Incredible Child Pianist

Posted by: CC2 and Chopin lover

Incredible Child Pianist - 07/18/08 07:00 PM

I came across this seven year old young lady quite accidentally on You Tube. I found her fluidity, trills, control and comfort at the keyboard quite astounding for a child. See what you think:

Umi Garrett
Posted by: RonaldSteinway

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 07/18/08 11:25 PM

If I have to compare her to other prodigies, she is in the bottom. But if compared to normal kids, she is good (note, just good, not much better).

There are soooooo many incredible kids in Youtube. I wonder why she caught your attention?
Posted by: argerichfan

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 07/18/08 11:48 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by RonaldSteinway:
If I have to compare her to other prodigies, she is in the bottom.
Well I don't know that I would go quite that far. She certainly has talent and flair, but alas we've been so inundated with -admittedly better- youngsters on YouTube that it's difficult not to get unwillingly and uncomfortably jaded.

My dear, come back in a few years. Who knows where you'll be.

One wonders when some 9 or 10 year old finally cracks the immense -and unwieldy- musical demands of the Busoni or Bartok 2. Unlike Rachmaninov 3 -always open season for prodigies- the hallowed realms of the Busoni and Bartok remain safe, if only because those concertos don't particularly interest youngsters.
Posted by: CherryCoke

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 07/19/08 01:22 AM

Weird, there's another thread about a different young pianist from this same concert.
Posted by: AZNpiano

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 07/19/08 01:42 AM

It's the same kid.
Posted by: Numerian

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 07/19/08 01:48 AM

She's playing Rameau in this other clip.

Her playing is quite remarkable for a 7 year old, but as others have noted, there are 6 and 5 year olds on You Tube who are also impressive. And then of course, all the mature professional performers age 8 and higher have to be considered as well. Give Umi Garrett another 6 years and she will have a concerto performance on You Tube with full orchestra, and then will disappear for awhile in a conservatory.

Personally, I'm waiting for the breakthrough performance from a child in utero.
Posted by: CC2 and Chopin lover

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 07/19/08 09:39 AM

RonaldSteinway asks:
There are soooooo many incredible kids in Youtube. I wonder why she caught your attention?[/b]

I think I enumerated the reasons quite specifically in my opening post. The fact that you could state that this kid is at "the bottom" implies you have seen many better seven year olds. Please do post their videos on this thread, as I am highly curious who YOU would put at the top, and why?
Posted by: Janus K. Sachs

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 07/19/08 10:14 AM

Given how often these "prodigy/child genius" threads seem to pop up nowadays, maybe the mods should consider a sticky thread?
Posted by: RonaldSteinway

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 07/20/08 02:23 AM

These two examples for you to watch...There are many others.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=p7EHL30Tut8&feature=related

http://youtube.com/watch?v=8mo0mbEt9Kc

Why these two are way better than your girl:
1. Different level of musicality.
2. Technically these two are much better than the girl that you praised...

Your girl's touch is way too heavy for the Minute Walts, The coordination between left and right hands is off. Technically and emotionally, she is not there yet to play minute waltz decently.
Posted by: Classicalist

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 07/20/08 02:27 AM

Now as a teenage pianist, I've grown up with my far share of 'prodigies' as people in my community would call them. What is surprising is many of these young kids lose their interest for piano so easily. It's really saddening because of all the talent they have.
Posted by: AZNpiano

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 07/20/08 02:48 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by RonaldSteinway:
Your girl's touch is way too heavy for the Minute Walts, The coordination between left and right hands is off. Technically and emotionally, she is not there yet to play minute waltz decently. [/b]
I would give the girl a break already! She's not out to compete with these other Youtube kids who have won national/international competitions.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 07/20/08 08:54 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by RonaldSteinway:
If I have to compare her to other prodigies, she is in the bottom. But if compared to normal kids, she is good (note, just good, not much better).[/b]
I would agree that her performance doesn't rate very high among prodigees. But compared to "normal" kids I think your opinion of her playing is way too low. I would say that compared to normal kids she easily rates in the 99th percentile for her age. In fact, normal kids will never have the technique to even attempt the Minute Waltz at any age.
Posted by: Piano*Dad

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 07/20/08 09:31 AM

 Quote:
I would give the girl a break already! She's not out to compete with these other Youtube kids who have won national/international competitions.
AZN,

I heartily agree.

