07 AM

Probably the darkest piece I know is the 2nd Shostakovich sonata. It's almost never played, but it's a wonderful piece, sort of a big brother (in spirit, not in style) to the Berg sonata (and in the same key.)
Posted by: Eeeff

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/16/07 01:32 PM

If you can play the melody JUST right, Moonlight Sonata, 1st movement.

That is one menacing line.
Posted by: John Citron

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/16/07 02:12 PM

I second the Alkan 2nd Movement. Also try Gottschalk's Morte!!, Berceuse, and La Savane.

John
Posted by: bryan s

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/16/07 09:40 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Robert Kenessey:
Alkan's 'chanson de la folle au bord de la mer' ("song of the crazy woman at the sea shore") for piano solo. Enjoy! (if that's the right word) [/b]
Just listened to it and
Wow, good stuff!
Posted by: dannylux

Re: The slower, darker stuff :) - 11/17/07 06:06 AM

Cécile Chaminade is known mostly for her charming salon pieces.

Her dark and brooding Au Pays Dévasté, Op.155 (1919) is very beautiful. This is no salon piece.

Another wonderful dark piece is Tomas Leon's Dolor Profundo.


Mel