Ludovico Einaudi

Posted by: NancyM333

Ludovico Einaudi - 11/11/06 07:09 PM

I sent Monica's beautiful recording of Nefeli to a friend who would really like to play this piece now. I checked out the sheet music (Monica, you're right, it is pricey), and I found the Eden Roc book for $13 or The Best of Einaudi for $23. Both have Nefeli in it. I am wondering if any of you have played other pieces by him and whether it would be worth it to get the "best of" book. Maybe it would be too many similar pieces, I don't know.

Nancy
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/11/06 07:20 PM

Hi Nancy,

Is this the book you are thinking of:

http://www.musicroom.com/images/catalogue/fullsize/m215106598.jpg

If so, then its a better buy than the Eden Roc book alone. The 'Best of' book has all the sheets from Eden Roc, in addition to two other complete albums' worth.

Also, $23 is a ridiculously cheap price for it. I paid around 55 for my copy. (money well-spent, though \:\) )
Posted by: NancyM333

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/11/06 09:59 PM

I'm wondering if this is the same one. There's no picture on this one (Amazon), but it says it's 175 pages. It was originally $34.95. I saw something like it for over $50 too, so I'm a little confused. I'm glad to hear that even at $55 you are pleased. It must be good.

Nancy
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/12/06 06:27 AM

Yes, 175 pages is about right.

Thats a really good price! Recommended, because if your friend likes the music and wants to look in Einaudi further, the music is already there.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/12/06 10:15 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by NancyM333:
I am wondering if any of you have played other pieces by him and whether it would be worth it to get the "best of" book. Maybe it would be too many similar pieces, I don't know.
[/b]
I think it's well worth the extra $10 to get the bigger book. As to the question of whether it has "too many similar pieces," well, that depends on the listener. Einaudi does have a distinctive, rather minimalist style. I love it, and I want to play it all. But someone who doesn't like his music would say it all sounds alike.
Posted by: gmm1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/12/06 10:21 AM

Could someone point me (or post)someone doing something by Einadui please?

I am interested in anyone who has a "rather minimalist style" for some unknown reason.

Thanks
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/12/06 10:54 AM

Well, here's my recording of Nefeli that Nancy was talking about:

"Nefeli" by Ludovico Einaudi, recorded on Zoom H4

Check out Euan's recital pieces, too; he's done several by Einaudi. The latest was Limbo , which is very minimalist.

And here's kawaigirl's rendition of "Una Mattina," which may be the most minimalist of Einaudi's works:


"Una Mattina" performed by Kawaigirl

Or, go straight to the horse's mouth... here's a thread Euan started that has a link to a 35-min video of Einaudi himself.
Posted by: gmm1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/12/06 11:17 AM

Wow - cannot believe I am this lame. Thanks Monica for the files - ever since my horrible system crash last month when I lost all my music files, my brain does not seem to work either.

Many thanks to Monica, Euan and Kawaigirl1 for posting. This guy is good. Looks like I have another book on the way....

BTW, I also need to start a "composer" file as well, as I can't seem to make the connection...oh, well.

Thanks again
Posted by: NancyM333

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/12/06 12:26 PM

Thanks for the link to the earlier thread, Monica. I haven't had a chance to watch the video yet, but I did listen to Euan and Kawaigirl's pieces, and I liked them a lot. I can see what you mean about thinking they sound alike if you don't like his music, but for me sometimes that's only a first impression. It takes me several "listenings" of many pieces before I really can begin to find the things that stand out about it. "Nefeli" really jumped out at me the first time I heard it from Monica, so I imagine I will enjoy lots of his things. I think I'll recommend that my friend get the larger book, and I can split the cost with her if it seems too much.

Right now I'm working on the theme to the movie "The Piano," and these pieces remind me a bit of that.

Euan and Kawaigirl: Really nice job on those recordings. It must be hard to keep steady on his pieces because it would be so noticeable to change rhythm, but you both sound great.

Considering I'd never heard of Einaudi before this weekend and am now poised to be a fan, it makes me wonder what other great music I am ignorant of!

Nancy
Posted by: psychopianoman

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/20/06 04:10 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
 Quote:
Originally posted by NancyM333:
I am wondering if any of you have played other pieces by him and whether it would be worth it to get the "best of" book. Maybe it would be too many similar pieces, I don't know.
[/b]
I think it's well worth the extra $10 to get the bigger book. As to the question of whether it has "too many similar pieces," well, that depends on the listener. Einadui does have a distinctive, rather minimalist style. I love it, and I want to play it all. But someone who doesn't like his music would say it all sounds alike. [/b]
That is funny. I let my piano teacher borrow my cd and she said it made her nervous and all the songs sounded the same.

I showed it to my mother as well and she looked like she wanted to puke!

I just do not get it. It all sounds different to me. Maybe I am just simple.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/20/06 05:23 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by psychopianoman:
That is funny. I let my piano teacher borrow my cd and she said it made her nervous and all the songs sounded the same.

I showed it to my mother as well and she looked like she wanted to puke!

I just do not get it. It all sounds different to me. Maybe I am just simple. [/b]
Haha, I'm curious as to why your teacher felt 'nervous' whilst listening. It has the opposite effect on many people, it relaxes them.

Certainly the left-hand patterns in Einaudi songs are very similar from album to album. Most of the time it is octave/9th arpeggios.
Posted by: psychopianoman

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/21/06 01:09 AM

I think the music carries a certain emotion with it and not all people like it. She said it made her not feel good.

It really is not her type of music though. She is strict old fashion gosple and blues.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/30/06 10:25 PM

OK, I got so inspired by kgirl's in un altra vita, I decided I'd give it a try. Finally got the sheets today, and I have to say I'm even more impressed with you traditional sheet music players than I was before (you guys and gals must be schitzo masochists to play this stuff the traditional way)...holy crap there's a lot of notes \:D

I've broken down the chord structure and rearranged it as a fake sheet, inverted it all to hell, drop a bunch of notes and still just barely got it to sound like music; really love pages 2-3 with the bell-like melody. I think I'll take this on as a long term project, maybe improvise it a little once I get the melody down...

So, kudos to those of you who managed to play this the way it was written, I still think you're insane, but no more jokes about cristofori's dream

I'll post it if I ever get it to the point where I won't be laughed out of this forum, maybe in a year or two \:D
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/30/06 11:24 PM

Einaudi's music is really, really nice; one of my (new) favorites.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/01/06 03:32 AM

...better make that < or = 9 months, I've decided to take on funburger's challenge and deadline for this piece, my own arrangement.

Just spent all night working thru a couple of the passages, this music is amazing, transcendental, incandescent; I swear my brain's on drug when I play this thing, huh.

kawaigirl, thanks again for introducing me to this remarkable music.

Mr S-H, I totally agree with you, stuff like this makes life almost worth living.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/01/06 08:26 AM

sid, I can't wait to hear your rendition of "un altra vita." Just one look at the sheet music was enough to convince me to put it away for a while... say, ten years. \:D

It's odd, I think it's you improvisers and play-by-ear folks who deserve the kudos! Following sheet music doesn't require much mental effort: Just play the notes as written. But to break the chord structure down and create a fake sheet and then try to improvise requires a solid grasp of music theory and a hearty dose of artistic creativity.

I like your description of Einaudi's music: "amazing, transcendental, incandescent." Yes!
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/01/06 06:43 PM

monica,

If I could play this as originally written I would in a shot, but that's impossible at my current skill level, so improvise will initially mean simplify \:\)

Breaking it down will be easy compared to building it back up...but if everything works as planned then by the time I'm done I'll own this piece and can add things back to it over time. It should be educational in any event.

Wish me luck.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/01/06 07:23 PM

Hey Sid,


Monica took the words right out of my mouth in that I can't wait to hear your rendition of this piece. I've said it before about the fact that I envy all those who can improvise and play by ear.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/01/06 07:23 PM

Oooops..double post
Posted by: text

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/02/06 05:08 AM

Hi everyone

I have just joined pianoworld. I have been lurking for a couple of weeks.

I was inspired to join pianoworld by kawaigirl1's performance of In Un'altra Vita. I just wanted to say how beautifully she played it. I had never heard of Einaudi and am going out to buy I Giorni today.

I also wanted to say how useful I am finding this forum. I have just ordered a Roland HP101e digital piano and just cannot wait for it to arrive (the forum helped me with my decision - along with a trip to my local piano store)

So when my piano arrives then the journey will begin. I have never really played piano, just tinkered. I played the organ when I was younger but have not really touched a keyboard for about 20 years.

I have to say that the forum topics that I have read have all been contributed to in such a positive and friendly manner. I am really pleased that I found this site. I hope to be able to add my contribution at some point.

text

 Quote:
Originally posted by kawaigirl1:
Hey Sid,


Monica took the words right out of my mouth in that I can't wait to hear your rendition of this piece. I've said it before about the fact that I envy all those who can improvise and play by ear. [/b]
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/02/06 03:32 PM

welcome, text, you've got great taste.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/02/06 03:49 PM

Hi text, welcome to the forum!

I'm sure you will enjoy the Einaudi album! And even better - he will be touring the UK next year to promote his new album \:\)
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/02/06 04:24 PM

Txs for listening and welcome to the forum text.

Einaudi's music is very addicting both listening and to play.

Enjoy
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/02/06 04:26 PM

Welcome, text! I was tempted to tell you to get the greatest hits Einaudi album, but then I realized that if you're like me you'll love it so much you'll go back and buy the individual albums, too. But Eden Roc and Una Mattina are heartbreakingly lovely, too.
Posted by: text

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/03/06 08:59 AM

Thank you all for the welcome.

I will keep an eye out for the tour thanks Euan.

 Quote:
Originally posted by Euan Morrison:
Hi text, welcome to the forum!

I'm sure you will enjoy the Einaudi album! And even better - he will be touring the UK next year to promote his new album \:\) [/b]
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/09/06 04:29 AM

Text, persevere, this music is really worth it.

I'm so excited tonight I can't sleep, finally had a (relatively) clean run and the music's starting to come thru and smooth out.

Thanks again, everyone for introducing me to this piece, and drawing me back to the sheet music, I've learned so much just trying to figure out how to play this. Things I thought were impossible are now doable and I can see it becoming easier with practice and time. Every morning I see an improvement, it's as if nanobots are busy at work forming new synapses while I'm asleep...I'm just so encouraged to see the visible progress and it's becoming a positive feedback loop (the better I get the more I want to play).

Most valuable lesson learned so far, never give up, never let a seemingly impossible piece daunt you, just keep picking away at it and the grey cells will do the rest.

And best of all, after working thru the piece so often, it's still as pretty as ever and has lost none of its charm.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/10/06 09:48 PM

Can anyone advise about what difficulty the pieces are in the "best of" book.....if they are advanced, I'd be wasting my money for sure....anything on the easy side?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/10/06 10:17 PM

They vary in difficulty, rocky; some are pretty easy, others I'll be waiting a year or two to attempt. Maybe Euan and kawaigirl will have other suggestions, but I found "Limbo" very easy to learn, and "Una Mattina" looks bizarre but is actually not bad. "Nefeli" only has about 4 tough measures.

I think it's a book you could be working out of for ten years, starting with the easier pieces and then moving on. At least my goal is to eventually learn them all!
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/10/06 10:34 PM

I may just have to order...guess "someday" I could play something from the book \:D
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/11/06 02:12 AM

Rocky, I'm sure you will be fine with the music \:\)

There are pretty much no 'crazy' bits - no 128th note scales or large jumps. The left hand usually just plays repetitive chord arpeggios.

On the whole, its just pretty straightforward stuff.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/11/06 07:53 AM

Thanks y'all......looks like I know a Christmas present I'll be getting for myself......off to order.....

Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/11/06 10:46 AM

Ok, Merry Christmas to me!!! I just placed my order for the "best of" book.....can't wait to get it and see that I'll only be able to admire it and not play anything in it.....
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/11/06 10:50 AM

rocky, I guarantee[/b] you'll be able to play "Limbo."
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/11/06 10:03 PM

Rocky,

You definitely can play Limbo. This is a great book to get and the different pieces found in the book are of various diffficulty, i.e. from easy to intermediate difficulty.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/12/06 07:59 AM

Thanks y'all....I've ordered the book, can't wait to get it!!! Just hope it arrives before Christmas!
Posted by: ARIAS

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/12/06 09:59 PM

nice music[/b]
Would someone tell me where I can order the sheetmusic from?
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/12/06 10:14 PM

Arias, you can order this book through Amazon.
Posted by: Patty39

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/13/06 01:31 PM

Ok ok ok, you got me - I went to my music store today and ordered it, it will be there on Saturday. Now, Rocky, let's cross our fingers that we won't be looking longingly at the book for month/years, though it cannot be as bad as my collection of ALL of Chopin's Nocturnes, I'll have to arrive at my 5th year to even try it .

Monica, it's been Nefeli, I loved that rendition of yours and from then on I listened to all the others, so I'll give it a try.

Patty
Posted by: Patty39

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/13/06 01:33 PM

Gosh, forgot - please keep me/us updated on that concert in Europe, it might be possible for me to go!

Patty
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/13/06 03:02 PM

Patty, you'll have yours before me...I ordered mine online through musicnotes.com and it shows that it is back ordered, I'm still hoping for arrival by christmas, but not holding my breath!
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/13/06 04:37 PM

Hi gang,

I have an unfortunate tendency to post a recording at the first hint of success rather than wait for a more refined version.

So here's my first take (i.e., first successful run thru/recording without significant/blatant errors) of Einaudi's In Un Altra Vita:

http://www.box.net/public/ciq79975gb

This is a rough rough draft, no refinement at all, bad bad dynamics, very little artistry (and truly a caricature of Kawaigirl's ideal version...so this is just ham fisted pianoing so far, but I'm just so bloody relieved after so many bad recording efforts I had to share this or burst.

I actually do know what I need to do to improve this, play it a couple hundred/thousand more times, but so happy today that I finally got a good recording \:D \:D \:D

BTW, this is my own arrangement, I tried to stick as close to the original as possible...had to invert all the chords, but ended up learning the bulk of it as written anyway \:\)
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/13/06 10:50 PM

Hey Sid,

I thought that was good rough draft of this piece. \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/13/06 10:55 PM

Very nice, sid! Your arrangement does a good job of conveying the original tone of the piece, but it does sound a little more do-able.

Yes, there's nothing quite so rewarding as leaning over and pressing that Red Dot at the end of what you know is a decent take! \:\)
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/14/06 02:07 AM

Thanks, Monica! Thanks Kawaigirl! I appreciate the feedback and encouragement. I'm just so happy I can make this music, still struggling very hard not to wake up from this piano dream \:\)

...And thanks again for the introduction to Einaudi, the interest on my debt of gratitude continues to compound \:\)
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/26/06 05:01 PM

Finally!!! I ordered on 12/11 and it was on backorder at musicnotes.com......finally shows as shipped today!!!

Can't wait to get the book.....now, I just need to learn how to play the piano \:D
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/26/06 10:24 PM

Yea, rocky! Can't wait to hear your first recording of one of his pieces. I still can't get over the beauty of his music.

Today I started work on a new Einaudi piece, "Giorni Dispari." That one is not so hard either but very very pretty. It has one section with notes WAY up on the ledger lines and I had to cheat and pencil them all in.
Posted by: gabytu

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/27/06 04:23 PM

Monica, loved your playing of Nefeli. YOu have a beautiful sensitive touch which really suits the music you play.
I can't understand why Einaudi's music would make someone nervous. It is very restful and relaxing. Also, I disagree with those who find it monotonous. If they listened more closely they would hear the subtle nuances and slight variations which add interest,without disrupting the easy flow of the music.
Of Course, I like minimalist music---Glass is one of my favorite minimalist composers. He wrote the music for the movie "The Hours."
Looking forward to listening to more of Monica's playing.
Gaby Tu
Posted by: gabytu

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/27/06 06:41 PM

Just finished listening to Sid's recording of Un Altra Vita. Really very very nice for what he calls a "run through." Beautiful piece, and although there were a few spots that it seemed he felt a bit uncomfortable with, on the whole he did a very fine job.
It is nice to hear "works in progress." Gabv Tu
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 05:44 AM

gaby,

Thanks! Really appreciate the vote of confidence. I'm still working away at it (when I'm not banging my head against Comptine), right now building up hand and forearm strength to sustain the piece (one thing to be said about piano, my hands and forearms are really buff looking these days \:\) . I don't seem to get tire of this piece...the more I play it the more music seems to come thru.

rocky, congrats, really looking forward to hearing your recording as well. Have you decided yet which piece you'll learn first?
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 08:07 AM

I think I read somewhere that this "best of" book is arranged in order of difficulty?? I may have dreamed that, but whatever the case, I'm sure I'll be looking for the easiest piece to try and learn first. I have a feeling most, if not all, of the pieces are going to above my level at the moment. But I'll give it my best shot! \:D
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 09:48 AM

It's not in order of difficulty, at least as far as I can determine. Try Limbo first. It's all just whole note chords in the left hand and arpeggios in the right hand.
Posted by: Patty39

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 10:03 AM

My copy arrived short before Christmas and I had my first peck at Nefeli first, and also tried out Limbo. Considering the fact that I usually torture myself with Chopin and the like (which is well worth it), I found myself pleasantly surprised by Einaudi's music. As far as I can say now, the only difficulty I encounter is speed, but that should be ok in no time. However, to all those of you who posted recordings - really very well done, because although the music's structure may be easy, the more attention you have to pay to phrasing (f, p, etc.) - only then it develops its (who said that?) peaceful and soothing quality. Again, I am grateful for having found you on the ABF.

Patty
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 10:19 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Patty39:
because although the music's structure may be easy, the more attention you have to pay to phrasing (f, p, etc.) - only then it develops its (who said that?) peaceful and soothing quality. [/b]
Great point, Patty. And that's where this sheet music collection is so helpful, because the pieces appear to have been very carefully and thoroughly transcribed. Sometimes I think Einaudi puts a different dynamic marking on each and every measure!
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 10:58 AM

I didn't think I was crazy...well I actually I might be.....but this is from some website called music-first.com:

The Best Of Ludovico Einaudi....A compilation featuring all the pieces from the albums Le Onde, I Giorni and Eden Roc. The pieces in this beautifully presented collection are organised in order of increasing difficulty.


Not that one should believe everything they read on the internet!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 11:30 AM

I just learned "Nefeli" and it really is not difficult at all. At first, the speed and amount of notes played per bar can seem a bit much, but after a while, you will notice a definite repetitive pattern which over time will enable you not to even think about these sections.

This song has quickly become one of my all time favorite pieces and I think I may even play it for the next recital.

Personally, I think every single adult beginer should learn this piece as well as Christofori's Dream as it will improve your playing dramatically.

You will learn to stretch your hands on both pieces and Christofori;s Dream will definitely teach you some very wide hand positions and chords.

After playing both these pieces now, some of the other music I have been playing now seems so much easier to reach and play.

Somebody should make these two pieces mandatory to learn!!.....anyone want to start a "song club" of sorts??
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 12:05 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by rocky:
The Best Of Ludovico Einaudi....A compilation featuring all the pieces from the albums Le Onde, I Giorni and Eden Roc. The pieces in this beautifully presented collection are organised in order of increasing difficulty.[/b]
Well, I'll be gosh-darned. I'm going to take a careful look at the book tonight. And if that's the case, I'll start picking new pieces to learn from the first half of the book. \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 05:04 PM

Hmmm...now that I've had the chance to look the book over, I guess I would say that they are in a rough order of difficulty. (Though I disagree with some of their rankings. ;\) )

Makes me feel rather encouraged, actually, as most of the pieces I've been working on fall in the middle of the book.

Speaking of Einaudi, I just ordered his latest album today. I don't think it's been formally released in the U.S. yet, but I'm getting it from some import retailer I found on amazon. If you go to Einaudi's official website (just google Ludovico Einaudi) he has excerpts from it, and it sounds beautiful. Most of the pieces have orchestration in addition to piano, though.

He has a forum on the web site, too, and it's neat to read the threads because he pops in and contributes every now and then. He says the sheet music for the new album should be available within a few months. \:\)
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 08:12 PM

OK, so I anxiously opened the package containing my new sheet music as soon as I got home from work.......well.....ummm......let's just say I will have to enjoy listening to you all play the pieces from this book and I'll just follow along with all the pretty little notes in my book.....because.....I don't think I can play anything in it.....(sigh)......

So......I'm stuck at a beginner level, that's ok....I'm loving every minute...perhaps in a year or two I can pull this book back out.....

For now, it's back to my "The Best of Jim Brickman" arranged by Dan Coates and my easy sheet music from "Les Miserables".....

Posted by: ARIAS

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 08:48 PM

hey guys[/b] After reading all your wonderful comments about this Einaudi guy...........I finally decided to order a CD the Echoes CD......Einaudi Collection[/b], I should be getting it within a few days. I decided to order his CD first and check out his music I think its time I hear what all the fuss is about . Although I've heard a few good recordings here on PW, I want to hear more before I decide if I want to order his sheet music.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 09:08 PM

I am playing 'Nefeli" almost 20 times per day now!! . I am absolutely hooked!

Is this some kind of addictive piano-crack or something as I just can't stop playing it!! \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 10:07 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by rocky:
let's just say I will have to enjoy listening to you all play the pieces from this book and I'll just follow along with all the pretty little notes in my book.....because.....I don't think I can play anything in it.....(sigh)......
[/b]
rocky, his music LOOKS a lot harder than it really is, because it's these never-ending arpeggios, usually 8th notes, and it looks intimidating all stretched out on the page like that. But I KNOW you can play at least a few because I know you've played harder stuff.

Go back and give Limbo a try. There's, what, only 3 different chords in the left hand? Get those 3 chords down and you've learned the entire left hand. The right hand is just arpeggios of those three chords. Most of the time you don't even have to reach an octave, I believe. I know[/b] you can play that piece.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 10:08 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
I am playing 'Nefeli" almost 20 times per day now!! . I am absolutely hooked!

[/b]
So when do we get to hear a recording of it?
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 10:40 PM

S-H....Can't wait to hear your recording of Nefeli \:\)
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/06 10:41 PM

How about I save it for Feb 15th(next recital).
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/29/06 08:06 AM

OK, I'll give Limbo a try! His stuff definitely looks tough on paper though...all those notes!!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/29/06 11:35 AM

Rocky, you too should play Nefeli. It looks very intimidating with all the notes but I promise, after a few passes through it, you won't even be reading half-three quarters of them as they are so repetitive.

The song is so nice it will be worth the effort. I get hung up in several sections still but I can play through them; just at a slower pace for for a moment.

Every time I play this piece the tricky parts get a litle smoother as I am starting to memorize the score and know where the next notes are without having to read the sheets. This actually helps me a lot (memorizing) as it takes away having to read the score correctly.

If you play any piece enough, you will probably end up memorizing it without even trying to.

Good luck, I want to hear your recordings as well.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/29/06 09:08 PM

OK, I took a second look. I have played through (or attempted to in my unique way) the first page of Limbo and it's not *too* bad, might be able to manage this one.

Then just for kicks, at Mr S-H's urging I tried playing through the first page of Nefeli. That page isn't bad, but I'm sure it gets more difficult....so we'll see!

I have also tried playing La profondita del buio and that possibly seems doable, but I'm at a disadvantage because I don't know exactly what it is supposed to sound like \:\(

So, I will work on some of this music.....may take me a long time, but they are very nice!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/29/06 09:58 PM

Rocky, here's another tip on Nefeli.

When you get to the third line on page 63 (if your sheet music matches mine), try keeping your fingers on the keys at first. The reason for this is that you won't have to "find" the far away notes as you usually only have to move your thumb or pinky up or down one note to start the next consecutive bar.

You will see what I mean when you get to this exact section of the piece.

The third line on page 63 (and the following several lines) really slowed me down as I was just searching for the notes, but of course, I found a way to cheat at that as well !!.

By keeping your thunb and pinky on the keys during this section, you will notice that each bar usually starts just a single whole note away so you don't have to look for it; your fingers are almost already on it!!.

I hope you understand what I mean as thats the only way I can explain it.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/30/06 02:30 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by rocky:
OK, I took a second look. I have played through (or attempted to in my unique way) the first page of Limbo and it's not *too* bad, might be able to manage this one.

Then just for kicks, at Mr S-H's urging I tried playing through the first page of Nefeli. That page isn't bad, but I'm sure it gets more difficult....so we'll see!

I have also tried playing La profondita del buio and that possibly seems doable, but I'm at a disadvantage because I don't know exactly what it is supposed to sound like \:\(

[/b]
rocky, if you have the first page of Nefeli under control, you can play it all. The section I found the absolute hardest in this piece were measures 17-28. It took a lot of concentrated effort and HS practice before I could play it HT. The rest of the piece is easier and largely repeats.

I don't have a recording of La profondita, and I agree that it is hard (near impossible, for me) to play things I don't know what they're supposed to sound like. Euan, kawaigirl, where are you? Can you learn this and post a recording for us?

I am currently hooked on Giorni Dispari and have been playing practically nothing else all week. \:\)
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/30/06 04:22 PM

I had a little listen to 'La Profondita' - its not a great piece, to be honest. It doesn't really go anywhere, and has a couple of horrible sounding chords.

If you are working through the book sequentially, Rocky, I would go with either Limbo, Ombre, or I Giorni to start with. Those are some of the better songs in the book.

I don't believe that the book is in order of difficulty. The piece on page 100 would be at the start. And the final piece, Due Tramonti isn't the most difficult in the book. But the end of the book does contain some tough songs!
Posted by: NancyM333

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/13/07 07:54 PM

Hi everyone--

I mentioned a long time ago that a friend was going to buy an Einaudi book, and it finally came in the mail. It's "The Best of Ludovico Einaudi." Now I am trying to make a CD of people playing pieces that are in this book, so I did a search and downloaded all the PW pieces I could find by Einaudi. This is what I found:

Una Mattina
Un Mondo a Parte
In An'Ultra Vita
Nefeli

I found a couple of others that weren't in this book, so I didn't include them. I also found some where the links didn't work anymore. If any of you have recordings of these works that you can post or email me, I'd really appreciate it. I think it will help her to hear regular people play these pieces.

Thanks,

Nancy
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/13/07 08:08 PM

Hi Nancy,

Here's a few that I've played that's in the "Best of:" book

Fuori Dalla Notte:

http://www.box.net/public/44bkydvbia

Canzone Popolare:

http://www.box.net/public/mm0tay79hk

Le Onde:

http://www.box.net/public/ef2p5rpoyp

Giorni Dispari:

http://www.box.net/public/3qtdtmf3kn

Hope it helps.
Posted by: NancyM333

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/13/07 09:13 PM

Thanks, Kawaigirl1--you're a goldmine of Einaudi pieces! I think some of the others I downloaded were from you also.

When I went to your Giorni Dispari link, it showed there was nothing found there at Box.net. I did get the others fine.

Thanks,

Nancy
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/13/07 09:15 PM

Hi Nancy,

Try that link again
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/13/07 09:18 PM

Kawaigirl:

I love your music! :3hearts: :3hearts:
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/13/07 09:20 PM

Txs S-H \:\)
Posted by: NancyM333

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/13/07 09:23 PM

Thanks, Kawaigirl. It came through that time.

Nancy
Posted by: mdp1w

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 12:47 AM

Kawaigirl,

You play beautifully!

Daria
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 08:27 AM

Txs Daria,

Have we turned you into an Einaudi fan yet? \:\)
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 01:31 PM

I think I may have found ('er, once again...stolen) a piece for a future recital in "Le Onde".

What an incredibly beautiful piece.

I am going to be playing "Nefeli" for the upcoming recital in Feb based on Kawaigirls & Monica's incredible recordings of them and now that I've heard "Le Onde". I am hooked even deeper into Einaudi's music.

I don't really know who to thank for this wonderful musical discovery but I think credit can be shared in one way or another amongst Euan Morrison, for posting up some of his links and Monica and Kawaigirl for performing some of his incredible music.

Thanks you guys!
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 01:39 PM

Oh, break down and buy the darned book, super-hunky. Anybody who plays "Nefeli" 20 times a day will want to learn many if not most of the other pieces. ;\)

"Le Onde" has been my waterloo. I can play it, but not musically enough to feel ready to record it. I find it very difficult to accent the melody and just barely hit the alternating lower notes in the right hand. Not to mention it's too long to fit on the music desk, so there's clunky page turns. But I feel like rocky: "one of these days I will play that music!"

On the positive side, "Giorni Dispari" is coming along well and I think I'll have it recital ready.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 01:55 PM

Monica:

You really should perform Le Onde for us. I'm sure you are being way to critical of yourself however, Kawaigirl set the bar incredibly high on that piece with her performance of it....I mean.. !

I don't think I will ever perform that piece the way you two have performed yours as you are much more advanced than me plus I never really read the music so in this situation, I may be at a big disadvantage. (I will post up some more excuses as they come to me....don't worry!) ;\) .

Anyway, Monica, you are right. I need to get the giant Einaudi book as I don't have any of his scores other than Nefeli which someone was nice enough to give me as a gift! \:\) .

I believe someone had found it for $35.00 somewhere, I forgot, it may have been Rocky.

Any suggestions on where to get it and what it is called?.

BTW, Monica. As many times as I have played Nefeli now, it has not gotten any better than after the first couple of days!

I know this is weird, but I really don't improve much on a piece after a certain point.

It has goten a little "smoother" and I have it 100% memorized which is nice since my cat likes to sleep on my ever growing pile of sheet music.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 02:02 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
Kawaigirl set the bar incredibly high on that piece with her performance of it....I mean.. !
[/b]
I second that Right after saying I thought my "Giorni Dispari" was coming along well, I listened to Kawaigirl's recording, and... let's just say it's a good thing there's still a few weeks before the next recital. \:D

I feel the same way with "Le Onde" as you do with "Nefeli." Even though I play it just about every day, it doesn't seem to be getting any better. \:\( Unfortunately, with this particular piece my plateau hit well before I felt satisfied with it.
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 02:17 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
Anyway, Monica, you are right. I need to get the giant Einaudi book as I don't have any of his scores other than Nefeli which someone was nice enough to give me as a gift! \:\) .

I believe someone had found it for $35.00 somewhere, I forgot, it may have been Rocky.

Any suggestions on where to get it and what it is called?.
[/b]
Well, I'm not Monica but I'll answer anyway \:D The book is "The Best of Ludovico Einaudi", MLR 659
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 02:23 PM

I just got finished listening to Kawaigirl's "Le Onde" - just beautiful! I have "The Einaudi Collection" CD and have to say Kawaigirl's playing rivals that on the CD. I've been learning this piece and now have another (higher) standard to try and reach! Great job!
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 03:56 PM

This was my latest attempt at 'In Un'Altra Vita' (In another life). I play it slightly different from the score:

http://www.box.net/public/nio9j2hi39
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 04:15 PM

VERY nice Euan!.

You've been holding out on us have'nt you?.

Where is all this talent coming from?, First Monica, then Kawaigirl, and now Euan!.

Thats it, I'm firing up the Jetta diesel and heading out to Village inn or Denny's and ordering TWO large humble pies. One to eat there and one to take home for later. You guys are amazing.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 04:42 PM

Very Very nice Euan,!! You must have been practising in secrecy!! BRAVO! I enjoyed your slight variation to the piece.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 04:53 PM

kawaigirl,

Thank you for the new pieces. I use you as reference material so you can imagine how grateful I am \:\)
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 04:57 PM

Mr S-H, I got the book at musicnotes.com, but I'm sure you can find it online many places, look for the best price!!

I still just play bits and pieces of a few songs from the book. It's definitely a bit out of my league, but it helps me to read along with the music while listening to the great performances like kawaigirl, euan and monica.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 05:57 PM

Nancy,

Here's another one for your CD that you're making.

Fuori dal mondo:

http://www.box.net/public/fatt7f5sa8


Txs guys for the wonderful comments.
Posted by: NancyM333

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 06:46 PM

Thanks so much, Kawaigirl. I think I'm up to nine pieces for the CD. Your work is really beautiful.

Has anyone recorded Limbo? I'm thinking that someone mentioned it as the easiest one, so it would be nice for her to try that to start.

No, Kawaigirl, I'm not planning to play any right away. I have so many piano projects going now that I can't make much progress on any of them. I am sure that I will hear an Einaudi piece--like I did with both Croatian Rhapsody and Rachmaninoff's C# minor prelude, both that I'm learning now--that I absolutely must play this very second. Then I will push something aside on my plate and do it. Right now Rachmaninoff hunts me down every day and drags me to the piano--he has hooked me like a drug, and it will be months before I finish that piece.

Mr. Super-Hunky--I found my "Best of" book at Amazon for $24.13. Of course, you get free shipping with any purchase over $25.00, so I bought another book so I could get "free" shipping. Capitalism at its most effective!

Nancy
Posted by: mdp1w

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 07:15 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mdp1w:
Kawaigirl,

You play beautifully!

Daria [/b]
 Quote:
Originally posted by kawaigirl1:
Txs Daria,

Have we turned you into an Einaudi fan yet? \:\) [/b]
Actually, kawaigirl, I've become a fan of YOURS!!
BRAVO, once more! :3hearts:

Daria [/b]
Posted by: Babs_

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 07:46 PM

KawaiiGirl[/b] Thanks for sending those recordings. You inspired me to look up Einaudis' website! Euan and Monica had some lovely recodings too! I love learning about new beautiful music.

By the way in case you havent heard I have a new name. See other thread for ABF Group
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 07:54 PM

Thanks Nancy:

I'm so cheap, if I know I did'nt get a good deal, it will keep me up at night!; thanks for the tip.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 08:09 PM

[QUOTE]Originally posted by NancyM333:

Has anyone recorded Limbo? I'm thinking that someone mentioned it as the easiest one, so it would be nice for her to try that to start.

Nancy [/QB][/QUOTE


Euan made a recording of Limbo in Recital #3. His link doesn't work but you can download the 2nd zip file and the piece will be found in there.

http://www.pianoworld.com/ubb/ubb/ultimatebb.php?/topic/32/2753.html#000021
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 10:47 PM

Or, if that's too much work, here's a version of "Limbo" I recorded on my trusty Zoom for my Christmas CD:

"Limbo" by Ludovico Einaudi

p.s. I just noticed I really need to edit out some of that dead space at the beginning... there's about a 12 second pause before the music starts, sorry.
Posted by: Babs_

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/14/07 11:04 PM

Nice Monica! Limbo That song sounds relaxing. And it doesn't sound like it would be too hard to play. I went ahead and ordered his greatest hit book from Amazon .

I really like Nefeli and Le Onde,,,,,,,,,,beautiful.
I am looking forward to getting the sheet music and seeing just how hard those pieces are to play.
Posted by: gabytu

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/15/07 04:46 PM

O. K. You all made a convert out of me. I just ordered The Best of Ludovico Einaudi--paperback from Amazon.com. Came to $28.80 with the shipping and handling.
Had a real problem ordering it, as every time I sent it my basket, they kept including some other item with it for and additional $20.00. After a number of tries, I finally got the unwanted item out of my basket and just the book should be arriving.

Now to wait patiently for its arrival, sometime between Jan 19-23. Can't wait to play some of those gorgeous pieces. Gaby Tu
Posted by: Babs_

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/15/07 05:04 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by gabytu:
O. K. You all made a convert out of me. I just ordered The Best of Ludovico Einaudi--paperback from Amazon.com. Came to $28.80 with the shipping and handling.
Had a real problem ordering it, as every time I sent it my basket, they kept including some other item with it for and additional $20.00. After a number of tries, I finally got the unwanted item out of my basket and just the book should be arriving.

Now to wait patiently for its arrival, sometime between Jan 19-23. Can't wait to play some of those gorgeous pieces. Gaby Tu [/b]
Isn't that a coincidence? When I ordered my music book by Einaudi I had a little trouble also! Everytime I went to the Shopping cart I saw that they had put EXTRA items in my basket, items I didnt even order! It took me a while but I finally figured out how to have only the music book in my shopping cart!
Posted by: psychopianoman

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/18/07 09:31 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Babs1:
[/b]
Isn't that a coincidence? When I ordered my music book by Einaudi I had a little trouble also! Everytime I went to the Shopping cart I saw that they had put EXTRA items in my basket, items I didnt even order! It took me a while but I finally figured out how to have only the music book in my shopping cart! [/QB][/QUOTE]

Maybe this is a new marketing method. Keep on adding unwanted items to their cart and out of irritation consumers will buy. \:D Maybe they are trying to see how many times they can do it befor they lose the customer. \:D
Posted by: gabytu

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/19/07 07:48 PM

I was really frustrated trying to get the extra items out of my cart. No matter how many times I deleted it,they would put it back. I was almost tempted to forget the whole idea of buying the Einaudi book, but finaly had success.

Well,today The book arrived. What a treat. I sat down and played through the first piece--Limbo. Gorgeous. I understand that it is the easiest one in the book. Some of those chords in the left hand are reminiscent of the Chopin Funeral March. Interesting.

Now, to listen again to the recordings made by Kawai Girl, Monica and others so that I can get a better understanding of how these should sound. My playing of Limbo seems to drag a bit, and I don't think I am bringing out essential notes the way I think they should go. I notice that Kawai Girl and Monica both bring out the melody of the pieces they are playing ,so that it stands above the continuous flow of the rest of the music. Gaby Tu
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/19/07 08:16 PM

I'm gonna play a version of "Nefeli" that will knock your socks off! \:D
Posted by: gabytu

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/19/07 08:58 PM

O.K. Mr. super-Hunky. quit teasing us and play it for us to hear. I envy you in warm and Sunny Scottsdale. I'm up here in the NW, where we are just beginning to thaw out after several days of snow and freeze. Impossible to drive in that stuff. Cars skidding all over the place. It is now raining, and a deep fog is settling in. Well, back to the piano.
I'm really excited about Einaudi. Gaby Tu
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/20/07 02:47 AM

Gaby,

I'm looking forward to your recordings as well!
Posted by: Oxfords Gal

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/20/07 07:02 AM

I purchased the one from Amazon and it's going on my "Someday I will be able to play pile" from amazon for 24 or so. \:D

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/custome...=283155&s=books
Posted by: gabytu

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/22/07 02:17 PM

Sid, I'll post my recordings as soon as I can make one without all the mistakes, flubs, etc.. At the rate I am going, it may be a while yet. Gaby Tu
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/22/07 07:11 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
I'm gonna play a version of "Nefeli" that will knock your socks off! \:D [/b]
Well, hee it is 4 days later and you might want to put your socks back on! \:\(

Once again, my acoustic recording is very "muffled" and "mooshy" sounding.

I really don't get it as the piano itself sounds incredible...almost like a concert hall!

My digital records crystal clear but lacks the resonance and sustain of the acoustic....but its so clear!.

I guess I'll record on the digital as my acoustic recordings just don't sound good.
Posted by: Babs_

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/22/07 08:43 PM

\:\) I got my book today! I was hoping to see the song Una Mattina in the book, but I don't see it Kawii Girl[/b] or anybody else where did you see the sheet music for that song? Is that in a different book maybe?

I took a look at the song Nefeli the Combined left and right hand appregios played together scare me I think I'll hold off on that for a while.
You're all right the Limbo would be the easest song to start off on. Ombre doesn't look too hard but I don't believe I have heard a recording of it. I think the Le Onde song would be easier to play before attempting the Nefeli. I am anxious to hear recordings for all the songs in this book. I know I have a good selection from you all here on PW , Monica, Euan and Kawii Girl and maybe Mr Super Hunky when he is "good and ready" to send us all that recording! :p
Anyway right now I am working a couple of David Nevue pieces, Deep Heaven and Vigil, plus I am working on a couple of classical pieces. So, I may not get to work on the Einauadi book for a few months. In the meantime, I am going to be listening to as many recordings as possible out this book so I can get a "feel for his music."
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/22/07 09:24 PM

Hi Babs1,

Einaudi's Una Mattina piece can be found in either his "solo piano Una mattina" book or he also has another book called "the piano collection volume 1" and Una Mattina can be found in there as well.
Posted by: Babs_

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/22/07 09:28 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
I'm gonna play a version of "Nefeli" that will knock your socks off! \:D [/b]
Well, hee it is 4 days later and you might want to put your socks back on! \:\(

Once again, my acoustic recording is very "muffled" and "mooshy" sounding.

I really don't get it as the piano itself sounds incredible...almost like a concert hall!

My digital records crystal clear but lacks the resonance and sustain of the acoustic....but its so clear!.

I guess I'll record on the digital as my acoustic recordings just don't sound good. [/b]
Oh I see Mr Super Hunky, that is ok, don't worry, I can keep my socks on for a long time.......... I have cold feet! \:D


Thanks for the info Kawaii girl, I will check out his other books cause I like that Una Mattina, it so relaxing and soulful
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/22/07 09:37 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
I'm gonna play a version of "Nefeli" that will knock your socks off! \:D [/b]
Well, hee it is 4 days later and you might want to put your socks back on! \:\(

Once again, my acoustic recording is very "muffled" and "mooshy" sounding.

I really don't get it as the piano itself sounds incredible...almost like a concert hall!