I do not know why people find it so easy to express harsh criticisms of young people on internet forums. This reflects typical snobbish "eat our young" classical-trained musicians for whom nobody but so-and-so is good enough. Welcome to the dying elitist world of classical piano. Good young people need to be celebrated, not chopped off at the knees.

Anybody remember Derulux? He used to make the same point quite often. Cutting up kids is very unseemly.


Vincent,

Nice Grieg. My son is starting to work on that movement now.
Posted by: Janus K. Sachs

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 07/20/08 10:52 AM

OT, but whatever happened to Derulux? When going through old threads, I always find his posts interesting.
Posted by: umipiano

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/13/09 12:48 AM

Hi this is Umi's father, just thought i would share this with everyone,
Umi is going to be on the "Ellen DeGeneres Show" scheduled to air on Monday May 18th, she will be performing Liszt "Gnomenregen" at least part of it, due to time limitations it could be no longer than 70 seconds in length. Wish her good luck!

Steve
Posted by: lisztonian

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/13/09 01:08 AM

Originally Posted By: Piano*Dad
Quote:
I would give the girl a break already! She's not out to compete with these other Youtube kids who have won national/international competitions.
AZN,

I heartily agree.

I do not know why people find it so easy to express harsh criticisms of young people on internet forums. This reflects typical snobbish "eat our young" classical-trained musicians for whom nobody but so-and-so is good enough. Welcome to the dying elitist world of classical piano. Good young people need to be celebrated, not chopped off at the knees.

Perhaps there would be no need for criticism if a child were not lifted to "incredible" or "prodigal" status.
Posted by: lisztonian

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/13/09 01:10 AM

Originally Posted By: umipiano
Hi this is Umi's father, just thought i would share this with everyone,
Umi is going to be on the "Ellen DeGeneres Show" scheduled to air on Monday May 18th, she will be performing Liszt "Gnomenregen" at least part of it, due to time limitations it could be no longer than 70 seconds in length. Wish her good luck!

Steve
Im happy to say I've tackled that piece as well. It sure is a tough one.
Posted by: wr

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/13/09 05:12 AM

Originally Posted By: Piano*Dad
Quote:
I would give the girl a break already! She's not out to compete with these other Youtube kids who have won national/international competitions.
AZN,

I heartily agree.

I do not know why people find it so easy to express harsh criticisms of young people on internet forums. This reflects typical snobbish "eat our young" classical-trained musicians for whom nobody but so-and-so is good enough. Welcome to the dying elitist world of classical piano. Good young people need to be celebrated, not chopped off at the knees.

Anybody remember Derulux? He used to make the same point quite often. Cutting up kids is very unseemly.



Well, one reason I can sometimes get harsh about these kids is because I think kids should not be shoved into the public spotlight before they are worldly enough to fully aware of the situation they are in, and are in control of it themselves. Anything else is exploitation, and that is what is unseemly. I don't care how it gets rationalized and how much the child seems to enjoy it on the surface, the kid is getting used and manipulated by adults. It happened to me on a small, local scale as a child, so I have some idea of what I am talking about.

If people in internet forums aren't being nice, maybe the answer to that is that they shouldn't even be made aware of these kids. Problem solved.
Posted by: lilylady

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/13/09 07:40 AM

Originally Posted By: Piano*Dad
Quote:
I would give the girl a break already! She's not out to compete with these other Youtube kids who have won national/international competitions.
AZN,

I heartily agree.
I do not know why people find it so easy to express harsh criticisms of young people on internet forums.... Cutting up kids is very unseemly.


I agree that this harsh criticsm here is quite uncomely. I would think that a piano community would be encouraging to youngsters who are studying the piano with fervor to become good enough to share their talents with others.

I also listened to the Rameau. I would be proud to be her parent or teacher.

I don't recall that CC2 said she was a prodigy, just sharing that he found a 7 yr old who is doing well.

Umi's Dad - Keep encouraging her and giving her all the opportunities to share her music with others!

RE:
Aimi Kobayashi
Quite exception talent. She has more musicality than most adults who play this piece!

KIT ARMSTRONG
Another exceptional young artist.

Thank you for sharing all three with us.

WR
RE: "Well, one reason I can sometimes get harsh about these kids is because I think kids should not be shoved into the public spotlight before they are worldly enough to fully aware of the situation they are in, and are in control of it themselves."

