Yamaha spare parts

Posted by: ChrisVenables

Yamaha spare parts - 05/19/09 10:17 AM

How easily and quickly can Yamaha dealers/techs in other parts of the world get Yamaha piano spares?

Yamaha UK keep very little, so they order most parts through Hamburg, who then sometimes have to order through Japan. It took them 2 weeks for ivorite keytops, 3 weeks for tuning pins, 6 weeks to supply wood tuning pin bushings, front and balance rail felt washers - ordered in March and I'm still waiting, top door U3 - 8 weeks, toe blocks ordered March still waiting.

We like to use genuine spare parts wherever possible, but these delays are making life difficult for us also for our customers.
Posted by: cps

Re: Yamaha spare parts - 05/19/09 07:07 PM

Yamaha Aus is similar. They keep some parts in stock, but generally have to order from Japan, which is a 2- 3 week wait. I've found them to be very reliable and parts have never been late.

In fact, it's a lot better than any other brand I've dealt with, which range from 6 weeks to 6 months!

Cheers
Greg
Posted by: athomik

Re: Yamaha spare parts - 05/22/09 09:33 AM

The Yamaha Spares Department in the UK carries something like 16000 different spare parts for electronic and acoustic instruments. Economic and space considerations mean that the most frequently used parts are the most likely to be stocked. When you think that some models of electronic keyboard are sold by the thousand, compared to a few hundred pianos of all models combined, and that a small power socket or IC costs pennies compared to piano case parts, it is more likely that a commonly used part for an electronic keyboard can be sent out the next day, whereas rarely used and expensive parts will need to be ordered in.

The reason parts are often sourced from Hamburg is down to the fact that Yamaha Europa supplies a much bigger market, so economics are more favourable and parts are likely to be used more frequently.

Some piano parts are replaced so rarely (as opposed to being repaired in the field) that they often have to come from Japan. One reason for any delays (over the usual 6 weeks)with this is that parts which are rarely used globally often need to be sourced directly from the production line, so it is necessary to wait for production to have the time and resources to produce extra bits.
The JIT production system is one cause of this bottleneck. ( Just In Time) This system (which is pretty much universally used by any production facility in the world, irrespective of whether it makes luxury cars or plastic buckets) relies on parts and suppliers being timed very closely to scheduled production requirements, so there is normally no spare capacity for fulfilling unscheduled requirements, such as mentioned by Chris.