My digital records crystal clear but lacks the resonance and sustain of the acoustic....but its so clear!.

I guess I'll record on the digital as my acoustic recordings just don't sound good. [/b]
[Says in a very low, subliminal droning voice: "Buy a Zooooooooommmmm, super-hunky; buy a Zoooommmmmm." \:D ]
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/22/07 11:11 PM

Monica, in my case it's the room acoustics along with me over pedaling on everything.

Recording on the digital removes these two variables so I'll use it once again as I'm starting to get on my own nerves regarding this issue!
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/23/07 12:13 AM

I've recorded another piece from Einaudi's "Best of...." called
La linea Scura

http://www.box.net/public/sr0y5ynahv


I'm still looking forward to hearing S-H's rendition of Nefeli even if it's on the digital \:\)
Posted by: Babs_

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/23/07 07:32 AM

Beautiful Kawai Girl! \:\) You have been blessed, .......you have strong hands!
Now that I have the book I can follow along with the music as I listened to your beautiful playing! My hands would hurt after playing all those appregios at that tempo for five pages long! :p

Don't feel bad Mr. Super Hunky, I don't have a zoooooom either , I am still waiting for my fairy godmother to show up at the door! \:D
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/23/07 05:30 PM

A clip of Einaudi on Italian tv playing a piece [Oltremare] from his latest album, Divenire:

http://www.chetempochefa.rai.it/TE_videoteca/1,10916,1073817,00.html


(credit to minimalist from the Einaudi forum for the link)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/23/07 10:06 PM

kawaigirl, beautiful job on the Linea Scura piece. I looked at the sheet music after hearing Euan's take of it some time ago, and the never-ending 16th notes scared me off. But it is a very pretty piece. Your recording quality was great, too. Those low bass notes were resonating through my headphones.

I feel like a hopeless copycat, but every time I hear you play something it makes me want to learn it too. \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/23/07 10:09 PM

Hey Euan, when I played that Einaudi clip, the audio came through fine but the video was very bizarre...colors were all weird. Anybody else have the same problem?
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/23/07 10:09 PM

Txs Babs1 & Monica.

Monica, this piece isn't that difficult to play. Just try it, you'll like it ;\)
Posted by: Babs_

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/23/07 10:39 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by kawaigirl1:
Txs Babs1 & Monica.

Monica, this piece isn't that difficult to play. Just try it, you'll like it ;\) [/b]
Kawaii Girl[/b] You know what , I think you may have a point. I tried it tonight and I got through the first 2 pages just fine, with a little more practice I think I could get through the last 3 pages as well, so I am more confident than I was originally. ;\) It's actually easier to play than it looks. The left hand is easy all simple chords. It is an interesting song, very soulful. And I liked the way you brought out the melody........beautiful. However I am just a bit curious.Kawaiigirl did you record that on that famous Zoom that everyone here has been talking about? It was a good recording. I am still waiting for my fairygodmother to show up at the door with a zoom in her hands.....still waiting. . :rolleyes:

Monica[/b] I viewed the clip Euan sent and not only did a get a good recording but the video was fine , no weird colors on my end .
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/23/07 10:45 PM

Hi Babs

Glad to hear you're trying the piece out. Hope you will post a recording soon.

I unfortunately don't have a zoom. I'm just recording the old fashion way and that's using my laptop. I was actually looking into the Zoom since it's so much simpler to do recordings with.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/23/07 10:52 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:


I feel like a hopeless copycat, but every time I hear you play something it makes me want to learn it too. \:\) [/QB]
That's my line!! :p
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/24/07 04:15 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
the video was very bizarre...colors were all weird. [/b]
Just what is IN that Sam Adams stuff? ;\)

Possibly a problem with codecs or something. You aren't missing much from the visual side of things, just glad you got the audio ok.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/24/07 03:37 PM

Kawaigirl:

Beautiful once again as usual.

I must say that I am kind of mad at you as you've set the Einaudi bar so incredibly high that there are no more rungs on the pole to raise it!!

We simply cannot improve on your performances and can only strive to someday match them.................someday!!

Anyway, I submitted my Nefeli piece yesterday to Bob and once again added a bit of "flair" to it including a home-made prelude and some other goodies .

Just remember that "flair" = too stupid, lazy, lack of concentration (pick one) to play the entire score as written so I just make stuff up as I see fit. If theres an easy way out, trust me, I'll find it! ;\)
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/24/07 09:28 PM

S-H:

You're making my head swell so big that I can't fit through the door \:D

My definition of "flair" = creativity. Not everyone is able to add flair to a piece and make it sound as good as you. I would fail miserably in this area.

Now you really got me curious on your rendition of Nefeli and I'm sooooo looking forward to hearing it. Any chance of a sneek preview?? ;\)
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/24/07 11:18 PM

Well, since I've been shooting my mouth off about it for so long now, I had better hope that it at least sounds respectable so I don't come off looking like a total loaf! :p

Besides, there is another fantastic rendition of Nefeli out there performed by Monica and I am kind of hoping that yours and her recording fall off the first few pages of posts so that other members don't compare my recording to you two. should that happen, I'm sunk!
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/25/07 04:24 AM

Here are a couple of lesser-known Einaudi pieces. I started them last week, so they are a bit rusty:

Dietro l'Incanto - www.box.net/public/04szuhnezu

Due Tramonti - www.box.net/public/xxoor678vs
Posted by: Oxfords Gal

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/25/07 08:01 AM

I found this site seems like you can download just nefeli but it's currently not available

http://www.tuneheaven.com/Sheet-Music-Tabs/Nefeli.html
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/25/07 03:46 PM

Euan,

Well played, I especially liked incanto...you and kawaigirl are so prolific it makes me feel like a beginner, haha.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/25/07 08:14 PM

Euan:

Just listened to your Einaudi pieces and they are very nice. I have'nt heard either one of these before which is surprising since I have been searching and listening to many of his songs.

I think you are "hooked on Einaudi" like me but then again, that makes sense since you were one of the first to introduce us to his music.

Are you playing an Einaudi piece in the Feb recital?.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/25/07 10:35 PM

Yes, great job, Euan! It's funny, sid; I liked Due Tramonti better than the Incanto piece. (The music, Euan, not your playing! \:\) ) The beginning of Incanto was just a bit too tense for me.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/25/07 10:54 PM

Euan, that was a wonderful rendition

Now I have 2 more to be learned pieces to add to my ever growing pile of music
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/26/07 06:05 AM

I'm currently listening and relistening to kawaigirl's nuvole bianche and thinking that's another definite one for learning, just as soon as I get past the current crop of pieces...happy sigh...

Just a passing thought, but it seems I'm the richest man in the world these days, so much lovely music and it costs me nothing but time. What fools those mortals be who burn their lives at the alter of materialistic consumerism and force-fed mediocrity when sublime beauty and wealth such as this exists and is theirs free for the taking, if only they knew.
Posted by: Babs_

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/26/07 07:39 AM

Thanks Euan Now that I have the book, I can follow along! It's always nice to hear different pieces. You have a nice touch! \:\)

Kawaii Girl: Remember I told you I was working on that La Linea Scura? Well I got through the first 2 pages until I got to the bottom of page 2 , Measure # 33 and I started to have some trouble, the notes I played just didnt sound right? And my hands were starting to get a tiny bit tired from all those 16th notes! I still say Kawaii Girl..........you have been blessed with some mighty strong hands! Now the Nefeli song is starting to look a little easier, but I am having trouble keeping the rythym going as smoothly as it does on the recordings. I may put it down for now and come back to it in a few months. Right now I am working on the Vigil and Deep Heaven and a couple of classical pieces which is enough to keep me busy!
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/26/07 11:52 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by sid:
Just a passing thought, but it seems I'm the richest man in the world these days, so much lovely music and it costs me nothing but time. What fools those mortals be who burn their lives at the alter of materialistic consumerism and force-fed mediocrity when sublime beauty and wealth such as this exists and is theirs free for the taking, if only they knew. [/b]
What a beautiful thought, sid, and one that deserves to be much more than a "passing" one! Yes, we are all truly fortunate.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/26/07 12:02 PM

Euan, you sly sandbagger you! "Due Tramonti" was so beautiful I thought I might want to tackle that one next, so I looked it up in the book.... and it's the very last piece!! In a book where the pieces are sorted in order of difficulty!!
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/26/07 01:18 PM

Monica,

To be fair the piece itself is fairly simple. The difficulty lies in crossing the voices over between the hands - you need to omit a couple of chords as the left hand is crossed over. But the tempo makes it easy as well. Don't know why its at the back of the book, really.
Posted by: mdp1w

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/26/07 04:54 PM

Euan,

After checking tour dates I found that Einaudi will be appearing near you!!

You are not going to miss seeing Ludovico Einaudi LIVE in EDINBURGH on March 4th?

UK Tour [/b]

Daria
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/26/07 04:56 PM

haha, yes its in my diary!
I just need to nip across the water and pick up some tickets. But you can be assured that I will be there (unless they have sold out already \:\( )

But I can't understand why the venue website doesn't mention the concert on its 'calender of events'??
Posted by: mdp1w

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/26/07 05:03 PM

You don't already HAVE[/b] your tickets?!?
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/26/07 05:16 PM

Ahah, I worked out how to get to the seating plan / booking section for the concert. They are having 'technical difficulties' with the site etc, so its not listed properly.

The middle section of the ground floor is roughly half full. The left side is strangely empty, and there are tons of seats higher up if i want. So there is no hurry at the moment.

I think I'm right in saying that left side is preferable so you see the keyboard better? (never been to piano gig)
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/26/07 10:38 PM

[QUOTE]Originally posted by Babs1:

Kawaii Girl: Remember I told you I was working on that La Linea Scura? Well I got through the first 2 pages until I got to the bottom of page 2 , Measure # 33 and I started to have some trouble, the notes I played just didnt sound right? And my hands were starting to get a tiny bit tired from all those 16th notes! QUOTE]

Hi Babs,

That section you're referring to had given me trouble when I was learning that piece. When you play that section slow, it will sound like you're playing wrong notes but in fact you may not be. I encourage you to continue on learning that section as once you get over this part, the rest of the piece is pretty much repeated.
Posted by: mwf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/26/07 10:54 PM

Hi

Bella notte I think is one of the nicer works he wrote for piano, I learnt all his works by ear off the cd's I have anyway, they are very simple to learn by ear, but at the same time very effective in their own way. You need a nice toned grand piano or sampled grand such as on a top-end digital to really do justice to these pieces IMO.

So simple, minimilistic music infact, such a rare treat by this italian composer, I have adored his works for a long time, the cd he released based on an african theme is by far the best compellation he has recorded, it has bella notte and I giorni etc.. on the album, its the best he ever did. Beautiful music.

MWF
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/28/07 09:00 PM

After mwf mentioned about Einaudi's piece called Bella notte, I had to check it out. Well the good news is that if anybody out there has learned In ultra vita, this piece Bella notte has a section that is the same as In ultra vita.

http://www.box.net/public/jei4rv0tc8

When it comes to playing by ear, I'm not very good at but I thought I give this Einaudi piece a try. It's call "La Casa Nel Bosco" This piece I believe is not in any of his books. I've added strings. For all the play by ear experts out there, if I didn't get all my notes correct, please forgive.

http://www.box.net/public/nqjmj1o2cs
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/28/07 09:55 PM

Kawaigirl:

Once again your music is incredible. I don't know how you get through these 5+ minute pieces without a single mistake, I mean you are non human!

Einaudi's music can be much more difficult to play than it sounds. Many of the notes are all over the place and you have to do incredible finger stretches everywhere.

Today I started to look at and learn Le Onde as that is my next challenge. The song seams to start off fairly simple and then WHAM, you start reaching all over the place.

After stumbling through page one and part of two, I can already tell the effort will be worth it.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/28/07 10:02 PM

Uhhhh S-H, I'm afraid to say that there are mistakes in my playing. \:\(

Le Onde is certainly a very beautiful piece. Will you be playing Le Onde for the May recital?? \:\)
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/29/07 04:39 AM

Yay! My favorite section of in un altra vita \:\)

...I had a mini-breakthru on this section yesterday, finally went back and added all the notes I had taken out from my simplified arrangement and managed to get all three voices going at once (something I didn't think was possible initially), been doing a lot of back and fill of late, now I have to repolish the entire thing all over again just when I had the previous arrangement memorized

That said, the new complexity sounds bloody marvelous.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/29/07 10:21 AM

Just when I think kawaigirl can't get any better, she goes off and plays an Einaudi piece by EAR!! Bella notte was gorgeous, kawaigirl. Maybe that will be my next attempt.

But Einaudi's music seems so complicated to me with all the arpeggios and multiple voices I can't conceive of ever playing it by ear.

sid, those breakthroughs are what keep us going as pianists. Congratulations! I look forward to hearing an updated recording.

And I'm looking forward to your Le Onde, super-hunky. I was playing that piece yesterday and gnashing my teeth at my utter inability to play it through without major mistakes, let alone any kind of musicality. It is my Waterloo.

I think it's a psychological thing. I can already play Giorni Dispari better than I can Le Onde, and it's probably technically more difficult. For whatever deep-seated neurotic reason I'm just hung up on Le Onde. I need a shrink. \:D
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/29/07 05:24 PM

Monica,

If you can play bella notte, you'll have in un altra vita in the bag as well, the pretty middle section is lifted straight from altra vita (as kawaigirl has noted), and is the hardest section from altra vita.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 02:13 AM

Monica:

I've got some real good "cheater" method for Le Onde. I'll try to explain it as best I can.

First off, you probably already have the first two pages of Le Onde down pat. I know your ability now, and you can play page one and two fairly easily I bet.

Page three gets really hairy and here's why; Instead of playing primarily 3-note arpeggio-like notes in the left hand, it goes to five! As a result, everything slows down. (At least for me).

So, once again, how do you fix it....cheat!, yes CHEAT!!.

First off, play only three note arpeggios in the left hand. I know this is NOT correct, but the song...oops, I mean "piece", will sound very similar.

Second, try playing these 3-note left hand arpeggios in a fake book type method in which you right down only the root note per bar in the left hand and just play the arpeggio based on the denoted root note.

By doing this, you will [easily[/b] be able to play the piece all the way through in corect time.

Once you get very used to playing the whole piece several times through, you can slowly add the correct 5-note left hand notes in as your ability allows.

Now get this, I just got the sheet music for this piece yesterday and I can play it all the way through in almost correct time!

NO, and again I'll say it, NO, I am NOT playing the piece as written. I have VERY much simplified the score so I can actually get through it.

I have today just started to add back in a few left hand notes, (i.e, starting to take the training wheels off), and crap, have things slowed WAY down!!; but, I am now starting to play the exact written notes....at about one mile per hour!!.

I'm wondering if you are possibly trying to learn a complicated piece all at once instead of smaller "baby steps"?

When I first looked at page three, a giant "impossible" banner popped out of my score!. There is absolutely no way I could ever play that without cheating my arse off in the left hand (so I don't even have to read the music), and practicing the right hand only many times.

After I practiced my right hand only (several times), I added back in the mindless fake-book type of left hand arpeggios and played both hands together.

Again, even though I am NOT playing the left hand as written, it does sound very similar.

Next step is to slowly add back in the correct 5-note left hand notes and play it as written...someday!

Then again, should it get to tough, I'm just going to toss the score out the window once I memorize the main body of the piece and start making stuff up!.

I know this may sound like a joke, but it's actually true!. Have you ever noticed that most of my improv sections just happen to be in the most difficult part of a song?

How many times do I have to tell you that I really am a hack!! \:D
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 03:42 AM

Hunky, I used the exact same method when learning the song.

I don't know if it is at the same part, but I learned a certain section using 3 note left hand instead of 5. In the end I was able to add in the 4th and 5th notes, but it allowed me to practice the piece without slowing down etc.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 03:54 AM

An interview with Einaudi on a UK radio station. He talks about his new album and his inspiration for it:

http://www.classicfm.com/Sectional.asp?id=11921

On the new concerts: "We will play Le Onde with a new arrangement with strings..."

Euan - buying tickets this week \:\) \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 09:10 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
Monica:

I've got some real good "cheater" method for Le Onde. I'll try to explain it as best I can.

[/b]
Hey super-hunky, I probably could've used your cheat sheet when I first started the piece. Now it's a bit too late. I can play all the notes no problem... it's just making it sound good (= like Einaudi) that is the issue for me. Most of the piece involves alternating high and low notes in the right hand. When Einaudi plays the piece, the melody (high notes) is accented and the low notes are barely perceptible. I'm just having the hardest time mastering that alternating loud/soft pattern so that it sounds good. \:\(
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 09:35 AM


Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:

I've got some real good "cheater" method for Le Onde. I'll try to explain it as best I can.
\:D [/b]


Awwwwww, you mean I've been learning the hard way??? \:D
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 11:40 AM

Awwwwww, you mean I've been learning the hard way??? \:D [/QB][/QUOTE]


No Kawaigirl:

It's just that you and Monica are in a VERY different league than I am. Remember, I really can't read music very good at all.

I only read as much as I have to until I can get the melody in my head and then go from there. I wish I could sightread like most of you can but I very rarely do it.

I'm having one heck of a time just trying to keep up with the songs everyone else is playing but I even though I must use every possible "crutch", "cheat sheets" whatever, it ultimately is worth the effort as I enjoy this music and everyones performances of them so much.

BTW, I'm having a much tougher time getting Le Onde to flow than Nefeli.

Oh, one more thing, Euan, about you getting tickets to the Einaudi performance......I hate you! ;\)
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 06:42 PM

Has anybody heard the piece called "LEO"? It's such a peaceful and tranquil piece. For me, the rhythm in the beginning of the piece was abit tricky to play.


http://www.box.net/public/pvgjt50ftn
Posted by: mdp1w

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 07:01 PM

kawaigirl,

You are amazing!! 'Simply beautiful! :3hearts:

Daria
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 10:09 PM

kawaigirl, please tell me that you have been secretly practicing and learning all these pieces over the past, oh, 5 years... and not that you're whipping them off at the pace of a new piece every 3 or 4 days... ;\)

beautiful job, as always, on Leo. \:\)
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 10:23 PM

Txs Daria & Monica.

Monica, I've been learning an Einaudi piece every week depending on how much practise time I have & the dificulty of the piece. Sometimes I wish I can say I was practising in secrecy since there's not enough time in a day to do everything.

Ummmm, Monica, Sid, S-H will you guys be posting an Einaudi piece soon?? I'm sure everyone is tired of listening to me play by now.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 10:26 PM

Leo is in the una mattina book, beautiful, kgirl!

No such luck Monica, I think she cranks them out one every week, not only that, but she does them to perfection as well, arghh, grrr, \:D .
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 10:35 PM

Sid,

How are you progessing with In un altra vita?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 10:39 PM

Well, I'm still slogging away on Giorni Dispari. It takes me MUCH longer than a week to learn an Einaudi piece!

I do have one piece, though, that I recorded for my CD that I don't think I've posted anywhere yet:

Un Mondo A Parte

I was inspired to learn this one by Euan's beautiful recording of it, and I found it one of Einaudi's easiest pieces yet. This is where I find it hard to believe that the "Best Of" book is ordered in difficulty, because it has Mondo in the last 1/4 of the book, allegedly harder than Le Onde or Giorni Dispari, and I can GUARANTEE it is much easier than either of those pieces!

It is also one of the most "classical" sounding of Einaudi's pieces. I don't know enough music theory to be able to identify the chord progressions he uses in it, but it possesses a tense melancholy that I find very beautiful, and I just love the deep booming loud bass part toward the end. \:\)
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 10:55 PM

Txs for sharing Monica, this is one of my favorite Einaudi pieces. Your rendition was marvelous Was this recorded on your zoom?

To me, IMO, I don't think the "Best of.." book is in any order of dificulty.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/30/07 10:59 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by kawaigirl1:
Was this recorded on your zoom?
[/b]
You bet!
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/31/07 01:08 AM

Monica,

You're no slouch yourself, well played and what a lovely tune!


kawaigirl,

A couple of days ago, I went back and put back all the second and third notes for the RH triads in that middle section...it's like a new piece now. Still working to smooth out the new fingering/transitions, emphasizing the melody line from the clutter and dealing with the truncated Em chords (which before I just played through like all the others)...basically fixing up all my shortcuts.

I think I would have saved myself a lot of effort had I just tried and played it correctly the first time...but then again, I didn't believe it was doable way back then (a month and a half ago), it is now. The progress is coming much faster this time and the new sound is unbelievable.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/31/07 05:01 AM

I've really been meaning to get back to my lead sheets, but just when I think I'm free...you pull me back in!

Un mondo sounds very classical, reminds me of Fernando Sor or Tarrega from my guitar days...

These last two are just so pretty (and sounds quite doable). If only I didn't have to sleep \:\)
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/31/07 04:43 PM

Okay Folks: I need some advice here.

First Monica's and Kawaigirls fantastic recordings of Einaudi pieces, (and I think that they both have more up their sleeves!) along with Euan having tickets to an Einaudi performance..... I'm gonna blow I tell you!

How do I contain myself and not turn my extreme jealosy into a fit of rage?!! I mean some of these recordings that these two "chicks" are submitting are virtually pro quality; both in their performance and recording quality.

Come clean you two, -please tell me that there is more to these pieces that we all don't know about...(something like you have been secretly practicing them for months each!).

Kawaigirl, if you are telling me that you are submitting recordings of Einaudi pieces that took you only a week to get to that level, I'm going to go smash my head through the drywall in my room (hopefully between the studs) with jealosy!.

Monica, a zoom recorder does nothing other than too digitally record your music on a portable recorder; i.e, it does not do anything for room acoustics etc yet your recordings are also starting to sound very proffesional.

My Nefeli piece for the upcoming recital has been recorded on my digital. I also recorded it on the big "BB", but the end result sounds very muffled and boomy. It's too bad because I can really bring that piece to life on the acoustic with lots of emotion but on the digital, it is just so much "crisper" and cleaner sounding however the emotion and feeling is lacking as I honestly just can't get that out of the digital, only the acoustic!

Anyway, I've got 3-mos until the next recital (after the Feb 15th one) and I am going to play Le Onde every single day until I get it right.

You guys are killing me!
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/31/07 04:49 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
Come clean you two, -please tell me that there is more to these pieces that we all don't know about...(something like you have been secretly practicing them for months each!).
[/b]
I've been practicing them for months each, not at all secretly. But kawaigirl apparently really can learn them in a week.

Hunky, just go out and buy the frigging Zoom already. \:D You're right; it doesn't do anything about room acoustics (I just stick mine right up on the music desk), but it will let you display your BB in *most* of its glory.

Just for jerks, after the recital, why don't you post your BB Nefeli recording here or in a new thread and let some of the audiophiles here offer suggestions?
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/31/07 06:27 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:


Kawaigirl, if you are telling me that you are submitting recordings of Einaudi pieces that took you only a week to get to that level, I'm going to go smash my head through the drywall in my room (hopefully between the studs) with jealosy!.


Ohhh no S-H, please don't bash you head against the wall. Mrs S-H will hate me for it!!

I've just set a goal for myself to learn one Einaudi piece a week (kinda like giving myself a deadline). Now having said that, that's just learning to play the piece but I don't have it memorized. When it comes to memorizing, that's another ball game for me. \:\(

Hmmm, S-H, why dont' you post your acoustic version here for us to listen to? It may not be as bad as you think.

Sid, I'm happy to hear you're piece is coming along. \:\)
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/31/07 07:58 PM

Monica:

I actually have looked into the zooms specifications very closely. It is basically comprised of two components; a digital recorder along with two built in microphones in the "x-y" position.

While it is very convienient and handy, its performance specifications (frequency range) is not as accurate as the two Rode NT5 condensor mics that I have been using.

As far as the digital recorder part of it, that is obviously a huge convienient factor and is extremely useful. "Performance" wise... digital is digital.

Your Zoom is WELL worth the money you paid (plus some), however, it will not do anything to improve my recordings as my problem is not with the digital or microphone part of the process.

Over christmas, my parents came over and my dad (electronics guru) tested and checked all of my recording equip (patch cords, mixer, mics etc).

His conclusion was very poor placement of my piano in the room along with significant "over-pedaling" on just about everything.

My acoustic grand is mimicking a sub-woofer in that the sound (especially the bass) is being reflected not only from the corner of the room, but all the built in wall niches as well.

He said the only true way to fix this is too move the piano more in the middle of the room.

Unfortunately, I cannot do this as that would put it right in the middle of a traffic pattern.

Playing much softer and with a lot less pedal would help out tremendously so I think I will re-record the piece and see how that sounds.

Take a look at this picture of my piano and where it is placed in the room and you can see how the piano is stuffed into the corner. Also, notice the niches in the wall that add to the boomy response.......Keep in mind this is a very powerful 7-footer as well!



Kawaigirl:

I like your suggestion about posting up an acoustic recording just on this thread. Since only a few Einaudi fans are invloved in this thread, it should'nt spoil the recital for anyone..(I hope) so I will record an acoustic version in the next few days and post it. (Remember, I literally have to drag my hard drive, monitor, keyboard, mouse etc into the other room and re-set everything up!)....What a pain in the rump!.......Hence the incredible value of the Zoom!!

Should I get in trouble for posting up a recital song before the recital, I'm taking you all down with me as accomplices!!
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/31/07 08:17 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:


(Remember, I literally have to drag my hard drive, monitor, keyboard, mouse etc into the other room and re-set everything up!)....What a pain in the rump!.......Hence the incredible value of the Zoom!!

S-H, If your B.day is coming up ask for a LAPTOP


After looking at your pic of your piano placement, I thought the piano would look very nice in the middle of the room. The only sacrifice is to walk around the piano.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/31/07 08:36 PM

Super-hunky, I had forgotten about your dad's recording background and expertise... yes, if anybody could diagnose your recording woes, it would be him. Have you thought about investing in some acoustic panels you could drag out just on recording days? I know I've read some threads where people swear by them.
Posted by: Oxfords Gal

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/05/07 11:37 AM

nefeli sight for digital download. 3.95 make sure you hit the change currency button and a printer available \:D


http://www.sheetmusicdirect.com/se/ID_No/31975/Product.aspx
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/23/07 12:10 PM

Hey Kawaigirl (or anybody)... I was listening to the Eden Roc CD the other day and thought about tackling "Exit" as my next Einaudi piece. Have you learned it yet? Is it manageable?
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/23/07 02:36 PM

S-H,

If your Dad diagnosed your piano as mimicking a subwoofer in your room, why don't you take a shot at using the same room treatments audiophiles use for taming the bass in stereo systems? Bass traps and various other acoustic absorbing materials appropriately placed in the room (most likely in corners of both floor & ceiling) might solve your problem and be a better solution that putting the piano in the middle of the room. A search for "bass traps" or "acoustic panel" should get you started.

If you want to get scientific about it, a relatively inexpensive SPL meter (about $29) from Radio Shack plus a low frequency test CD (I have one by Autosound 2000 but there are several available) would give you an idea of what the frequency response in your room looks like and what effect different acoustic treatments have.

It is also possible to "treat" the room with furnishings and/or furniture placement. As an example, I have a stereo system in a room that was almost painfully bright. A couple of strategically placed bookcases and relocating two soft chairs completely solved the problem.

You've made an investment in a beautiful piano, no reason it shouldn't sound its best!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/23/07 06:50 PM

Greg:

Thanks for the tips but we have already done many many tests with very sophisticated equipment.

First we brought in an oscilliscope to not only identify the frequencies being produced by the piano but also to differenciate a true sign wave from that of distortion.

It turns out that I am not creating any distorted sounds but some of the very low frequencies (Deep Bass) are over-resonating due to the passive sub-woofer effect of the numerous niches in the wall next to the piano.

In addition to this, the piano is stuffed into a corner to further accentuate this problem.

Step two was to add varying thicknesses of foam underneath the piano to tone down the bass and while it greatly helped, my mids and highs were also diminished greatly.

The solution is real simple, just move the piano into the middle of the room!. Actually, I will do that next time I record.

The pain in the arse factor is just not worth moving the piano around or playing with foam padding underneath it.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the piano other than it sounds terrible when I record on it due to the worst acoustic conditions possible.

Like I said, A simple shove into the middle of the room for recording can solve this. For now, it's just too easy to hop on the digital and record a very crisp and clear recording the first time through without having to monkey with everything.

FYI, I have submitted an acoustic recording before using the M&H. My holiday recital "Christmas time is here" submission was done on it but like I said, it sounds terrible as it is way to boomy.

My heavy overpedaling also does not help this situation either!

Thanks again for the tips.
Posted by: mwf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/23/07 07:32 PM

Just noticed this thread and if I had known it existed I would of made a huge contribution earlier. My situation is this, I have played Einaudi for years and feel free to ask me anything on his pieces, I love to play them and never tire of listening or playing his music. Its very minimilistic but so beautiful and effective its quite astonishing how he mangages it. My favourite pieces are most of the I Giorni album and from le onde, I have his new album-Divineire, its excellent and much better than the last album I bought-una mattina, which unfortunately was not to my liking so much, which was a shame. Nothing seems to of got near I Giorni IMO since, but his new album is close. I can learn his pieces by ear in a few hours and get them up to a good standard. What I like about his music is I dont have to go out and buy the scores, because they are so easy to learn the notes from the cd's, he uses very similar patterns in the left hand and beautifully simple but deep and meaningful melodies and chord structures, achingly gorgeous. However I feel his music is only best heard on grand pianos, because the simple chord patterns etc.. need to stand out well, I dont think it works very well on standard uprights. I play his music on my digital piano which is sampled on a grand so its very effective. I would love to post some recordings myself, since I know plenty off by heart having played them so much over the years, not really sure how to though... I would also like to hear other peoples recordings if you could show me the links to them, is there one by kawaigirl and a few others?

Cheers
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/23/07 07:54 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
Greg:

Thanks for the tips but we have already done many many tests with very sophisticated equipment.

First we brought in an oscilliscope to not only identify the frequencies being produced by the piano but also to differenciate a true sign wave from that of distortion.

It turns out that I am not creating any distorted sounds but some of the very low frequencies (Deep Bass) are over-resonating due to the passive sub-woofer effect of the numerous niches in the wall next to the piano.

In addition to this, the piano is stuffed into a corner to further accentuate this problem.

Step two was to add varying thicknesses of foam underneath the piano to tone down the bass and while it greatly helped, my mids and highs were also diminished greatly.

[/b]
S-H,

That's exactly why I suggested the bass traps. Bass frequencies tend to "pool" in corners both at floor and ceiling level. The bass traps can make a huge difference by absorbing those reflections without affecting midrange & treble which other solutions (foam, carpeting, etc) would do. It sounds as though you only want to affect the low frequencies and that's exactly what bass traps are designed to do.

I'll stop beating the drum on this, I just saw your comments about the piano and your environment and I have spent a good deal of time over the years modifying acoustic environments for audio systems with moderate success so I thought I'd suggest it for whatever it's worth.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/23/07 08:39 PM

Greg, that is great advice on the bass traps. I am not familiar with them so I will certainly look into it for my situation..
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/23/07 10:51 PM

mwf,

Which is your favorite piece? I'd certainly like to hear your play by ear recordings!
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/23/07 11:24 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
Hey Kawaigirl (or anybody)... I was listening to the Eden Roc CD the other day and thought about tackling "Exit" as my next Einaudi piece. Have you learned it yet? Is it manageable? [/b]
Hey Monica,

The piece "Exit" is one of my soon to be learned pieces. I had glanced at the score and it's quite manageable especially if you were able to handle a George Winston piece, this piece will be quite easy in comparison.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/23/07 11:37 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mwf:
I would also like to hear other peoples recordings if you could show me the links to them, is there one by kawaigirl and a few others?

[/b]
Hi mwf,

If you look at the earlier pages of this thread namely p 2 - 7, there's a few of us who had posted our recordings of Einaudi's pieces.

Looking forward to hearing you play. \:\)
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/24/07 03:26 PM

Oh yesssss.....!

Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/24/07 03:34 PM

Oh man. I am SOOOOOOOOO jealous!! You will have to post a very long review of the concert, Euan.

I'm going to see John Mayer tonight. :rolleyes: He is my sister's favorite musician, and when she heard he was playing in Lexington, she suddenly became willing to visit me from Seattle, although I could never talk her into it before.

I would MUCH rather be seeing Einaudi!

p.s. Kawaigirl, I would challenge you to a race to learn "Exit," except that I know you would win!
Posted by: mwf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/25/07 12:46 PM

I have to admit I am not a beginner, I am an adult though and I love Einaudi so I feel I can make a good contribution to this thread. I would love to post some recordings as I have just bought a CLP270 and its ideal for Einaudi, because of the richness of the grand piano sample alone. I love the piano theme from the film 'the piano' by Nyman, love to play that and want to post a recording if I can also. I play alot of advanced classical piano also, but I really enjoy playing more minimilist piano music too, like Nyman and Einaudi, simple but yet can be more effective and beautiful than alot of more complicated works. You should check out the score for 'Amelie' also by a french composer/pianist, that too is minimilist in nature and very nice also, there is some lovely solo piano pieces in the soundtrack, and you can access the sheet music on the net if you find the right places, for free.

Anyway back to Einaudi, my favourite pieces are questa notte, Giorni Dispari, bella notte and especially the other version of that-un alta vita, I think-the second half is sublime with the high notes. One of my personal favourites and one I love to play most is nefeli, very good piano piece. I used to adore the second track on the I Giorni album- I Due Fiumi, thats a real beauty to perform. Le onde was what started it all off for me, I actually found that to be the hardest piece to play, but probably because I was not as good then.

I think the wonderful thing about Einaudi is that beginners can be inspired to play the piano from a early stage, like me. The music is not too taxing and the notes/chord progressions etc.. are very effective and easy to remember and pick up. Most of his pieces I think are based around more simple keys that dont use alot of sharps/flats so again more benfits for the beginner. I think his greatest composition maybe Questa Notte, I feel it has story to tell overall and has different parts that work very well together, and it kind of reminds me of the scarborough fair tune, I think you may have to be english though to understand what I mean.

Oh and one of my current favourite pieces by Einaudi is the title track from his new album-Divenire, its excellent-very moving because it has the backing of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic. I would reccommend this album to Einaudi fans if you have not got it, I think its far better than his last studio album-Una Mattina which I did not completely like, not his best album IMO.

Just to finish, I would like to post some recordings but am not sure how to do so, considering I have a lap-top and usb facilities on both piano and computer, is it quite simple to record onto the computer from the piano? My CLP270 has it all when it comes to linking up to a computer/midi etc.. so it wont be a problem, its just I dont have a clue how to transfer a recording across to the computer/internet. Would I make the recording first on the piano, save it and then transfer it across through the usb cable to the computer? Is it that simple and quick and uncomplicated?

Thanks
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/25/07 12:57 PM

mwf,

Your question about recording is well timed, There's a recent thread here on how to record. It's principle shortcoming is that it doesn't deal much with how to record an acoustic piano but that's a non-issue for you with the CLP-270.

There's been much discussion here about Yann Tiersen's work, in particular comptine d'un autre ete, along with some posted recordings (Monica's was excellent!) and links. A search for the title or Yann Tiersen should yield the correct threads.

By the way, you're welcome here as a non-beginner. We tend to be all over the map here at ABF in terms of time at the piano and playing abilities.

Looking forward to hearing your recordings!
Posted by: mwf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/25/07 01:05 PM

Thankyou very much Greg for yur excellent reply.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/25/07 11:07 PM

MWF:

I am now a huge Einaudi fan thanks 100% to a few people on this forum (Euan, Monica & Kawaigirl).

I love his music so much that I have'nt even seen my Jim Brickman book in weeks!!. Really!.

I think that I may push my big-boy (M&H "BB") into the middle of the great room and re-record Nefeli acoustically. While einaudi music sounds great on just about anything, I agree with you 100% that his simple tones carry out best on a grand piano.

I can play just a few basic notes in the progression that he uses and give myself goosebumps!!.( hmmm, no comment on that one!).

Anyway, I have heard two terms thus far that best describe his music. Monica had called it "Hauntingly beautiful" and you have described it as being "Achingly beautiful".

Both are accurate.

I am working on "Le Onde" now and am almost finished with it. To me, Le Onde is just as nice as Nefeli and has a few sections that may be even nicer.

It took me three weeks to learn this piece at a respectable level. This is an eternity for me as I usually learn and record a piece in a day or two. I have finally come to realize that when I do this, my piece is no where as ready as I may like to think and in a way, it is kind of discounting the beauty of the piece at the same time by doing such a rush job.

I do not want to do this anymore. This music is just to nice to not put 100% of your efforts and abilities into.

Rather than move on to another Einaudi piece, I want to continue to play Le onde and attempt to finally put some polish on a piece.

BTW, you really should look up and listen to some of Kawaigirls Einaudi recordings. She has come as close to mastering them as any I have ever heard. That, and the fact that she learns and records a new piece a week!!. I mean how nuts is that??.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/26/07 07:39 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mwf:
I think the wonderful thing about Einaudi is that beginners can be inspired to play the piano from a early stage, like me. The music is not too taxing and the notes/chord progressions etc.. are very effective and easy to remember and pick up. Most of his pieces I think are based around more simple keys that dont use alot of sharps/flats so again more benfits for the beginner. [/b]
I think Einaudi's music is great. However, if the above is really true then I think it is time I throw in the towel. While I can play bits and pieces of his music, I think it will be years before I could ever play one and make it sound decent.

Guess I should just stick with Mary Had a Little Lamb and forget it.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/26/07 07:58 AM

Don't say that rocky! Man, I'm cheering for you and I know you can do it...it's taken me months just on this one piece but I'm almost ready to rerecord a decent take of ultra vita (with all the notes added back in)...it's still the only piece of einaudi I know, but I love it, and playing it now as it was written, I feel as though it's really the only way it should be played. It's really strange, what seemed impossible before just seems "right" when played now, not sure if that makes sense..

I'm coming to the conclusion that any and everything is possible. The hardest part is convincing yourself that you can do it and then just sit down and do it.

Lol, my biggest problem with the piece these days is sometimes, I get lulled by the music and zone out and loose track of what I should be doing...which is an enviable problem to have, I know.

Keep at it, rocky, don't go by how hard a piece is when making your selection, just pick the piece that calls out to you to be played, if the desire is there, the way will make itself available to you.
Posted by: mwf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/26/07 09:37 AM

Yet again I just wrote out a huge message but lost it, very annoyed

In summary I said I take that comment back about Einaudi for beginners, really his music is not easy as such, just minimilistic in nature, and alot of chordal patterns/structures are evidently repeated throughout his individual pieces and on the whole throughout his repetoire. If you take my favourite piece I learned by him-'in un'altra vita', the left hand part throughout the piece is easy to learn/memorise because of the falling third then raised whole tone pattern in the left hand, A minor-F major-G major-E minor, this occurs many times consistently throughout the piece, albeit it changes at times, but in general this is the chordal pattern the left hand adopts mostly in the piece. Now one only has to learn the right hand part once they have the relatively easy left hand part sorted, I dont know of many other pieces by any composer that repeat sections so often, and no I am not saying its a bad thing, but it makes the learning process that much easier and far more comfortable to the performer. I suppose the only other piece is Pachebels Cannon in D \:\)

Einaudi's music is simple but amazingly effective to both the performer and listener, its quite astonishing how he pulls it off, because in theory his music is that minimilist it technically should not work, but boy does it do the job.

Has anyone tried the second track off, IMO his best album, I Giorni? its called 'i due fiumi' its a very beautiful piece and after hearing it I learned it by ear and I think I have it correct in my head, although learning by ear is normally never 100% correct. Thats perhaps why I have got to grips with Einaudi so much over the years, because I have always been able to learn his solo piano pieces by ear accurately and have never had to go out and buy the music scores, this way I always saved money, and I have always found it most comfortable to learn by ear and memorise a piece, not to read straight off the sheet. I could never learn too complicated a piece by ear, that IMO is almost impossible, such as trying to learn Rachmaninoff preludes for example by ear, not advisable. But with Einaudi his music is more clear and direct and you hear what you want to hear, not a polyphonic mess of notes that are impossible to decipher.

does everyone who has been posting recordings use this box.net thing then, if so what does it do? Also does everyone who has posted recordings done so on a digital piano? It sounds as if thats the case.

Cheers
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/26/07 09:43 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mwf:
I dont know of many other pieces by any composer that repeat sections so often, and no I am not saying its a bad thing, but it makes the learning process that much easier and far more comfortable to the performer. I suppose the only other piece is Pachebels Cannon in D \:\)

...does everyone who has been posting recordings use this box.net thing then, if so what does it do? Also does everyone who has posted recordings done so on a digital piano? It sounds as if thats the case.
[/b]
Two more candidates for 'most repetitive pieces ever': Ravel's Bolero and 'Pomp and Circumstance.' \:D

Most of us use box.net because it is simple and free and MUCH easier for other people to play your files than Savefile or that other nightmare file sharing service where you had to click through about a billion pages of ads first.