Shame on you. You justify getting harsh with a child just because you disagree with their parents? Geeze. Give the kids a break.
Posted by: Phlebas

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/13/09 09:23 AM

Originally Posted By: umipiano
Hi this is Umi's father, just thought i would share this with everyone,
Umi is going to be on the "Ellen DeGeneres Show" scheduled to air on Monday May 18th, she will be performing Liszt "Gnomenregen" at least part of it, due to time limitations it could be no longer than 70 seconds in length. Wish her good luck!

Steve


Best of luck to her. Please ignore the negative comments here. People often forget they are talking about real people.
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/13/09 10:18 AM

Originally Posted By: RonaldSteinway
These two examples for you to watch...There are many others.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=p7EHL30Tut8&feature=related

http://youtube.com/watch?v=8mo0mbEt9Kc

Why these two are way better than your girl:
1. Different level of musicality.
2. Technically these two are much better than the girl that you praised...

Your girl's touch is way too heavy for the Minute Walts, The coordination between left and right hands is off. Technically and emotionally, she is not there yet to play minute waltz decently.


I think that's a little harsh and depends what you mean by "decently". Although your criticsms are valid, I think she plays it better than all but around 2-3% of all people of any age who play piano. So for a seven year extremely good(less than 1% could play it that well) but maybe not prodigy level(whatever that means...everything is relative).
Posted by: Horowitzian

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/13/09 10:52 AM

Originally Posted By: RonaldSteinway
These two examples for you to watch...There are many others.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=p7EHL30Tut8&feature=related

http://youtube.com/watch?v=8mo0mbEt9Kc

Why these two are way better than your girl:
1. Different level of musicality.
2. Technically these two are much better than the girl that you praised...

Your girl's touch is way too heavy for the Minute Walts, The coordination between left and right hands is off. Technically and emotionally, she is not there yet to play minute waltz decently.


I agree with pianoloverus; that's a bit harsh, considering her age.
Posted by: umipiano

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/13/09 11:14 AM

She is in the best of hands with loving teachers that know the ways of the claissical music field. It is just sad that there is soo little in the way of finincial aid out there to help these young aspiring kids. What is one to do if they win a competition in another state and the only way to get there award is to perform there which will require two plane tickets, a hotel for the night, a taxie etc... and then on top of that you have already paid $200+ in competition fees and entry fees. It is a true up hill battle even with all the help and support we recieve from friends and family. We hope the Ellen show will open up some doors for her and make her goal a little eaiser to reach.

Steve
Posted by: jdhampton924

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/13/09 11:48 AM

I see two problems with this..

One if you want to watch a professional pianist......Go watch a professional pianist. It will be more enjoyable to you. Of course a kid is not going to be able to do as well. Even a prodigy.

I can understand why some people are harsh. When it comes down to it. Playing good is not enough in the end. Reminds me of that film The Competition. Where the mother says to her son "You play like an angel, shouldn't that be enough.." His reply was "We all play like angels." Then goes on to talk about the girl who dresses younger then she was. I can understand why we as a group expect something more. When it comes down to what a lot of us can do, just being able to play is the normal.

As for exploitation...I think we should give the benefit of the doubt on that one. No one has any proof that is going on....And we can't possibly speak for the girl.
Posted by: EmilyChopin

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/13/09 11:54 AM

I totally agree with wr. These kids are talented but they're not the ones putting up videos or talking about how they're prodigies, it's their parents. Their parents ought to be proud but flinging them into performances like this isn't always good for them. Look what happened to Mozart with his dad.

Regarding the girl, she seems to be having fun, and she IS talented. But I wonder who picked out the Minute Waltz for her to play?
Posted by: Horowitzian

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/13/09 12:58 PM

Originally Posted By: umipiano
She is in the best of hands with loving teachers that know the ways of the claissical music field. It is just sad that there is soo little in the way of finincial aid out there to help these young aspiring kids. What is one to do if they win a competition in another state and the only way to get there award is to perform there which will require two plane tickets, a hotel for the night, a taxie etc... and then on top of that you have already paid $200+ in competition fees and entry fees. It is a true up hill battle even with all the help and support we recieve from friends and family. We hope the Ellen show will open up some doors for her and make her goal a little eaiser to reach.

Steve


Hi Steve,

I enjoyed the Chopin waltz, but what I really found on your YT channel that I though was great was the Liszt Gnomenreigen . Tell Umi "great work" from me. thumb My only concern is that her shoulders appeared to be tense to me; but those poofy sleeves might have been contributing slightly to an optical illusion. smile

I can tell that in the year between the Chopin and the Liszt her touch has gotten lighter. However, some of the perceived heavy touch in the Chopin CC2 linked to might have been the acoustic combined with poorer recording quality.
Posted by: wr

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/13/09 11:12 PM

Originally Posted By: lilylady

WR
RE: "Well, one reason I can sometimes get harsh about these kids is because I think kids should not be shoved into the public spotlight before they are worldly enough to fully aware of the situation they are in, and are in control of it themselves."