I don't think all the Einaudi recordings were done on digitals. Mine, for example, were recorded on my (acoustic) M&H A, using my Zoom H4 digital recorder, which (*ahem*) I recommend highly.

p.s. I admire your ability to play Einaudi by ear. There's NO WAY I could do that!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/26/07 12:25 PM

Rocky:

Don't give up!. "Nefeli" is NOT a hard piece, actually, if you learn just a few sections, you will notice that the piece repeats itself all over the place.

Remember, I am a horrible sight reader which is what prompted mr to improvise so much from the start. I'll bet you anything that you can sightread much better than I can because I only spend the time to get the main melody in my head and then toss the score alltogether.

In Nefeli, there really are only 4 or 5 sections to learn. once you know them, you are set as like I said, they just repeat throughout the piece.

You can very easily play some of his pieces using the fake-book method in the left hand or simply lopping off notes here and there to make it easier.

When I started to learn "Le Onde". I only played 3 arpeggiated notes in the left hand throughout the tune "fake-book style" so in essence, I really was not reading the left hand score at all other than looking at the root note per bar.

This free'd up a lot of mental capacity as now all I had to do was basically play the right hand (or at least think about it).

I also listened to a recording of Kawaigirls performance many many times before even begining to play the piece.

I did this so I could get a feel of what the tune should sound like and at what tempo because when I tell you I can't read music good, you need to understand that I also don't know how to read time signatures, tempo, volume, etc.

This is why playing piano is so easy for me because I don't pay attention to anything, I only play what I hear in my mind....thats it!

Sure, this is wrong....but ask yourself.."is it"?. I will be going on 3 years now this May and I am still enjoying playing piano more than ever,

I am never frustrated, I never have to force myself to practice and I certainly don't want to make a *job* out of learning difficult or complicated music scores.

My method may sound a bit off center, but look at the facts. I still don't really know what I am doing but somehow I ended up learning and recording "Nefeli".

I am doing this baby step method right now with "Le Onde" and it is slowly coming together as well. So, again, don't give up. I may however suggest that you try a different method of learning this or any piece or even give my method a try.

I will be glad to give you all the tips I can as long as you sign my disclaimer that reads something like this:

WARNING: You are being instructed by someone who is not competent in what he is doing; actually, he does'nt have a clue!"...you have been warned.

Seriously Rocky, give it another shot.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/26/07 01:49 PM

I haven't given up, but his music is very slow going for me!!!! I agree much of it is repetitive, but.......even so, all those notes going on in both hands I think is above my level right now. I can play parts of Nefeli, parts of Le Onde and parts of others...someday I'll hopefully be able to play the whole pieces!!

I do enjoy the parts I can play though
Posted by: mwf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/26/07 04:55 PM

I was the same a few years ago when trying to take on his music, even though now it is not much of a problem. It just takes practice and effort, never give up because its not worth it,one day you will be able to master these pieces, and believe me its a great feeling, without sounding big-headed which I asure you I am not, I feel I am at that stage of being able to play his music competently and accurately without mistakes/memory slips, however it took ages and is no where near in the same league in terms of advanced classical music, so I am no quick learner, just done alot of practice. The beauty of Einaudi is his music is so beautiful and timeless and has that appeal to listeners, more so to non-pianists I find, who can more easily relate to his simple but hugely effective repetoire. Alot of his music is used in adverts on tv etc.. well in England it is anyway, so often people can relate to it more, because they recognise it and take a liking to its beautiful shape/character.

I was wondering does anyone have the solo piano version of Giorni Dispari, I know you can buy it in his book, but I only want to learn this particular piece, one of my favourites by the composer. Its interesting also because this piece is not in the usual key you would expect Einaudi to write it in, something like A minor for example, instead its in F minor with 4 flats I think, I have learnt some of the song by ear a long time ago, but I want to have the score so I dont have to keep listening to the CD over and over again.

Thanks
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/26/07 05:31 PM

To anyone in UK:

On Friday night (9pm), Classic FM is playing an Einaudi concert for their 'Evening Concert' slot.

Its the live recording from Liverpool last year of Divenire (as a complete piece)!

[unfortunately the station stopped web-access for non-UK residents \:\( ]
Posted by: EJR

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/27/07 09:05 AM

Euan: "Friday night (9pm)"
Thanks for the tip!
Posted by: mwf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/27/07 03:09 PM

Thanks Euan, I did not realise even though I listen to Classic FM everyday in the morning on the way to work, my alarm clock is even set to Classic FM! I have the new album its great
Posted by: Shey

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/27/07 03:37 PM

Hiya, just found this thread, who has a recording of Nefeli, I have heard so much about this song, but have not heard it as yet. Sorry, I know that if I lood back at all the comments I would find it, but I am pressed for time just now. So please someone play it for me, possible Kaiwaigirl, lovely pianist or even Euan. Look forward to hearing it. Thanks Shey
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/27/07 09:04 PM

Hi Shey,

Here's my recording of Nefeli:

http://www.box.net/public/0pelpjzcd1
Posted by: Babs_

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/27/07 10:25 PM

Kawaii Girl[/b] I never tire of hearing you play that song! this is impossible! About once a week now I try playing it and each time it gets a little easier, I am surprised that some of the parts I thought were impossible before (the combined right and left hand appregios) are actually a little more managable now, so I've got maybe half the song done now. But don't look for me to play as well as Kawaii Girl , Eunau or the famous Mr. SH !!

I have the Einauldi Collections Cd and the more I listen to it, the more I like it. I find it to be a very soulful CD. I tried the Le Onde a little and I was surprised that it seems to me it is harder to play than it sounds! I actually find that alot of his music is harder to play than it sounds or maybe its just me After all, I am not as advanced as some of you folks here ! :p But that's ok, I kinda like it like that , because I learn so much from you all !
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 11:24 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Babs1:
I tried the Le Onde a little and I was surprised that it seems to me it is harder to play than it sounds! [/b]
Le Onde is my waterloo! I have been working on that piece for over a year and I STILL can't bring out that melody nicely over the alternating notes played. It is MUCH harder to play well than it sounds!
Posted by: mwf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 03:30 PM

Hello,

Kawaigirl how do you put your recordings made on your piano onto MP3 format and then on the web, amazing, I would love to be able to do that-could you briefly describe what process you went through? Do I need computer software such as cubebass or whatever its called, and midi connections/usb, is it complicated and does it take a long time to get the hang of, I am not an adult beginner on the piano, but I certainly am when it comes to recording onto MP3 files on to the web, that to me is very cool, I need to learn because I would love to share my performances of Einaudi.

I have just bought a lovely digital piano by yamaha and its perfect for Einaudi. I have made recordings in the past but only onto tapes, there are many Einaudi pieces on them which I learned by ear, I can still remember to play at any time: Questa Notte, In Un Alta Vita, Bella Notte (not too different ;\) ), Giorni Dispari, I due Fiumi, Nefeli, Le onde and others. So now basically I would like to record most of these new onto MP3 maybe, my DP has everything I need to record onto the computer, I just need the leads, software for the computer and knowhow I guess. I know there is a member who has posted how to record onto the computer, but I was wondering whats the best/easiest way.

Kawaigirl how do you do it? Also is that a digital or acoustic piano in your recordings? Your recordings are very good IMO, I am quite surprised at how well you play them.

Thanks
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 04:32 PM

mwf,

There are several ways to get recordings onto mp3 format, but here are a couple that I use:

1) Use a free program called 'Audacity' (just google for it). Then it depends on the connections on your piano. I personally use a wire that goes from the headphone socket of my piano, and goes into the mic socket on my laptop. It doesn't produce the best tone, but its good to start.

Once you have the two connected, you can play away and record using the software. However, to get mp3 format using the program, you need an extra bit of software, called LAME. Its like an add-on for Audacity. It's a little tricky to install proper, so we can help you further with this bit. Then you convert the recording into mp3, and you're done!

2) Another method I am using now is recording a MIDI file, then converting it to mp3. Again, I use free software (I'm cheap!). A program called 'Anvil Studio'. This time, I use a MIDI/USB connector. You can get one in music shops. It connects into the MIDI sockets on the piano, and goes into the USB socket on the computer.

I open the Anvil program, get my keyboard ready, then record my playing. This time, since its recorded in MIDI format, I need to use a special 'piano sound' to get the proper tone. You can get free sounds called 'sound fonts', or you can buy piano packages such as Ivory.

Once you recorded in MIDI, you can get another free program called SynthFont. You open the file in there, add the proper piano tone, then save the file as mp3.

Sorry, this probably isn't the clearest explaination! It really is a case of getting the right software, making sure the connections are working, then just experimenting until you get the 'Eureka' moment when it all turns out good.

If you need anything clarified, just let me know (or you can pm me if you prefer).
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 04:46 PM

Kawaigirl & Monica,s Einaudi recordings are {to use a past american idol comment by Neil Sedaka} "Ear-delicious"! It's not that I could listen to both of them and their recordings all day....I HAVE!!.

To be honest, I feel a little guilty by constantly learning and recording their song selections, but I simply cannot help myself as I have never heard nicer sounding music...ever!.

First I "stole" Monica's "Christofori's Dream", then, I hijacked Monica's and Kawaigirls "Nefeli", and now I am about ready to record "Le Onde" based on Kawaigirls incredible recordings.

If I were them, I would say (to me) "Hey Super-Hunky, any chance of you coming up with an original piece of your own at any time"?!.

Like I said, under any other circumstance, yes, but this is an exception. I have never heard any nicer music or performances of them than these two girlies did!. Please consider my performing your pieces as the ultimate form of flattery as thats what it really is!.

Monica, I don't know why, but the fact that you are having some struggles with "Le Onde" is motivating me even more to really polish this piece. This competitive motivation runs very deep in me and should not be considered a positive attribute so I guess deep down, I really am evil!! ;\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 04:50 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
If I were them, I would say (to me) "Hey Super-Hunky, any chance of you coming up with an original piece of your own at any time"?!.

...

Monica, I don't know why, but the fact that you are having some struggles with "Le Onde" is motivating me even more to really polish this piece. This competitive motivation runs very deep in me and should not be considered a positive attribute so I guess deep down, I really am evil!! ;\) [/b]
You inspired me to (try to) learn "Lake Erie Rainfall," super-hunky, which I had never heard before you recorded it, so it goes both ways. One day very soon I'll pick it up again and finally get it up to pace.

hmmm.... and maybe I'll have to put some extra practice time into Le Onde if we're going to make a race of it. \:D
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 05:00 PM

...and I've got Le Onde almost in a recording-worthy shape, so we could post all 3 together!!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 05:42 PM

Oh great, now Euans in too!.

Darn it you guys, I wanted to post a recording of Le Onde that would blow your socks and pants off!! After hearing Euans last recital piece, it's very obvious that he's been holding back on us. {Like our own secret weapon}.

Actually, I guess its okay as it is your guys music that I am stealing to begin with!.

So, where are you guys{and gals} with this piece?. I can play this piece very smoothly in a few sections but in no way can I get through the whole piece without several mistakes and some very obvious slow downs.

I hope to have this piece ready in a few weeks or so.

I expect Monica's version to be picture perfect to the nth degree.

I really don't know what to expect from Euan now as he obviously has the ability to bury us at any time!, and of course, my version will be somewhere WAY out in left field as usual.

Kawaigirl, you should probably get in on this as well as it is your version that we are all using as our standard reference.

Maybe we could all submit the same piece in the next recital, or possibly have our own little mini "Le Onde" show and shine exhibition.

I'm game for anything, I'm just glad to be playing this music.
Posted by: Babs_

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 07:23 PM

Can't wait to hear all of you guys recordings!! I am still struggling with Nefeli although I have it halfway done but it doesn't sound as good as the way some of you play it! :p

And Mwf I am so looking forward to hearing your recordings once you get the recording thing squared away! Good luck, I have yet to figure how how to record although I know Malzeit posted an excellent thread the other day about how to record.I bookmarked it for future reference.

Maybe sometime this summer I'll record but it probably won't be an Einauldi song, I have more trouble bringing out the melody with his music than with Nueve. With Nueves; music I have an easier time playing along with the melody. Maybe it has something to do with the way the music is written.

I am just curious, I was listening to African Melody 111, off the Einualdi collection CD and I found it to be a beautiful and the most interesting song, I just love the way the different melodies flow! \:\) Einauldi really has an amazing touch! Has anybody tried playing that?
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 07:31 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Euan Morrison:
...and I've got Le Onde almost in a recording-worthy shape, so we could post all 3 together!! [/b]
Make it 4! I've been working on Le Onde as well and was hoping to submit it to the next recital assuming I can get over the curse of the red dot!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 08:56 PM

Okay, now we just have to have an Einaudi recital!.
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 09:47 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
Okay, now we just have to have an Einaudi recital!. [/b]
I agree! That'd be fun if we had an all Einaudi recital, I'm sure there would be other submittals besides Le Onde. Monica & Kawai Girl could resubmit their excellent past recordings in addition to Le Onde.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 09:51 PM

I'm very close to doing a recording of "Giorni Dispari," which I may hang onto long enough to submit for the next regular recital. But if we have an all-Einaudi lovefest before then, I could be talked into submitting it earlier.

Babs1, I love the African Melody III. But the sheet music for it looked too intimidating, so I'm going to tackle some of the other pieces first. I think I'm going to try "Exit" next, actually.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 10:03 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mwf:
Kawaigirl how do you do it? Also is that a digital or acoustic piano in your recordings? Your recordings are very good IMO, I am quite surprised at how well you play them.

Thanks [/b]
Hello mwf,


I believe alot of members here use the Audacity software to do their recordings which is a free software. I have a mac laptop so it came with a recording software called "Garageband'. The digital which I bought recently has a USB connection which I connect directly into the laptop. Then I go into Garageband and press that "RED DOT" and record. I'm not very technologically advanced when it comes to recording, so that's about all I do when it comes to making a recording. Once the recording is done I then share the file to i-tunes which automatically converts to MP3 format. From there, you upload the Mp3 file to box.net and then paste the link to your post.

I don't know if this is useful information for you or not since most people own a PC and not a MAC.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 10:17 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
If I were them, I would say (to me) "Hey Super-Hunky, any chance of you coming up with an original piece of your own at any time"?!.

[/b]
Actualy S-H, I tend to look forward to hearing other people playing the same piece because everyone will add their own style to the piece which makes it that much more interesting to listen to. Take your version of Nefeli for example. You added your own improvisation to the piece which I thought was fantastic.


Hey, I think S-H's idea of having an Einaudi recital is great! I'm in. \:\)
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/28/07 10:32 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Babs1:
Kawaii Girl[/b] I never tire of hearing you play that song! I wish you lived next door to me!! ![/b]
LOL, Babs, hmmm, if where you live is a nice and warm with bright sunshine, I won't mind being your neighbour since where I live it's snowy and miserable right now. \:D
Posted by: mwf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/01/07 03:25 PM

Thanks Kawaigirl, my piano is a clavinova so it has everything as far as recording/hooking up to a computer is concerned, mine too has a USB to host port and midi ports (which I dont have to use so I have heard), so it should all work-just have to get down to doing it. I will be using a lap-top/PC so its alot easier because of its mobility factor, I can move the computer to the piano instead of the almost impossible opposite as it weighs 100KG-up the stairs!! to the PC, I dont think so.

Kawaigirl, are your recordings we can hear on box.net the actual original sounds/expressivness that you played on your piano? Is there any loss of sound quality or expressivness when converting to MIDI-I presume thats what you change the data to, to begin with-MIDI, then finally MP3.

Thanks
Posted by: kyon4lyfe

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/01/07 05:06 PM

Wow Einaudi is very popular here. I must say I'm sucked in by his tranquil music as well. I just ordered the Best of Einaudi, but Amazon isn't shipping it til the end of March \:\(
Posted by: Shey

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/01/07 05:48 PM

I absoulutely loved it Kawaigirl, thank you.
Einaudi is performing tonight at Bridgewater Hall in Manchester, 25 minutes away from me.
Recently found out via Euan. But, I had to work, I would have loved to have gone to the concert. Thanks again for sharing, you sound so professional, do you do public performances? I'd pay to come to see and hear you. Shey
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/01/07 08:45 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by kyon4lyfe:
Wow Einaudi is very popular here. I must say I'm sucked in by his tranquil music as well. I just ordered the Best of Einaudi, but Amazon isn't shipping it til the end of March \:\( [/b]
Ouch! But you can listen to Kawaigirl's recordings in the meantime... she's practically a "best of Einaudi" herself!

btw, welcome to the forum, kyon4lyfe!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/01/07 10:48 PM

Yes, both Monica and Kawaigirl are the Einaudi pro's with Euan ready to burst through at any time.

Kawaigirl, you must submit a recording in the upcoming "piano style show" (for lack of any other name). If you don't, you will be in lots of trouble, I mean all kinds of trouble so please do and avoid all the penalties.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/01/07 11:20 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mwf:
T

Kawaigirl, are your recordings we can hear on box.net the actual original sounds/expressivness that you played on your piano? Is there any loss of sound quality or expressivness when converting to MIDI-I presume thats what you change the data to, to begin with-MIDI, then finally MP3.

Thanks [/b]
I don't think there's any loss of sound quality when coverting to MP3 as it sounds the same to me. But I would think that anybody who's a pro in this area might say otherwise.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/01/07 11:26 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
Yes, both Monica and Kawaigirl are the Einaudi pro's with Euan ready to burst through at any time.

Kawaigirl, you must submit a recording in the upcoming "piano style show" (for lack of any other name). If you don't, you will be in lots of trouble, I mean all kinds of trouble so please do and avoid all the penalties. [/b]
....uh oh.....I better roll up my sleeve as of yesterday and start practising...lol


ohhh BTW....for anyone who's interested....Einaudi has a new music book ...it's sheet music from his new CD-Divenire. I've already ordered through musicroom.com. \:\)
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 12:01 AM

Euan, mwf, shey, Babs, greg, come on and sign up for the "Neo classical" group please. We need some more on our team!. Thanks Kawaigirl, you had me worried for a moment there.
Posted by: vogel54

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 09:50 AM

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Hi, May I join in on this thread? I am amazed at how much one can learn from all of you. I just happened to stumble upon this thread and was introduced to a wonderful composer. Watched the video and listened to you play Monica, Brilliant! You're right Mr. Hunkey, The music is addicting and beautiful. I must get the work and begin to play. I am an Italian American and anyone who comes from the mother country is bellissimo!

Ringraziarla molto per quest'opportunita meravigliosa di imparare di un compositore nuovo ed ascoltare la sua musica. Lei e tutti i pianisti meravigliosi!

Nicolo
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 09:57 AM

Welcome to the thread, vogel54!

(and I hope you realize that you will soon be getting asked to translate all the Italian song titles on his albums now ;\) )
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 09:57 AM

Hi Vogel54,

Of course you can join the thread! Even better, is if you can contribute a recording to it! Even if you can't, we're all Einaudi fans here and one more is always welcome.
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 10:00 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by kawaigirl1:
ohhh BTW....for anyone who's interested....Einaudi has a new music book ...it's sheet music from his new CD-Divenire. I've already ordered through musicroom.com. \:\) [/b]
Thanks for the pointer, I'm going to place an order in a few minutes!
Posted by: vogel54

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 10:03 AM

Hi Greg and Euan!

Thanks for the welcome! Wow I was hooked right from the start! Beautiful music! I haven't seen his compositions yet. His work seems like it might not be too difficult to play. Have you seen any of his work?

Nick
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 10:03 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
Euan, mwf, shey, Babs, greg, come on and sign up for the "Neo classical" group please. We need some more on our team!. Thanks Kawaigirl, you had me worried for a moment there. [/b]
I've not read the thread yet but I'm headed over there now. Hmm.. Neo classical.. Team... What would the team name be?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 10:31 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by vogel54:
Hi Greg and Euan!

Thanks for the welcome! Wow I was hooked right from the start! Beautiful music! I haven't seen his compositions yet. His work seems like it might not be too difficult to play. Have you seen any of his work?

Nick [/b]
Well, I'm not Greg or Euan, but I'll answer anyway. ;\) If you wade through all 9 or 10 pages of this thread, you'll see we discuss at various points the relative difficulty of his music. The big "best of" sheet music collection is allegedly ordered in terms of difficulty, but most of us have serious objections to some of that ordering.

But at any rate, there's at least a few Einaudi pieces that aren't really that hard at all, e.g., Limbo, Un Monde Aparte, Nefeli. There's recordings of all those posted here in the thread.

Kawaigirl, thanks for alerting me to the new sheet music collection. I am breaking my vow of sheet music abstinence to order it right this very second!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 10:42 AM

Hi Vogel54:

Any fan of Einaudi is a friend of mine. Welcome!
Posted by: mwf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 02:15 PM

I have the 'Diviniere' cd, bought it last week from amazon-its fantastico, I am about to start learning the stunning title track by ear, even though I can buy the score, I want to save money \:D

I highly recommend this album BTW, its IMO much better overall than 'Una Mattina', the ipod loops/reverse piano loops and Royal Liverpool Philharmonic add an extra rich texture to Einaudi's music, its going in a new more dynamic direction, proving stunning/exciting results in his wonderful new album.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 09:34 PM

Welcome Vogel54 \:\)

Hope you will play something for us to hear.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 10:50 PM

Argh! Somebody beat me with a whip! When it's perfect, I ain't recording and when I'm recording, it ain't perfect:

In Un Altra Vita (take 2) alas, still not where it should be.

http://www.box.net/public/j7ibns31jb

For comparison, here's my initial simplified arrangement (take 1).

http://www.box.net/public/ciq79975gb

take 1 took 3 weeks to learn, I can't believe it took me 2 months just to add back the notes to that central section for take 2. Please somebody tell me they can hear the difference so as to prevent my imminent suicide.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 11:06 PM

Hey Sid,

Great job with the piece! Take 2 was definitely much fuller sounding, so yes, there's a difference between the 2 takes.
Posted by: Babs_

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 11:07 PM

I decided to be a copycat and I went ahead and ordered his new cd-Divenire and the sheet music book ! It is going to take at least 3 weeks to get it, I am soooooooo bad I told myself I wasn't going to order anymore music!!!!You guys are a bad influence! :p

Vogel Welcome and C7 and MWF too. !

I am still working on a couple of Nueve pieces that I need to get polished away.However, I am also enjoying Einauldi music as well. I have attemped to play a few of his pieces,like Nefeli and Limbo . I really like the Nefeli, it's just a matter of smoothing out those appregios , it's going to take alot more practice. His music is so expressive and you really have to have the right touch because it affects the melody.

I attempted Le Onde but I had a hard time getting the melody to sound the way it is sopposed to, it's funny I thought it would be easier than Nefeli but it is actually harder, I am going to put that song aside for awhile.

SH I went ahead on that other thread and signed up
for the neo classical group.

Monica, what CD is the song Exit on? Is it in the Best of Ludovico Einaudu musicbook?

I have also worked on La Linea Scura. I like that piece, when I play that CD I put that song on low and I meditate to it and sometimes I do my yoga to it too, I can only play it to measure 32 too and then I get stuck! Maybe one of these days I will be able to figure out how to play that song all the way through and do my yoga at the same time won't that be something? \:D
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 11:12 PM

That's great Babs that you're getting into Einaudi's music
Posted by: Babs_

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/02/07 11:17 PM

Sid that was lovely!!! \:\) I enjoyed it, what a beautiful song, one of my favorites.

That is not an easy dong to play either, I have never tried that song , it is in my book and I just checked out the music and it would be a challenge for me. By the way I thought the 2nd take sounded like a better recording .
Posted by: mwf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/03/07 10:45 AM

Exit is off Eden Roc, I think.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/03/07 03:08 PM

Thanks, kawaigirl!

Babs, I'm so glad you liked it! \:\) It's my favorite as well. A good recording is so close I can almost taste it, very frustrating. Looking forward to your recordings, Babs.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/04/07 11:29 PM

Sid, you're making great progress with that piece. You could use this version for the big Einaudi vs. everybody else showdown coming up. \:\)

I started working on "Exit" this weekend. That is one fun piece to play! It includes the LOWEST bass note I have ever seen or played to date, the very first B waaaaaay down at the far left of the keyboard. It rumbles so powerfully it almost gives me the chills.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/05/07 07:54 AM

Well, I guess I better put up my review of the Divenire concert[/b] then!

I should start by saying that I was lucky to even get there – had a long journey that afternoon, and combination of weather, traffic, and construction meant that I barely got the hall in time!

Ludovico was accompanied by 6 string players, and an electronics person. They all got a warm welcome onto the stage, but when Einaudi walked out the applause multiplied!

It was the first time I’ve ever heard a 9ft concert grand, and it sounded fantastic. It was quite strange seeing an ipod on the left hand side of it (near the keys), and I’m not too sure what its function was (he never touched it during the show).

As for the track-listing, I think it went something like (not too good with the newer tracks):

Svanire, Uno, Andare, Rose, Fly, Ritornare, Oltremare [interval].

Monday, L’Origine Nascosta, Primavera. Then Einaudi said ‘now we will do some older songs’, so it continued:
La Nascote della cose segrete, Eden Roc, Le Onde

And for the encore: Stella del mattino/I giorni (medley), and Giorni Dispari to finish.

After the concert, Einaudi sat and signed books/cd’s, so I got the Divenire book signed (definitely NOT going on ebay \:\) ). You only get a couple of seconds, so all I could say was “Ciao – bellissimo!”, and he simply replied with “Grazie”.

You definitely get the impression that he is genuinely touched by the applause and adoration he receives. He is very thankful and humble.

As for the music itself, it was quite something listening to most of the pieces. A couple of the newer ones seemed to be ‘filler’, but it was made up for by tracks like I Giorni and Le Onde. And to hear Giorni Dispari complete with strings was quite amazing!

Out of the new tracks, Divenire itself, Oltremare, Monday, and Primavera were simply fantastic. They would sit happily on an updated 'Best of' compilation.

Overall, a fantastic evening, and I truly hope he makes it into the USA so you guys can hear him play as well \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/05/07 09:29 AM

[swoons with envy] You spoke with Einaudi himself??? And got his autograph??? Wow.... And you spoke to him in Italian! I probably would be completely tongue-tied and would stammer unintelligibly in any language.

What was the piano?

The ipod thing is weird. Maybe there's something on his website that explains it.

I keep checking his concert schedule and there's no sign he'll be playing the States any time soon. Drat.
Posted by: mwf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/05/07 09:36 AM

Think the ipod is the loop sounds he uses in his new album divinire, uses reverse piano loops/ipod loops for the atmospheric sounds he wants to create to go with the piano. Was the piano a Steinway D in the concert? I am guessing it was.

The loops IMO work well throughout the new album.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/05/07 09:47 AM

Hi Monica,

It wasn't too much of a big deal speaking to him - he doesn't come across as the 'virtuoso superstar' type of person, so everyone was really cool and relaxed.

He played a Steinway D (don't know if it was Hamburg or NY). I think he is contracted to them now (although he used to play Yamaha, I think).

I'm pretty sure it was an ipod. The only other explanation was it was a wireless unit for the microphone beside the piano (he spoke a couple of times to introduce people). But it certainly looked like an mp3 player.

At first I thought it may have been for timing (like a metronome). Then maybe it could have been for controlling the electronic samples. But I will ask on the Einaudi forum and get back to you.

You'll just have to fly to Europe instead ;\)

Edit: I was writing as you posted the explanation, mwf! The thing was that he never seemed to click any buttons, or manipulate the device at any point (unless he did so when the lights were dimmed, or I just never picked up on it).
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/05/07 09:51 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Euan Morrison:
You'll just have to fly to Europe instead ;\)

[/b]
My hubby's up for a European vacation, and if we do one, I will definitely pick a country that overlaps with his tour! The only snag is that Mommy (me) is the one who gets stuck sitting next to and entertaining my rambunctious 7 year old, and I'm not sure I'm up for that on an overnight flight.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/05/07 09:58 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Euan Morrison:
You'll just have to fly to Europe instead ;\)

[/b]
My hubby's up for a European vacation, and if we do one, I will definitely pick a country that overlaps with his tour! The only snag is that Mommy (me) is the one who gets stuck sitting next to and entertaining my rambunctious 7 year old, and I'm not sure I'm up for that on an overnight flight. [/b]
But to see a concert like that and meet Einaudi himself, trust me - it's worth it!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/05/07 10:13 AM

Great review Euan. I found myself clinging to every word while reading your write up.

Unlike some other new-age or romantic style pianists, Einaudi seemes to genuinly feel and perform his music the way that he wants it to come across, not just a manufactured/marketed three minute catchy piece to appeal to the mass markets on their morning drive to work.

Here in the states, it seems that many artists must conform to the three minute rule in order for their music to get any air play at all.

I understand the realistic aspects of this but it is a shame. If it were'nt for the more commercialized christmas album, groups like Mannheim Steamroller would not get any air play as well.

I did see Jim Brickman in concert a few months ago and while he was very nice to meet, you got the feeling that the entire performance was not for the peoples appreciation but rather the promotion of Jim's new album.

I am jealous that you got to see him in concert, wish I was there!
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/05/07 10:26 AM

Hi S-H,

I know what you are saying - its almost like musicians have a choice, sell-out and get the record deal and fame, or stay unique and possibly miss out on the publicity. Or some can be get the best of both worlds!
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/05/07 10:30 AM

Incidentally, here is the new book. Unfortunately the signature isn't much, but its 100% authentic \:\)

Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/05/07 11:03 AM

Thanks for sharing Euan, sounds like a great time!!
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/05/07 09:34 PM

Euan,

I envy you sooooo much. Not just the fact you saw the concert, but you also got an autographed music book! Wow, that's fantastic


What an interesting signature that Einaudi has.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/06/07 12:37 AM

Good idea, Monica, I'll do that.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/11/07 12:24 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Euan Morrison:

It was quite strange seeing an ipod on the left hand side of it (near the keys), and I’m not too sure what its function was (he never touched it during the show).
[/b]
Sorry to dig this up again, but I finally got the answer as to the ipod question.

I posted the same question on the official Einaudi forum. Intially, people were saying that it related to the loops on the album.

Then the ACTUAL bass player from the tour posted:

Here is the answer! Ludovico from his iPod sends a slight pulsing "bell" that we consider as a metronome. We tried to listen to it through headphones, but putting on them took always a lot of time. So Ludovico decided that was musically expressive to let it sounds live.
Sorry for my terrific english... but you can trust me: I am Franco, the double bass player of the sextet!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/11/07 05:59 PM

Actually, this is something that I don't understand at all.

I am now really trying to play Einaudi (or any other romantic type piece) with as much expression and emotion that I can.

I have noticed that when I do this, my timing is all over the place, but not in a bad way...I hope!

On some of the very dramatic, off pitch notes that can really give you goose bumps, I tend to slow down just a bit and really put extra emphasis on these sections. I like to let the last single note or two really hold on and "sing" for an extra moment.

I don't know how you can do this while keeping up with a constant steady beat?

Remember, I have no formal training at all so I may be way off on this one or there may be something that I don't know about.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/11/07 06:19 PM

S-H, if you ever listen to Einaudi play, he tends to emphasize certain notes by holding the note an extra second longer than the rest. Sometimes these note emphasis are not marked in his sheet music.


I for one don't use a metronome when playing "neo-classical" pieces. I did that once and the piece came out sounded very mechanical. So now, the way I approach learning a piece is by listening to a recording and then try to mimic the artist with how they had perform the piece.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/11/07 06:33 PM

and I try to mimic how kawaigirl plays, the operative word here, however is try. \:D
Posted by: vogel54

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/11/07 06:52 PM

Hi Mr. "H",
Vogel here, I was reading your post regarding timing and steady beats etc. and that you were not trained. I was trained in classical music for many years and quite frankly, I was tired of counting every measure. I recently read a wonderful book entitled "Notes From the Piano Bench" by Boris Berman. A wonderful book directed to all musicians;beginner to advanced. Let me quote a passage from the book for you, hopefully it will make you feel better about your playing:
quote "...concrete tools of piano playing, I should emphasize is that they serve to achieve the most IMPORTANT GOAL: the ability to create an illusion. What one DOES is infinitely less important than the sound that emerges from the instrument." What he is saying here is, play from your heart.He also states that efforts to connect notes physically may make the melodic line less smooth than by playing it naturally , with the help of pedaling. Certainly, dynamics is important, but at this stage making a piece "your own" is so much more important than counting and worrying whether or not it sounds exactly like the composer. I think the beauty of Neo-classic playing is portraying your interpretation of the music. No one pianist plays a piece exactly like someone else. My interpretation of a piece will be different than yours and it should, because I'm playing it. I'm feeling it, I'm conveying to my listener my emotions.

Best Regards,
Nick
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/11/07 08:00 PM

Nick:

That was a very good reply and I understand what you are saying completely.

I hope you will have a chance to listen to my version of Einaudi's "Le Onde" as I really am puting every thing I have into it.

Yes, this is just another shameless "pre-promotion" of a piece I will be submitting but I am so excited about it, I can't help myself!.

For so long now,(almost 3 years), I have been doing nothing but just trying my darndest to play a piece while actually hitting most of the correct notes.

I never even bothered with the pedal as for the first 2 years I was playing on a digital and basically just nailed that thing to the floor!!

Now that I have changed the way I learn a piece and especially the amount of time I spend on it, I am discovering a whole new world of playing that I never even scratched the surface of.

I have been playing "Le Onde" for around a month or so and now don't really need to spend all of my attention just hitting the correct notes.

Now that I can finally get through a piece without searching for the correct notes to hit, I am able to devote more attention to things like expression and emotion which I have never done before.

If you listen to my last recital submission "Nefeli", I hit most (not all) of the correct notes and even tossed in a little "re-composing" or improvising here and there but
that piece totally lacked expression or emotion as I have really never tryed to do that before.

When I first heard "Le Onde" performed by Kawaigirl, I literally, and I mean literally tossed everything I was working on and set out to learn this piece.

I have never heard a piece with so much expression infused into it and I absolutely fell head over heals for it!

I will be submitting a sneak-peak performance of it in the upcoming ABF piano-styles exhibition set for Mon March 26th and it will be the first time I have ever attempted to play with expression and emotion.

BTW, if I were someone else (besides me) reading these posts, I would be thinking to myself, "Oh boy, here goes that super-Hunky guy self promoting his music again!, will he ever stop?"!

I know, I even make myself a bit sick at times (and thats pretty bad when you annoy yourself!!), but like I said, I just can't help myself as I am getting and having too much enjoyment with these piano pieces.

I would love to get everyone all worked up and as excited about his "achingly beautiful" music as I am.

I've heard incredible pieces from Euan, Monica Kawaigirl, (and of course my own hacked-up hybrid recompositions) and would really like to hear from some others as well.

I hope others will also get the incredible enjoyment out of performing his pieces as I do too.

To be totally honest, I could listen to Einaudi's beautiful music all day but I can only take so much of listening to classical "finger-gymnastics" type of music.

I love music for its beautiful and relaxing sound, not for its technical difficulty. I do appreciate the talent and skill required to play most technical classical pieces, but its not what I'm listening to late in the evening when I want to wind down; Einaudi is!.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/11/07 08:16 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:



To be totally honest, I could listen to Einaudi's beautiful music all day but I can only take so much of listening to classical "finger-gymnastics" type of music.

I love music for its beautiful and relaxing sound, not for its technical difficulty. I do appreciate the talent and skill required to play most technical classical pieces, but its not what I'm listening to late in the evening when I want to wind down; Einaudi is!. [/b]
Well said S-H
Posted by: stephenc

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/11/07 08:24 PM

"I love music for its beautiful and relaxing sound, not for its technical difficulty. I do appreciate the talent and skill required to play most technical classical pieces, but its not what I'm listening to late in the evening when I want to wind down; Einaudi is!"

Mr S-H, I strongly urge you to listen to these two pieces by Chopin late at night to supplement your Einaudi - his nocturnes are the music of the night. They are performed very well by two 'amateur' pianists.

I'd really like to hear your interpretations on either of these pieces actually!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwSbfOkRlio

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYhuJp3jgjY
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/11/07 09:26 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by kawaigirl1:
S-H, if you ever listen to Einaudi play, he tends to emphasize certain notes by holding the note an extra second longer than the rest. Sometimes these note emphasis are not marked in his sheet music.
[/b]
I've noticed that as well. That's why I was surprised to hear that the ipod thing by his piano was for a metronome signal... and it's why I was not at all surprised to hear the member of his band say they ended up not using it!

I've been trying hard to duplicate his rubato and it is a lot harder than it sounds!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/11/07 11:24 PM

"Mr Rubato", thats kinda catchy! ;\)
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/12/07 02:37 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
I've noticed that as well. That's why I was surprised to hear that the ipod thing by his piano was for a metronome signal... and it's why I was not at all surprised to hear the member of his band say they ended up not using it!
[/b]
Monica, its just a small point, but I thought I would make clear. Its the headphones they didn't bother with - and instead the bell signal was put out live over the P.A. It must have been pretty quiet,because I wasn't aware of it.

But as you say, Einaudi's music sounds better when it is played expressively. When he was playing Le Onde, since he had the string players to keep in time, he had to play the piece in strict time, which took a little off it. Still sounded awesome though!
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/12/07 03:01 AM

I was thinking, perhaps it should be post-neo-classical (what a mouthful!), maybe post-neo \:D

Neo-classical in my mind are the youngsters like Eric Satie, Samuel Barber, Gabriel Faure, Maurice Ravel...people like that, dead but recently so.

Einaudi is still giving concerts for crying out loud, you can't be alive and classical in the same sentence!

Hmmm...how about...I've got it! New Age!
Posted by: vogel54

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/12/07 06:11 AM

S_H,
I don't think you are promoting yourself at all. I read before me someone who is passionate about what he does and that's what I would expect from someone who was able to build a truly beautiful home, work out and have the results you display, and play the piano without formal training the way you do. You really should get Belman's book and read it. It's a great tool and very helpful. I was trained in classical music as a child and young man, left the piano because life got in the way and now that I have plenty of time on my hands I want so desperately to play well again. I just listened to the two nocturnes that Steph posted. I am currently working on #72 and I play the piece a little differently than the gent playing and that's ok. My timing is a little off and I am working on the triplets. If you can get as close to the composer's interpretation I think that's pretty good. Don't become discouraged. I am sure that you are playing well enough to make Angels smile! Another quote from the book: "I am also reminded of the story about Michelangelo, working with great care on the back of one of his sculptures that was to be placed in a corner of a church.He was asked why he spent so much effort on the part that no one would see. His reply was, "God will see it." Think about that!

Best Regards,
Nick

PS Hope you're feeling better healthwise!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/12/07 03:39 PM

Stephenc:

Thanks for posting up those two pieces. I have not heard them yet as we have packed all of our audio equipment and I don't have my stereo hooked up to my computer anymore.

I do however have a good pair of desktop speakers I just found in the closet that we have not packed and I should be able to listen to your classical works this evening.

To be honest, I'm kinda looking forward to hearing what you consider to be beautiful music. I'm just wondering if we have similar tastes in that department.

There has been a sort of underground "sub-group" of AB members who seem to have banded together due to very similar tastes in music.

This is in no-way to be confused with any social "clique" or anything like that...(high school was over 20 years ago for me!!).

I just have noticed that there is a strong neo-classical/romantic/new-age following as well as an equally strong (if not stronger) traditional classical following.

Personally, I am not stuck on any one type of genre of music and my only criteria is that it appeals to me, thats all.

Heck, I even enjoyed a country song or two before!.

I'm looking forward to replying to these pieces hopefully this evening.
Posted by: stephenc

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/12/07 08:52 PM

I'll look forward to your responses Mr S-H! I think we have very similar likes in terms of piano music as evidenced by our mutual admiration for Brickmans work especially and also David Lanz and i've also enjoyed several Einaudi pieces to.

I think labelling music as 'classical' can sometimes turn people away from it without giving it a chance (I know I use to have this opinion myself until I watched some Chopin on youtube and was speechless!). But as I've said elsewhere - some pieces of music simply transcend genres - just playing the simple opening bars of either of the above pieces is like magic (even on a digital piano, and even more so on a grand!).
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/13/07 12:15 AM

Okay Stephenc, I had a chance to finally listen to both classical recordings.

first off, we can the the best of friends, grow up together, have lots of fun and never tire of each others company. We can be very similar in a lot of things, but we both are individuals as well. In this respect, you love chocolate ice cream, but my heart belongs to vanilla!

Growing up as a kid, besides being more than a handful for well everybody, I had one odd habit. I would literally shut out all of my thoughts or even stop playing with the other kids for a moment when I heard some heart wrenching notes either played or sang.

These "notes" usually had something in common with them; they were either played in very dramatic chords or as single, individual slightly off notes.

I really don't know how to describe these "off" notes other than they usually are just possibly a half note from what you would have expected to hear. They are very, VERY powerful to me and is what attracts me to this neo-classical type of music.

The beginning of Barry Manilows "Could it be magic" (borrowed from Chopin) chords do it and if you want to hear what I am talking about, find a copy of that song and listen to the piano prelude in the begining of that piece.

"Manheim Steamroller" has a few compositions that do it and "Einaudi's" "Le Onde" certainly has a lot of it.

I can't describe it any better than I have as I don't know the correct term for it. Possibly "sad" notes or "off" notes, I don't know. All I know is that when I hear a piece that incorporates these special melodies and heart-tugging notes, I can actually and physically get a lump in my throat and even goose bumps at times.

While the two performances you posted on youtube were performed with incredible expression and obvious talent, the melody itself did'nt tug at my heart strings as a few other tunes instantly have.

For me, its not about how talented or how well the piece is performed, but rather how beautiful the piece itself sounds when performed.

Very few songs or piano pieces have ever affected me like this; it is very rare.

As much as I love Kawaigirls performance of Einaudi pieces, they don't all do it for me; only a select few do.

Christofori's Dream does
Nefeli does
Le Onde does
Lake Eerie rainfall does
Barry Manilow's prelude to "could it be magic" does
Manheim Steamroller compositions do
Even Barbara Steisands "Evergreen" and "All I ask of you" does (Phantom of the opera).

This may give you a better understanding of the type of music that I really enjoy.

You may also want to listen to the opening chords of The guess who's "Laughing". Same thing. Very dramatic, almost tear-jerking melodies.

Eric Carmens "All by myself" intro (Rachmaninoff rip of)

Breads "Lost without your love" intro.

These are all great examples of this heart tugging type of dramatic chords and notes that I like. I only wish I knew what they were called.

If you have a moment (and a Rhapsody subscription), you may want to give a listen to the songs I have mentioned to get a better understanding what musically makes me tick.

I think deep down, I may be a hopeless romantic (at least musically)!
Posted by: stephenc

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/14/07 04:33 AM

One thing I've always admired in you Mr S-H is that you're the straightest of shooters - you could have said yeah, loved them, great pieces, but you gave your honest thoughts which were very insightful. In hindsight, some amatuer recordings were probably not the best introdution to this music, but I think the best elements were in each recording so you would have gotten a good feel for the style. It's odd how as much as I love Lake Eerie Rainfall and Cristofori's Dream, I find (particularly the first of those youtube pieces) even more beautiful - I cannot hear or play that particular piece enough!

These were just softeners though you realise for your classical neo- classical shootout - in time you will be converted!!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/14/07 05:13 PM

BTW Stephen.

You really had me second guessing myself on these pieces as I know we do share our love for certain piano tunes.

I went ahead and re-listened to each piece once again but this time I did not watch the video portion of it.

While the piece still did not hit me emotionally in the heart-strings as some others had, I can honestly say that I did enjoy them more without the video possibly distracting me.

When you only listen to a piece audibly, you don't have to divide up your attention to several different senses. I wonder if this is why so many top musical performers close their eyes when they perform. I can only guess that they are soley concentrating on the music as opposed to looking into the audience or something else.

I actually enjoy my favorite songs or piano pieces when it is absolutely quiet and dark. The perfect enviroment for me is just lying in bed with the lights off when all else is quiet.

Like I said, I still would'nt put these two pieces in my all time favorite lists but they certainly became much more appealing to me when I only had to listen to them.
Posted by: stephenc

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/14/07 08:39 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:

I actually enjoy my favorite songs or piano pieces when it is absolutely quiet and dark. The perfect enviroment for me is just lying in bed with the lights off when all else is quiet.
[/b]
Totally agree - there is no better time for listening - I swear my piano even sounds better at night when its very quiet and dark - or maybe may hands are just really primed from a full days playing!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/15/07 12:22 AM

The reason your piano sounds better at night is because much of the "white" noise, i.e your refrigerator cooler, a/c, outdoor sounds that you have come to just ignore may be gone.

I once thought that my piano played clearer at night only to realize that the coolant motor of the refrigerator in the kitchen did'nt circulate as much in the cooler night time hours.

If you are using a desk top PC right now, listen to how quiet the room gets by just turning off the computer!

Tip of the day: best time to record very clearly on an acoustic piano is in the middle of the night. Yes I know there are all kinds of reasons why this may not be realistic, but just listen to how quiet it is at say 3.00 in the morning.

The notes on the piano can seemingly resonate forever.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/24/07 03:48 PM

Hi gang,

Here's my final version of In Un Altra Vita:

http://www.box.net/shared/8e6otmos8f

Still not completely perfect, but it was getting towards 4am and I was thinking how lovely the chords in my bed sounded.

Funny story, I've been a bit depressed lately, I knew I had this piece down, but in recording I kept making these mistakes. Well, went back to check Kawaigirl's recording and some of my past recordings, and it turned out I was steadily accelerating with each iteration! Kawaigirl's version sounds like a stately ship, mine like a rabbit on speed even after I consciously moderated the speed to a pace I still liked (the version that you won't be hearing sounded like an overclocked hamster).

Thanks again to kawaigirl, for being my muse on this.

Needless to say, I'm extremely jealous of all you wunderkinders who can manage so many more pieces in the time it takes me to get one done...that said, I'm pretty happy with this recording. Hope you like.

(P.S. This recording satisfies the credit requirement for funburger's September challenge and Mr. S-H's upcoming music style play off \:\) )
Posted by: Thalamus

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/24/07 03:58 PM

Sid,

This is the first time I've heard this piece - I think you did a wonderful job - you play so nicely! Your playing inspired me to want to learn the pice, but I think its a bit beyond me at this point... (I'll add it to the list of 'someday' pieces I collect ;\) )
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/24/07 04:16 PM

Thalamus, thank you so much for the nice compliment! \:D (It's a relief to be able to say it's good enough for a final version)

If you have the time, you should go back to the beginning of this thread to where it all started, kawaigirl's magnificent rendition of this piece.

Frankly, I wasn't ready either when I started this (I was still fooling around with leadsheets at the time), but I was just so captivated by kawaigirl's lovely playing that it forced me to jump in the deep end on this one. Just to give you an idea, this piece actually taught me hand independence and gave me the confidence to go on to tackle Comptine by Tiersen...that's the power of love for you \:\)

FYI, I had to learn this piece twice, the first was my own simplified arrangement, once I had that down, I went back and relearned it a second time with all the notes added back in...I'm glad I did!

Thanks again!
Posted by: Thalamus

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/24/07 04:34 PM

Sid,

Thank you for the insights, and the encouragement! I am working on developing hand independence right now, so perhaps I will take your suggestion and tackle the piece soon rather than later. And I think its great that your final product after such a long journey made all that hard work so worthwhile!
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/24/07 10:26 PM

Hey Sid,

Clap Clap Clap \:\) You've done very well with the piece. Great work! You should now learn Bella Notte since there's a whole section of In un'altra section in there.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/24/07 10:28 PM

Sid, I wish I could hear your piece but I packed up my speakers and stereo and only have my pc left (we're moving).

I should be able to listen in a few days after we get settled in a bit.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/24/07 10:33 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by sid:
I knew I had this piece down, but in recording I kept making these mistakes. Well, went back to check Kawaigirl's recording and some of my past recordings, and it turned out I was steadily accelerating with each iteration! Kawaigirl's version sounds like a stately ship, mine like a rabbit on speed even after I consciously moderated the speed to a pace I still liked (the version that you won't be hearing sounded like an overclocked hamster).
[/b]
That is so funny, sid! I did the same thing with Nefeli. I like to play it every day, and I must have unconsciously been jacking up the speed as I got more confident playing it over the weeks. Then one day I put on the best of Einaudi CD, and when "Nefeli" came on I went "Whoah! I'm playing that way faster than he does!" \:D

Your latest version sounds terrific, sid. I think you can consider this one officially nailed. \:\)
Posted by: pianoid

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/25/07 12:10 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:

For me, its not about how talented or how well the piece is performed, but rather how beautiful the piece itself sounds when performed.
[/b]
All I can say is: don't give up on Chopin after listening to just 2 of his pieces. You can hardly find much more melodiously ingenious composers out there with a romantic flair for sadness and sorrow.

You said you like "sad" notes? Chopin is full of them: what else to expect from the author of the Funeral March?

Perhaps those particular pieces "clicked" with the previous poster, but not with you, though I'm sure there are quite a few Chopin pieces who'll move you just as the few Einaudi you listed. Be it the waltzes, nocturnes or even a few studies.

Search for pieces in minor keys, since those are commonly associated with sorrow and sadness.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/25/07 10:00 AM

I downloaded a free page of his music. I wish I was at the level to play his music. Very nice.
Something to look forward to...

And for the rest of you I'm kicking you all out of the Adult beginners area...you're all too good to be here... \:D
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/25/07 12:54 PM

Thanks, Monica! I know it could be better, but I guess it's good enough for now. Still have the Gagnon piece to perfect and then I can finally start in on Cristofori's in earnest.

Kawaigirl, thank you! Currently listening to Bella Notte as I write, that's not a half bad idea, I really like that new ending section and the repeat of that lovely middle section (which really needs to be played more than just once imo)...an idea might be to stick the whole of Bella into the end of Altra Vita, ending up with up a new nine minute performance. I think this is probably a better idea than trying to haphazardly improvise Einaudi (I like his music too much \:\) ).

Mr S-H, good luck on the move, hope the M&H withdrawal pangs don't get too bad!

Mark, glad you could find a sample to look at before buying.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/25/07 05:19 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by kawaigirl1:
Here's my recording of Nefeli:

http://www.box.net/public/0pelpjzcd1 [/b]
I blame you all because I can't get this song out of my mind...:lol:
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/25/07 05:39 PM

Here he is:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=o_NDXH5sjbI&mode=related&search=

http://youtube.com/watch?v=f_QhLv5-to0&mode=related&search=

Enjoy my friends...
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/27/07 07:22 PM

Monica,

How are you coming along with Divenire? I've jumped right to the bottom of the 3rd page and onto the 4th page. I think that section is the toughest of this entire piece where there's so many notes and the melody can easily be lost. The first and 2nd page is pretty straight forward.

Is there anybody else out there that's learning this piece?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/27/07 09:44 PM

I have been playing it obsessively for the past 3 days, kawaigirl, to the extent that I felt some soreness in my forearm today, so it's a good thing I'm going to a conference tomorrow and will have to take a rest!

In typical Kern stubborn fashion, I am playing it straight through from start to finish. I can play the parts on pp. 3-4, albeit about 5 times as slow as Einaudi does and with numerous errors when my thumb doesn't jump back to the right starting place on the arpeggios. I don't think it's the hardest part, though--the part that's giving me absolute conniptions is the section on the bottom of the fifth page (p. 10 in the book) continuing on for the next 2 pages. I really don't handle irregular rhythms well, and what I am playing doesn't sound at all like Einaudi plays it, and I fear it's not just a tempo problem. It also sounds to me like the left hand in this section is not what's on the recording, and that just makes it harder. (Or, possibly, I'm mangling it so badly it sounds nothing like the recording. )

I just love this piece, though, and I look forward to the time I can play it at a galloping pace.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/27/07 09:47 PM

p.s. thanks, Mark737, for those YouTube links. \:\) Man I wish he would come tour in the U.S.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/29/07 06:56 PM

Well, at todays lesson I brought the first promotional page of Nefeli that I recently downloaded and asked my teacher if it was doable in the near future. To my surprise she said it was doable right now. She said the music would be a work in progress and take some time. (Similar to Moonlight I'm working on), but no reason not to do it. She said its good to play what you really like, even if it takes extra time.

I asked if she ever heard of Ludovico Einaudi, and she said no. She then played the page like a pro and liked it very much. So I'm cleared to order the book. I told her if I could play his music clean and up to speed, I would be a very happy student.

Hope it works out...
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/29/07 07:09 PM

Congratulations, Mark! I'm so excited for you...and you know what this means, a recording at some point in the future! Have fun.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/29/07 10:02 PM

Mark, glad your teacher approved of Einaudi. You will have fun learning Einaudi's music.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/04/07 04:29 PM

Well his book arrived today. You guys didn't tell me Nefeli was six pages long...:lol:
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/04/07 04:36 PM

But most of Nefeli is repeats or repeats with very slight variations (Einaudi is sneaky that way), so it's not that bad. ;\)

Kawaigirl, I must be doing something wrong with Divenire, because I get a forearm pain in my left arm after playing it. I think it may even be caused by the "easy" section on the first few pages where you're endlessly alternating the thumb and index finger. So I am limiting myself to playing it only once per day, which is really slowing my progress down.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/04/07 05:41 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
But most of Nefeli is repeats or repeats with very slight variations (Einaudi is sneaky that way), so it's not that bad. ;\)
Well I hope so.... \:D
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/04/07 09:25 PM

Monica, try playing Divenire with a very relax arm/hand.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/04/07 09:53 PM

Easier said than done, Kawaigirl, easier said than done. ;\)

But I am working on it and played it twice today without apparently aggravating anything. Of course, I also had two Sam Adamses first, which helped greatly in the relaxation department if not the accuracy department. \:D
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/04/07 10:07 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
Of course, I also had two Sam Adamses first, which helped greatly in the relaxation department if not the accuracy department. \:D [/b]
LOL... that'll work too! \:D
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/04/07 10:15 PM

Let me ask you this: What fingering do you use when you have to hit those high E's in the left hand (e.g., first page, line 5, middle measure). Do you reach up and try to get it with your thumb, or do you switch to using say the 2nd and 3rd fingers for the A-G alternations and then hit the E with your thumb?
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/04/07 10:23 PM

Monica, for that measure I use:

5-2-1-2-1-2-1-2-1-2-1-2

It gets too complicated if you try to use the switch fingering method.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/04/07 10:54 PM

Yeah, that's what I was finding, but I'm also having a hard time getting that big jump smooth and even using the 1-2-1-2. *sigh*
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/04/07 10:57 PM

Monica, I'm not sure if this is the right way to explain it, but do you rotate your wrist abit when playing that jump?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/04/07 11:01 PM

Hmmm... I'm not sure. I'll give it a try and make a conscious effort to rotate more on that section and see if that helps. Thanks!
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/07/07 08:15 PM

Hooo Weeee.... Divenire[/b] was challenging to play with the various timings throughout. I was trying to listen to the piano part from Einaudi's recording but it was abit difficult due to the orchestra background.

Here's my attempt. I'm still working on trying to fine tuning the piece. Monica how are u coming along with the piece?

http://www.box.net/shared/4dahnp57xp
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/07/07 09:27 PM

Oh, that was so beautiful, Kawaigirl! You're lightyears ahead of me on it, although I continue to make steady progress. I can play it just about as fast as you, but much more unevenly, so I still have a long way to go. Your tip about rotating my wrist more on the first 3 pages was exactly what I needed, by the way. No more pain/tension. \:\)

I've been putting in more time than I care with the metronome on that bridge section, which I am finding very tricky because he has it arranged differently than the recording. So hearing your rendition will help me a lot.

This may end up being my favorite piece of his. Until he releases a new album, that is. \:D
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/07/07 09:44 PM

Kawaigirl,

Perfect.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/07/07 09:52 PM

Glad to hear the wrist tip helped you Monica.

That bridge section you mentioned was indeed the trickiest part of the whole piece. I too had tried to play that setion with a metronome but then quickly did away with it because it came out sounding too mechanical and if you kept the same metronome speed throughout the piece, that section comes out way too fast.


Certainly looking forward to your recording Monica \:\)
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/07/07 10:05 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by kawaigirl1:
Hooo Weeee.... Divenire[/b] was challenging to play with the various timings throughout. I was trying to listen to the piano part from Einaudi's recording but it was abit difficult due to the orchestra background.

Here's my attempt. I'm still working on trying to fine tuning the piece. Monica how are u coming along with the piece?

http://www.box.net/shared/4dahnp57xp [/b]

That was great!!
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/13/07 01:07 AM

Hey Mark, how are you coming along on the Nefeli?

Funny story, I was looking at Bella Notte (this is the piece with the large section lifted from Una Vita), and no matter how hard I tried, I couldn't get that final section to sound like it was supposed to (figured it must be way over my head)...until I looked again at that section today and noticed that he had switched to two treble clefs and I was still trying to play the second staff as a bass, haha.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/13/07 08:44 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by sid:
I was looking at Bella Notte (this is the piece with the large section lifted from Una Vita), and no matter how hard I tried, I couldn't get that final section to sound like it was supposed to (figured it must be way over my head)...until I looked again at that section today and noticed that he had switched to two treble clefs and I was still trying to play the second staff as a bass, haha. [/b]
LOL!! I've done that before! And you feel like a real dunce when you finally notice it. \:D I've played some pieces where the lower staff switches back and forth between treble and bass clef every few measures. Drives me crazy. I'd rather sit and figure out ledger lines than constantly switch clefs.

Well, I'm still plodding away on Divenire. I had managed to convince myself that I was getting it up reasonably close to tempo, so I got out my metronome and started it ticking at the assigned tempo.... and promptly got left in the dust. So now I'm working on convincing myself that it sounds better slower. \:D
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/13/07 09:20 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by sid:
Hey Mark, how are you coming along on the Nefeli?[/b]
Hi Sid,
I'm still working on page one. The last measures on the page are taking some time. Just yesterday the teacher laid out some fingering. It's going to be a very long term project. I'm still cleaning up Moonlight and working the Alfred book, so I'm not working on Nefeli exclusively. It still nice to play even the 1st page.Thanks for asking.

Mark
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/13/07 11:53 AM

Mark, the good news is that if you are like me, you will find those last measures on p. 1 of Nefeli to be the most difficult of the entire piece. It will be smooth sailing the rest of the way. \:\)
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/13/07 12:58 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
Mark, the good news is that if you are like me, you will find those last measures on p. 1 of Nefeli to be the most difficult of the entire piece. It will be smooth sailing the rest of the way. \:\) [/b]
Wow...thats great to hear! I haven't looked beyond page one.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/13/07 11:07 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by sid:


Funny story, I was looking at Bella Notte (this is the piece with the large section lifted from Una Vita), and no matter how hard I tried, I couldn't get that final section to sound like it was supposed to (figured it must be way over my head)...until I looked again at that section today and noticed that he had switched to two treble clefs and I was still trying to play the second staff as a bass, haha. [/b]
:D Okay, so I'm not the only one who's had that experience. I felt like such a dork when I finally noticed it.

Txs Sid and mark for listening.


Mark[/b] I concur with Monica about Nefeli. Once you get through page one, it's a breeze from there on.


Monica[/b] How far from the stated tempo are you with Divenire?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/16/07 09:09 AM

I'd have to check with the metronome, but I would guess I'm about 3/4 of the way there. It's fast enough that it sounds okay to me, but when you compare it to the recording you realize that he's just REALLY blazing through it. I'm not sure I can ratchet it up to that last level, though.

Incidentally, I had my music teacher friend over this weekend, and she saw the Divenire sheet music on the piano and said, "that's HARD!" I then asked her about the fingering on that first section. She recommended using 2-3 for most of the alternating 16th notes, but then end the measure on your thumb so you can make the jump down easily. So now I have to decide whether to try to switch fingering at this late stage, which I don't want to do, but on the other hand I was having problems making everything sound smooth and even at a fast tempo, so maybe I'll give it a try.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/16/07 11:07 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Mark737:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
Mark, the good news is that if you are like me, you will find those last measures on p. 1 of Nefeli to be the most difficult of the entire piece. It will be smooth sailing the rest of the way. \:\) [/b]
Wow...thats great to hear! I haven't looked beyond page one. [/b]
Well I think they are nuts.....or I'm just miserable at piano....which might well be the case...but I have never really progressed past the first page. I can play the first part easily...but that last part of page one I just couldn't get my brain and fingers to work together...ugh!
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/16/07 11:12 AM

rocky, the only way I was able to do it was measure by agonizing measure, very very slowly, over and over again. Oh, and did I mention I did this HS a gazillion times before tackling HT? But hang in there, because one you get that part down, the rest of the piece just slips on out, much like delivering a big-headed baby and the relief that occurs when the rest of the body just slithers out. [er, maybe that analogy was a bit too vivid, but it's apt, trust me. ;\) ]
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/16/07 11:17 AM

Thanks for the visual image Monica!!

I still have never given up on this piece, but don't work on it very often. I love playing the first part of page one...but that only lasts a few seconds! LOL I'm not giving up....may take me a few years...but I'll keep trying!
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/16/07 03:26 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by rocky:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Mark737:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
Mark, the good news is that if you are like me, you will find those last measures on p. 1 of Nefeli to be the most difficult of the entire piece. It will be smooth sailing the rest of the way. \:\) [/b]
Wow...thats great to hear! I haven't looked beyond page one. [/b]
Well I think they are nuts.....or I'm just miserable at piano....which might well be the case...but I have never really progressed past the first page. I can play the first part easily...but that last part of page one I just couldn't get my brain and fingers to work together...ugh! [/b]
At my level I have to think of this as a long term project. But with my teacher helping me it will come in time. It's just a matter of not giving up. If you work it by measure and build off of it, I bet you can get it too...
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/16/07 09:37 PM

Monica,

Playing this piece at 3/4 of the recommended tempo IMO is nice as well. Have you made a recording at this tempo?

I'm glad I read your piano teacher's friend's comment after I learned Divenire as being "hard". If I read that before, it would surely play on my mind.


Rocky, I agree with what Monica and Mark had said about working one measure at a time. I know it'll sound really boring but it works.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/16/07 10:41 PM

I just tested myself against the metronome and can play Divenire, roughly, at 72. But that's the main part of the piece. The bridge part completely flies apart if I try to play it as fast as the rest, and it just doesn't sound good. I know you said much the same thing earlier. So now I'm guessing we're really supposed to slow down for it but for some reason the sheet music didn't get marked that way.

I'm not ready to record it, as there's too many places where I hesitate or miss a jump back to my little finger. But it's getting there.
Posted by: Lisztener

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/17/07 01:34 AM

kawaigirl1,

Your playing of "Divenire" is beautiful.
Posted by: Shey

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/17/07 07:48 AM

Kawaigirl,
Absolutely gorgeous, just listening to your 'Divenire'........again. You are such an inspiration.

Shey
Posted by: Oxfords Gal

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/17/07 10:00 AM

kawaigirl,

You rock!!! \:D
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/17/07 07:23 PM

Txs to all for the wonderful comments. It's most encouraging.

Monica, did you try listening to Einaudi's recording to play that slower bridge section? That might help with the tempo. That was my method for learning that part.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/17/07 07:48 PM

I can't wait to hear Kawaigirls "divenire", all of her Einaudi pieces are just amazing. I don't have my speakers hooked up yet but this will give me some incentive; I know it will be worth the rumaging through the endless boxes.
Posted by: Lon Varscsak

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/17/07 09:03 PM

Wow, I just listened to your recording...beautiful. Now if I could only play like that after all of my 2 weeks worth of training! ;\)

Keep up the great work!
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/07 09:11 AM

To all the LE fans...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WC6oIGLl83M

Its in his book and not crazy hard...

PS: I gave Monica a head start...:lol:

Enjoy, its very nice...

Mark
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/07 10:57 AM

Except that I am sitting here at my desk when I really want to get to my piano and start learning this beautiful piece!

I am really grateful to Mark for pointing this piece out to me. It's not on the Echoes CD so I hadn't heard it before, but it's really really beautiful. I think about 100 of those "listens" on the YouTube clip are from me. \:D
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/07 11:02 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
Except that I am sitting here at my desk when I really want to get to my piano and start learning this beautiful piece!

I am really grateful to Mark for pointing this piece out to me. It's not on the Echoes CD so I hadn't heard it before, but it's really really beautiful. I think about 100 of those "listens" on the YouTube clip are from me. \:D [/b]
When it goes into the right hand, it really grabs you...an amazing piece...
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/07 12:12 PM

Good find Mark, this is from I Giorni. I wonder how we all missed it, it's a nice sounding piece, very relaxing.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/07 12:47 PM

I Due Fiumi

I'm surprised you all haven't played this one yet. This is one I can "almost" play. A couple of spots can still trip me up, but this is one of the few I've been able to get all the way through!!

So.....this tells you this piece is easy and you all can probably learn it in less than a day!!

I almost submitted this as my recital piece!
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/07 02:10 PM

OK rocky,

I think this is your chance to lead the pack \:\)

I'd love to hear you playing this so record and post already!
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/07 02:43 PM

Yea Rocky, DO IT already!. (no peer pressure!). ;\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/07 08:01 PM

This afternoon I was listening to that video over and over again when I had the blinding realization that I am not paid during the summer (I'm on a 9-month contract) and therefore I did not have to be at work.

So I packed up, went home, and started I Due Fiumi. It is surprisingly easy yet breathtakingly beautiful. I am hooked.

p.s. does anybody know the translation of the title?
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/07 08:08 PM

I think I Due Fiumi translates to "The two Rivers"

This is a pretty piece and not too difficult to learn.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/07 09:40 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
This afternoon I was listening to that video over and over again when I had the blinding realization that I am not paid during the summer (I'm on a 9-month contract) and therefore I did not have to be at work.

So I packed up, went home, and started I Due Fiumi. It is surprisingly easy yet breathtakingly beautiful. I am hooked.

p.s. does anybody know the translation of the title? [/b]
You do know its still spring right...:lol:

To think I had an effect on your work week...hahah
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/07 09:44 PM

Well, the kids just went to bed so I reluctantly had to stop working on I Due Fiumi. \:\( I have pretty much all the notes down, but in looking at the score it's clear there's a lot of subtle dynamics and emotionality going on, so it will take a while to get it sounding its best.

p.s. to mark: yeah, it's still spring, but final grades were turned in last week so I am F-R-E-E until mid-August.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/07 10:03 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
Well, the kids just went to bed so I reluctantly had to stop working on I Due Fiumi. \:\( I have pretty much all the notes down, but in looking at the score it's clear there's a lot of subtle dynamics and emotionality going on, so it will take a while to get it sounding its best.

p.s. to mark: yeah, it's still spring, but final grades were turned in last week so I am F-R-E-E until mid-August. [/b]
Well Monica, congrats on all your free time. I expect many more LE songs posted. And as for the kids sleeping, you need to get a nice digital piano with head phones... \:D
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/07 11:03 PM

Ludovico Einaudi's Julia

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFtUoLyIt34
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/19/07 07:54 PM

I don't think I have ever gotten into a piece as much as I did I Due Fiumi. Last night I waited until 11:30 when I was sure the kids were sound asleep and then played it quietly until 12:30. Then I put a few more hours in it today.

Here is the end result:

"I Due Fiumi"

It's not polished; there's a couple of hesitations, one right at the beginning of the main melody, drat it. I'll probably try to re-record a better take for my annual CD. But this is probably the shortest time it's ever taken me to learn a piece semi-decently, so I was too excited to wait and try for another one.

Man this is a heart-breakingly beautiful piece.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/19/07 08:15 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
I don't think I have ever gotten into a piece as much as I did I Dui Fiumi. Last night I waited until 11:30 when I was sure the kids were sound asleep and then played it quietly until 12:30. Then I put a few more hours in it today.

Here is the end result:

"I Dui Fiumi"

It's not polished; there's a couple of hesitations, one right at the beginning of the main melody, drat it. I'll probably try to re-record a better take for my annual CD. But this is probably the shortest time it's ever taken me to learn a piece semi-decently, so I was too excited to wait and try for another one.

Man this is a heart-breakingly beautiful piece. [/b]
Wow...you did this amazingly fast. But then again even I almost did page 1 in a day... \:D

You are very close to nailing it. I really liked it. One thing I liked from the you-tube piece was when the right hand was hitting the notes hard in that one area. This piece just has a sweet spot that I love...

I envy you for the ability to lean his pieces so fast and well...

Mark
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/19/07 08:18 PM

Thanks, Mark, but this one is definitely an exception. You should hear (or, rather, you shouldn't hear) my rendition of Le Onde, on which I have been working for over a year.

p.s. You copied my post before I could sneak in and correct my mistaken spelling of the title. Oops.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/19/07 08:58 PM

I told you all you could probably learn this in one day if I could play it and Monica went and did it!!

I won't tell you how long it took me.....sigh

Nice job Monica, I definitely won't be posting a recording of this piece now as I really don't need the public humiliation!!

Hopefully one day I "will" be able to play the piano....if not, I can always listen to y'all! \:D
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/19/07 09:27 PM

Very nice Monica.

You'll have this piece polished in no time ;\)
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/19/07 11:03 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by rocky:
I told you all you could probably learn this in one day if I could play it and Monica went and did it!!

I won't tell you how long it took me.....sigh

Nice job Monica, I definitely won't be posting a recording of this piece now as I really don't need the public humiliation!!

Hopefully one day I "will" be able to play the piano....if not, I can always listen to y'all! \:D [/b]
You sound just like me Rocky... \:D

But I'm stubborn and determined to play some LE...
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/19/07 11:22 PM

And I'm starting to believe what Mr. Hunky once said about playing LE's music. That just by playing or trying to play in my case, it makes you a better piano player in general. I've noticed some subtle changes in my abilities...
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/20/07 09:03 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by rocky:
I definitely won't be posting a recording of this piece now as I really don't need the public humiliation!!
[/b]
:(
Now I feel bad, rocky, because I *definitely* want to hear your version! (a) because it's a beautiful piece, (b) because I learn by hearing others' interpretations of pieces and seeing how they do things differently, and (c) if I can post the same pieces as Kawaigirl and live through it, you can post the same pieces as me. \:D
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/20/07 09:39 PM

LOL Monica....don't feel bad!!!! I don't!!!

I think you played that very well!!! Wish I could learn things as quickly!!!

I tried recording it today (bunches of times!!) and just couldn't get through it ...ugh!!!

I have saved everyone's recordings of Einaudi's pieces and enjoy everyone of them.

When I grow up I wanna be like y'all \:D
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/20/07 10:22 PM

Rocky, I hope we all can hear your version of I Due Fiumi.

For me, being able to listen to the different interpretation of the piece by all levels is a learning experience.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/21/07 01:16 AM

Well played, Monica, I love that refrain 40 seconds in. This piece definitely appeals to me, it's so peaceful and restful, quite lovely. A few very slight hesitations but your tempo and dynamics sound just about perfect.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/22/07 06:25 PM

A question for Monica or Rocky, what fingering do you use when you play that spread out 4 note G chord (at measures 7 & 8) of fiumi?

I can do 5,3,2,1 all in the left hand but it's a stretch.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/22/07 07:19 PM

I'm sure I probaby don't do it technically correct, but I play it like this:

5,2,1,2,1,2,5,2,1,2,1,5

(Scared to see how differently Monica might be playing it!!! )

\:D

P.S. It would be helpful if they had included some suggested fingerings!
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/22/07 07:29 PM

Thanks rocky, that was the other alternative (or cheating by playing the top note with my right hand) hehe, I was hoping I didn't have to do that walk (especially going backwards).

I think Einaudi has big hands, the bastard! \:D
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/22/07 08:40 PM

That's good fingering for those 2 measures Rocky.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/22/07 09:57 PM

Thanks kawaigirl! I usually just play what feels comfortable...unless an area is giving me problems and then I will look to the suggested fingerings........how I wish this book had some!! \:D
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/23/07 08:16 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by rocky:
I'm sure I probaby don't do it technically correct, but I play it like this:

5,2,1,2,1,2,5,2,1,2,1,5

(Scared to see how differently Monica might be playing it!!! )

\:D

P.S. It would be helpful if they had included some suggested fingerings! [/b]
Thats how I do it with kind of a slow roll, if that makes any sense...
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/23/07 08:49 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by rocky:
I'm sure I probaby don't do it technically correct, but I play it like this:

5,2,1,2,1,2,5,2,1,2,1,5

(Scared to see how differently Monica might be playing it!!! )

\:D
[/b]
That's how I play it, too, Rocky. \:\)

What about the rolled chord at the very last measure? I can't play it with one hand so I do the bottom two notes with my left hand and top two notes with my right.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/23/07 10:07 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
What about the rolled chord at the very last measure? I can't play it with one hand so I do the bottom two notes with my left hand and top two notes with my right. [/QB]
I do the same as you Monica.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/27/07 01:40 AM

I managed to play it all the way though tonight...you guys are right, it does seem to be very intuitive. Very pretty as well, especially the top of that middle section, I keep wanting to go back just to play that part. \:\)

Lol, can't seem to sleep tonight, every few minutes I have to get up and play that section again (from every piece of his I learn something new, not only is his music wonderful but he's a very fine teacher as well.)
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/27/07 09:04 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by sid:
I managed to play it all the way though tonight...you guys are right, it does seem to be very intuitive. Very pretty as well, especially the top of that middle section, I keep wanting to go back just to play that part. \:\)

Lol, can't seem to sleep tonight, every few minutes I have to get up and play that section again (from every piece of his I learn something new, not only is his music wonderful but he's a very fine teacher as well.) [/b]
I also really like the top of the second page. Just having trouble getting it up to speed.

His music really helps my sight reading across the grand staff. The way his writing is spread out, you can't help but read better...
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/27/07 09:27 AM

Does anyone know what the C3 notation in "I Due Fiumi" means?

Thanks
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/27/07 12:26 PM

The 1C means to use the una corda (soft) pedal. Then the 3C means to let off it ("3C" indicating that the hammer hits all 3 strings, rather than being shifted one over when the una corda pedal is down). So most of this piece is played with the una corda pedal depressed, which is sort of unusual.

I have a question that will reveal my almost total lack of music theory knowledge: What key is is this piece written in? There's no sharps or flats in the key signature, which I thought meant it should be either C or A minor. But it doesn't really sound like a C major piece to me, and I'm not seeing any A minor chords in it. And I thought one of the other tricks to figure out what key a piece is in is to look at the lowest bass note on the last measure, which in this case is G.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/27/07 12:36 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
The 1C means to use the una corda (soft) pedal. Then the 3C means to let off it ("3C" indicating that the hammer hits all 3 strings, rather than being shifted one over when the una corda pedal is down). So most of this piece is played with the una corda pedal depressed, which is sort of unusual.

I have a question that will reveal my almost total lack of music theory knowledge: What key is is this piece written in? There's no sharps or flats in the key signature, which I thought meant it should be either C or A minor. But it doesn't really sound like a C major piece to me, and I'm not seeing any A minor chords in it. And I thought one of the other tricks to figure out what key a piece is in is to look at the lowest bass note on the last measure, which in this case is G. [/b]
Thanks Monic for the answer. I've been using my sustain. (Only one I have on my digital).

I thought it was in C too. I didn't see any A minor cords.

Good question. I'll ask my teacher next week. Although someone here will have an answer to you very soon I imagine...
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/30/07 05:56 PM

Aw man. I got my copy of "I giorni" in the mail today. Even though there's a fair amount of overlap between it and the best of Einaudi CD, I decided I had to hear Einaudi play I due fuimi himself. So I eagerly put it in my CD player only to discover that I am playing it about 30% too slow. I was matching the tempo of the little girl on the video, and I guess SHE was playing it too slow.

[gnashes teeth and thinks unfair thoughts about little girls playing Einaudi pieces beautifully under high-pressure recital circumstances, and then decides instead to rail bitterly against the lack of metronome markings for this piece in the book.]

Guess it's back to the practice bench for me. \:\(
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/30/07 09:14 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
Aw man. I got my copy of "I giorni" in the mail today. Even though there's a fair amount of overlap between it and the best of Einaudi CD, I decided I had to hear Einaudi play I due fuimi himself. So I eagerly put it in my CD player only to discover that I am playing it about 30% too slow. I was matching the tempo of the little girl on the video, and I guess SHE was playing it too slow.

[gnashes teeth and thinks unfair thoughts about little girls playing Einaudi pieces beautifully under high-pressure recital circumstances, and then decides instead to rail bitterly against the lack of metronome markings for this piece in the book.]

Guess it's back to the practice bench for me. \:\( [/b]
You mean I have been killing myself learning this at the wrong speed? It sounds pretty good on the video.

Any I "think" its a male in the video, but i could be wrong...
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/30/07 09:26 PM

Here is a guy playing at the proper speed...second song. I like the slow version to be honest...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vxRmlzZDCg&mode=related&search=
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/30/07 10:14 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Mark737:
[QUOTE]Any I "think" its a male in the video, but i could be wrong... [/b]
On the video link you first posted, that's definitely a little girl... she's got pigtails, and her name is Rilla Cotton, which doesn't sound like a boy name.

Yeah, the other video you posted was closer to Einaudi's pace, but I think Einaudi might play it even faster. He also plays it with a LOT of rubato, where I had been playing it more even. The guy's video, though, included something that Einaudi does that's not in the sheet music, which is to add an ornamentation to measure 19. I need to listen to it several more times to see if there's any other differences between the sheet music and the CD.

I like it slow, too. \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/30/07 10:28 PM

Still no metronome marking but on I Giorni the track only lasts 4:21. I think my mp3 of it was six minutes something, so my impression that I was 30% too slow was right on.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/30/07 10:34 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
Still no metronome marking but on I Giorni the track only lasts 4:21. I think my mp3 of it was six minutes something, so my impression that I was 30% too slow was right on. [/b]
The youtube slow version was actually 4:45, strange
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/30/07 10:56 PM

You are so right. *Sigh* This means that not only was I maligning the poor little girl, I wasn't even matching her tempo.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/30/07 11:12 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
You are so right. *Sigh* This means that not only was I maligning the poor little girl, I wasn't even matching her tempo. [/b]
At least you got her sex right...:lol:

I must watch that video 3 times a day to get that piece down.

I'm going to go for the slower version. It has much more heart that way...
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/08/07 05:50 PM

I posted this in the July piano bar, but I thought I'd add a link to it here as well, given that this is the archival Einaudi thread.

Here's a re-recording of "I due fiumi," after having the benefit of several weeks additional practice. Note that I now am much closer to hitting the right tempo. ;\)

"I due fiumi" by Ludovico Einaudi, second take
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/08/07 06:13 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
I posted this in the July piano bar, but I thought I'd add a link to it here as well, given that this is the archival Einaudi thread.

Here's a re-recording of "I due fiumi," after having the benefit of several weeks additional practice. Note that I now am much closer to hitting the right tempo. ;\)

"I due fiumi" by Ludovico Einaudi, second take [/b]
You nailed it quite well. Bravo!! I love this song. I like this speed as well. I can play though it, but still have a ways to go...
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/08/07 10:00 PM

Hey, Mark... did you ever ask your teacher about the key that I due fiumi is in? I'm still curious to find out the answer.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/09/07 12:55 AM

Nice job, Monica!

I think I'm just about ready to start recording it as well. Haha, watch as both me and Mark both come out with a recording at the same time.

Isn't this pretty straight forwardly in the key of C? Or am I missing something?
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/09/07 07:34 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
Hey, Mark... did you ever ask your teacher about the key that I due fiumi is in? I'm still curious to find out the answer. [/b]
Darn, I forgot and we just did a quick run through of this song last week. I'll try to remember this week.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/09/07 07:36 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by sid:
Nice job, Monica!

I think I'm just about ready to start recording it as well. Haha, watch as both me and Mark both come out with a recording at the same time.

Isn't this pretty straight forwardly in the key of C? Or am I missing something? [/b]
Your going to post it before me. I'm still working on cleaning up the top of page two and with my severe case of Red dot fever it could be a looooogg time...:lol:
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/09/07 09:47 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by sid:

Isn't this pretty straight forwardly in the key of C? Or am I missing something? [/b]
I guess the reason I'm questioning is that the piece doesn't start out in C; you start out with an F-A-C arpeggio, then an A-minor inversion (E-A-C), then C inversion (E-G-C) then D-G-B, and that repeats through the whole piece, with the final chord being a G. Given the absence of sharps and flats in the key signature, it should be either C or A minor (according to my imperfect understanding of music theory), but ending on that G chord confuses me.
Posted by: Relic

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/09/07 07:06 PM

how long have you been playing the Piano Monica? Just wondering..

i've been practicing I due Fiumi today and it went pretty well, it's a lovely piece. I will post my recording as soon as i'm done with it ;\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/09/07 10:12 PM

Three years, Relic, but I had 7 years of accordion as a child.

I'm looking forward to hearing your recording. \:\)
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/14/07 12:47 AM

Don't say I didn't warn you, here's my first take of Einaudi's I Due Fiumi; there's a measure in there that's different from the score (I'll give a gold star to the first one who can tell me where it is :p ).


http://www.box.net/shared/0q9ztn4sx4


I fooled around with it off and on for about a month since Mark first introduced us to it and Monica did her blitzkrieg and it sort of fell into my lap when I wasn't looking; wished I could learn all my pieces this way. Let me know what you think (hey Mark, I beat you to it \:D ).

My only complaint is my damn ankle, started pedaling seriously and it stiffens up again (why couldn't nature have given us titanium bone instead of this friable calcium, chalk for bone, go figure!) Well it's worth it just to get this recording in. Hope you like.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/14/07 01:54 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by sid:
Don't say I didn't warn you, here's my first take of Einaudi's I Due Fiumi; there's a measure in there that's different from the score (I'll give a gold star to the first one who can tell me where it is :p ).


http://www.box.net/shared/oem33omtbu


I fooled around with it off and on for about a month since Mark first introduced us to it and Monica did her blitzkrieg and it sort of fell into my lap when I wasn't looking; wished I could learn all my pieces this way. Let me know what you think (hey Mark, I beat you to it \:D ).