Shame on you. You justify getting harsh with a child just because you disagree with their parents? Geeze. Give the kids a break.


Obviously, I'm not actually "getting harsh with a child" because that child is not posting on this forum. I shouldn't have needed to explain that.
Posted by: sotto voce

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/14/09 12:22 AM

Isn't it possible for children to be exploited even while apparently enjoying it?

Children are considered not to know what's in their best interest, and there are things to which they cannot legally give informed consent; it goes with the territory of being a minor. It's assumed that parents or guardians will act in their children's best interests, but that doesn't always happen; sometimes they are ignorant or misguided, and sometimes the child's needs just aren't a priority.

Like wr, I had some traumatic experiences as a kid. Learning to play and read music in earliest childhood was a great advantage, but being pushed too fast too soon to perform—while fun at first—had effects that scarred me enough to abandon piano completely for several years (and to continue abandoning it periodically throughout adulthood). Because I had learned nothing about artistry or the personal relevance of musical expression, cultivating and reclaiming them—and overcoming cycles of ambivalence and even antipathy—has been a lifelong struggle.

I wouldn't wish to be the outsider judging what differentiates active encouragement from inappropriately aggressive promotion, and I sure don't envy the parent charged with that responsibility.

Steven
Posted by: BJones

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/14/09 01:21 AM

Originally Posted By: Horowitzian
but those poofy sleeves might have been contributing slightly to an optical illusion.


Like the rotation on these cirlces?



smile
Posted by: Numerian

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/14/09 07:40 AM

To some degree or another I've known three of the contestants who happen to be competing this month in the Van Cliburn competition. Two have performed at my house and one I arranged to perform as a teenager with a local orchestra.

They have worked at the piano almost all of their lives, and in every case it started as a requirement imposed on them by their parents. Their parents were very driven people, constantly looking for opportunities for their children to perform. Exactly when the parent should begin pushing the child in front of the public is a difficult question, but often the determination is made not by the parent (and certainly not by the child), but by the teacher. At least if they have a very good teacher.

Once these kids went on to conservatory (Julliard, Curtis, etc.), the parents were forced to butt out and stop acting as career managers. The teachers and the school take on that role, except interestingly on those occasions when the parents can still arrange a gig back home during a school break. At this point, though, the child is now a teenager/adult, and wants every exposure possible, because everyone in the conservatory knows how difficult a music career is and how important exposure is.

I'm sure there are many more cases where the child prodigy fizzles out or drops out, so it is difficult to say at this stage what will happen to Umi. What I've seen though, is that before age ten parental pressure to practice, and parental help in getting public performance experience, is important as long as the child enjoys both of these experiences. If the child is only going through the motions, it is probably useless to expect much. Second, the parent has to be prepared to get out of the picture once a really good teacher takes over the education, and especially if a top conservatory is involved. Then it becomes more and more what that young adult wants for herself or himself, and how badly they want it.

And that, by the way, is only the career part, and says nothing about whether the child can emotionally identify with the music being performed. One big clue I have seen is whether the child starts asking questions about the composer, the musical period at the time, and especially when the child wants to explore other piano literature. That's a big step forward to engagement with music, not just with a piano career.
Posted by: Piano*Dad

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/14/09 08:54 AM

Originally Posted By: Numerian


They have worked at the piano almost all of their lives, and in every case it started as a requirement imposed on them by their parents.
.
.
.

Exactly when the parent should begin pushing the child in front of the public is a difficult question, but often the determination is made not by the parent (and certainly not by the child), but by the teacher. At least if they have a very good teacher.

.
.
.

I'm sure there are many more cases where the child prodigy fizzles out or drops out, ... What I've seen though, is that before age ten parental pressure to practice, and parental help in getting public performance experience, is important as long as the child enjoys both of these experiences. If the child is only going through the motions, it is probably useless to expect much. Second, the parent has to be prepared to get out of the picture once a really good teacher takes over the education, and especially if a top conservatory is involved. Then it becomes more and more what that young adult wants for herself or himself, and how badly they want it. ...



All very good points.