My only complaint is my damn ankle, started pedaling seriously and it stiffens up again (why couldn't nature have given us titanium bone instead of this friable calcium, chalk for bone, go figure!) Well it's worth it just to get this recording in. Hope you like. [/b]
Bravo Sid, you out did your self this time. And it maybe a very long time till I come close to what you just accomplished. You really got the little nuances of the piece down well. Loved the long runs on the top part of page two.

Is you little modification the double g octave on the top of page 3? It sounds like you only hit one g instead of the octave?

Again, masterful job for a one legged piano player... \:D Hope the leg feels better.

Mark

PS: Any pedaling advice on this piece?
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/14/07 01:57 PM

Sorry double post
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/14/07 02:01 PM

I just love this piece. Beautiful playing, sid, very relaxed and smooth. Was it measure 56 that you played differently?
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/14/07 02:21 PM

Thanks Mark! I'm gratified you liked it. Nah I wouldn't short change the double octaves, ok enough teasing, I just added a short lh run of the g chord at 1:40 (measure 56...basically copying over measure 60...thought it flowed better that way). Sorry, Mark, but Monica gets the gold star \:\)

Regarding pedaling, I try to pedal every chord change (although there's a couple of points (e.g., at 37sec (measure 21) where if you haven't practiced the pedaling the transition can seem a little abrupt; if you're lazy you can get away with not releasing the pedal at these points for that extra measure, it won't sound too bad; but if you practice it you can get the transition to go pretty smoothly); I hold the pedal down for the big two measure G chord arpeggios. Also, when you have to move your left hand a distance to transition to these big two measure G chord arpeggios, you might want to hold off releasing the pedal until you've started on the new chord run otherwise you lose the sustain too early (what do they call this legato?). Also, on measures 53&54 and 57&58 you might want to hold the pedal for both measures otherwise those two chords (F and Am) sounds a little thin)

If you have headphones, you can actually listen to mine and Monica's version and hear the "swoosh" of the pedals (Monica's are more obvious since I have my pedal effects turned down but it's still there if you listen carefully, pretty neat).


Thanks, Monica! Haha, you've got it in one .

I'm really glad you liked it. I don't have this recording by Einaudi so I guess I pretty much followed yours for reference, really fun piece to learn.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/19/07 05:54 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
Hey, Mark... did you ever ask your teacher about the key that I due fiumi is in? I'm still curious to find out the answer. [/b]
I asked her today, and she said its in C but changes to G in some spots and some other stuff that was over my head...lol
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/19/07 08:49 PM

Thanks, Mark... that "changing to G in some spots" is no doubt why it ends in the G chord.

[resolves to hit the music theory books...]

I've been working on I Giorni now that I have I due fiumi recorded. It's got some big chords toward the end I can't reach, but I just re-arranged them and it doesn't sound too bad.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/23/07 11:06 AM

With my piano freshly tuned, I put in some heavy hours with the Zoom this weekend, and I think I am finally ready to put Le Onde to rest. I have struggled with this piece more than any other Einaudi piece, and I'm still not entirely happy with it, but I think I will put it away for now:

"Le Onde"

You'll hear a few bobbles at about the 1:40 mark, and I edited out the part halfway through when I spread out the last 4 pages of the sheet music. This is also the only recording where I edited out a major mistake, as it occurred on the very last gosh-darn line and I was NOT going to try to do it all over again.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/23/07 01:26 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
With my piano freshly tuned, I put in some heavy hours with the Zoom this weekend, and I think I am finally ready to put Le Onde to rest. I have struggled with this piece more than any other Einaudi piece, and I'm still not entirely happy with it, but I think I will put it away for now:

"Le Onde"

You'll hear a few bobbles at about the 1:40 mark, and I edited out the part halfway through when I spread out the last 4 pages of the sheet music. This is also the only recording where I edited out a major mistake, as it occurred on the very last gosh-darn line and I was NOT going to try to do it all over again. [/b]
I'm always amazed you guys can play such long pieces (to me at least) so well.

Very minor hesitations Monica, great feel, great sound. Thanks!
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/25/07 01:54 AM

That's pretty, Monica, where it's good it's very good...but I'm sure your perfectionist alter ego knows perfectly well...yes, you're going have to go back \:D

Have you tried just memorizing it? Love your piano, btw, can I have it?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/25/07 09:43 AM

Er, no, sid, but if I ever upgrade to a BB I'll let you have first shot at it. ;\)

Yeah, I know, I'll probably have another go at Le Onde. Maybe this weekend, as the piano is still freshly tuned and the kids are going to be away so I'll have the house to myself and the Zoom. \:\)

You know, I can and do memorize just about everything I play, but I have some kind of mental block with this piece and don't have it memorized. I think it's because he repeats things with subtle variations and it's hard to remember what variation goes where. But I've never actually sat down and consciously TRIED to memorize something; I either memorize it along the way (90% of the time) or don't. Maybe I should make a concerted effort to memorize here.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/25/07 10:35 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica Kern:
Maybe this weekend, as the piano is still freshly tuned and the kids are going to be away so I'll have the house to myself and the Zoom. \:\) [/b]
Just curious Monica, how long does your piano stay in tune?

Mark

PS: I will bid against Sid for you M&H \:D
Posted by: LuigiV

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/25/07 10:50 AM

Ludovico Einaudi talking about "Le Onde"

If it were a history the longest beach would be acclimatized on lungomare of one. One beach without beginning and aim. The history of a man perhaps who walks along this river and never does not meet nobody. Its look stops every a lot to observe some object or fragment carried from the sea, the prints of a granchio, a gull hermit. The landscape is always the sand, the sky, some cloud, the sea. They change only the waves, always equal and always various, the more small, the more great, the more short, longer." Ludovico Einaudi

Luigi
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/25/07 11:12 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Mark737:
Just curious Monica, how long does your piano stay in tune?

[/b]
It's actually very stable now that I have the Dampp-Chaser. My tech said that the A was right at 440 and that there were entire sections of the keyboard that were on pitch and he didn't even adjust. It was mostly the upper section that had gotten a little flat, and the one bass string that had broken and I had to replace and is still settling in.

But I am fussy, and I swear it sounds best the first week or two after a tuning, so if I'm recording for posterity I prefer to get as much Zoom time during that interval as possible. \:\)

I'm also the kind of person who tunes her piano at least 3 times a year. My tech doesn't charge enough, imo, so it's not a big expenditure. \:D As OperaTenor says in his signature line, "Happiness is a freshly tuned piano."

Luigi, thank you for posting that interview excerpt from Einaudi. Yes, the piece certainly conveys that sense of sameness and waves rolling in and out, doesn't it?
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/13/07 04:03 AM

Another I Due Fiumi on You Tube. It's played rather fast, and I was wondering if this is the speed that it was intended to be played. If so, I like the slower version better... \:D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGtRTg0Jt8U&mode=related&search=

Mark
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/14/07 02:28 AM

You're correct; he's playing it too fast. Einaudi's version is 4:21, and the YouTube clip is 3:46, with several seconds dead space at the beginning. Slower is better. \:\)

I really wanted to post my own YouTube clip of this piece, but I got distortion when I recorded it, and even if I wanted to upload it with the distortion, I couldn't figure out how to get it off the camera and into the computer. \:\( I will need to wait until I can get some smart teenager to help me out.

On an unrelated topic, I have a question for any of you who have played "I giorni," which is the Einaudi piece I am currently working on. What fingering do you use for measures 186 and 187 (2nd and 3rd from the end). Okay, 186 is easy enough: I'm playing 2&5 for the F and and higher D chord, alternating with my thumb on the lower D. But measure 187, when you're playing E and the higher D together, and alternating with the lower D, do you still use 2 and 5 (which is a huge stretch for me), or do you make your thumb pull double duty and and have it alternate between the lower D and E?

(hope that made sense....)
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/14/07 02:44 AM

Monica,

The fingering I had used for measure 187 was 1/5 and then the thumb played the "D", so I do the latter of what you described.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/14/07 02:56 AM

thanks! I've been doing the former, but not all together successfully... I sometimes end up squishing down the C, too, in making that stretch.

I was worried I couldn't jump my thumb back and forth fast enough to have it play both the low notes, but I'll give it a try.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/19/07 12:51 PM

Inizio-Ludovico Einaudi

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtF-y3NfaOU&mode=related&search=
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/19/07 01:04 PM

Nice find Mark \:\)

Are you currently learning any Einaudi pieces?
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/19/07 01:23 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Kawaigirl1:
Nice find Mark \:\)

Are you currently learning any Einaudi pieces? [/b]
yes, I Due Fiumi, and its going very well.

but I put Nefeli on hold because it was giving me problems and the lenght was too long. I hope to get back to it at a later date.

Mark
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/19/07 03:18 PM

Beautiful, peaceful video, Mark; I've added it to my "piano solo" playlist on YouTube.

Here's an interesting tidbit I came across as I was doing some research on "I Giorni," which is the piece I'm working on now:

The inspiration for Ludovico Einaudi's 'I Giorni' was a 12th-century folk song from Mali about a hippopotamus who was cherished by the residents of a nearby village but killed by a hunter. 'The song,' writes Einaudi in his succinct liner note, 'is sung as a lament for the death of a king or a great person or for the loss of a loved one.'
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/19/07 05:32 PM

I gotta tell you guys about the dream I had last night. I dreamed I had FRONT ROW seats for an Einaudi concert, and--get this--he was playing naked! :3hearts:

I told my husband about it and he just laughed and said that as long as I was only sitting there in the audience watching him, it was okay. \:D
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/19/07 06:24 PM

\:D \:D Monica that was too funny
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/19/07 06:29 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
I gotta tell you guys about the dream I had last night. I dreamed I had FRONT ROW seats for an Einaudi concert, and--get this--he was playing naked! :3hearts:

I told my husband about it and he just laughed and said that as long as I was only sitting there in the audience watching him, it was okay. \:D [/b]
There has to be something subliminal going on there Monica...lol
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/19/07 08:35 PM

Monica.....umm.....

I put it away for awhile, but I pulled out "I due fiumi" this morning and was surprised that I didn't have to start from scratch. Of course, starting at bar 33 is the most difficult part and hurts my hands if I practice too long. What fingering are you all using for this section?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/19/07 09:22 PM

Left or right? For right hand, the logical thing to do would be to play all the C's with 4. I don't do that. I find it more natural to start with 5 on the high Cs', and then switch to 4 on measure 38 when I need to free 5 up for the D. On 41, I switch back to 5 on the high C to make it easier to catch the C an octave lower 3 notes later, but then I go back up on 4 so as to be able to play the D smoothly in the next measure. That is, for 41 I play 5-4-5-1-4-3-4-3-4-5-4-3 etc.

For left I play 5-2-1-2-1-2 etc. It's a bit of a stretch (for me), and it helps if you rotate your wrist. Is that the part that makes your hand sore?
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/19/07 10:05 PM

Sorry...made a boo boo
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/19/07 11:43 PM

Haha, all my dreams these days are of naked Bosendorfers.

What piece was he playing, do you remember?
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/20/07 12:02 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:

For left I play 5-2-1-2-1-2 etc. It's a bit of a stretch (for me), and it helps if you rotate your wrist. Is that the part that makes your hand sore? [/b]
Both hands feel stretched, however, the left is probably worse than the right. I am using the same fingering as you, so I will try to rotate my wrist more and see if that helps. Thanks
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/21/07 12:21 AM

OK, just played this and the right hand is fine....it's the left hand that starts to hurt. I do use the same fingering as you and no matter what I tried tonight after a few runs through that section my forearm starts hurting!! I guess I need to relax and rotate more!!
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/21/07 01:01 AM

Hey Rocky, that's the same fingering that i used as well and yes, by playing with a relaxed LH will minimize the forearm pain.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/21/07 11:48 AM

Thanks y'all \:D While playing that section last night I kept telling myself..."relax" "relax"... \:D
Posted by: psychopianoman

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/01/07 05:37 PM

 Quote:


I really wanted to post my own YouTube clip of this piece, but I got distortion when I recorded it, and even if I wanted to upload it with the distortion, I couldn't figure out how to get it off the camera and into the computer. \:\( I will need to wait until I can get some smart teenager to help me out.[/QB]
Hi monica!

I have been out for some time but let me know if you got your video posted. I would like to see it. If not, I bet I could help. Just send me a message and I'll see if I can guide you through it.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/01/07 05:45 PM

Hi psychopianoman! It is good to see you posting again!! \:\)

I still haven't gotten my videos uploaded. I think the problem is that I need the software that came with the videocamera to move the files off the camera and into Windows Movie Maker. When I try to open them from the little disc they're on, all I get is one massive file that the program won't recognize. I can PLAY the video on my computer, though; I just can't seem to import the video into Movie Maker. Reading the manual makes me think I need the drivers etc. that came with the camera, and I just haven't had the time to do a thorough search of our closets to try to find the disc. It's an older Sony Handycam, btw.

It's become low priority, though, because I'm swamped with work what with classes starting and all.
Posted by: psychopianoman

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/01/07 06:56 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
Hi psychopianoman! It is good to see you posting again!! \:\)

It's become low priority, though, because I'm swamped with work what with classes starting and all. [/b]
I bet you are right. I'm used to using dv tapes and running the camera into the computer via firewire. This makes it a snap to load into movie maker.

P.S. I only have time to post now because I did not enroll for the fall semester.
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/01/07 08:48 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by rocky:
OK, just played this and the right hand is fine....it's the left hand that starts to hurt. I do use the same fingering as you and no matter what I tried tonight after a few runs through that section my forearm starts hurting!! I guess I need to relax and rotate more!! [/b]
Rocky, just a suggestion but check to see if you're sitting up high enough (relaxed elbow should be at or slightly higher than the level of the keys). I've never felt any pressure from i due fiumi. The only time I've felt pressure on my forearms was when I've played other pianos where the seat hasn't been adjusted and is too low.
Posted by: rocky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/04/07 12:10 PM

I did raise my cheap little bench a little higher, we'll see how it goes! \:\)
Posted by: Van

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/08/07 01:57 PM

Interesting thing, I've been kind of busy lately and the last couple of weeks totally forgot that In Un Altra Vita was even in my repertoire, so last night played it again; luckily it's still solidly in memory but the neat thing is how fresh and beautiful the music sounded after a brief hiatus. Anyone else notice this effect when going back to an old piece?

Hope it helps rocky.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/30/07 10:30 PM

Ok Ludovico Einaudi fans, I'm looking for another EASY LE piece. Like to keep it to 3-4 pages tops. I Due Fiumi is in the books so to speak and Nefeli was too long and troublesome at my level.

So I'm looking for some recommendations for a doable rookie type piece...

Thanks

Mark
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/30/07 10:37 PM

How about:

- Lontano
- Limbo
- Un mondo a parte (this IMO is a pretty piece)
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/30/07 10:40 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Kawaigirl1:
How about:

- Lontano
- Limbo
- Un mondo a parte (this IMO is a pretty piece) [/b]
Thanks...I'll definitely check them out.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/30/07 11:35 PM

[Rudely jumps back into the LE thread].

Mark, I just caught up on a few things here and I definitely would suggest keep plowing through Nefeli.

I can honestly say its my favorite piece now, possibly of all time. It's worth the work.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/31/07 06:47 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
[Rudely jumps back into the LE thread].

Mark, I just caught up on a few things here and I definitely would suggest keep plowing through Nefeli.

I can honestly say its my favorite piece now, possibly of all time. It's worth the work. [/b]
It one of my favorites too, but the top of page two drove me nuts. That was a few months ago, so maybe I'll visit it again.
Posted by: TThomas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/31/07 08:32 AM

Hey Mark -

I'm working on Stella del Mattino. I wouldn't call it easy (well, for me) but I think it's do-able even at my level. Plus, it's only 3 pages so I think I can stick it out if I find it tougher to get down as I go. I think it's a very pretty piece and I reallyreallyreally want to have it ready for the next recital. Been wanting to learn an Einaudi piece for a long time. If you can play I Due Fiumi, you can play this! YouTube Linky

Tina
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/31/07 09:13 AM

"Primavera" is also very easy; I'd put it in on the same level as Limbo or I due fiumi. But I think it's in the Devinire book, not the big Best Of book.

"I Giorni" is not hard either, and it's gorgeous. It's got a couple of big chords in the left hand I can't reach, but I just rearranged them.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/31/07 06:32 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by TThomas:
Hey Mark -

I'm working on Stella del Mattino. I wouldn't call it easy (well, for me) but I think it's do-able even at my level. Plus, it's only 3 pages so I think I can stick it out if I find it tougher to get down as I go. I think it's a very pretty piece and I reallyreallyreally want to have it ready for the next recital. Been wanting to learn an Einaudi piece for a long time. If you can play I Due Fiumi, you can play this! YouTube Linky

Tina [/b]
I LIKE IT...I hope it's in my book. Must check it out, thanks!
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/31/07 06:33 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
"Primavera" is also very easy; I'd put it in on the same level as Limbo or I due fiumi. But I think it's in the Devinire book, not the big Best Of book.

"I Giorni" is not hard either, and it's gorgeous. It's got a couple of big chords in the left hand I can't reach, but I just rearranged them. [/b]
Thanks, Monica...will check them out...
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/31/07 09:29 PM

Seeing as it's Halloween, here's a little trick or treat for you...

I was browsing YouTube, and I came across a video for Le Onde that only got two stars. I was about to get all irate on Einaudi's behalf, when I watched it. It's "Le Onde" being played in the background, while some guy is singing Italian vocals (in what appears to be a completely unrelated melody) dubbed on top, and it's all set to a bunch of still photos of things like flowers, sailboats, and, er, a naked lady or two :

Bizarre Le Onde clip

Please tell me that isn't Ludovico singing...

I gave it 1 star. :p
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/31/07 09:39 PM

Oh my the vid wasn;t too bad...but the singing?
Posted by: TThomas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/31/07 10:05 PM

Ugh, that's was bizarre! I couldn't even bear to make it past 1 1/2 minutes! So weird to hear that voice coupled with such beautiful music - it just did not "go"! Sort of like dipping your chocolate chip cookies into ketchup.
Blahhhhhh.......

Tina
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/01/07 12:10 AM

Or having to drink V-8 everyday. I'd rather drink shrimp dip cocktail sauce \:D .
Posted by: playadom

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/01/07 06:55 AM

S-H, V-8 is mad good!

As for the video, that was just really odd. I like it when the guy goes 'piano piano'. But I wasn't watching the video much, it was way too disturbing. Especially when he was singing about that zebra.
Posted by: TThomas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/01/07 08:46 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
I'd rather drink shrimp dip cocktail sauce \:D . [/b]


Tina
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/01/07 09:14 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by playadom:
As for the video, that was just really odd. I like it when the guy goes 'piano piano'. But I wasn't watching the video much, it was way too disturbing. Especially when he was singing about that zebra. [/b]
he was singing about a zebra?? I was too busy trying to tune out the guy singing!
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/01/07 09:14 PM

[
Posted by: TThomas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/23/07 05:41 PM

After being without my computer for a few days (turns out I had to have the $$$ logic board $$$[/b] replaced, so thank goodness it was actually still under warranty - just barely!) I was going through all my iTunes and sheet music (organizing, cleaning up and BACKING up for once :rolleyes: ) and I came across a copy of Einaudi's Exit sheet music. I actually didn't remember having it, so I did a quick Google to see if I could find a recording or find which album it's on. Check out the very first page of my Google result, hehe \:\)


p.s. - don't be stupid, stupid, STUPID like me and never back up your computer! (Or maybe I'm the only person who never does this!) I learned a very stressful and valuable lesson when my computer conked out and had to wait for days to see if I lost everything on my hard drive. I am soooo lucky not to have lost anything.

Tina
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/24/07 06:25 PM

Taking a guess, I think Exit is on Eden Roc? (okay,I'm being ultra-lazy and not even 'googling' first to check!)

p.s. Go Monica! First result \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/24/07 07:51 PM

Oh my. I wonder if I can put that down as "community service" on my merit review. \:D

What a riot!
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/10/08 12:48 AM

Ok, this thread has been buried for way too long so I went scouring youtube for a nice video link to post here.

This song doesn't seem very popular over there and I'm not sure why. I don't know the person who played it but it sounds pretty nice. Just be careful your head isn't stuck sideways if you watch it.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=BjZeBIu-CNw

It's a nice video of some playing "Come Un Fiore"

The video has been up for a while and as far as I can see it has far too few views for something done so nicely. ;\)
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/10/08 07:40 PM

Great find Anthony. Yes, I wish the vid wasn't sideways ...lol but nevertheless the person had played it well.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/12/08 09:15 AM

I didn't know what y'all meant with the sideways comments until I watched it... you would think she could have rotated it in the video editor.

Now that has me wanting to tackle that piece next.
Posted by: rockpeter

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/14/08 10:02 AM

Thats it, push Einaudi in my face while I have to wait for an out of print copy of Einaudi's Greatest hits. \:\(

Peter
Posted by: TThomas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/14/08 12:26 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by rockpeter:
Thats it, push Einaudi in my face while I have to wait for an out of print copy of Einaudi's Greatest hits. \:\(

Peter [/b]
LOL, aww! Gee, I hope it doesn't get lost in the mail, or damaged during shipment. Nah....that's not possible....is it? :p
Just kiddin' ya. I'm sure it'll arrive on your doorstep before you know it. Mmmmm.....new sheet music, and a BOOK of it to boot! Always good! \:\)

Tina
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/26/08 11:22 AM

So I was looking on amazon.com for some CDs I wanted to buy when I noticed one of the "suggestions for you" that they're always adding to the mix:

A special edition of "Divenire"

There's not a whole lot of detail about it, but it's a 2-CD set, not just one, and it apparently contains 3 bonus remixes... I strained my eyes trying to read what it read on the cover of the CD. Euan, have you seen this new special edition? Anybody???

The danged thing is an import and costs $33 so I'm wondering if it's worth getting it seeing as I already have the regular ol' plain edition.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/26/08 12:06 PM

I hadn't seen the special edition in the stores, or even heard about it!

After a little search, this shop lets you hear 30 second samples from the 3 remixes:
http://www.zavvi.co.uk/music-Classical--...ccc.r10.1/p.jsf

(I don't think I will be running out to buy the new edition \:\( )
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/26/08 01:16 PM

Thanks, Euan! That site was a lot more helpful than amazon, and it appears the only difference is the bonus CD that contains the 3 remixed pieces (for a total of about 15 minutes of music). After listening to those 30 second samples, I think I'll hang onto my $33. \:D

But if I hadn't already bought Divenire, I'd buy this special edition, so I guess it's good to know about.
Posted by: psychopianoman

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/26/08 05:13 PM

I love his music but two of the remixes are not his so I will save my cash as well.

I really enjoy Einaudis' music and I am thinking he will experiment more and more in the electronic/synth field in the future.

He is always growing musically. I have his Le Onde cd and I only like 3-4 songs. On the other hand I have 3 of his other cds and I listen to them 10-15 times a month each!
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/27/08 12:01 PM

So I saw this thread on the top of the Adult Beginner's[/b] Forum (emphasis mine)... saw that it was 18 pages long, and figured there must be some worthwhile discussion going on. And, being a true Adult Beginner myself, there must be something in it for me.

Downloaded a couple of the pieces posted by y'all... wow. I'm on board. I want to play this stuff.

Problem is, I am only 2 months into my piano playing journey. Heck, it takes me over two minutes to get through "Little Brown Jug" in Alfred's Book One. So although I have these delusions of being able to play, say, Limbo, I have to put them to bed for a few months, maybe a year. I am not sure I have that kind of patience.

Anyhow, do I get a gold star for reading all 18 pages?

One more thing... Kawaigirl, your recordings are really something. You've gotten plenty of props for them, deservedly so. You don't need any more from me. But one thing that hasn't gotten much mention is that you made those on a digital, is that right? This music is highly nuanced, as many of you have pointed out. If I am reading y'all correctly, the music (some of it) isn't demanding technically, but highly demanding in terms of dynamics and expression. I think I remember someone in this thread going so far as to say that Einaudi should only be played on a grand... That you, KG, are able to meet these challenges on a digital speaks highly of your ability, and also says something of your instrument. A Kawai digital, I assume?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/27/08 03:08 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Always Wanted to Play Piano:

Anyhow, do I get a gold star for reading all 18 pages?
[/b]
Here you go, AWTPP!!


Some of Einaudi's pieces really aren't that hard at all. Maybe I wouldn't recommend them for a two-month beginner, but perhaps 6 months. I can't remember how long Mark had been playing when he started I due fiumi, but I don't think it was too long.

If you like the music, buy the book and put it away for a few months. You may be pleasantly surprised when you pull it out at 6 months. \:\)

Yes, Kawaigirl is my hero. I'm *still* flabbergasted at how quickly she was able to produce a wonderful recording of Divenire. I've been working on that piece OVER A YEAR and have yet to get a recording I'd feel good about posting here.
Posted by: psychopianoman

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/27/08 05:29 PM

I think it is hard to play it well with a digital piano/keyboard. He often records using a Steinway.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/27/08 10:00 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Always Wanted to Play Piano:


One more thing... Kawaigirl, your recordings are really something. You've gotten plenty of props for them, deservedly so. You don't need any more from me. But one thing that hasn't gotten much mention is that you made those on a digital, is that right? This music is highly nuanced, as many of you have pointed out. If I am reading y'all correctly, the music (some of it) isn't demanding technically, but highly demanding in terms of dynamics and expression. I think I remember someone in this thread going so far as to say that Einaudi should only be played on a grand... That you, KG, are able to meet these challenges on a digital speaks highly of your ability, and also says something of your instrument. A Kawai digital, I assume?
Txs Always Wanted to Play Piano. You certainly deserve a gold star for reading all 18 pages! Yes, those recordings were recorded on my Roland RD300SX.
Posted by: MJinMN

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/01/08 09:03 AM

Ok, add another fan to the Einaudi thread. Since purchasing a new piano about 10 months ago, I've been playing mostly Scott Joplin rags and a few old pieces from my childhood piano days. While my wife really enjoys playing the piano, she hasn't done it nearly as much primarily because she doesn't have any sheet music for songs she'd like to play. Consequently, I've been searching for music that she'd enjoy and I recently stumbled across Einaudi, which seemed perfect. We recently ordered his large 175 page book from Amazon, along with the greatest hits CD, but haven't received them. I've also been listening to some of his works on youtube and trying to figure out which are my favorites. While this started out being for my wife to play, I think I'll have to ask her permission to play a few songs myself (we try not to play the same pieces to avoid the comparisons, as well as the redundancy of hearing it all the time).

With all of that introduction, can you please tell me that Stella del Mattino is in the large book? Amazon doesn't have the table of contents listed, and I find myself captivated by that song. Also, for anyone who has played it, can you tell me roughly how difficult it is? I'm hoping I'll be able to manage some of these pieces. In my very different Joplin world, I've been playing Bethena, Magnetic Rag, the Entertainer, and am just geting going on Elite Syncopations. I am a master of none, for sure, but play well enough to get through the first three at reasonable pace.

Also, it may be helpful for folks considering that book if someone might consider listing the songs included (I know I would appreciate it greatly).

-Matt
Posted by: gmm1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/01/08 09:12 AM

OK Matt, here ya go:

Limbo; Melodia Africana II; La Profondita Del Buio: Quel Che Resta; Ombre; Samba; I Gorni; Bella Notte; I due Fiumi; Melodia Africana III; Lontano; Stella Del Mattino[/b]; Fuori Dal Mondo; Nefeli; Exit; Fuoria Dalla Notte; Melodia africanan I; Tracce; Password; Melodia Africanan IV; Le Onde - Canzone Popolare; Le Onde; Detro L'Incanto; Giorni Dispari; Julia; In un'Altra Vita; Un Mondo A Parte; Sotto Vento; L'ultima Volta; Inizio; La Linea Scura; La Nascita Delle Cose Segrete; Passaggio; Onde Corte; Questa Notte; Due Tramonti

Excuse any spelling/typing errors, please.
Posted by: TThomas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/01/08 09:34 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by MJinMN:
Also, for anyone who has played it, can you tell me roughly how difficult it is? I'm hoping I'll be able to manage some of these pieces. In my very different Joplin world, I've been playing Bethena, Magnetic Rag, the Entertainer, and am just geting going on Elite Syncopations. I am a master of none, for sure, but play well enough to get through the first three at reasonable pace.
[/b]
Hi Matt - I just performed Stella del mattino for our most recent ABF recital. I think if you can knock out Joplin's work (which I can do only in my dreams so far!), Stella will probably feel like a warm-up piece for you! \:\) It is a very pretty piece, to be sure and I enjoyed learning it.

Tina
Posted by: Kawai, HI

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/26/08 08:31 PM

Sorry, nothing new. Just posting to bring this close to the front so I can find it. (I really like this thread)
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/27/08 12:38 AM

You can bookmark this thread or just use the stickied post of important threads as this thread is linked from there.

As a last resort there's always the search function to find it. \:\)
Posted by: Kawai, HI

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/27/08 04:10 AM

Thanks AnthonyB for the help. Do you mean book mark on my computer? I don't understand the stickied post of important threads thing. And when I did a "Einaudi" search it didn't really pop up. Keep in mind the rate limiting step is me.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/04/08 12:49 AM

If anyone has the Divenire cd without the remixes they are now available on the ludovicoeinaudi.com website if you sign up to be able to download them. I'd say I like the Uno one best.

The consolation for registering is that 50 downloaders have a chance to win a signed copy of Divenire.

Not that I want to reduce my chance of getting one of those copies, I just thought mentioning it to other Ludovico fans would be the right thing to do. (And who ever said atheists lack morals?)
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/05/08 10:34 AM

Ok, I have spent a good portion of the last month listening to the various Einaudi CD's our library has. I found some stuff that I simply don't care for (Dr. Zhivago, Stanze), and others that are wonderful. I'd also have to say that the La Scala 2 disk set is probably sufficient for me, as most of what I really like is on it. If I had to claim a favorite piece, something I'm MOST looking forward to playing, it would probably be In un'altra vita.

I should go back through this thread and see if anyone has had any luck with it. I don't recall.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/05/08 11:39 AM

I know there's at least two members' recordings of that piece somewhere in this thread, but I'm not sure I have the stomach to go through all 19 pages to look for them. \:D

AnthonyB, thank you so much for that tip about the Divenire remixes! Now that I bought the iPod, I can actually download them. I am sure my daughter will be delighted to have more "sappy Italian new age" (her words, not mine! \:D ) loaded on it. :p
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/05/08 12:00 PM

KWgirl and Ewan posted recordings. KG also mentioned something about it being more complex to play than one would think, just listening to it.

Uh oh.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/05/08 02:29 PM

Van has at least a couple of recordings of it, too; he started out learning a simpler version but then went back to learn the full version. Might be worth comparing them. (They're early on in the thread.)

I believe it about it being complex. The sheet music is awfully intimidating.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/06/08 10:08 PM

IMPORTANT BREAKING NEWS!!!

Apianostudent over in the Pianist Corner just posted a thread that Einaudi is making his U.S. debut, this May 21, in San Francisco! Apparently it's the only concert he's playing here this tour (he's evidently stopping off on his way to Japan).

I am *so* tempted to haul out my credit card and dump the kids on my hubby for 2 or 3 days and just GO...

Einaudi U.S. concert debut thread
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/07/08 12:09 AM

I'll go if some others do. Mrs Hunky's been wanting to go to northern Ca anyway.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/07/08 07:09 AM

That's great news! I'm so glad he is (finally) playing in the States. Hopefully it will result in a bigger market for him there.

From experience, his concerts are *definately* worth it - nothing beats sitting in the audience listening and watching to the music.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/07/08 08:58 AM

As best as I can tell, it's a "private" concert with no ticket sales to the general public (at least not yet). I registered with the radio station to be a member of their "club" and entered a contest for tickets, with the winners to be announced on Monday May 12th. I am going to explore other avenues of getting tickets too (the time-honored "throw a lot of money at the sponsor" trick ;\) ). Hunky, I am *seriously* considering going and would love to meet up with you and Mrs. hunky if we can only figure out how to get tickets.

I asked my hubby last night if he minded if I dumped the kids on him for two days so that I could go to the concert and try to have Einaudi's baby. He replied "it's okay, as long as he pays the child support and I get to sleep with Madonna." That's why I married him.
Posted by: Lisztener

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/07/08 10:00 AM

Monica,

I was going to wait until after the recital to tell you, but I've signed a contract with RCA Red Seal to release my first DVD of New Age compositions along with a week-long stint at Carnegie Hall to begin a nationwide tour. Since this is my first tour, RCA is underwriting ticket costs for select FEMALE members of Piano World. I get to choose the first 100 ladies for free admission. You are at the top of my list!

Interested? \:D

Sincerely,

Lisztener

BTW, My stage name will be different from My user name here. We're reviving an old American name, "Johnny Appleseed". They expect my DVD to sell in the multiple millions of dollars.
Posted by: TrapperJohn

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/07/08 10:01 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:


I asked my hubby last night if he minded if I dumped the kids on him for two days so that I could go to the concert and try to have Einaudi's baby. He replied "it's okay, as long as he pays the child support and I get to sleep with Madonna." That's why I married him. [/b]
Madonna Good gravy! His only hope is that she's better in the sack than in the recording studio (she'd almost have to be) :p - for 2 days alone with the kids he deserves far better \:D (Actually, I'm not sure I'm old enough to be discussing these lascivious arrangements ).

Regards, JF
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/07/08 10:06 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Lisztener:
Monica,

I was going to wait until after the recital to tell you, but I've signed a contract with RCA Red Seal to release my first DVD of New Age compositions along with a week-long stint at Carnegie Hall to begin a nationwide tour. Since this is my first tour, RCA is underwriting ticket costs for select FEMALE members of Piano World. I get to choose the first 100 ladies for free admission. You are at the top of my list!

Interested? \:D

Sincerely,

Lisztener [/b]
Lisztener, after hearing your beautiful recital submissions, I'd gladly travel across the country to hear you, too. \:\) Er...but...no babies; I'm saving my ovaries for Einaudi. ;\)

p.s. to JohnFrank, I gotta agree with you about Madonna. It was the one fundamental area of disagreement when my husband and I got married. (And at our reception, I had to pull the D.J. aside and tell him that he could play anything EXCEPT Madonna.)
Posted by: Lisztener

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/07/08 10:23 AM

Drat! \:D
Posted by: TrapperJohn

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/07/08 01:01 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:

p.s. to JohnFrank, I gotta agree with you about Madonna. It was the one fundamental area of disagreement when my husband and I got married. [/b]
Madonna was your one fundamental area of disagreement? ;\) You guys will easily make your golden anniversary!

Also, this seems to be the right thread to let you know that the other day I ordered the Narada Easy New Age Sampler from sheetmusicplus.com. You had recommended The Ultimate New Age Collection to me in some other thread recently, but I felt this one was more appropriate for my current skill level. It has works by David Lanz, Michael Jones, Wayne Gratz, etc., including Lanz's beautiful "Leaves on the Seine", which is the 1st one I will attack. I sometimes joke a little about New Age music, but I've been a fan for years with many CDs. Thanks again for your suggestions, which took me to the right website

Regards, JF
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/07/08 09:51 PM

Originally posted by Monica K.:

As best as I can tell, it's a "private" concert with no ticket sales to the general public (at least not yet). I registered with the radio station to be a member of their "club" and entered a contest for tickets, with the winners to be announced on Monday May 12th. I am going to explore other avenues of getting tickets too (the time-honored "throw a lot of money at the sponsor" trick ;\) ). Hunky, I am *seriously* considering going and would love to meet up with you and Mrs. hunky if we can only figure out how to get tickets.[/b]

Monica, I say a bunch of the ABF members get together (online) and compile a "best of Einaudi" compilation cd. We can write him a letter and explain how he is such a HUGE influence to many of us and we can provide him our cd as proof!.

A good businessman knows his target audience (and market) and you just never know what can come out of it.

Jim Brickman does special performances and contests all the time; maybe Ludovico will as well. It's free to ask!.
Posted by: TrapperJohn

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/09/08 11:18 AM

Got the New Age Collection in the mail yesterday - "Leaves on the Seine" looks manageable - only 97 measures (with CODA) - will memorize for future recital.

Regards, JF
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/11/08 07:57 PM

We haven't had an Einaudi recording posted here lately... this was going to be my backup recital piece, but I decided the Carly Comando piece was good enough:

"Fuori dal Mondo"

This is one of Einaudi's easiest pieces, I think--harder than Limbo or Exit but easier than Nefeli or I Giorni.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/11/08 08:22 PM

Great playing Monica \:\) That was beautiful.
Posted by: angelojf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/11/08 08:31 PM

Thanks Monica! Nice job. Are you composing your own compositions yet?

Lets hear your own compositions!

-Ang
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/11/08 09:32 PM

That sounded great Monica.

I've still not completed an entire Einaudi song but I'm very much a beginner. I'm sure Limbo will be the first one I can play all the way through. I bought the best of book along with my first learning materials since I know I'll play it someday. For some reason it's also fun to listen to the songs with the sheets right in front of your eyes as well.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/11/08 10:20 PM

Just listened to your piece Monica; very nice. I even detected a rolling chord or two. Was that written in or are you starting to get the itch to improvise?.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/11/08 11:12 PM

mr_super-hunky: No, the song is written out that way using grace notes. I typed this into lilypond to generate something similar with the notes instead of scanning the book (too annoying to grab the broken printer that still has the functioning flatbed scanner attached).

Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/12/08 10:03 PM

AnthonyB is right; the rolled chords are written in the music. (I, alas, don't have an improvising bone in my body...)

Okay, my quest to score tickets to the Einaudi concert has hit an obstacle. After not seeing any announcement of the contest winners, I emailed the program director of the radio station, explained that I was a HUGE Einaudi fan and willing to fly from Lexington, Kentucky, if only he would let me buy a ticket. This was his reply:

 Quote:
"Monica,

You crack me up!

There is no guaranteed way, but we’re hoping to bring him back in the Fall for a full-blown concert. Keep reading your emails as part of the club to find out more."
I'm not entirely sure how to interpret "You crack me up," but however you cut it, it doesn't bode well for my ticket prospects, does it? \:D It could well be that this "private informal concert" is really just Einaudi playing a piece or two in somebody's living room and that I'd be better off saving my $$ to fly out in the fall, if they indeed book a "full-blown" concert for him. Wish I knew for sure that he would be coming back to the states.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/13/08 10:03 AM

Okay, I've been emailing back and forth with Bill Lueth, the KFDC program director, who was happy to provide more detail about the "private concert" after I assured him that I was a *benign* deranged fan and not a *dangerous* deranged fan. Apparently this concert will consist of Einaudi playing for only about half an hour with a limited audience of 60 people. So I think I will abandon any more strenuous efforts to get a ticket and wait for the fall concert. If I am going to pay $600 or so for a plane ticket I want to hear him play for more than half an hour.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/14/08 03:06 PM

Well, if Einaudi IS going to have a "full-blown" concert, then count me in as well!.

Kawaigirl and Euan MUST attend too!.

I still think we should put together some kind of a Einaudi tribute cd together and send it to him just for kicks. Who knows, if he does ever have a real concert here, we may get a chance to meet him in person. If he's nice, I may even sign an autograph for him and get his as well!. Remember I actually did this with Jim Brickman. He even posed for a few pics with me. Now it's Ludo's turn. :p
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/14/08 03:06 PM

Sorry, double post. Damn I hate Vista!
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/14/08 06:33 PM

If Einaudi does have a concert in the USA, I would love to see him in concert as well. And maybe I'll even to see Euan, Monica and
S-H in person! \:\)
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/18/08 06:17 PM

Ludovico will be making his quick skip into and out of the US to promote the US release of Divenire next month. He'll be recording for the "Echoes" show that airs on some stations all over the country (but no word I can find on when this will actually air.) When it does, it looks like the show is 3 hours long. Hopefully I'll be able to hear this somewhere. Some of the other performances/interviews will air on stations in New York and California. I think all but one of those stations have online streams available.

If anyone wants to be reminded of the schedule, check Ludovico\'s myspace page for the stations and times.

I'll be attempting to record any of the shows that I can with my computer for folks who won't be able to catch them. I've got no promises that I'll be successful, however. ;\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/19/08 09:54 PM

Thanks for letting us know, AnthonyB! I will definitely try to track down one of those online streams.

I am thrilled that he is finally turning his attention to the U.S.

I started working on Nuvole Bianche this weekend. It is easier to play than it sounds, which is always a quality I like in a piece. :p
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/19/08 11:01 PM

Monica: Ha! That's exactly the piece I was listening to as I read your reply! \:\) It's one of my favorites. I don't have any Una Mattina or Divenire sheets at the moment. Just the best of book.

I think I'm just about to the point where I can play Limbo all the way through. Likely with a bunch of mistakes, but hey, I'm very much a beginner.

As a matter of fact, I still have issues when playing notes with both hands at the same time (instead of chords and a melody) but Limbo is kind of nice with all those chords. ;\)

Anyway, I was also messing around and was able to play the first few bars of Nefeli if I went slow enough.

I'm really trying to learn bits and pieces so that when I actually go to test out digital pianos I'll have some material that I'll be playing on it rather than stuff from my teaching books.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/20/08 04:01 PM

For anyone who may have missed it, here is the audio from the "Sound Check" show from wnyc public radio from 05/20/08 where the 2nd half of the show featured an interview with Einaudi and a performance of Andare. Clip is just over 22 minutes long and IIRC Andare starts about just under 10 minutes into the program. The sound quality isn't great but this was a low bitrate stream. Enjoy.

Einaudi WNYC Interview/Performance
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/22/08 03:02 PM

I enjoyed that interview... it was a hoot to hear the interviewer try to pronounce "Divenire" and never once get it right, with poor Ludo politely correcting him.

There was also an entertaining part where the interviewer came right out and asked something to the effect of "How do you feel about the fact that people love your albums but the critics hate them?" Einaudi just replied very politely that he did not mind bad reviews if they were written by smart reviewers. The radio guy then said "so if a critic doesn't like your albums that means he's dumb?" and Einaudi just laughed.

He's got a very nice voice. But then again I'm a sucker for Italian accents. :2hearts:
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/01/08 07:38 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:

He's got a very nice voice. But then again I'm a sucker for Italian accents. :2hearts: [/b]
And your going to Naples!!!!!!!!!
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/03/08 11:24 PM

Oh well, I forgot to look up streaming radio for the echoes program to listen in tonight. It seems from the playlist available that they had 3 tracks from his playing on the show that aired today. Monday, Andare and Oltremare. There is, however, a link on the echoes.org website with extra tracks from the concert!

Bonus tracks from Einaudi Echoes performance

I started it up and first up is Stella Del Mattino. Not sure how long or what else is on here yet. ;\) Also not sure how long the link will be active. Just audio, no video.
Posted by: polostrings

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/06/08 08:57 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
I assured him that I was a *benign* deranged fan and not a *dangerous* deranged fan. [/b]
:D This had me chuckling all day, Thanks! \:D
Posted by: Mankeh

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/07/08 06:51 AM

I saw him in November last year, was brilliant, I live in England though. I'd be surprised if he didn't go to America.
Posted by: Key Notes

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/08/08 01:46 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
I am playing 'Nefeli" almost 20 times per day now!! . I am absolutely hooked!

Is this some kind of addictive piano-crack or something as I just can't stop playing it!! \:\) [/b]
I love this song too! When do you all think I can attempt to try to learn it, considering I'm only two and a half months into my piano playing adventure?

Key Notes \:\)
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/28/08 03:17 PM

OK, we've had a bit of a lapse in recordings again so here I got with my first one ever posted. \:\)

Of course, It's "Limbo". I picked this piece for my first one because of the easy left hand which meant that both hands weren't trying to do stuff at the same time. I think it's a pretty good effort for only 6 months along in my piano journey! Of course the dynamics could use a bit more work and there's a few rough spots in there but if I set the bar too high for myself I'll never get anything posted at this stage. \:\)


Now without further delay:
Limbo performed by AnthonyB on 06/28/08 (or maybe 28/6/08 for you European folk)

Enjoy!
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/28/08 05:43 PM

That was great, Anthony! And quite the impressive Red Dot debut.

And on top of that you've only been playing for six months... you should be giving yourself a big pat on the back. \:\)

The Roland sounds great, btw.

Key Notes, I missed your earlier question on this thread. Nefeli is not overly difficult, but there's a couple of lines that gave me conniptions (real hand independence challenges), and that was with 3 years of piano under my belt. Unless you're completely hooked on it and no other Einaudi piece will do, I'd encourage you to try "Limbo" or "I due fiumi" as your first foray into Einaudi.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/28/08 08:55 PM

Well done AnthonyB...congrats!

Here is your next assignment;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WC6oIGLl83M
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/28/08 09:22 PM

Mark...excellent choice. \:\)

I already have sheets sitting on the music rest. This one will be much more of a challenge than Limbo so I'm afraid I won't be able to give any sort of time frame on it.

Getting the hands to work together more will be the hardest challenge with this piece but it's a step we all have to take at some point.

But if Rilla Cotton can do it then so can I.
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/28/08 09:29 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by AnthonyB:
Mark...excellent choice. \:\)

I already have sheets sitting on the music rest. This one will be much more of a challenge than Limbo so I'm afraid I won't be able to give any sort of time frame on it.

Getting the hands to work together more will be the hardest challenge with this piece but it's a step we all have to take at some point.

But if Rilla Cotton can do it then so can I. [/b]
Based on your excellent work so far, I know you will get this one also...

Keep up the good work...
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/28/08 09:56 PM

Thanks for the kind works as well as the words of support.

I due fiumi is a really beautiful song so I really can't wait until I can hammer it out all by myself.

This song is pretty opposite of Limbo in that there's more work in the LH compared to the right. I do really like the part on page 3 when you start doing the G octaves in the RH.

I've gone through all the RH parts on the song but it will take time to get all the LH working properly along with the RH parts. The large spaced out bits of the left hand will likely be the hardest bit for me.
Posted by: Key Notes

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/30/08 10:08 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by AnthonyB:
OK, we've had a bit of a lapse in recordings again so here I got with my first one ever posted. \:\)

Of course, It's "Limbo". I picked this piece for my first one because of the easy left hand which meant that both hands weren't trying to do stuff at the same time. I think it's a pretty good effort for only 6 months along in my piano journey! Of course the dynamics could use a bit more work and there's a few rough spots in there but if I set the bar too high for myself I'll never get anything posted at this stage. \:\)


Now without further delay:
Limbo performed by AnthonyB on 06/28/08 (or maybe 28/6/08 for you European folk)

Enjoy! [/b]
Wow, nice job Anthony! and thanks again for the informations on Nefeli.

Hi Monica, Thank you so much for your words of wisdoms. I had the chance to sample the first page of Nefeli, thanks to AnthonyB, up until the dreaded measure 17 and I would have to agree. While I love this and a million of other beautiful songs, I will have to get back to it at another time, if not at a much later time. \:D Thanks again.

Key Notes \:\)
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/01/08 02:41 PM

Luckily wasn't to far along in the piece but I was attempting to get an even better recording of Limbo when my cat decided to help with a little improvised duet.

LimboCat

Oh it started off real nice, at least. If I didn't have my left foot on that darn soft pedal I may have been able to shoo it away before it jumped but probably not without messing up my playing.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/01/08 02:53 PM

Oh my gosh, that was HILARIOUS, Anthony!

The funny thing was, that big deep chord actually WORKED with the music. \:D \:D
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/01/08 03:00 PM

Oh dear!! On the bright side Anthony, at least the cat didn't jump onto the piano towards the end of the piece.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/01/08 03:06 PM

Well, I could have kept going with the piece and then edited those notes out of the midi. However, I knew where the cat was going. From the left to the right of the piano since it was going to jump to the top of my computer desk. Of course, along that path are all the buttons of the piano. So it could have stopped the recording, kicked on the metronome or most likely, changed voices to something awful along the way. \:\)
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/02/08 05:37 AM

There is a quick clip on youtube of the Einaudi 'concert' in SF:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPOXkcJCAjA
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/02/08 07:38 AM

Oh, you *would* have to torment me with that, Euan, wouldn't you?! \:D

Did you notice that there were at least two empty chairs at that concert? After I begged and begged the station manager to let me buy a ticket??? [gnashes teeth in impotent rage]

I thought it was funny that the description for the YouTube clip says Einaudi was unknown in the U.S. until the radio station started playing his music. We all know the *real* reason for the spurt in U.S. popularity is the loyal band of AB forumites. :p
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/02/08 08:52 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
Oh, you *would* have to torment me with that, Euan, wouldn't you?! \:D

Did you notice that there were at least two empty chairs at that concert? After I begged and begged the station manager to let me buy a ticket??? [gnashes teeth in impotent rage]

I thought it was funny that the description for the YouTube clip says Einaudi was unknown in the U.S. until the radio station started playing his music. We all know the *real* reason for the spurt in U.S. popularity is the loyal band of AB forumites. :p [/b]
I didn't notice the empty chairs, but I did notice the description you mention (I was thinking the same thing!).

I'm sure you will have the last laugh, though - when he plays in Kentucky you can let him know that you knew of him and played his music ages before all the stations ever did.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/03/08 06:39 AM

Divenire Remixes Available Free!! [/b]

Excuse me if this was posted previously. As many of you know, a new version of Divenire was released fairly recently, containing 3 remixes of album tracks. Several of us questioned having to buy the same album again just to get the 3 tracks.

From what I've read, Ludovico himself was concerned with fans having to do so, so he has made the 3 tracks available on his website (as long as you sign up for his newsletter):

http://download.ludovicoeinaudi.com/
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/06/08 04:14 AM

Thanks for the video Euan. I am working on several Einaudi "inspired" pieces right now and it's great to see him perform.

Maybe his secret is wearing sunglasses while he performs indoors!, who knows but it's working.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/16/08 10:02 PM

Okay, here's my latest Einaudi recording:

Primavera

Just a few comments:

1.) I started this piece because it looked dead easy, which it is... IF[/b] you play it 10 times slower than the actual tempo. \:D Playing it at the called-for tempo is MUCH harder (for me), especially because the darned thing is so long with nary a pause.

2.) I am not playing this exactly as written in the sheet music, but the sheet music doesn't duplicate the recorded version, which has strings. The section that starts quietly at about 2:05 and then gets louder and louder sounds a heck of a lot better on the recording because it has all sorts of wild string arpeggios accompanying it. Here in the solo piano version it just gets, well, tedious. So I only play it once and skip the repeat of that part. \:D

3.) There is a big blooper but for all the reasons outlined above I didn't have the energy to keep battling the Red Dot to try to record an un-bloopered version.
Posted by: dannylux

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/17/08 12:22 AM

Very pretty playing, Monica.

You've certainly conquered the grace notes.

Thanks for posting your beautiful recording.


Mel
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/17/08 12:32 AM

Wow Monica, that was beautiful. Why did'nt you use that for the upcoming recital?

I swear I'm starting to hear some *embellishments* in your playing and I like it.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/17/08 12:47 AM

Nice work Monica. I think most of us feel the same way when trying to get error free recordings.

As for myself, I'm still plugging away at I due fiumi. I'm still slow in some spots but I'm getting better overall and can now play through the entire piece (usually still making a mistake here or there). Of course, I also try to play Limbo as well at least once a day.

I also got a new piece of music (and it's not Einaudi) that I likely won't be able to play for a while but it is something to encourage me in the long run. On the plus side even if I can never play it the score is at least autographed by the composer which makes it somewhat collectible.
Posted by: Key Notes

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/17/08 01:39 AM

Wow, beautiful playing Monica. I may have to get his best of cd as well. \:\)
Posted by: Kawai, HI

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/17/08 01:58 AM

Very pretty!
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/17/08 09:39 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by mr_super-hunky:
Wow Monica, that was beautiful. Why did'nt you use that for the upcoming recital?

I swear I'm starting to hear some *embellishments* in your playing and I like it. [/b]
The "embellishments" are probably the bloopers, hunky. :p

I didn't want to use this for the recital because (at the risk of sounding blasphemous) this is not one of Einaudi's prettiest pieces, imo. Now that I've got a recording for my annual compilation CD I'll let it fall out of my repertoire.

For the recital I plan to play either Nuvole Bianche, which is a much more beautiful piece imo, or another piece by somebody else.

Thank you all for the very nice comments. \:\)

AnthonyB, you've got me quite curious about your autographed piece!
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/17/08 12:36 PM

Outstanding Monica...I really liked it...
Posted by: Babs_

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/17/08 01:04 PM

Very beautiful Monica................you're really good at playing his music. Nice grace notes too, I always like those grace notes they have a way of adding flavor. \:\)

I know I have heard this song before but I cant seem to remember which CD this song was on. A couple of his CDs' were stolen out of my car a year ago when I was at the mall doing Xmas
Shopping.
Posted by: Lisztener

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/17/08 01:30 PM

Monica,

As usual, you put your heart and soul into your piano. Nice work, girl.

It's beautiful. \:D

Sincerely,

Lisztener
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/21/08 01:57 PM

As per AnthonyB's encouragement, I have, as of this weekend, officially embarked upon Limbo.

AnthonyB, by the way, is kicking some serious tail on I due fiumi. He shared a recent take on it, and he's thisclose. Hats off.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/30/08 06:33 PM

Ok, y'all, I posted a clip of where I am with Limbo on my blog. The recording has a few errors in it, the tempo is uneven, especially in that buildup section, measures 31-54. I need a lot of work there. And I also have to pay better attention to dynamic markings, and overall do a better job with legato. But if I waited until all that was done, I'd never get anything posted.

I do have a question. How can I even out the tempo? Is it just a matter of practice? I am still really choppy.

Finally, a clip for you
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/30/08 08:14 PM

I think you're making terrific progress, AWTPP!! Yeah, there were a couple of small hesitations, but that's something that will work itself out with practice. I'm guessing the hesitations occur at the same spots, so I would just practice the measure or two before and after each transition five times in a row.

I don't think I had clicked on your blog before... that's really impressive! I love the layout and how easy it is to navigate, and all your links. (And I would have been complimentary even if you HADN'T have mentioned me. \:D )

I definitely think you should submit Limbo to the recital and earn your Order of the Red Dot medal. You'll have two weeks to try to get a smoother recording, but even if you don't, I think the current version is more than adequate. \:\)
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/31/08 10:38 AM

That was great AW2PP. I understand where you are at with the piece since I've been there too. \:\)

Some of the sound is a bit lousy due to what youtube has been doing to audio. Some horrid stuff with compressors and the like that usually causes some notes after some silence to be a simple "thud" as well as amplifying the low volume stuff horribly. I do hope youtube sorts the issue out rather soon, as a lot of people that post musical performances are really upset.

While I do have a video camera I don't have any way currently to get any video into my computer so you'll just have to settle for a possible audio recital by myself. But it was nice to get a peek at the old piano and yourself as well!
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/31/08 12:12 PM

It's probably more appropriate to play Ragtime on that old piano, but that stuff it so hard.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/01/08 09:08 PM

I'm embarrassed to ask this, but here goes. What do the horizontal bars over individual notes mean? (For instance, the very first RH note of Melodia Africana II...)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/01/08 10:19 PM

It's an accent marking, AWTPP... hold those notes a little longer to emphasize the melody. \:\)
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/02/08 12:21 AM

In my fun attempts at beating that darn red dot for today I think I need to add notes to the sheet music to see if the poor piano player is remembering to breathe. ;\)

I'll have to admit I crashed horribly when I got close to finishing my first good recording. I'm sure that happens to all of us too.

But yes, Monica did state that correctly, a bit longer on those notes with the little lines like that. \:\)
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/03/08 10:15 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kCnpnyTZGNA

Samba
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/03/08 10:19 PM

La Nascita (Ludovico Einaudi)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnhaMn3_UNc
Posted by: Key Notes

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/04/08 03:47 AM

"Samba" sounds very nice, I like it.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/06/08 02:34 PM

Seeing as Einaudi is not composing music fast enough to suit me, I've been digging up some of his more obscure albums. I recently bought "Stanze," which I think is one of his first releases. It's unusual in that (a) it's harp , not piano; and (b) he's not playing the music. Amazon.com in the States doesn't carry it, but amazon.co.uk does (and iTunes carries it as well):

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Einaudi-Stanze/dp/B0000264YQ

After listening to it a few times, my assessment is that:

*I prefer his solo piano albums, BUT

*it's still very pleasant music, ALTHOUGH

*it's a lot mellower with fewer distinctive melodies.

This would not be an album I'd recommend to introduce anybody to Einaudi, but diehard Einaudi fans should still enjoy it, and if you like harp music, you should definitely get it. \:\)
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/06/08 04:23 PM

I might as well post this question to the Einaudi thread here.

I'm wondering if anyone has the sheet music books for some of the other Einaudi albums and where they got them from.

I've got the best of book so that pretty much covers Le Onde, I Giorni and Eden Roc albums leaving Una Mattina and Divenire uncovered. It's never too early to get started on my Birthday and Christmas lists, you know. \:\)

Is anyone out there just buying a song or two online rather than the entire album worth? (The best of book from Amazon was a steal compared to buying a few songs.)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/06/08 04:43 PM

I've got both the Una Mattina and Divenire books. The average level of difficulty is a bit harder in those books than the Best Of collection, though. Of those two, my (slight) preference would be for Una Mattina. From that book I've played the title piece, "Dietro Casa," and "Nuvole Bianche" (my recital piece \:\) ). And I really really want to learn the 12 minute epic "Ancora" someday, but it's way beyond me at this point.

It is not an exaggeration to say that I want to learn everything Einaudi has ever written or will write for piano, so I opt for buying the books over single pieces. Even if I can't play them all yet, with luck, one day I will!
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/07/08 09:14 PM

Monica, maybe you can answer something for me. (Or anyone, just chime in...)

I've shelved Fuori Dal Mondo for now, as the LH is a bit beyond my level. I could probably memorize the pattern done with enough time, but I think there is some rememdial work I need to do first. I figure if I work on some of the simpler LH patterns for awhile, while learning a simpler piece, it will make this (and other pieces) easier on down the road. So, I've been talked into giving Ombre a try.

Ombre seems very easy, on first glance. The RH, in fact, is trivial. However, there are some LH intervals that thoroughly confuse me.

Starting on measure 9, there is a whole note on the LH (an A), followed by some 8th notes. I can manage sustaining the A with my pinky, and hitting the 8th notes with 3 and 5. This gets trickier as the span increases (measure 16, for instance), but it is still manageable.

Later on, not so much. Measure 33, for instance, is the first LH span of octave plus two. I can barely manage this, but it's a real stretch. I am certain people with smaller hands could not make this reach, which, in turn, causes me to wonder how this is really supposed to be played.

Ombre gets worse. Much worse. There is no way I (heck, no way Shaquille O'Neal) can cover the spans in, say, measures 79, 87, 93... and yet, there is no sustain pedal called for here.

I took a look at various Youtube clips, and based on what I can tell, everyone simply makes a quick reach for the lowest note, then returns to the middle of the keyboard. From the sound, I can't quite tell if they are able to sustain the lowest note, much less how.

I figure there must be some basic technique I need to learn here. And whatever it is, I figure I should be doing that even in the measures like 9 where the span is not a problem.

So my question is obvious: how is one expected to sustain those super low notes, while keeping up with the LH arpeggios higher up the register?

I have a second question, related to this, but I don't want to be greedy. This is long enough as it is.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/07/08 09:26 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Always Wanted to Play Piano:
Ombre gets worse. Much worse. There is no way I (heck, no way Shaquille O'Neal) can cover the spans in, say, measures 79, 87, 93... and yet, there is no sustain pedal called for here.
[/b]
Use it anyway. ;\) That's how I play this piece... I pedal the heck out of the left hand. You have to, especially starting with measure 53 when you're holding those octaves and playing eighth notes.

The Einaudi book only very rarely indicates pedaling, and usually only when it's not immediately intuitive. But I pedal heavily through all his pieces. Well, truth be told, I pedal heavily through EVERYTHING I play. ;\)

In Ombre, the trickiest part for me was measure 25, where you're playing the triplet and the E in the right hand is doing double duty with the bass clef pattern. It's hard to voice that so the melody stands out clearly.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/07/08 10:04 PM

So basically you pedal every measure. Cool. I haven't been getting my cardio in this summer, I could use the extra workout.

(Seriously. The pedals on my old piano are pretty stiff.)

Thanks for the info.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/07/08 10:09 PM

Well, it's more precise to say I pedal with every chord change, rather than every measure. (Even I have my limits. \:D ) e.g., I'll pedal with measure 9, 10, 11 and hold down through 12; pedal 13, 14, 15 and hold down through 16, etc.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/07/08 10:26 PM

AW2PP:

If you watch this Ombre video you should be able to see the sustain pedal being used. This is a pretty decent version of the piece it seems.

Audience noise is a bit distracting though.

Personally, I think the sheet music would look rather messy if there were pedal marks all over the place.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/08/08 03:17 AM

AWTPP - I'm not looking at the book, but I'm pretty sure I know which part you are talking about.

And yes - just use the sustain pedal, and the way Einaudi plays it, he plays the low notes and then makes a little pause before hitting the higher ones, which adds to the piece.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/08/08 11:11 AM

Thanks, everyone. I look forward to sitting down with this when I get home from work today.

Euan, you are missing one more feature on your haggis pitch. You left off "Good for what ails ya!"
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/08/08 05:20 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:

In Ombre, the trickiest part for me was measure 25, where you're playing the triplet and the E in the right hand is doing double duty with the bass clef pattern.[/b] It's hard to voice that so the melody stands out clearly. [/QB]
Which leads me to my second question. The double duty you are talking about, unless I am horribly mistaken, is that the E is called for, simultaneously, in both clefs. Correct? The difficulty being that, in the middle of the LH supporting arp, that E has to be emphasized, since it is part of the melody.

Correct?
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/08/08 06:13 PM

I think that's the one thing I have a bit of an issue with in my "I Due Fiumi" as well. Towards the bottom of the 2nd page I could likely use to separate the melody away from the bass notes a bit better.

I guess in measure 26 of Ombre there's an E in the melody and later on one in the bass arpeggio so I would assume you'd emphasize the first one but not really the second one. I'll have to give those measures a close listen in the recorded version later on today. I never noticed that the music was sharing those notes upon my rough glances at the piece. I would have quickly realized that upon trying to play it though. ;\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/09/08 02:04 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Always Wanted to Play Piano:
Which leads me to my second question. The double duty you are talking about, unless I am horribly mistaken, is that the E is called for, simultaneously, in both clefs. Correct? The difficulty being that, in the middle of the LH supporting arp, that E has to be emphasized, since it is part of the melody.

Correct? [/b]
Correct to both. I deal with it by playing that note with my right hand (to emphasize the melody) and skipping the left hand. But it's awkward.
Posted by: TrapperJohn

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/10/08 06:45 AM

Quick question - exactly how does one pronounce his name (IOW, how does he pronounce his name)?

Regards, JF
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/10/08 07:09 AM

Hmm, my phonetics aren't exactly great but this is how they say his name on radio:

Ein (same as 'mine' but without the m)
Audi (same as 'howdy' but lose the h)
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/10/08 07:36 AM

Just as a quick aside,

Somewhere in the world there is a rather special Einaudi album that according to the man himself "won't be getting promoted at all". It's only available on one website and it sounds incredible!

I won't say any more until I place my order (it needs a credit card and I've only just signed up for one). Hopefully in a month or so I will report back with cd in hand.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/10/08 08:48 AM

And whilst I've been exploring the world of Einaudi this morning, I found these two gems also:

http://www.box.net/index.php?rm=box_v2_mp3_player_shared&node=f_160339665
(a radio interview with Ludovico - contains a live solo piano version of Andare)

http://www.echoes.org/demora/EinaudiLRCbonus.ram
(more live radio pieces)
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/10/08 11:08 AM

I think we've had both of those links on here in one form or another but it doesn't hurt for someone new to come along and see them. \:\)

And you must be talking about that "Live in Berlin" cd from the Divenire tour that was posted about on the Einauid forums. It does sound great, but maybe I'd have to stick that one on my Christmas list (Or birthday list.)

I'm quite a bit more interersted in Ludovico's replies to that thread mentioning he is working on a new album. He must have heard Monica complaining about him not writing music fast enough.

It will be interesting to see what he comes up with after Divenire. Maybe as long as there is some kind of USA leg to the tour, I won't care. \:\)
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/10/08 11:49 AM

Ok, Anthony you caught me out! I was indeed referring to the 'Live in Berlin' album.

http://www.klassikradio-shop.de/musik/ludovico-einaudi-live-in-berlin.2306.html

In un'altra vita with strings sounds fantastic - I don't remember him playing that one at the concert I was at.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/10/08 08:10 PM

Seriously. He needs to come to the USA. At this point, I think I could talk my entire household into going, and these are folks who weren't piano fans prior to hearing his music.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/10/08 08:29 PM

I think the best way to advertise for any upcoming US tour would be to attempt to produce some kind of concert or special that could possibly air on PBS stations nationwide during a pledge drive or something like that.

If he could pull something like that off it would be a great way to get some exposure to the general US population. Getting US Classical stations to play something like Einaudi would seem difficult (most smaller markets with Classical stations seem to play mainly established older classical works.)

It would also seem to me that any US tour might end up being in the early spring/late fall into winter timeframe as Einaudi likes to do a lot of festivals during the summer months.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/10/08 08:34 PM

Thanks, Anthony, for saving me the effort of flying to Scotland to wring Euan's neck in an effort to obtain the info about the mystery Einaudi album. I am going to whip my credit card out posthaste and order one for myself.

The station manager at KFDC assured me that they were working hard to bring Einaudi back for a real concert "sometime this fall." If so, we'll make an AB forum spectacular out of it. \:\)
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/11/08 01:50 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
I am going to whip my credit card out posthaste and order one for myself.
[/b]
Aaargh - I knew this would happen. Please, no one else order a copy (until at least I order mine \:\) )!
Posted by: TrapperJohn

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/11/08 06:04 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Euan Morrison:
Hmm, my phonetics aren't exactly great but this is how they say his name on radio:

Ein (same as 'mine' but without the m)
Audi (same as 'howdy' but lose the h) [/b]
Euan - thanks for the phonetic pronunciation clues - I was saying "Eee-naul-dee" (in my mind) with naul rhyming with haul - but if they pronounce it Eine-ow-dee on the radio it MUST be correct, right?

Regards, JF
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/11/08 01:41 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Euan Morrison:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
I am going to whip my credit card out posthaste and order one for myself.
[/b]
Aaargh - I knew this would happen. Please, no one else order a copy (until at least I order mine \:\) )! [/b]
Well, you're safe, Euan. I clicked on that website and it's all in German! So then I tried to rely on my 3 years of high school German to attempt to order the album anyway, but was flummoxed entirely when I got to the page where they wanted me to create an account. Guess I'll have to wait until it gets a wider release...

[gnashes teeth some more and curses her typical American monolinguism]
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/11/08 02:06 PM

Here is what I did:

Benutzername - username (guessed)
Passwort - password
Wiederholen - i guessed that meant 'repeat password'

and that should create the account!
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/11/08 02:09 PM

Well, since you have gone through all that effort, I'll be lazy... could you tell if they shipped out of the E.U.?
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/11/08 02:40 PM

Oh, now that is a good point. I don't see USA in the list of countries when you input an address \:\(
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/11/08 10:05 PM

I really wonder why Einaudi is slow to come to North America. Maybe it's because he may feel that his music won't be as popular in North America than the UK? I really hope that's not his reason.

There's a music of his called Luce that's in his Divenire book, but when I tried to hunt that piece of music down, it's only available via the itunes UK \:\( So, for us people in North America, we'll just have to wait. Sighhhh........
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/11/08 11:50 PM

We could always consider kidnapping him or something. We would'nt really hurt him, we would just make him play nice music for us that's all!. \:D
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/12/08 03:19 AM

From what he said on the radio interviews, I think he wasn't working with a record label who was really trying to promote him in NA. (I could be wrong, but I'm sure that's the answer he gave when asked)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/12/08 10:24 PM

In the "1" thread a couple of weeks ago I wrote about playing the piano while a carpenter was working on my kitchen cabinets (I'm undergoing the Kitchen Renovation From Hell, but then again, ALL renovations stem from that locale...), and the carpenter was so taken by the Einaudi pieces I was playing that he asked me to write down his name and the titles.

So today the carpenter had to come back (don't ask :rolleyes: ), and the first thing he said was "I bought an album by that Einaudi guy you were playing and it is terrific!"

All Einaudi needs is a little more exposure here, and a nation of fans awaits.

Euan, your explanation makes a great deal of sense. It could also be the case that Einaudi has no trouble at all filling a very busy concert schedule with adoring fans from Europe and has no need or desire to travel so far. (Though if he could make it to Japan, you'd figure that Lexington, Kentucky, would not be out of reach! :p )
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/12/08 11:13 PM

That's a great story Monica. The way I see it, Ludo owes you a finders fee of sorts!. It also speaks for your playing abilities in that contractors run out after work and hit........ the neo classical section of the record store (of all places) as opposed to the local bar!

That's got to count for
MORE than something! .

You see, if you just composed and performed your own beautiful melodies, we would'nt have to beg Ludo to come over here as we would have you. (although Einaudi's melodies are going to be real tough to beat).
Posted by: Mark...

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/13/08 12:18 AM

Oh no Monica is now seranading carpenters... \:D
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/20/08 02:03 PM

It arrived....



Am just listening to it now - Le Onde with strings is better than I remembered. In'Un Altra Vita with strings works pretty good, and am now savouring a 14min version of Oltremare \:\)

(p.s. that isn't my finger in the picture, it's the arm of a string player!)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/20/08 09:44 PM

I'm glad you told us it wasn't your thumb, Euan! It sure looks like it. \:D

So I finally broke down and joined what is only the second forum I've ever belonged to (yeah, you guessed it, the official Einaudi forum). And imagine my surprise when I encountered some familiar faces there. \:D (AnthonyB and Always Wanted to Play Piano, to be exact.)

I think it's wonderful that every so often Einaudi himself will post something there. :3hearts: I must restrain myself from starting a thread begging him to come play Lexington, Kentucky, with promises of all sorts of, er, favors should he do so. :p
Posted by: TrapperJohn

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/21/08 07:37 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:

I think it's wonderful that every so often Einaudi himself will post something there. :3hearts: I must restrain myself from starting a thread begging him to come play Lexington, Kentucky, with promises of all sorts of, er, favors should he do so. :p [/b]
Favors? What favors?

I wouldn't recommend the exercise of favors.

If your ultimate objective is to persuade Mr. Einauldi to perform for you (pianistically speaking) and to do so at the peak of his skills, you would certainly want him to be well rested and refreshed. But favors are not particularly conducive to this physical state. To the contrary they are often exhausting, draining one of energy and even motivation.

For example, if the favor you had in mind was, say, joining you in a jogging session, or taking a tour of Lexington, or even just a visit to the UK campus, then these activities could be detrimental to your final objective.

Other favors - while not specified here - would certainly be equally deleterious and self-defeating.

With wanton & brazen regards, ;\) JF
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/21/08 12:17 PM

Yeah, Monica, I am sort of a noob over there myself. "Josh" who posts over there seems to be a professional pianist, and he has some really insightful things to say. The forum seems to move much more slowly, as I think there are far fewer people participating. But given the narrowness of the topic, I think this is to be expected.

Things have been really busy on my end, with the new baby, dealing with complications related to the closing on our new house, and a shakeup at work. Not much time for piano. So my progress on Ombre, though inexorable, is slow. There are some LH jumps that require better "aim" 9for lack of a better word) than I have. Just takes practice, I reckon. And that is why I chose this piece in the first place.

Nevertheless, I am already eying the next piece I want to attempt. I am thinking Tracce, partly based on a recommendation from the aforementioned Josh, and partly because I think it sounds really approachable. It will be an effort to not let all those flats intimidate me...
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/21/08 12:25 PM

The most exciting thing I saw on that forum was a reference to an upcoming new album from Einaudi, scheduled apparently for sometime in 2009.

"Tracce" is very pretty. I'm at work so I can't scope out the sheet music to see how it compares to others. I like all the low bass notes, though.

I'm amazed you even have time to be on the forum, AWTPP, with a newborn, not to mention all the little ones... and you guys are MOVING, too!?! Talk about being gluttons for punishment... your wife deserves a medal. Or sainthood. Tell her I said so. \:D But I do hope you are able to get in some piano time. It may be the only way to save your sanity. ;\)
Posted by: Benny

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/22/08 03:59 PM

Hello everyone!
I am posting my own Einaudi recording here. I hope, you don't mind.

http://www.box.net/shared/63y8ic7odh

I have not heard very much of Einaudi before. As it is obviously not possible not to read anything about Einaudi here on these forums \:D , I finally became aware of his music.
I have recently downloaded Monica K.'s beautiful recording of "Giorni Dispari" and I thought I could make my own attempt and bear the risk of presenting the result to such an expert jury.

Thanks to all members for giving me a lot of new ideas! \:\)
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/22/08 06:02 PM

Hi Benny,

Am just listening to your recording now and I think it's brilliant! I loved the pace and the dynamics, and also you played it note-perfect. Well done!

I still find it quite a tough piece to play, but it's a great piece for you to start with. Do you have any more recordings to follow?
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/22/08 10:55 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Benny:
Hello everyone!
I am posting my own Einaudi recording here. I hope, you don't mind.

http://www.box.net/shared/63y8ic7odh

I have not heard very much of Einaudi before. As it is obviously not possible not to read anything about Einaudi here on these forums \:D , I finally became aware of his music.
I have recently downloaded Monica K.'s beautiful recording of "Giorni Dispari" and I thought I could make my own attempt and bear the risk of presenting the result to such an expert jury.

Thanks to all members for giving me a lot of new ideas! \:\) [/b]
Great job Benny. We're more than happy to acquire more fans of Einaudi's music and to hear them play. Since you played that so well I'll be more than happy to look forward to any future performances.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/22/08 11:45 PM

Welcome to the forum, Benny! That is a beautiful rendition of "Giorni Dispari," which is still maybe my all time favorite Einaudi piece to play.

What are some of your other favorite composers to play?
Posted by: Benny

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/23/08 03:59 AM

Thanks a lot, Euan, AnthonyB and Monica for your encouraging comments!

I am mainly interested in classical music (baroque to contemporary) and I try to pick out some pieces of my level (let say: between easy and intermediate). My favorite composer is JS Bach. I really like the complex polyphonic structure of his music which just takes me into another world. Currently, I am working on some of the 2-part inventions. Certainly, there is a large difference to Einaudi's music, but I think the fluent and meditative character of this music shows some similarities.

Usually I tend to learn slowly and to forget fast :rolleyes: , so you won't see a "flood" of new recordings from my side. However, I am interested in learning another Einaudi piece, but I don't have a good idea which one. Can you recommend something?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/23/08 11:00 AM

"I giorni" is a pretty one. \:\) I really like "Nuvole Bianche," but it's in the Una Mattina book rather than the big best of book.
Posted by: Carol I.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/24/08 04:28 PM

I've just ordered "The Best of Ludovico Einaudi". I'm a diehard classical music fan, but hearing Benny's beautiful recording of "Giorni Dispari" really tempted me last night . . . and Amazon had only one copy left in stock, so I couldn't resist. Now I can't wait for it to arrive!

Carol
Posted by: Benny

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/25/08 03:20 AM

Hi Carol,
actually I am a "diehard" classical fan, too. Now I have just extended my definition of "classical" music to include Einaudi as well ...

Thanks Monica for your suggestion. I like "I giorni", too. I have been indecisive the whole weekend, and now I think, I will try "Questa notte". Like the melody and the challenging left hand jumps.
Posted by: RobM

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/25/08 11:15 AM

Benny, it sounds as though you should start receiving some kind of commission for sales of "The Best of Ludovico Einaudi" - your rendition of "Giorni Dispari" also inspired me to purchase the book from amazon (it was still in stock in the UK thankfully). Before today I'd neither listened to or even heard of Giorni Dispari, so thanks for bringing this fantastic piece to my attention! \:D

Monica, while researching the book to make sure it had the songs that I want, I was quite surprised to stumble across your name as the first reviewer for it on amazon.com. After reading your review there was no doubt in my mind that I had to buy the book. I couldn't believe how cheap it is; less than £14 including delivery for 36 different pieces! What a bargain! \:\)

At the moment the only Einaudi that is in my repertoire is a version of Le Onde that I taught myself by ear a while ago. I think I managed to get it pretty much note perfect, but I can't wait to fix this piece up if necessary and then get cracking with all the other pieces in the book that I've never even heard of. Watch this space for my recordings at some point in the near future....
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/25/08 11:26 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by RobM:
Monica, while researching the book to make sure it had the songs that I want, I was quite surprised to stumble across your name as the first reviewer for it on amazon.com....

At the moment the only Einaudi that is in my repertoire is a version of Le Onde that I taught myself by ear a while ago.[/b]
Hee hee... yeah, I do a fair amount of reviewing for amazon.com. Don't forget to vote for my reviews as "helpful" as I'm always trying to boost my reviewer ranking. ;\)

If you can play Le Onde, you can play MANY of the other pieces in that book. I still consider Le Onde to be one of the most difficult Einaudi pieces to play well, given the difficulty of accenting the melody and making the other notes in the right hand barely perceptible.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/25/08 05:27 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:

In Ombre, the trickiest part for me was measure 25, where you're playing the triplet and the E in the right hand is doing double duty with the bass clef pattern. It's hard to voice that so the melody stands out clearly. [/b]
I posted this on my blog, but might as well mention it here. I have made reasonable progress with Ombre, and can pretty much play it through. Strangely enough, I can play the triplet part on measure 25, but on measure 69, I have only played it correctly twice. And both times, it was because I wasn't really paying attention. And when I realized what I had done (correctly), I got so excited, I lost focus and messed up the next measure. I'm thinking the difference between measures 25 and 69 is that the LH octaves are not automatic enough for me. I have to focus too closely on hitting the octaves (and returning to the counter melody), leaving insufficient reserves to time the melody. I suppose this will come with time and repetition.

Next up: Stella. Any hints?
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/25/08 05:30 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
your wife deserves a medal. Or sainthood. Tell her I said so. \:D But I do hope you are able to get in some piano time. It may be the only way to save your sanity. ;\) [/b]
You have no idea. If I were a better writer, I would attempt to convey the extent of her heroism.
Posted by: Benny

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/25/08 09:47 AM

Looking forward to all the recordings which seem to be coming. \:\)

In case, you haven't done it yet: I recommend to browse this thread for the previous recordings which let ME run to the next sheet music store.
Posted by: Benny

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/25/08 09:56 AM

oops, too many mouse clicks ...
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/25/08 10:47 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Always Wanted to Play Piano:


Next up: Stella. Any hints? [/b]
Here's what I did with that one: split it into sections.

Section 1 is the melodic opening lines.
Section 2 is the chord progression (but not so melodic) part which follows
Section 3 is the catchy melodic part after that.

Then you play 1,2,3,2,1,2,3 - with a little change at the end. (i hope I got that right - it's been a while so that might not be quite accurate!)

And be free with it - have some nice pauses at the end of each section etc
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/25/08 11:14 AM

Thanks, Euan. I guess I will know that I am progressing as a pianist when, one day, the first few halting steps on new pieces like this aren't so awkward. Section 1, after 30 minutes or so, is still pretty rough for me. Had to stop out of wrist fatigue.

But, as always, this too shall pass. Thanks again for the tips.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/27/08 03:24 PM

I have grumbled often and loud about the brick wall I hit with "Le Onde," a piece that many of you have played beautifully with seeming ease. Not that I'm jealous or anything.

But I've kept slugging away, and hitting that Red Dot over and over, and I've finally come up with a version of Le Onde that, while not perfect, is probably good enough to put on my annual compilation CD. There's one edit for a page swap in the middle, but all the other hesitations and skipped notes are left in.

Le Onde

I think I'm going to officially put it away for now. Maybe after a couple of years I'll take it out again, and--with any luck--it'll be a breeze and I'll laugh at how frustrated I used to get with it.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/27/08 04:21 PM

You did a great job with this piece Monica. I'm listening to it right now for the second time.

I know how tough this piece can be if you remember my recital submission of it a few recitals ago. I literally had to make up a bunch of it as I had a real tough time with the timing and big finger speads.

Your timing was spot on and as always, a real pleasure to listen to. Nice work.
Posted by: Kawai, HI

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/27/08 08:04 PM

I still stumble thru Nefeli, I can't imagine tackling this one. You did it beautifully. Your love for his music shines thru.
Posted by: Benny

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/28/08 06:50 AM

I am just listening to your version of Le Onde, Monica. It's great! As in your other recordings, I heard so far, you are again able to evoke a certain, quiet atmosphere that matches perfectly this music. I think, it's because you played it with so many dynamic levels especially in the mp-p-pp range. Thanks for sharing.
Posted by: Carol I.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/30/08 07:55 PM

No matter how often I checked the status of my order (thinking that somehow I could transmit a sense of urgency into cyberspace), Amazon was consistently predicting that my "Best of . . ." book would arrive on Tuesday -- just after the long Labor Day weekend, when I'm back at the office. \:\(

But then our mail carrier pulled up into the driveway this morning and handed me a box from Amazon! She was taken aback with my little dance of joy, until I explained what the box held. Having a piano herself, she understood completely. \:D

So I've had a wonderful afternoon discovering a completely new style of music. I'm starting with "Limbo" (did pretty well with that the first time through) and "Nefeli". Once I've mastered those, I'm thinking I'll work on "Le Onde" and "Giorni Dispari".

I'm looking forward to many pleasant hours with this book. But there's one thing that has me completely baffled: in "Limbo", I have no clue what the "1C." and "3C." markings mean. If anyone can shed some light on this mystery, I'd be grateful. \:\)

Carol
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/31/08 01:09 AM

Looks like you're well on your way to getting a lot of enjoyment out of that purchase. Those "1C" and "3C" markings are regarding the "Soft" or "Una Corda" pedal on the piano. That's the left pedal usually.