I think most of this applies to the non-prodigy as well. If a child is not motivated, parental pushing is counter-productive on many levels. If they are, but they are not fully focussed, the parent can provide some of that focus and discipline. Not forever, of course. Butting out is hard, as I know from first-hand experience. And it's not instant, as in switching off a light.
Posted by: wr

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/15/09 01:10 AM

Originally Posted By: Numerian
What I've seen though, is that before age ten parental pressure to practice, and parental help in getting public performance experience, is important as long as the child enjoys both of these experiences.


I really don't have a problem with parents working with getting their talented kids to develop their talent as fully as possible, but the line between that and turning the child into a "musical genius project" rather than a well-rounded human being is mighty thin indeed, IMO.

I also agree that some public performance experience for really young kids (i.e., pre-teens) can be a good thing, if it can kept within the range of what most kids do. But if talented tykes start getting presented as extraordinary and sensational, to audiences far and wide, their psyches are in real danger of getting thoroughly warped, and I am not convinced the musical results are worth it, no matter how well they might play.
Posted by: pianobuff

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/15/09 02:53 AM

I think that there is nothing wrong with parents sharing their child's gifts for others to enjoy (isn't that what music is all about?) as long as the child is enjoying the process of sharing. I understand how it could easily get out of control, but if a child (or anyone that has a great talent, then let it be shared!)

As far as comparing pianists, what is the benefit of this, unless you talk privately, but I don't think it should happen on a public forum.

I think Umi plays superbly and I hope her all the best on the Ellen show and for the future.
Posted by: landorrano

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/15/09 08:27 AM

Originally Posted By: Numerian
To some degree or another I've known three of the contestants who happen to be competing this month in the Van Cliburn competition. Two have performed at my house and one I arranged to perform as a teenager with a local orchestra.

They have worked at the piano almost all of their lives, and in every case it started as a requirement imposed on them by their parents. Their parents were very driven people


The competition circuit is a horror and has nothing to do with music.

A parent who pushes their child in that direction is bloodthirsty.

Run, run, little Umi, run, while you still can ...
Posted by: Piano*Dad

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/15/09 09:17 AM

Thanks for that well thought out and nuanced view. I'm sure the Garrett's will benefit greatly.
Posted by: sotto voce

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/15/09 09:28 AM

Originally Posted By: Piano*Dad
Thanks for that well thought out and nuanced view. I'm sure the Garrett's will benefit greatly.

As one who has personally benefited from a similarly well thought out and nuanced view from the same source, I'm not surprised.

Steven
Posted by: landorrano

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/15/09 04:04 PM

Originally Posted By: Piano*Dad
Thanks for that well thought out and nuanced view. I'm sure the Garrett's will benefit greatly.


Thank you for the compliment.
Posted by: ProdigalPianist

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/15/09 04:50 PM

Originally Posted By: pianobuff
I think that there is nothing wrong with parents sharing their child's gifts for others to enjoy (isn't that what music is all about?) as long as the child is enjoying the process of sharing.


My level of agreement with this depends on the definition of "sharing the child's gifts" I guess (not that my opinion matters too much). If a kid likes to perform, then hauling them down to the local senior citizen's center and having them play, I would agree, is "sharing their gifts". Ditto if you tape them playing and put it up on YouTube because you're proud of them and so your friends and relatives can see.

But putting them on a very competitive national stage (tv appearances, competitions)? _Promoting_ them as prodigies, or incredibly gifted? Not so sure. Because if you do that, and the kid is _not_ one of the very very few at the very, very top?

What happens then? Some people will ooh and ahhh and coo over them and talk about how wonderful and special they are...then along will come people who rip them to shreds for 'not being that good' or 'clearly not at the level of so-and-so who is X years younger." And what does that do to a musician's self-confidence and sense of self? It seems to me that if the child is not one truly of the best in the world at their age, PR touting them as a 'prodigy' or an 'incredible pianist at the beginning of a world-class career' will do more harm than good.

You may be a very big duck on your little pond but sooner or later (on this path, sooner) you're in the ocean with the sharks. And you are a very small duck indeed.

I don't know why the music world needs another (or, for that matter, any) child prodigy. It doesn't do any favors for the child and the resulting emphasis on race-the-clock child performers doesn't do any good for the world of classical music, in my opinion. Who cares who will be the youngest to do Rach 3 with the London Symphony?? When we have adults of great artistry who have a hard enough time trying to make a living? What's the point of promoting little kids?