In a grand piano it causes the hammers not to hit all 3 strings for a note. This causes a softer sound. On uprights the effect can be a bit different by moving the hammers a bit farther away from the strings IIRC. Digital pianos may or may not have the feature available to use una corda. On some uprights you might even be better off just ignoring the 1C/3C markings but I've not had much experience in the matter.
Posted by: Carol I.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/31/08 09:31 AM

Thanks, Anthony! Your explanation makes complete sense -- and also will keep me from looking in vain for any missing "2C." markings! My "Pianist's Dictionary" refers to "una corda" and "tre corda", so of course this is the obvious abbreviation for these terms.

I don't remember seeing this abbreviated notation on other sheet music, but I'll keep an eye out for it.

Carol
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/31/08 10:22 PM

Oh boy, Carol! You must be feeling like a little kid in a candy shop. \:D Can't wait to hear some recordings of Einaudi on your Estonia. \:\)
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/31/08 10:33 PM

Hey Monica!

Glad you finally overcame your "Waterloo" and mastered Le Onde! Just got finished listening to your recording and you did a great job, especially considering how long you've been struggling with it. Congratulations on not only getting through it but also on playing it so well.
Posted by: Carol I.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/01/08 09:03 AM

Gosh, Monica, I've never thought seriously about recording myself playing, but maybe some day . . . even if I never played anything beautifully enough to post it, it would be a useful learning tool to be able to sit back and listen objectively to my own playing and compare it with other recordings of the same pieces. It sounds like something to look into one of these days. There must be useful information in old threads about what recording equipment to buy and where to position it, right?

Anyway, my first step is to learn to play some of these pieces well! It's been a fun couple of days. Which reminds me, I'd better get back to the piano now! \:\)

Carol
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/01/08 11:41 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Carol I.:
There must be useful information in old threads about what recording equipment to buy and where to position it, right?
[/b]
Just buy a Zoom (H2 or H4, doesn't really matter). They're easy to use and practically foolproof.

Up in the "Important topics page" of AB forum there is a sticky to the Zoom thread.
Posted by: RobM

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/01/08 06:21 PM

Yay, my copy of the "The best of Ludovico Einaudi" arrived in the post today.....its so pretty! \:D I've really surprised myself actually with how excited I am that its arrived. These past few days of impatient anticipation must have really whet my appetite to get stuck in - I can't remember the last time I felt this inspired to play the piano!

Unfortunately I haven't had much time to delve into the book yet (my new job I started recently is severely eating into my practice time) but I did at least manage to squeeze in about 15 or 20 minutes earlier, in which time I've learnt just the first page of "Giorni Dispari". I'd better get some sleep now, but I plan on having plenty of time tomorrow evening to make some real progress. If all goes well, hopefully I'll have a decent recording of it within a week or two. \:\)
Posted by: Carol I.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/01/08 08:13 PM

Rob, I'm glad to hear that Amazon delivered your book quickly, too. Gosh, isn't it a nuisance that making a living cuts into piano time, especially when you have new music to play? I was just feeling sorry for myself for having to go back to work tomorrow, despite having had a three-day weekend . . . and you didn't even have that in the U.K.! Hope you've got one of those bank holidays of yours coming up soon. ;\)

Monica, thanks for the tips about recording. I've had a look at the threads and it all looks quite feasible . . . but, seeing as how I need to get some serious practice time in first, and as it will take a bit of studying to figure out some of the technical bits, I'm going to make this a winter project. It will be just the thing to take on when we're under three feet of snow in Michigan. Also, the only other major winter project we have scheduled is to organize the basement; this will quite nicely take precedence over that! \:D

Carol
Posted by: RobM

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/04/08 04:29 PM

Hey, haven't been around here much over the last few days - the little spare time I've had has been spent practising with my shiny new book! It was actually a bank holiday last week so I can't imagine there will be another one for some time. \:\(

Just thought I'd swing by because I've got a quick fingering question and I hardly thought it was worth creating a new thread. Besides, I guess most of the people who will be able to help reside in this thread anyway. I'm having a little bit of difficulty with the fingering for bars 33 and 34 in Giorni Dispari (I'm sure most people here will have the sheet music....if not I can take a photo, but I couldn't be bothered with the hassle), where the following notes are played in the right hand (I've put the higher of the notes in italic to make it read easier):

Ab C G Bb F Ab Ab Ab G Ab Db F Ab Db F Ab

For this section, I use the following fingers:

4 1 5 2 4 1 5 1 5 1 2 4 1 2 4 1

I hope I've got this right....is 1 the thumb and 5 the pinky? I'm always getting these the wrong way round!

I've been scratching my head over this for a little while now, and I've come to the conclusion that I've simply given it far too much thought and now nothing feels quite right. Although the fingering I've written above is what I eventually settled with. If you've played this piece -- and if you can understand my fingering 'notation' -- could you please let me know if you play it differently to how I've written it above? Thanks! \:D
Posted by: Benny

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/04/08 04:39 PM

Hi RobM,

your description is very clear. I have used
5 1 4 1 3 1 5 1 5 1 2 4 1 2 4 1
for this section. For me, it was convenient, because it is a smooth motion of the hand.

Have fun with this nice piece!
Posted by: RobM

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/04/08 05:11 PM

Of course! That feels so much better!

Like I said, I think the problem was that I was thinking about it far too much and I couldn't just 'feel' what felt right. Thanks Benny! \:D
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/04/08 08:12 PM

Benny beat me to it, but I use the same fingering he does. \:\)

What I like about Giorni Dispari is that the bass pattern is one Einaudi uses in many different pieces, which makes the others a lot easier to learn.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/25/08 03:24 AM

Time to shake a bit of dust off the good old Einaudi thread and make a post.

Here's a bit of playing around with I Due Fiumi that I recorded. Pretty much messing around with going slower in some of the parts and what not. Normally I'd post to something like the piano bar but since it's almost the end of the month anyways...

I Due Fiumi -- Performed on October 25th (Yup, no longer the 24th) Strangely, I seem to get quite a few good takes at really early hours of the morning (About 2am in this case.)

About the only thing that I didn't really like about the take was the arp at the end, but overall I had a good time recording it. If I do some more work I'll try to get a decent take of "Limbo" done as I went right on to "I Due Fiumi" as the last recital was quickly approaching and I wanted to get that one done so it never really got a good polish.

[edit - beware of spelling mistakes when posting past 2am]
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/25/08 03:59 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by AnthonyB:


Here's a bit of playing around with I Due Fiumi that I recorded. Pretty much messing around with going slower in some of the parts and what not. Normally I'd post to something like the piano bar but since it's almost the end of the month anyways...


About the only thing that I didn't really like about the take was the arp at the end, but overall I had a good time recording it. [/b]
Being a beginner I'm not in a position to critically listen to this piece.

So me saying it sounds beautiful, perhaps means a little less. But it was beautiful.

That's what I want to do when I grow up, metaphorically speaking ;\)
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/25/08 04:24 AM

And as an aside this forum has introduced me to the music of Ludovico Einaudi and for that I am eternally grateful.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/25/08 02:32 PM

OK, even though most of you internet slackers have not even listened to the last entry yet, here's a good take of "Limbo" that I got this morning.

Limbo -- performed Oct 25, 2008 (At an amazingly normal time of day)

(Just in case you didn't see my last post just a few above this one, I'll re-link my performance here)
I Due Fiumi -- performed Oct 25, 2008 (but in the early wee hours of that um, "Morning")

I really let :Limbo" go for a long time while learning I Due Fiumi and some other pieces and just picked it back up a few days ago in order to get a more recent recording of me playing it. I think I'm happy enough with this one for now.
Posted by: Danny Niklas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/25/08 04:35 PM

Anyone recorded "I Giorni"?
I see two months ago Einaudi performing in public and totally for free. We have something called "white nights". They're days of the year in which the city becomes a huge circus and all shops, and theaters, and museum, an libraries and so on are open from midnight till 6 am in the morning. Cars can't travel, so the city is full of people including young children staying awake all night enjoying various street performances, live music, parties, free food, walking from square to square.

Einaudi performed free in a stage on the beach at 5 am in the morning. It was beautiful.

[img]http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3284/2649402779_bddcabae6f.jpg?v=0[/img]

Einaudi and semi-minimalist music in general requires a non superficial listening. In fact it is hard complex music. The complexity is indeed the fact that having few musical material allow for a far greater deailed processing of the material. So th evolume of each note, the dynamic of each sixteenth, the rubato of each phrase everything becomes importat. It reminds me of Mozart in a way. Mozart is hard to play well. If you simply learn to play all the notes at the right time without mistakes the piece will sound boring. You must really have the exact intepretation of each note because you can't hide behind virtuosisms and complex figurations.

Simple music is harder to make sound good, and this in itself makes it very hard and complex music to master and play well.

I love "Passaggio" too. Is a great piece but often overlooked in favour of more famous ones.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/25/08 05:16 PM

I'm sure there are "I Giorni" recordings posted in this thread somewhere. It is also likely that there were some posted to some of the recitals. Personally, I've not tried "I Giorni" yet. I'm going to make an attempt to learn a piece that isn't from the I Giorni album itself. So far the three pieces that I've learned to play have all been from that album!

If you have any recordings or videos you would like to share with us feel free to post links here Danny.
Posted by: Danny Niklas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/25/08 05:51 PM

Interesting anecdote.
My teacher used to assign Einaudi pieces to advanced students who were losing motivation or were frustrated preparing for an exam. So she would say "slow down on that Beethoven (or Chopin or whatever) and practice Einaudi instead"

She was right, after the Einaudi piece the students were refreshed, more motivated, with a renewed love for music and less frustrated with their exam pieces. She photocopied the pieces, claiming that just one per student wasn't that much of a piracy thing, but usually all the students would eventually buy the sheet book.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/25/08 07:22 PM

Ooooh! Look what my best friend Google found for me on the internet!

Ludovico Einaudi - Live in Berlin This is an archive from an internet radio show. There is a link to copy and paste on that page to get the actual audio. I linked there because you can see the tracks and the order they are in. The show starts and ends with non-Einaudi tracks but appears to have the entire Live in Berlin CD. You've got to listen to the DJ between tracks, but I can live with that for now.

I really hope Ludovico brings copies of thie CD with him to the states for us concert attendees to purchase. Enjoy. (And purchase the CD if you can, I suppose.)

Enjoy!
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/26/08 01:06 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Danny Niklas:
Anyone recorded "I Giorni"?[/b]
I submitted it for one of the recitals, recital 9 (?) maybe. I can link it here, too, though:

I giorni

This is one of my favorite Einaudi pieces to play, as it sounds a lot more difficult and impressive to play than it really is, which is my kind of piece.

Danny, what a special treat to see Einaudi play in that setting. \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/26/08 01:11 PM

Anthony, great job on "Limbo" and "I due fiumi."

And thanks so much for that link to the Live in Berlin archive. It hadn't occurred to me that he might bring CDs to sell in SF, but I sure hope you're right! I've got everything else he's recorded but that one. \:\(
Posted by: Danny Niklas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/26/08 02:47 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Danny Niklas:
Anyone recorded "I Giorni"?[/b]
I submitted it for one of the recitals, recital 9 (?) maybe. I can link it here, too, though:

I giorni

This is one of my favorite Einaudi pieces to play, as it sounds a lot more difficult and impressive to play than it really is, which is my kind of piece.
[/b][/quote][/qb]

"I Giorni" is only easy as far as notes are corcerned, but in order to make it fast but calm and relaxing with the right kind of volume and dynamic over every note, one must works a lot.

I think a common misconception is that easy pieces are those where playing and memorizing the notes is rather easy because there's no much "blackness" in the sheet. But as anyone who wants to play Mozart properly knows, those are not the correct criteria for "easiness" or "hardness".

 Quote:

Danny, what a special treat to see Einaudi play in that setting. \:\) [/b]
He will make a bis the next summer.
Maybe the fans among you can fly to Italy and be my guests \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/26/08 08:13 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Danny Niklas:
"I Giorni" is only easy as far as notes are corcerned, but in order to make it fast but calm and relaxing with the right kind of volume and dynamic over every note, one must works a lot.
[/b]
You are right, Danny. There's a lot I would change on my recording even a few months later (e.g., my tempo varied all over the map, and I didn't put as much rubato in that last section as Einaudi does). If I weren't busy trying to get a better recital recording I'd haul out the Zoom and try again on I giorni. \:D

On the other hand, the fact that many of Einaudi's pieces ARE easy in the sense of getting the notes down makes him a good choice for beginners or early intermediate players. I know I can't, and maybe will never, play as delicately and beautifully as Einaudi does, but even when played not so great, Einaudi's music sounds nice. In that sense, he's more forgiving than, say, Mozart. \:\) Hmmm... that could almost make a great thread in itself: Which composers sound the best when played poorly? \:D
Posted by: Danny Niklas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/26/08 09:30 PM

Very nice rendition of "I Giorni" Monica.
The problem is that it's incomplete \:\(

Anyway I have few questions for you.

How do you chose to pedal this piece?

Can you reach the D and E with finger 5 and 2 easily on the bar before the first arpeggio?

Do you have problems with the tenths in the second part of the piece?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/26/08 11:25 PM

Hi Danny, thank you for the kind words. \:\) I do love this piece and would love to be able to play it even better.

Here's my answers:

1.) I pedal this piece the way I pedal everything, = too much. \:D More seriously, I pedal pretty much continuously, lifting up and reapplying at chord changes.

2.) erm... I'm not sure what measure you're talking about here. "First arpeggio" where... the right hand? Measure 69? I don't see a D and E in the measure before that.

3.) Heck yes. I can't play those big chords at all in the left hand starting around measure 141. I just rearrange them, e.g., in measure 141, rather than playing G-D-B in the left hand, I play D-G-B; in measure 144, rather than playing B-F-D I play F-B-D. I thought rearranging sounded better than just dropping one of the notes.
Posted by: Danny Niklas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/26/08 11:43 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:

1.) I pedal this piece the way I pedal everything, = too much. \:D More seriously, I pedal pretty much continuously, lifting up and reapplying at chord changes.
[/b]

\:D Do you use the una corda pedal in this piece?

 Quote:
2.) erm... I'm not sure what measure you're talking about here. "First arpeggio" where... the right hand? Measure 69? I don't see a D and E in the measure before that.
[/b]

Bar 86
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/26/08 11:50 PM

Yes, I apply the una corda where marked in the score.

Aha... THAT D and E. \:D I play the chord with 5 and 1, and then hit the lower D on the next note with the thumb again. I started out playing the piece trying to do the D and E with 5 and 2, but it was too much of a stretch, and I found myself squishing other keys down while playing. Using the thumb for both the lower E and D is not optimal (I feel it comes off a little too jerkily) but seems to work the best of the options for me thus far.
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/27/08 09:12 AM

Monica,

I just listened to your "I Giorni" It was fantastic. That's why I want to learn the piano.

Thank you, it brightened up my afternoon \:\)
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/27/08 03:43 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by AnthonyB:
OK, even though most of you internet slackers have not even listened to the last entry yet, here's a good take of "Limbo" that I got this morning.

Limbo -- performed Oct 25, 2008 (At an amazingly normal time of day)

(Just in case you didn't see my last post just a few above this one, I'll re-link my performance here)
I Due Fiumi -- performed Oct 25, 2008 (but in the early wee hours of that um, "Morning")

I really let :Limbo" go for a long time while learning I Due Fiumi and some other pieces and just picked it back up a few days ago in order to get a more recent recording of me playing it. I think I'm happy enough with this one for now. [/b]
This slacker did listen to your Limbo clip. Yours is much more interesting than mine in terms of dynamics and tempo changes. I fall victim to making sure I hit the notes, and as a result, as Danny suggested (not speaking in my case, but in general) mine sounds sort of boring. Sort of like if it were being played with a metronome clicking. Which, incidently, it was.

Glad to see this thread up and running. Still working on getting a clean take on Ombre for the recital. For some reason, I just can't make it the whole way through without losing concentration.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/27/08 04:42 PM

I found "Ombre" to be a tough one to record, too, AW2PP. Something about jumping down and hitting those left hand octaves consistently is tough to do perfectly. (And you can't hide or overlook a blooper involving loud left hand octaves the way you can other wrong notes! \:D )

p.s. I loved your "live blogging" entry on the delivery and setup of your new Casio, especially the non-picture of the pedals installed upside down. \:D \:D ROFL!
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/27/08 04:54 PM

Good old lack of concentration gets just about everyone. You just end up listening to what you're playing and forget that you're the one that's supposed to keep playing it. Always laugh at myself when I lose concentration like that. Of course, lack of concentration is usually the cause for flubs in places that are simply on "autopilot" most of the time. Since you hardly have to think about what you are doing in the first place it is that much easier to lose your concentration completely.

Good luck on getting Ombre finished in time for a recital submission, aw2pp.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/28/08 02:16 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
I found "Ombre" to be a tough one to record, too, AW2PP. Something about jumping down and hitting those left hand octaves consistently is tough to do perfectly. (And you can't hide or overlook a blooper involving loud left hand octaves the way you can other wrong notes! \:D )
[/b]
This is an astute point. The octaves begin in measure 53, and just about when my LH has comfortably assumed the shape of an octave, he throws in a GC (a 6th, is that?) followed by a DF. I have a lot of trouble with this for some reason. It's hit or miss.
Posted by: Benny

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/28/08 03:16 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by AnthonyB:
OK, even though most of you internet slackers have not even listened to the last entry yet, [/b]
Sure, we did... \:\)

It's simply beautiful. I wish my next recording sessions could be similarly successful!
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/28/08 11:07 PM

Quick update... fired up the iPod and tried to play Ombre alongside the La Scala recording of same. Wow. Over the course of the last several months, I got so focused on what I was doing with the piece, I had developed a completely different (and much less interesting) take on it. In comparison, my in-process recordings were slow, plodding, and (how to put it?) tentative. There is nothing tentative about Ludovico's recording, I'll say that. But to play it boldly requires precision, for reasons Monica discussed earlier. Those jumps, those octaves... these need to be met decisively.

AnthonyB, hope it's ok to ask this out in the open... what's your impression of Tracce? When I listen to it, it sounds serious, but really easy. But the sheet music is unexpectedly daunting.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/29/08 01:08 AM

Yeah, the sheets for Tracce do indeed look a bit daunting. The beginning parts aren't all that bad but they can be quite the finger twisters. I've yet to fully work out the latter sections which are the interesting parts of the piece. There is one Tracce video currently on youtube which actually sounds pretty nice. That's not me playing it though.

Tracce on youtube

I likely would have finished learning this piece if I wasn't distracted by the piece I ended up picking for this recital. I'm sure the part that starts bringing in the left hand can be worked out fairly quickly once I really get started on it.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/29/08 08:35 AM

By the way, I stand corrected, there is no version of Ombre on La Scala, just on Le Onde.
Posted by: Carol I.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/01/08 08:38 PM

I'm greatly pleased with my "Best of" book. The feeling that comes from playing Einaudi's music is magical.

I'm getting some Einaudi converts already. Just for fun I played Nefeli for my piano teacher (first time for anything not classical) -- she really liked it and was thinking she might order the "Best of" book herself. A couple of weeks later we had a group piano class at our house and one of my teacher's teen-age students tried out some Einaudi pieces - her mom has added the "Best of" book to her Christmas list!

And today at last I downloaded the mp3 files of all of the tracks in the "Best of" book and they're playing randomly on my computer now ... wow! I'm making a list of all the new pieces I want to learn - it's a long list - guess I'd better go get started!
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/01/08 10:00 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Carol I.:
I'm greatly pleased with my "Best of" book. The feeling that comes from playing Einaudi's music is magical.

I'm getting some Einaudi converts already. Just for fun I played Nefeli for my piano teacher (first time for anything not classical) -- she really liked it and was thinking she might order the "Best of" book herself. A couple of weeks later we had a group piano class at our house and one of my teacher's teen-age students tried out some Einaudi pieces - her mom has added the "Best of" book to her Christmas list!

And today at last I downloaded the mp3 files of all of the tracks in the "Best of" book and they're playing randomly on my computer now ... wow! I'm making a list of all the new pieces I want to learn - it's a long list - guess I'd better go get started! [/b]
Thanks for the update! Feel free to let us hear any recordings once you're happy with them. We absolutely love recordings. Of course, you have the right to save one for the recital. \:\)
Posted by: Carol I.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/02/08 08:12 PM

Thanks, Anthony. I'm not set up to record yet - and I'm not sure I can play anything flawlessly enough to attempt to do so \:o - but I'm thinking this might be a good project for 2009.

Today I discovered "La nascita della cose segrete" ("The birth of secret things" I think, but my Italian is rusty) and have flagged it to start working on. Interestingly, it doesn't seem to be one of the popular ones on the ABF, as I found just one reference to it when I did a search. But I think it's quite beautiful.

Carol
Posted by: Danny Niklas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/02/08 08:18 PM

I feel an hole in my stomach anytime I listen to Nefeli. There's something absolutely mystical in this music. It is joyfully beautiful but at the same time disturbing and deeply aching.
Posted by: Carol I.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/02/08 08:31 PM

What I've found to be unique about Einaudi is that it rates high on two scales: beautiful music to listen to, and a pleasure to play. With my usual classical repertoire, I find that the some of the most beautiful pieces are just not all that much fun to play! It's not just about difficulty . . . maybe it's the broad freedom of interpretation and expression that's possible with Einaudi's music. It's so easy just to get lost in the sounds coming from the piano.

Carol
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/04/08 05:38 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Carol I.:
Thanks, Anthony. I'm not set up to record yet - and I'm not sure I can play anything flawlessly enough to attempt to do so \:o - but I'm thinking this might be a good project for 2009.

Today I discovered "La nascita della cose segrete" ("The birth of secret things" I think, but my Italian is rusty) and have flagged it to start working on. Interestingly, it doesn't seem to be one of the popular ones on the ABF, as I found just one reference to it when I did a search. But I think it's quite beautiful.

Carol [/b]
Yeah, La Nascita Delle Cose Segrete is a pretty piece. That's one that I've been playing around with. Here's me messing around with the first page of the piece:

La Nascita Practice
Posted by: Carol I.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/05/08 08:41 AM

Anthony, that was beautiful!

It was exactly what I needed to hear this morning. I just now made the mistake of getting drawn into a post-election-day debate with a work colleague whose views are the complete opposite of mine. Never a good idea.

Hearing your lovely playing has restored my good mood.

Carol
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/05/08 08:45 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Carol I.:
Anthony, that was beautiful!

[/b]
Ditto! I gotta say that what you call "messing around" with a piece I call "just about ready to record." \:D
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/05/08 11:49 PM

Heh, I can tell you that didn't take just one attempt. \:\) Plus I haven't really gotten around the other sections of the piece yet. I'm going to really have to give this one some effort as I like to play that part quite a bit. For some reason I've still got a hard time with the chord change in the left hand even though I shouldn't. Oh well, practice will fix that up given enough time. I spent some time this afternoon going over the rest of the right hand parts.
Posted by: Danny Niklas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/06/08 12:09 AM

I think we could invent a new beginner learning method based on Einaudi music alone. It is based on the three most important patterns of music (arpeggios, chords and scales), it is slow enough but require a steady rhythm, it is that beautiful to trigger motivation and boost self-esteem, it requires a great care for dynamic and phrasing.

I got the idea from a piano student who learned to play on Final Fantasy tracks. After two years he had become so good, to choose to apply for grade 8 piano. Not only he passed the exam, but was congratulated for possing a magnificent touch and musicality that normally students at that level don't possess.

Would you choose Einaudi over Bastien?
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/06/08 01:34 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Carol I.:
Anthony, that was beautiful!

[/b]
Ditto! I gotta say that what you call "messing around" with a piece I call "just about ready to record." \:D [/b]
Ditto Ditto \:D
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/06/08 08:59 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Danny Niklas:
I think we could invent a new beginner learning method based on Einaudi music alone. It is based on the three most important patterns of music (arpeggios, chords and scales), it is slow enough but require a steady rhythm, it is that beautiful to trigger motivation and boost self-esteem, it requires a great care for dynamic and phrasing.

...Would you choose Einaudi over Bastien? [/b]
In a heartbeat!! In fact, I already did!! \:D

Of course, asking that question on the Einaudi thread will probably get you a biased sample of replies. ;\)

But I think this is a terrific idea, Danny. I can envision a book entitled something like "Learning with Ludo" (well, maybe that's *not* such a good name... \:D ) that would be geared toward the adult/teen learner. It could come with a companion CD that people would actually want to play outside of lessons, just for listening pleasure. Given Einaudi's popularity in Europe, I'm guessing such a curriculum would be a good seller there. And you're right: Einaudi's music is ideally suited for teaching arpeggios and chords (less so for scales, imo) as well as Alberti-like bass patterns.

And I think it would be particularly appealing to people to be able to start playing "real" music very very early on.
Posted by: DragonPianoPlayer

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/06/08 09:40 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Danny Niklas:
I think we could invent a new beginner learning method based on Einaudi music alone. It is based on the three most important patterns of music (arpeggios, chords and scales), it is slow enough but require a steady rhythm, it is that beautiful to trigger motivation and boost self-esteem, it requires a great care for dynamic and phrasing.

...Would you choose Einaudi over Bastien? [/b]
In a heartbeat!! In fact, I already did!! \:D

Of course, asking that question on the Einaudi thread will probably get you a biased sample of replies. ;\)

But I think this is a terrific idea, Danny. I can envision a book entitled something like "Learning with Ludo" (well, maybe that's *not* such a good name... \:D ) that would be geared toward the adult/teen learner. It could come with a companion CD that people would actually want to play outside of lessons, just for listening pleasure. Given Einaudi's popularity in Europe, I'm guessing such a curriculum would be a good seller there. And you're right: Einaudi's music is ideally suited for teaching arpeggios and chords (less so for scales, imo) as well as Alberti-like bass patterns.

And I think it would be particularly appealing to people to be able to start playing "real" music very very early on. [/b]
I thought there already was one, although not by Einaudi - http://www.quiescencemusic.com/

Rich
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/06/08 10:02 AM

On a similar vein, is there a piece of New Age sheet music that is attainable by someone, i.e. me, to have a go at as a longer term project.

I'm currently on page 90 of Alfred Book 1, and also learning 'The Sound of Music'; self taught, so a complete newbie.

I do however much prefer listening to New age piano so would love to have a go at learning a piece.

If you think this is still a pipe dream at my stage please say

Any thoughts appreciated

Blackbird
Posted by: LaValse

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/06/08 10:03 AM

It's amazing how similar all these online piano lesson websites look...
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/06/08 10:49 AM

Blackbird. That is just about where I stopped with Alfred's. I started by learning Limbo then went to I Due Fiumi, then Stella Del Mattino and now messing with La Nasciata along with some other piece that I had started on.

I went back to Alfred's book one a few times but never seem to want to play those pieces when I obviously like these pieces better. \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/06/08 11:12 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Blackbird:
On a similar vein, is there a piece of New Age sheet music that is attainable by someone, i.e. me, [/b]
Absolutely. If you like Einaudi's music, you should buy the "Best of" sheet music collection. It's about $25, and you won't be able to play a lot of the pieces, but there are some that are almost certainly within your grasp right now. As Anthony pointed out, "Limbo" and "I due fiumi" are good ones to start with. I personally think "I due fiumi" is gorgeous, so I'd recommend that over "Limbo."

If you'd rather not spring for a huge book at this point in time, check out some of David Nevue's easier pieces. I wrote about them in the thread linked below, including some recordings so you can hear what they sound like. "Solitude" is a lovely piece and very very easy.
Thread about easy David Nevue pieces

[edited to fix stupid typo ]
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/06/08 11:35 AM

Wow, thanks AnthonyB and Monica for the prompt reply

I've listened to all the pieces mentioned and like them all but for my first attempt I've gone for Solitude for a couple of reasons.

It's a legitimate free download so I can start now.

It's seems with a lot of work something I could do.

I love the music

It will be so nice to attempt to learn a piece I have a real feeling for.

I have a horrible feeling my Alfred may take a back seat \:\)

Thanks again both

Blackbird
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/06/08 01:38 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
If you like Einaudi's music, you should buy the "Best of" sheet music collection.
[/b]
Someone today asked what I wanted for Xmas, it's now on the list \:\)
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/07/08 10:39 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Blackbird:
Wow, thanks AnthonyB and Monica for the prompt reply

I've listened to all the pieces mentioned and like them all but for my first attempt I've gone for Solitude for a couple of reasons.

It's a legitimate free download so I can start now.

It's seems with a lot of work something I could do.

I love the music

It will be so nice to attempt to learn a piece I have a real feeling for.

I have a horrible feeling my Alfred may take a back seat \:\)

Thanks again both

Blackbird [/b]
Blackbird, where can one download Solitude?
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/07/08 10:48 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Always Wanted to Play Piano:
Blackbird, where can one download Solitude?[/QUOTE]

Whoops had to edit out the link, didn't realise it's not allowed but if you go to this site you will find it.

Hope that is ok
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/10/08 01:42 PM

Is there anything in the Divenire compilation (sheet music) that is approachable for a beginner?
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/10/08 02:02 PM

I'm not sure there is anything in there that is easier than the stuff in the best of book. I think that one is last on my list to get (after I get the Una Mattina book).

Now I'll just let Monica come around and really answer the question. \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/10/08 02:10 PM

If you're not fussy about tempo, "Primavera" is easy in terms of the notes. Getting it up to speed was harder for me.

I personally was able to play more out of the "Una Mattina" than "Divenire." (I have literally been working on the title piece "Divenire" for over a year, and it's still too sloppy to record, although I am finally--FINALLY--getting it up to something approximating the right tempo.)

Actually, right now I am working on "Ancora" from the Una Mattina book. This is a piece I absolutely love but was too intimidated to start on it originally due to its length and tricky rhythms. (The freakin' piece is 12 minutes long!! The sheet music for it has 18 pages!!!!) But I was looking for a new Einaudi piece to work on, and I kept getting drawn back to Ancora. I started it 3 days ago, and it's captured my heart in the same way that I due fiumi did. But it's going to be a long term project to get it done.

But the section of the piece starting at 7:01 is just sublime. I hope he plays it at the concert.
Posted by: Carol I.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/10/08 08:33 PM

Clearly I need to buy "Una Mattina" and "Divenire" ASAP! (Even if they don't qualify for super saver shipping on Amazon.com.)

"I due fiumi" is wonderful, and I learned it quite quickly over the weekend. Thus encouraged, I tried "Melodia africana II" and thought I'd learned it as quickly, but I've just listened to the recording and Einaudi plays it so fast! And it does sound better when he plays it. Oh well. :rolleyes:

My only problem with Einaudi is that I like everything in the "Best of" book, so I dash from one piece to another and learn nothing properly. Any attempt to follow a disciplined and organized course of study seems to fail. Listening to the recordings doesn't help, because they're all beautiful and I want to learn everything immediately.

If Monica (as the Forum's official Einaudi expert) and some of our other experienced Einaudi fans could list their absolute best favorites pieces to play, in increasing order of difficulty, it would be an enormous help to those of us who just can't make up our minds what to learn next! (Or maybe limit it to the top five or ten, in case everything he ever wrote qualifies as your absolute best favorites.)

Thanks!

Carol
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/10/08 09:07 PM

While the US version of Amazon.com spoiled you with the cheap "Best Of" book, you won't get so lucky with the Other music books. Amazon doesn't carry them. That is likely one of the reasons I don't have either book yet.

Well, that and I was going to actually get some other music by some other composers (Do I need to hand in my Einaudi Fan Card?) first. I do want at least a little bit of variety for the stuff I learn. I actually did a lot of jumping around trying to pick something that I would want to attempt to learn next and that might end up on hold when my new music books arrive.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/11/08 01:41 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Carol I.:
Clearly I need to buy "Una Mattina" and "Divenire" ASAP! (Even if they don't qualify for super saver shipping on Amazon.com.)

"I due fiumi" is wonderful, and I learned it quite quickly over the weekend. Thus encouraged, I tried "Melodia africana II" and thought I'd learned it as quickly, but I've just listened to the recording and Einaudi plays it so fast! And it does sound better when he plays it. Oh well. :rolleyes:

[/b]
Ok, so just to be clear now, this means you are much better than me. I've been playing on and off for about 10 months, and I am self-taught. So calibrate everything else I have to say accordingly.

 Quote:
Originally posted by Carol I.:


So . . . [request for help coming] . . .

If Monica (as the Forum's official Einaudi expert) and some of our other experienced Einaudi fans could list their absolute best favorites pieces to play, in increasing order of difficulty, it would be an enormous help to those of us who just can't make up our minds what to learn next! (Or maybe limit it to the top five or ten, in case everything he ever wrote qualifies as your absolute best favorites.)

Thanks!

Carol [/b]
I'll take a stab here. Here are the first dozen or so pieces I intend to learn, in order how difficult I perceive them to be, from easiest to hardest. YMMV (see my comment above). Please understand that I have yet to attempt about half of these (especially those down near the bottom of the list), so hopefully you'll get some more informed responses before too long. But since I have given this question some thought already, I may as well tell you what I came up with.


Limbo[/b] - General agreement that this is the easiest.
I Due Fiumi[/b]
Lontano[/b]
Sotto Vento[/b]
La profundita del buio[/b]
Ombre[/b] - This will be my recital submission. I was able to get up and running pretty quickly on this one, but having a hard time getting it to where I like it.
Tracce[/b]
Stella del Mattino[/b] - Working on this one now, it's not bad.
Fuori Dal Mondo[/b] - I had to shelve this one, had a lot of trouble with it.
Melodia Africana I[/b]
Nefeli[/b]
La Linea Scura[/b] - I hear it's easier than it looks.
Le Onde[/b] - On the other hand, Monica has said more than once that Le Onde is actually harder than it looks / sounds. Perhaps like Ombre, in that the notes aren't hard to get down, but making it musical, that's another matter.
Un Mondo a Parte[/b]
I Giorni[/b]
Giorni Dispari[/b]

If none of these are challenging in any way, maybe you should queue up Questa notte, which I figure I'll master about one week after I perform the Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto for all of you.
Posted by: Carol I.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/11/08 08:02 AM

Thanks, AWTPP! That's a great list. \:\)

It's just what I was looking for, and the comments are especially helpful. I'm sure there are plenty of challenges here. And I'm going to follow your example of having a specific plan to follow. It's way better than my current approach of trying pieces at random in an attempt to learn everything I like right away!

I hope we get more replies; I'll be interested in seeing how others rank these and other pieces.

Carol
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/11/08 08:46 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Always Wanted to Play Piano:
Limbo[/b] - General agreement that this is the easiest.
I Due Fiumi[/b]
Lontano[/b]
Sotto Vento[/b]
La profundita del buio[/b]
Ombre[/b] - This will be my recital submission. I was able to get up and running pretty quickly on this one, but having a hard time getting it to where I like it.
Tracce[/b]
Stella del Mattino[/b] - Working on this one now, it's not bad.
Fuori Dal Mondo[/b] - I had to shelve this one, had a lot of trouble with it.
Melodia Africana I[/b]
Nefeli[/b]
La Linea Scura[/b] - I hear it's easier than it looks.
Le Onde[/b] - On the other hand, Monica has said more than once that Le Onde is actually harder than it looks / sounds. Perhaps like Ombre, in that the notes aren't hard to get down, but making it musical, that's another matter.
Un Mondo a Parte[/b]
I Giorni[/b]
Giorni Dispari[/b]

[/QB]
Hi,

I've only had a quick glance at the list. In my opinion, I would put I Giorni further up (maybe nearer Nefeli).
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/11/08 09:26 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Always Wanted to Play Piano:
I came up with.


Limbo[/b] - General agreement that this is the easiest.
I Due Fiumi[/b]
Lontano[/b]
Sotto Vento[/b]
La profundita del buio[/b]
Ombre[/b] - This will be my recital submission. I was able to get up and running pretty quickly on this one, but having a hard time getting it to where I like it.
Tracce[/b]
Stella del Mattino[/b] - Working on this one now, it's not bad.
Fuori Dal Mondo[/b] - I had to shelve this one, had a lot of trouble with it.
Melodia Africana I[/b]
Nefeli[/b]
La Linea Scura[/b] - I hear it's easier than it looks.
Le Onde[/b] - On the other hand, Monica has said more than once that Le Onde is actually harder than it looks / sounds. Perhaps like Ombre, in that the notes aren't hard to get down, but making it musical, that's another matter.
Un Mondo a Parte[/b]
I Giorni[/b]
Giorni Dispari[/b]

[/QB]
Such a useful list and a great idea. I'm going to keep a close eye on how you get on as I want to pinch all your good ideas along the way. I'm especially interested on how difficult you find the first two on the list relative to each other.

I'm currently enjoying learning David Nevue's 'Solitude' but Einaudi is where my heart is \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/12/08 09:19 AM

I really should be working, but I can't resist this intellectual exercise. Here's my list of pieces that I've tackled, in my subjective order of difficulty. I'll put asterisks in front of the ones I think are the prettiest:

Limbo -- yes, the easiest. But it's not nearly as pretty as "I due fiumi," so I usually suggest that one first, just to make sure the person becomes a committed Einaudi fan for life. ;\)

**I due fiumi-- stunningly beautiful, and fairly easy. 'nuff said.

**Fuori dal mondo-- good intro to common Einaudi bass pattern. One of my hubby's favorites, so I play it a lot.

Exit-- has some really deep bass chords that are fun to play, rather ominous in tone.

Samba-- not hard, and very repetitive. Not one of my favorites.

Ombre-- nice; dynamics are key.

Una Mattina-- rhythm is easier to learn if you've heard the music. One of the most minimalist of Einaudi's pieces.

**Dietro casa-- this may be Einaudi's easiest bass, very repetitive chords in right hand. The dynamics make or break this one.

**Un mondo a parte-- the most "classical" sounding piece of Einaudi's I've played so far. The ff section starting on measure 48 is tremendous fun to play.

Primavera-- in terms of the notes themselves, this would be rated even easier, but getting it up to tempo was challenging (for me; I don't do andante \:D ). The section on pp. 42-43 is just lovely; the section on pp. 40-41, not so much.

**I giorni-- this has a few big chords I can't reach, but if you rearrange them, the rest of the piece is doable.

**Nuvole bianche-- one of my all time favorites.

**Nefeli-- if you can get past the dreaded measures 17-25, you'll get the piece down, and it's worth it.

**Giorni dispari-- one of my all time favorites.

**Le Onde-- my Waterloo. Nobody but me rates this that hard, but this is my list so I can rate it where I want. :p

**Ancora-- the one I'm working on now. Much of it is doable, but the length and syncopated rhythm in part of it bumps this to the harder end of the spectrum.

**Divenire-- Kawaigirl talked me into trying to learn this ages ago, when I had no business attempting it. I can butcher it, but one of these days I *will* play this piece the way it deserves to be played.

Man this guy has written some amazingly breathtakingly beautiful music.
Posted by: Carol I.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/12/08 11:10 AM

And I really should be working, too, but I can't resist a quick peek at this! ;\)

Thanks, Monica! What a great list. These lists are going to be an enormous help as I try to discipline myself to learn just one or two pieces at a time.

BTW, my husband has just ordered "Una Mattina" and "Divenire" for me! (Okay, so I'm revealing some inconsistency here - why should I need those books already when I still have almost all of the "Best of" to learn?) \:D

Carol
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/12/08 12:02 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Carol I.:
And I really should be working, too, but I can't resist a quick peek at this! ;\)

Thanks, Monica! What a great list. These lists are going to be an enormous help as I try to discipline myself to learn just one or two pieces at a time.

BTW, my husband has just ordered "Una Mattina" and "Divenire" for me! (Okay, so I'm revealing some inconsistency here - why should I need those books already when I still have almost all of the "Best of" to learn?) \:D

Carol [/b]
Because it can't hurt to have the entire collection to choose from?

I'll be in trouble if he has any sheet books with him at the concert as I could not likely pass up a chance to pick them up and maybe get them autographed at the same time. \:\)
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/12/08 02:45 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by AnthonyB:
[QUOTE]
I'll be in trouble if he has any sheet books with him at the concert as I could not likely pass up a chance to pick them up and maybe get them autographed at the same time. \:\) [/b]
You'd better bring the credit card in that case ;\) (He had the entire range at the concert I attended)
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/12/08 03:00 PM

Well that's it. I can't wait until Christmas I've ordered The best of.....

Can't wait \:\)
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/12/08 04:25 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Blackbird:
Well that's it. I can't wait until Christmas I've ordered The best of.....

Can't wait \:\) [/b]
Brilliant - I'm sure you are going to love playing the music!
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/14/08 01:35 PM

Anybody have any hints on Stella? I am having trouble with the third section (beginning measure 33). Ordinarily, when I try to play an unfamiliar rhythm like this, I just try to do it very, very slowly, until it becomes familiar enough to play it at speed. In this case, it is taking me so long to move off "very very slowly", I am concerned maybe I am not doing something right.

AnthonyB, did you have any trouble with this?
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/14/08 03:03 PM

I will say this part scared me at first but I just took it slow and paid attention to what I was doing. I would start by getting the left hand pattern down. Then you start playing the left hand and it continues up in the right hand. Once I had the left hand down it didn't take too long to get down. The other part is a bit of alternating between the left and the right hand if you look at the notes. Just start slow and I think you'll find that that section is the most fun part of the entire song. My biggest trouble in that section is trying to stay with an even tempo. I can go up slow with the left but my right hand likes to fly through the notes. Oh well. \:\)
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/15/08 02:17 PM

We've got Chopin recitals, Beatles recitals, Holiday recitals, ABF recitals etc...