I do applaud a parent trying to give a child who loves music and hopes to make a career out of it (assuming the child does want this) every opportunity. And as someone who grew up in the middle of nowhere I do understand it generally takes connections, and money, to be able to get a musical education capable of reaching that goal. I just have qualms about promoting kids.
Posted by: umipiano

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/16/09 04:09 AM

Well the recording for the Ellen show happened on the 14th, I was just blown away by how well they treated us they were so nice. There was allot of dancing going on and I think that really helps everyone feel good and happy. It went very well, I feel her teacher was very instrumental in making this a great moment that Umi will cherish forever. We are so proud of her. As long as she wants to keep pursuing her goal, my wife and I will do our best to keep up with her. Back stage Jamie Foxx even shook Umi's hand and congratulated her on the performance.

Be sure not to miss the show, it will be this coming Monday!

Steve (Umi's Dad)
Posted by: lilylady

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/16/09 07:14 AM

That's great Umi's dad!

I'll set up my tape to watch it since I'll be out working.

Give her a great big hug from her supporters. ;-)
Posted by: James Cook

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/17/09 04:28 AM

The first one is obviously older then 7 when the video was made. The second is one year older than, and playing an easier piece, with an obviously less developed technique. What's the matter with you people and your quiping. Find some videos of real 7 year olds that are better, why don't you? Or aren't there any?
Posted by: Palindrome

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/17/09 07:22 PM

With regard to "pushing children," I think that each individual case has to be treated on its own, and that much as we are interested in the music, we're not the ones to judge.

Well-meaning people (Alfred Corning Clark) thought Josef Hofmann was being exploited, and so gave a gift to the family to allow Hofmann the luxury of not having to perform as a child. He commented that he did not feel exploited, and that as a result of not being on the stage for his later childhood and teen years, he lost the platform ease he had had when younger, and needed many years of concertizing to re-acquire it.

Other pianists (Slenczynska comes to mind) seem not to have benefited psychologically from the pressure put on them as children.

And then (in my own family, sorry to say) I've seen children with definite gifts and interest in an art not supported by parents. Bad mistake on their part? Or was it just a reasonable assessment that a career as a dancer was almost certainly not going to be a "successful" one?

I wish Umi the greatest success, and hope that some day I'll be in the audience when she, as an mature artist, gives us enjoyment.
Posted by: umipiano

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/19/09 02:18 AM

Umi on Ellen Show
Steve G
Posted by: lilylady

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/19/09 07:22 AM

Originally Posted By: umipiano


She was great! Very personable. Fun stuff with her tricks. And she played her piece very well.

Hugs to Umi!
Posted by: pianobuff

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 05/25/09 02:36 AM

Congratulations Umi! Great stage presence and well played Liszt. I look forward to hearing more.

I am curious, what other pieces was she learning while learning Dance of the Gnomes?


Posted by: Bill Ross

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 09/13/09 04:11 PM



The Genius Of The Child Pianist http://youngpianists.proboards.com/index.cgi?/
Posted by: cruiser

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 09/13/09 04:21 PM

Originally Posted By: Janus K. Sachs
Given how often these "prodigy/child genius" threads seem to pop up nowadays, maybe the mods should consider a sticky thread?


sticky thread? ...good idea - preferably at the bottom of the last page!

Posted by: Janus K. Sachs

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 09/13/09 04:34 PM

Originally Posted By: Bill Ross
*SNIP*
Thus, the Sacred Spam resurrects a thread that had already become a zombie once.
Posted by: GoldenSound

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 09/13/09 11:58 PM

Originally Posted By: CC2 and Chopin lover
RonaldSteinway asks:
There are soooooo many incredible kids in Youtube. I wonder why she caught your attention?

I think I enumerated the reasons quite specifically in my opening post. The fact that you could state that this kid is at "the bottom" implies you have seen many better seven year olds. Please do post their videos on this thread, as I am highly curious who YOU would put at the top, and why?


This 7 year old plays a mean fantasie impromptu
Posted by: cruiser

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 09/14/09 04:04 AM

Can we PLEASE confine this old thread to the vaults?! mad

I'm sick of hearing about clever kids!! (with half a wink)
Posted by: Damon

Re: Incredible Child Pianist - 09/14/09 08:19 AM

Originally Posted By: cruiser
Originally Posted By: Janus K. Sachs
Given how often these "prodigy/child genius" threads seem to pop up nowadays, maybe the mods should consider a sticky thread?


sticky thread? ...good idea - preferably at the bottom of the last page!


Ditto. Unless....someone has a video of a two year old playing the Mephisto Waltz while dancing a tango.