How about an Einaudi recital? I think there are enough of us who are fans and who would want to contribute. If the idea is popular enough (say 10-12 people), we could work through the albums one by one, taking a song each?

Just a thought...
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/15/08 02:54 PM

An interesting idea Euan. It would be interesting to see what order we would go in if we decided to do something like this. Start with the older albums and work up?

Of course, starting with the albums that have most of the pieces in the "Best Of" book would work the best since that one is the easiest to get here in the States. Of course, there's a good chance that I'll have two more books to play with once my trip to San Francisco is over. I'll be swimming in even more sheet music than I know what to do with. \:\)
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/15/08 05:00 PM

Yes, that would be a good idea - start from Le Onde. Eden Roc may be a problem as there are non-piano pieces.

I Giorni, Una Mattina are fine, and then the same problems with Divenire (string-y pieces).

[Diario Mali is also an official album, but no sheet music (and no kora players either)]

You guys are going to have so much enjoyment from the concert. I'm getting excited myself, and I'm not even going!
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/15/08 05:29 PM

I do think that we would have quite a hard time getting all the pieces from the albums though as some of the sheets look pretty frightening to some of the tracks. \:\)
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/15/08 05:31 PM

What a great idea Euan \:\) Count me in.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/15/08 09:58 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by AnthonyB:
I do think that we would have quite a hard time getting all the pieces from the albums though as some of the sheets look pretty frightening to some of the tracks. \:\) [/b]
Not a problem now that Kawaigirl is involved. She can play all the hard ones, and we'll handle the others.

I'm in too. I may try to re-record some of the first Einaudi pieces I ever recorded, as I think (I hope) I can play them better now.
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/16/08 12:27 AM

I'd like to be an official supporter \:\)

Then one day when I'm a bit more than a basher of keys to join in

\:D
Posted by: pixy

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/16/08 06:01 AM

Count on my as enthusiastic supporter (and next century I might join in) :3hearts:
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/16/08 09:36 AM

Blackbird and Pixi, there are some easier Eianudi pieces that you guys can tackle. Do join in and have some fun \:\)
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/16/08 10:44 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Kawaigirl1:
Blackbird and Pixi, there are some easier Eianudi pieces that you guys can tackle. Do join in and have some fun \:\) [/b]
I've ordered "The best of..." book just to have look and wet the appetite but I must finish 'Solitude' that I'm really enjoying learning at the moment.

So much music so little time \:\)

but who knows \:D
Posted by: pixy

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/16/08 10:55 AM

I already have them all \:D
I am having lots of fun with Nefeli (i.e very little progress if any).
Posted by: pixy

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/16/08 10:59 AM

Hi Kawaigirl1
Which one you think would be best to try first? Please, bear in mind I've got ten pretty thumbs
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/16/08 11:28 AM

Pixi, how about trying Le Onde Canzone popolare? It's only 1 page long and not difficult.
Posted by: pixy

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/16/08 11:34 AM

I'll park Nefeli and try that one. One pagers sound right for starters (leaving the 18 pagers for Monica.)
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/16/08 06:31 PM

I posted this one to the November piano bar but soon after the recital kicked off, leaving the piano bar in the dust for a while. I figured I would add a nice little link here.

Stella Del Mattino - Recorded on Nov 16, 2008.

I took some time off playing the piece after all the work making a recording for the recital. Once I get things ironed out after the pause I can usually pull off some great renditions. Feel free to compare this one to my recital entry.
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/17/08 06:08 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Kawaigirl1:
Pixi, how about trying Le Onde Canzone popolare? It's only 1 page long and not difficult. [/b]
Just got my "Best of.........." through the letterbox.

Turned straight to page 100. This is definitely on my list of next to do.

Sorry for butting in \:D
Posted by: pixy

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/17/08 08:58 AM

I only have another five hours work. Then Bath-Dinner-Bed duties and I'll join you in starting page 100.
Lets see where this week takes us!
Posted by: pixy

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/17/08 10:04 AM

I only have another five hours work. Then Bath-Dinner-Bed duties and I'll join you in starting page 100.
Lets see where this week takes us!
Posted by: wj3

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/17/08 10:33 AM

Ok you guys, you have got me interested too. Ive put the "Best of" on my amazon wish list for christmas. I love listening to everyones playing in the last recitals. I have recitals 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 downloaded into my mp3 player, and listen to them everyday. I would like to try to learn some of these pieces. I guess I am becoming a Einuadi fan. yeah!
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/17/08 03:55 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by wj3:
Ok you guys, you have got me interested too. Ive put the "Best of" on my amazon wish list for christmas. I love listening to everyones playing in the last recitals. I have recitals 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 downloaded into my mp3 player, and listen to them everyday. I would like to try to learn some of these pieces. I guess I am becoming a Einuadi fan. yeah! [/b]
We'll always take new Einaudi Fans! I also hope that some of my performances as such an inexperienced beginner have shown that some of his pieces are definitely doable with little experience and will only improve over time.

I sure hope you've been good this year wj3! ;\)
Posted by: wj3

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/18/08 09:51 AM

Thanks AnthonyB. I am really impressed by your playing. You have sure have made good progress. I hope I can do as well. By the way I tried to be good this year......hum..well I thought about being good this year.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/18/08 02:08 PM

Trying to get the LH patterns down on I Due Fiumi. (I assume that is the key to this piece... once those are automatic, everything else falls into line.)

I having some trouble getting the big arp in measures 7 and 8 smooth. My wife casually walked by as I was working on it, and said "What you're doing doesn't look right. It looks uncomfortable. I've never seen anybody try something like that." I had been playing it 5-4-2-1. Her suggestion was to cross over (5-2-1-2), which, I'd admit, seemed pretty natural.

What's the by-the-book way to do this?
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/18/08 02:49 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Always Wanted to Play Piano:
Trying to get the LH patterns down on I Due Fiumi. (I assume that is the key to this piece... once those are automatic, everything else falls into line.)

I having some trouble getting the big arp in measures 7 and 8 smooth. My wife casually walked by as I was working on it, and said "What you're doing doesn't look right. It looks uncomfortable. I've never seen anybody try something like that." I had been playing it 5-4-2-1. Her suggestion was to cross over (5-2-1-2), which, I'd admit, seemed pretty natural.

What's the by-the-book way to do this? [/b]
I play it 5-2-1-2. No way could I manage 5-4-2-1. Good luck and I hope you can make some good progress on the piece. I will let you know that if I have to "cheat" and look anywhere while playing it is normally the left hand. So don't feel terrible if you have to take glances down while playing. \:\)
Posted by: Wimbwicket

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/22/08 02:28 PM

Hey guys,

I need some advice. I'm 16 years old. So you can guess that i don't have a lot of money to spend. Luckily is Christmas coming up. I really want to ask a Ludovico Einaudi book but i don't know which one, because i want to get the best book for my mum's money :p , so i can ask a few different gifts too :p .

What book should i buy? 'The Best of ...' book? Or is there one album that really stands out? What book(s) do you have? And with what book of Ludovico Einaudi are you the happiest?

Thanks,

Wimbwicket
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/22/08 02:47 PM

The "Best of" sheet music collection is clearly the best value of the bunch. As for albums, the "Echoes" (greatest hits) collection would be the one to get if you could only have one Einaudi album. However, there is a very real possibility that you will get that album and then decide that you must simply own everything Einaudi has ever released, and then you'll end up duplicating your efforts. Or at least that's what happened to me. :p

I think I'm incapable of choosing a favorite Einaudi album, but Divenire, Una Mattina, and I Giorni would be way up there. Along with Eden Roc. Oops. Better stop before I name them all.
Posted by: Wimbwicket

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/22/08 02:51 PM

Lol ok, i think i'll get Best of collection, but one quick question, is Einaudi music easy to play (because this is the Adult Beginners forum)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/22/08 03:41 PM

Well, we have 28 pages of this thread to answer your question, but the one sentence answer is: Some of his music (e.g., Limbo and I due fiumi) is easily accessible to beginners; some of it is wicked hard.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/22/08 04:47 PM

As ever, I would agree with Monica. The 'Best of' music book (published by Ricordi) is the one to go for.

And the Echoes compilation album is the best cd to get.

Speaking of albums - for me, the albums I Giorni and Eden Roc are a little bit better than the others. But there are great tracks on them all, so it doesn't matter which one.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/02/08 04:30 PM

Well, my brother in law and sister are out of town so I sort of borrowed the webcam for a while. ;\)

Stella Del Mattino Video

I was a bit speedy towards the end and was too lazy to work out replacing the webcam audio with an audio track recorded directly from the piano but you'll just have to deal with it and like it the way it is. Oh, and I think youtube killed the dynamics. I really hate that they put audio through filters.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/02/08 04:56 PM

Great job, Anthony! I was pleasantly impressed by the audio quality of the webcam mic.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/04/08 11:27 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Danny Niklas:
I think we could invent a new beginner learning method based on Einaudi music alone. It is based on the three most important patterns of music (arpeggios, chords and scales), it is slow enough but require a steady rhythm, it is that beautiful to trigger motivation and boost self-esteem, it requires a great care for dynamic and phrasing.

I got the idea from a piano student who learned to play on Final Fantasy tracks. After two years he had become so good, to choose to apply for grade 8 piano. Not only he passed the exam, but was congratulated for possing a magnificent touch and musicality that normally students at that level don't possess.

Would you choose Einaudi over Bastien? [/b]
I'd like to revisit this question. For now, I have effectively shelved Alfred's for Einaudi, but I'm questioning the extent to which this is a wise decision.

I'm making reasonable progress on I Due Fiumi, which seems to me an exercise in arpeggiated broken LH chords, with a few RH scales (sort of) thrown in for good measure. In all honesty, it's arguable (a piano teacher would argue, I'd think) that I have no business attempting any of this music. I have had no lessons, and have only completed one method book (Alfred's Book One). To me, I Due Fiumi (and the other Einaudi pieces I've attempted) are much more enjoyable than doing exercises. I tip my hat to those of you able to do your Hanons. To me, that's simple drudgery, and who has time for that? My (piano) bench time is far too scarce to do things that I find annoying.

On the other hand, there must be SOME value in these exercises (Hanons. scales, arps), otherwise they wouldn't have lasted through generations of piano teachers and students. I accept that, so long as I avoid doing these things, I willingly forgo the benefits those exercises bring to those who undertake them.

On the other hand... if there is some long-term technical value in learning to play things like simpler Einaudi pieces (Limbo, Stella del Mattino, I Due Fiumi), that would be the best of all worlds, would it not? Playing things I enjoy which, oh by the way, also have beneficial long-term side effects.

So what's your take? Does playing these pieces make you a better player? I understand that the answer to this depends on what your piano goals are, and thus, YMMV (and MMMV). But those of you who have gone before me, and taken up these pieces as relative piano noobs... did you find that playing these pieces helped you in ways other than being able to play more Einaudi pieces?
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/04/08 01:36 PM

aw2pp: I know that you made it through book one while I stopped right about at the blues stuff when I started on my Einaudi Pieces. I think one thing that made a difference over Alfred was that I wasn't even listening to the pieces being played online while with Einaudi at least I could listen to them being played. That helps me when compared to some of the stuff in Alfred for which I had no audio to back me up. Of course, most of the pieces are available to be heard on youtube now. I must say that I can get easy parts of Einaudi pieces down pretty quickly but it takes some effort to work on the tricky sections. In "I Due Fiumi" I could play the first page over and over easily before I finally nailed down the even trickier (for me) section after that. Of course, even the bottom of the first page was tough at first but that came together nicely once I worked on it.

I keep asking myself if I should go back to Alfred's just to finish but whenever I try I can't seem to keep at it for very long.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/04/08 01:46 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by AnthonyB:

I keep asking myself if I should go back to Alfred's just to finish but whenever I try I can't seem to keep at it for very long. [/b]
I guess that's the essence of my question. If you and are deriving great(er) or equal benefit from playing what we can of Einaudi's simpler pieces, what would be the point of doing other work that isn't as enjoyable? It sounds like you and I are in the same place on this question.

If there is greater value in working through the methods (be it Alfred's, Bastien, traditional exercises, or what have you), I'd be ok focusing on those for a few months, or years, or whatever it takes. More importantly, if I become convinced there is greater value, that's what I would do.

Maybe a teacher would / could convince me.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/07/08 09:00 PM

AWTPP, I think the answer to your "greater value" question depends entirely on what your goals for piano are. If you want to be a well-rounded pianist with excellent technique and familiarity with the canon, then an "All-Einuadi" curriculum won't cut it. If you want to learn to play music that is so beautiful it makes your heart ache, then "all Einaudi, all the time" is all you need. (Erm, can you tell I'm just a little bit biased? ;\) )

More seriously, I recognize that there are several glaring gaps in my technique. Make that Grand Canyons in my technique. I can't trill to save my life, and any metronome marking greater than 100 or fast runs will make me break out in a cold sweat. So, as much as I love Einaudi, if somebody told me they wanted to learn to "play piano" in the abstract, I'd advise against a diet of pure Einaudi. But if somebody told me "I love Einaudi's music and would be happy playing only music that sounds like that the rest of my life," I'd have no qualms in telling them that they should follow their heart, and that's indeed what I have done.
Posted by: Lisztener

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/07/08 09:25 PM

Monica, that is a beautiful post.
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/08/08 07:20 AM

Yea, what Monica said makes a lot of sense for most of us.

I would however mix up Einaudi with a few other composers (I like Nobue Umatsu from the final Fantasy piano collections) as well as Jim Brickman, David Lanz etc.

Also, if you can hear some of these beautiful melodies in your head, why not give composing by ear a try.
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/08/08 11:58 AM

A simpletons question about Le Onde Canzone popolare

Bars 5-12 Bass Clef shows the E tied for all 8 bars. Is this correct as the note will only hold for a few bars before fading out.

Am I misreading this?

Waiting in anticipation of looking silly \:\)
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/08/08 12:35 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
AWTPP, I think the answer to your "greater value" question depends entirely on what your goals for piano are. [/b]
My piano goals are simple. I want to play as effortlessly as KawaiGirl. I mean, duh.

All kidding aside, I picked up the piano seriously in the hopes of playing classical music. Having since learned what all is required to get me to that point, I've had to define some interim goals, because, if indeed I ever become the piano player I want to be, it'll take many years. Goals (for me, anyway, and probably for most) don't work that way. We need interim milestones to feel like we are making progress, otherwise become despondent about our apparent lack of progress. These Einaudi pieces represent some early milestones for me. But I have to admit, I have larger goals, not just classical, but even some solo Jazz piano. And I am convinced that, in order to play that stuff, I am going to have to know my technique (er, "tecnic") and theory.

Not that I am ready to set aside Einaudi pieces either. I don't know if I share your goal of playing the entire catalog some day... some of his pieces... how shall I say this? Some of his stuff is boring to me. I can confidently say I will never learn L'ultima volta, for example.

I've got a lot of work to do. Sounds like I just need to practice more. Next up in Alfred's Book 2: Bridal Chorus from "Lohengrin".
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/08/08 02:25 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
Make that Grand Canyons in my technique. I can't trill to save my life, [/b]
Monica, a simple solution to your trill problem - you just need to look at Nuvole Nere!
;\)

(might have a problem with the fast runs - don't know any Einaudi pieces to help that)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/09/08 09:09 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Blackbird:
A simpletons question about Le Onde Canzone popolare

Bars 5-12 Bass Clef shows the E tied for all 8 bars. Is this correct as the note will only hold for a few bars before fading out.

Am I misreading this?

Waiting in anticipation of looking silly \:\) [/b]
Hope you weren't holding your breath, blackbird! \:D I saw your question yesterday at my office and was pretty sure I knew the answer but wanted to look at the sheet music before responding.

Yeah, that note is really tied for all those measures. To make things even more baffling, the music calls you to pedal several times during that long duration, so even if there were any sustain going on, the pedalling would seem to clear it.

The only thing that I can think of is that Einaudi calls for that note to be tied and held down so that the string would vibrate sympathetically with other notes being played later on.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/09/08 04:25 PM

Pedaling questions on I Due Fiumi:

1. Is the entire piece Una Corda, except those few measures where you go into the high treble registers, and it's specifically marked 3C?

2. The LH is a bunch of broken chords. Do you sustain each measure? Do you sustain across measures where the chords are complimentary?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/09/08 04:31 PM

1. Yup

2. Not sure exactly what measures you're talking about, but I usually pedal at all chord changes, even if they're complimentary. (Oh, and I pedal *constantly*.)
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/09/08 04:43 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
Hope you weren't holding your breath, blackbird! \:D I saw your question yesterday at my office and was pretty sure I knew the answer but wanted to look at the sheet music before responding.

Yeah, that note is really tied for all those measures. To make things even more baffling, the music calls you to pedal several times during that long duration, so even if there were any sustain going on, the pedalling would seem to clear it.

The only thing that I can think of is that Einaudi calls for that note to be tied and held down so that the string would vibrate sympathetically with other notes being played later on. [/b]
Thanks Monica

Yours even more confused by this music lark ....walks away scratching head \:D
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/09/08 04:54 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:



2. Not sure exactly what measures you're talking about... [/b]
EVERY measure. From the sound of things, this is your approach.
Posted by: Josh Winiberg

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/10/08 05:39 AM

Hello all! I'm new here, but I know Piano Monika from the Einaudi forums (thanks for the point to this thread!)

I find with the pedalling of phrases that sometimes it's better to mix and match pedalling. I used to pedal so mechanically - at every chord change. While true to the recordings, I have recently found it more expressive to not be so even with it, and Ludovico himself has started to change this in more recent performances I've noticed.

For instance, if the left hand accompanyment is only a chord, then - apart from the melody - it is not vital to pedal. For example, if the left hand plays a broken chord while sustaining. Instead of pedalling the broken chord, you can sustain it manually with the hand, and make the right hand melody more staccatto'd, giving the impression that one hand is pedalled and the other isn't.

In the end, I think pedalling every chord change is a safe technique for beginniners, but to achieve great expression you should be prepared to deviate from this a little. The flowing beauty of Ludovico's work is at it's best when it's given contrast in places.

As for Canzone Populare, I don't have the sheet music here, but I believe the E which is sustained underneath should be sustained manually, so that it slowly fades under the other left hand notes. It wouldn't be cleared by pedalling this way, and will fade away nicely. Played at the correct tempo, there shouldn't be a long time, if any time, where you can't still hear the E.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/10/08 06:36 AM

Hi Josh, welcome to the forum!

I am also on the Einaudi boards (although less often now than previously).

Your compositions are very beautiful and am looking forward to you sharing your knowledge of Einaudi's music also.
Posted by: Danny Niklas

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/10/08 07:22 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Always Wanted to Play Piano:
 Quote:
Originally posted by Danny Niklas:
I think we could invent a new beginner learning method based on Einaudi music alone. It is based on the three most important patterns of music (arpeggios, chords and scales), it is slow enough but require a steady rhythm, it is that beautiful to trigger motivation and boost self-esteem, it requires a great care for dynamic and phrasing.

I got the idea from a piano student who learned to play on Final Fantasy tracks. After two years he had become so good, to choose to apply for grade 8 piano. Not only he passed the exam, but was congratulated for possing a magnificent touch and musicality that normally students at that level don't possess.

Would you choose Einaudi over Bastien? [/b]
I'd like to revisit this question. For now, I have effectively shelved Alfred's for Einaudi, but I'm questioning the extent to which this is a wise decision.

I'm making reasonable progress on I Due Fiumi, which seems to me an exercise in arpeggiated broken LH chords, with a few RH scales (sort of) thrown in for good measure. In all honesty, it's arguable (a piano teacher would argue, I'd think) that I have no business attempting any of this music. I have had no lessons, and have only completed one method book (Alfred's Book One). To me, I Due Fiumi (and the other Einaudi pieces I've attempted) are much more enjoyable than doing exercises. I tip my hat to those of you able to do your Hanons. To me, that's simple drudgery, and who has time for that? My (piano) bench time is far too scarce to do things that I find annoying.

On the other hand, there must be SOME value in these exercises (Hanons. scales, arps), otherwise they wouldn't have lasted through generations of piano teachers and students. I accept that, so long as I avoid doing these things, I willingly forgo the benefits those exercises bring to those who undertake them.
[/b]

They have lasted because of "tradition" and tradition is such a strong force no matter how nonsensical and useless something is, tradition will preserve it and also because they're an easy way out for many. It is harder (yet more useful) to choose carefully pieces and accomodate someone's musical predisposition, compared to just "prescribe" the same method books which have been used over and over.

Scales and arpeggios have their intrinsic utility and I wouldn't remove them from the practicing repertory, but it's important to practice them musically.

 Quote:
On the other hand... if there is some long-term technical value in learning to play things like simpler Einaudi pieces (Limbo, Stella del Mattino, I Due Fiumi), that would be the best of all worlds, would it not? Playing things I enjoy which, oh by the way, also have beneficial long-term side effects.
[/b]

Technique can't be separated from music. Whatever you can't play is a technique to learn. Fast arpeggiato patterns, crescendo, chords, rubato, staccato, soft, pedalling, chromatic passage, note reading ... aren't you learning all of these "technique" by playing Einaudi pieces?

It's a bit like yoga.
A yoga beginner practices beginner yoga positions.
A yoga advance practices advanced yoga positions.
You're not asked to practice "technique separated from yoga". How boring and demotivating would be to be learning yoga and be asked to run slowly in place for 40 minutes?

 Quote:
So what's your take? Does playing these pieces make you a better player?
[/b]

Always ask yourself the magical question:
“What I can do now that I couldn't before?"

Einaudi is not used alien techniques that are needed for his pieces alone. He is implementing in a personal creative ways universal piano technique that would be needed to play a million of other pieces.

Everything in music is either a jump, a scale, an arpeggio or a chord. These are the four categories you can place whatever musical line in.
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/10/08 07:51 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Josh Winiberg:


As for Canzone Populare, I don't have the sheet music here, but I believe the E which is sustained underneath should be sustained manually, so that it slowly fades under the other left hand notes. It wouldn't be cleared by pedalling this way, and will fade away nicely. Played at the correct tempo, there shouldn't be a long time, if any time, where you can't still hear the E. [/b]
Welcome and thank you for the advice though it does confuse me slightly.

Am I correct in understanding that I should be playing the E and then keeping the key depressed throughout the next 8 bars?

I have done that at tempo, playing a recording in the background just to confirm the timing and the E fades just before the end of the 3rd bar (i.e. bar 7).

I have many impediments to piano playing apart from my fingers, one of which is learning on a poor keyboard. Would that cause the lack of sustain that you suggest.

Or am I just keeping it depressed because it would have an effect on other notes subsequently played, pretending I'm playing a real piano \:\)

Any help to clear the fog appreciated \:D
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/10/08 01:07 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Josh Winiberg:
In the end, I think pedalling every chord change is a safe technique for beginniners, but to achieve great expression you should be prepared to deviate from this a little.[/b]
Nicely said, and welcome (again), Josh!

Blackbird, I think you hit the nail on the head that the type of piano will matter a lot in how long the sustain lasts. I would just hold that note down for the duration and not worry unduly about it.
Posted by: Blackbird

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/10/08 01:57 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:

Blackbird, I think you hit the nail on the head that the type of piano will matter a lot in how long the sustain lasts. I would just hold that note down for the duration and not worry unduly about it. [/b]
Thanks Monica, now moving on \:D
Posted by: JoseHeno

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/16/08 12:27 AM

I've been messing around with some of the pieces in the "Best of" book, and I've noticed something I don't quite understand: "1 C." "3 C." For example, in "Limbo", under measures 7, 31, 55, 63, 71.

What does this mean? Maybe it's just my inexperience, but I've only seen this in this Einaudi book.

Thanks.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/16/08 01:26 AM

1C and 3C are markings for use of the Una Corda pedal. Some digital and even upright pianos lack this functionality. What this pedal does is move the hammers over a bit so they only they can strike one fewer of the strings (where applicable) as well as the strings not hitting the normal spot on the hammer. This generally will cause a softer sound.

Where you see a 1C you would depress the Una Corda pedal (usually the left pedal) and release it where you see a 3C. The piece will still usually sound ok even if you ignore these markings. However, my digital piano supports this feature so I have a second pedal to take advantage of it. \:\)
Posted by: JoseHeno

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/17/08 11:40 AM

Thanks, Anthony.

Unfortunately, my very beat-up upright, although the pedal is there, does not support this feature.

I will practice using it anyway, and just imagine that the sound is changing.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/17/08 04:58 PM

By the way, Danny, thanks for the insightful and encouraging response to my question.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/18/08 12:10 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by JoseHeno:
Thanks, Anthony.

Unfortunately, my very beat-up upright, although the pedal is there, does not support this feature.

I will practice using it anyway, and just imagine that the sound is changing. [/b]
On a really old 1900's upright my sister has (as a piece of furniture the left pedal actually operates as another sustain. On some upright pianos the una corda pedal moves the hammers slightly away from the strings instead of shifting over which can result in less hammer speed by the time the hammer reaches the strings.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/18/08 01:37 PM

Another new video for YouTube.

This time it is me playing I Due Fiumi. This song (not this performance of it) was the first one I played for the ABF Recitals here. Along with that this was the second Einaudi song I learned how to play.

At this rate the only song that I can play that I don't have a video of is Limbo. Looks like I've got some learning to do. ;\)

I decided to record and post this one to give aw2pp some inspiration to keep playing the piece and hopefully we'll get to hear it someday. For all I know he'll keep it tucked away until the next recital. \:\)

Without further delay...

I Due Fiumi

I replaced the webcam audio with direct from the piano audio again but I might have been a slight hair fast on the audio sync but it looked close enough for me.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/18/08 05:23 PM

I'm probably at a similar level of polish on IDF as I was with Ombre when I recorded it for my last recital. I haven't decided whether to use it for my recital entry next quarter, or something else. Part of me would rather post something a little shorter, and perhaps something that hasn't been submitted before. On the other hand, that doesn't leave me with many choices, assuming I stay with pieces from the Einaudi repertoire.

If I can grab some time this weekend, I'll grab a recording. Our flip cam is down... otherwise, it would be time to add to my Youtube channel (which, right now, consists merely of my shaky Limbo attempt from back in, egads, July.)
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/20/08 06:57 PM

Trying out Melodia Africana II. The LH chord in measure 5 (and many times thereafter) is a pretty uncomfortable stretch for me. In these circumstances, is it allowable to move the highest note down an octave?
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/21/08 12:51 AM

I've only sort of skimmed the sheet music for the song but I'm wondering if the right hand could help out with the notes in the bass clef in this case.

When the huge chord appears in the lower hand they have the treble clef with a g on a lower ledger line but with it marked up with an "underscore" as an ornament. I assume it would be hard to notate a chord for that right hand to play and only emphasize that g note.


I would have to figure out how playable measure 21 would be then. You still run up to playing that chord with the same notes ending measure 20 but then have to up a few more notes in 21 with the right hand.

Oh well, maybe someone else can come along and shed some light on the situation. \:\)
Posted by: Chaplin

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/21/08 01:49 PM

I can really use some help and advice about Limbo


There are obviously very dedicated Einaudi –experts here and I’m wondering whether it is possible to start a sort of ‘question-corner’ as a guidance for the absolute (Einaudi) beginner. Maybe it is asked before, but I haven’t read all the twenty something pages of this topic. (Sorry..)

I’ve started with Limbo and I’m ashamed to say that I in spite of all the practice I've made a complete mess of it! I just cannot get it right. I really thought that I should be able to learn it in due time, but it’s a struggle all the way. Today’s practising was so frustrating then I ended up kicking my poor piano …

I seriously hope you guys can throw me a life line and help me to clear some confusion.

About LIMBO
Measure 5 RH : I should play g bb g. No matter how I stretch, twist and turn I cannot reach it. ( I know I’ve got small hands; I can barely reach an octave).
Q: Is there a general rule/advice which note (low or high g) can be left out? There are more stretches for me in this piece so I think I have to modify it a bit, in order to be able to play it…


Measure 23/24 RH: I play the phrase bb bb d bb bb d bb bb / g bb eb g
Measure 23/24 LH: g d g / eb bb eb
Q: I’m really wondering what I’m doing wrong, the sound that I’m making is not even close to the several YT vid’s \:\( . Are the above mentioned notes the right notes? Should indeed the LH notes be played as block chords?
Listening to examples on YT it seems that there is a sort of ‘second melody’ in this part; which above mentioned notes do not seem to account for. Bit difficult to explain, hope I make any sense.

I hope that some of the Einaudi-experts (and compared to me you are all experts) can help me,

Have a nice day!
from Chaplin


PS. English is not my first language…
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/21/08 02:18 PM

Anthony, that was a lovely job on I due fiumi. You've really perfected it.

AWTPP, I've not played Melodia Africana II, so this is only an off the top of my head response after looking at the music and fiddling on the piano for a minute or two. A lot of times I'll try what Anthony suggests, which is to see if there is a way to enlist the right hand to help out. For measure 5, I don't think that would work well. The problem is that you have to emphasize that G in the right hand, and it would be hard (though not impossible) to do so while holding down the F right next to it with your thumb. So I think what I would do in this case is to drop the F down an octave and play the chord as D-F-C instead.

And now for Chaplin. \:\) You can play Limbo. If it's getting frustrating, just slow down and play it one measure at a time. Let's start with measure 5, RH. Maybe I'm not understanding your post, but there are only three notes in that right hand chord: the G below middle C, the B-flat below middle C, and then the G above middle C. [Edit: I think I understand now; when you write 'bb' you mean 'b-flat,' correct?] It's only an octave, so if you can reach an octave, you should be able to play it. I personally would encourage you to keep trying to reach that octave (piano music has a LOT of octaves in it), and over time your hand really WILL stretch. But if you absolutely can't play it, I'd drop the lowest right hand G in that measure.

As for a general rule, the most general rule I know of is "use whatever sounds best." I've heard that it's often the most important to preserve the root of the chord. Sometimes it will work to drop one of the notes down an octave (as in the advice given to AWTPP); sometimes you can just leave a note out entirely. Experiment and see what sounds best to your ears.

As for measures 23 and 24, those are the right notes (assuming the second 'b' is a flat). Do you have a videocamera? Is there a way you can post just those measures so we can see what you're doing? I'm guessing you've got the notes right and just are having a problem getting the rhythm down. Try slowing it waaaaaayyy down and counting. And, yes, the left hand chords are intended to be played as a single (block) chord.

Are you pedaling while you play those chords? It will sound better pedaled and might give the impression of that second melody you're talking about.

Good luck, and hang in there.
Posted by: Chaplin

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/21/08 03:51 PM

Thanks Monica for your encouraging words!
And yes the additional 'b' indeed means 'flat'. Sorry I thought it was a common way to write it, but is probably only so in my country.

About the octave stretch in g bb g; I do try, both g's I can barely manage but then my hand is almost flat on the keyboard and therefore it is not (yet?) possible for me to hit the bb also. But I will practice, so thank you.

M. 23/24 Now you've confirmed that I do have the right notes, I think it must be a rhythm problem. I guess/hope the same recipe eventually will do the trick: so I'll try some more practice.

Thank you very much, amongst other things today I also really started doubting my (poor) sight reading abilities.

Kind regards
from Chaplin
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/21/08 05:01 PM

Also remember that the first Bb comes before the chord kicks in. The first one starts over in measure 22. As Monica stated for these measures I use the sustain to hold the chord and release it and press down again for the next chord.

I just took a bit of time to make short video of those measures played slowly so maybe you can learn something from it.

I didn't feel like posting it to youtube at the moment, so see if you can download it from box.net and take a look that way. (That would be easier for watching as needed anyway.)

Short Limbo Clip
Posted by: Chaplin

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/22/08 05:32 AM

Thanks Anthony, I can certainly learn something from it; makes it a lot easier to catch the rhythm.

Initially I was a bit confused, because you've mentioned 'video' and 'watching' and the clip I've downloaded was audio. I absolutely don't mean to sound ungrateful, just wondered whether this was all right. (I'm not only piano dumb but also technical stuff stupid \:o ) At first I thought there was something wrong with QT and the firewall, but after adjusting some settings nothing changed, so I guess it is meant to be an audio file.



Thanks again, I appreciate your help.


I’m off to practise!
Have a nice X-mas
from Chaplin
Posted by: JoseHeno

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/22/08 10:25 AM

To AWTPP Re: Melodia Africana II

I had that exact same problem myself. My solution was to raise the D one octave - playing it with my thumb - and lower the F one octave - playing it with my pinky - , essentially having them switch places in the formation of the chord. Not only are you playing the same notes, but it makes a very, very smooth transition to and from the chords around it.

What is sacrificed is the bass-ness of that low D. But I'd much rather be able to play it!

If, somehow, I can afford pinky extension surgery, I'll play the correct chord.
Posted by: Chaplin

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/22/08 11:36 AM

double post
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/22/08 12:44 PM

Chaplin, if that was only audio then you must not have the certain video codec it was encoded with. I'll gladly upload a different version for you to try.

Limbo Clip as a WMV file

You can give this new video clip a try and good luck learning Limbo.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/22/08 12:52 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by JoseHeno:
To AWTPP Re: Melodia Africana II

I had that exact same problem myself. My solution was to raise the D one octave - playing it with my thumb - and lower the F one octave - playing it with my pinky - , essentially having them switch places in the formation of the chord. Not only are you playing the same notes, but it makes a very, very smooth transition to and from the chords around it.

What is sacrificed is the bass-ness of that low D. But I'd much rather be able to play it!

If, somehow, I can afford pinky extension surgery, I'll play the correct chord. [/b]
Thank you, Jose. I will try that when I get home.

Those of you who met Ludovico before (Josh, Anthony, etc.)... are his hands that large? I'm a pretty big person, but can barely make the reach when and if that is all I am concentrating on. I can't imagine being able to do that at any sort of tempo.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/22/08 02:47 PM

aw2pp: Maybe you should ask about that chord over on the Einaudi forums as well. Josh or the others would have a better chance to see it and maybe comment on it.

Ludovico Einaudi is actually shorter than I am and I'm not all that tall myself. I don't know exactly how this relates to hand size but I didn't take pictures of his hand with mine as a reference, sorry. ;\)
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/08 11:23 AM

AnthonyB, that was fantastic playing to "I Due Fiumi" "thumb". Keep up the great work \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/28/08 10:40 PM

A PW member kindly brought it to my attention that I had been playing a note in "Nefeli" wrong (and a rather important note at that ). I double-checked the sheet music and confirmed that I had in fact been playing it wrong all these years. (That's the big downside of memorizing quickly and then not looking at the music again...)

Shucks. THAT wouldn't do. And since Nefeli had been one of the first pieces I had recorded with my Zoom when I got it a couple of years ago, I figured it could stand to be recorded again. So here in all its glory, is my latest version of "Nefeli," this time with more of the right notes. ;\) (There is one misplayed note, but it's more subtle and at least this time I *knew* it was misplayed!)

"Nefeli," version 2.0
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 12/29/08 12:05 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
A PW member kindly brought it to my attention that I had been playing a note in "Nefeli" wrong (and a rather important note at that ). I double-checked the sheet music and confirmed that I had in fact been playing it wrong all these years. (That's the big downside of memorizing quickly and then not looking at the music again...)

Shucks. THAT wouldn't do. And since Nefeli had been one of the first pieces I had recorded with my Zoom when I got it a couple of years ago, I figured it could stand to be recorded again. So here in all its glory, is my latest version of "Nefeli," this time with more of the right notes. ;\) (There is one misplayed note, but it's more subtle and at least this time I *knew* it was misplayed!)

"Nefeli," version 2.0 [/b]
Sounded pretty good here, Monica.

I should try my hand at coding a midi utility that can compare a performance from my digital piano to a midi file that I get generated when I typeset music in order to print it out. I've done that for a few of the Einaudi pieces since that book is a pain to deal with and it is difficult to scan the pages as well. Plus, when I typeset it myself it forces me to read it before playing which helps me when I get over to the piano.

Now to pick a language and get to work, I guess. \:\)
Posted by: JoseHeno

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/15/09 04:00 PM

Anybody playing Quel Che Resta? So far, it's my favorite Einaudi piece, but it seems relatively unpopular for some reason. I like how moody it is.

Anyway, I have a question: what does everyone think the right tempo is? I like a moderate Allegro, 135-150 bpm or something like that. I've heard a lot of people play it very, very quickly, and I feel that's missing the point. I haven't actually heard a recording of Einaudi himself playing it.

There are a lot of tasty, crunchy dissonances in this piece, and I feel that if you play the notes too fast, you lose the ability to savor them. Any thoughts?
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/15/09 05:11 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by JoseHeno:
Anybody playing Quel Che Resta? So far, it's my favorite Einaudi piece, but it seems relatively unpopular for some reason. I like how moody it is.

Anyway, I have a question: what does everyone think the right tempo is? I like a moderate Allegro, 135-150 bpm or something like that. I've heard a lot of people play it very, very quickly, and I feel that's missing the point. I haven't actually heard a recording of Einaudi himself playing it.

There are a lot of tasty, crunchy dissonances in this piece, and I feel that if you play the notes too fast, you lose the ability to savor them. Any thoughts? [/b]
YES! \:\) I'm glad you brought this piece up because I learned it myself and also wondered why nobody else has mentioned/recorded the piece before. It's a fantastic piece in my opinion.

With the tempo, I tend to play it similar to the Einaudi recording, whatever that is played at. I haven't heard the youtube recordings, so I don't know how fast others play it.

I also use pauses between the seperate musical phrases. I will record this one soon.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/15/09 08:37 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by JoseHeno:
Anybody playing Quel Che Resta? So far, it's my favorite Einaudi piece, but it seems relatively unpopular for some reason. I like how moody it is.[/b]
So many Einaudi pieces, so little time! \:D

I'm listening to it again right now. You're right; it's beautiful. And doesn't look that hard at all. hmmm....

[vows silently to self to tackle that one next]

As for tempo, I am horrible at estimating bpm, so I can't give a metronome marking. But listening to the recording, it seems like Einaudi is playing it pretty fast.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/15/09 08:50 PM

I would assume a tempo marking of Scorrevole doesn't translate to anything in the slow category. \:\)

I will agree the piece itself does sound very beautiful. I'll have to take a shot at it someday.
Posted by: JoseHeno

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/15/09 09:47 PM

I seem to have settled on 152 bpm. I agree that to really be "Scorrevole" - giving a sense of flowing or gliding - it can't be too pokey. But 152 isn't so fast that you miss out on the coloring. I wish I had the ability to record!
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 01/16/09 06:42 PM

My sister turned on the radio this morning. My (amazingly adorable) three year old nephew stated he did not want to listen to what came on. Instead, he wanted to listen to his uncle Tony play piano. Of course, what he meant was that he wanted to hear the Einaudi CD that was in the radio.

One day I hope to sound as good as an Einaudi CD. But at least he knows what type of music I play. \:\)
Posted by: tekkie

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/01/09 01:16 PM

Anyone know which key "I due fiumi" is in? I saw a few postings earlier in this thread regarding this, but no definitive answer.

It looks like the piece is laid out nicely in 8 bar phrases, where each phrase ends with a G chord. Most of the times, the G is preceded by a C chord. Also, the song ends on a G. However, the key signature has no sharps/flats.

Could this be a mode starting on the fifth note of the C major scale, i.e. the tonic chord is G? If so, the end of each phrase (C followed by G) would form a plagal cadence (IV-I).

I'm not that familiar with modes, so I could be off base here.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/01/09 06:34 PM

There was an answer to that question, buried somewhere in here. Apparently it starts off in C but then wanders into G (although with no change in key signature). I think you're right about it being some kind of mode thing. I'd love to hear a definitive answer.
Posted by: tekkie

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/01/09 08:32 PM

One of the previous posts did talk about modulating to the key of G:

"I asked her today, and she said its in C but changes to G in some spots and some other stuff that was over my head...lol"

However, each 8 bar phrase starts and ends with similar chords - starts with F, ends with C followed by G. It repeats throughout the piece, so it doesn't seem like there's any modulation. The piece also doesn't appear to be in the key of C or Am since the phrases and song end in G.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/02/09 09:17 AM

That's what had me confused, too.

Tell you what... I'm also a member of the Einaudi forum. I'll post the question there and see what the experts say and report back.
Posted by: Rodney

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/02/09 01:19 PM

I had a look and it appears that the song is in G Mixolydian (a kind of Bluesy upbeat scale). Major scale with the 7th note lowered a half step.

Take a look at my post on posted 03 August, 2005 12:27 PM in the Chord Voicing techniques (A Primer) thread.

Rodney
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/02/09 01:38 PM

Thanks, Rodney! I fully intend to let it drop into dinner conversation tonight that I am playing a piece in the Mixolydian mode. \:D (Er, if I can even pronounce the word, that is.)

Let me ask a follow-up question that will reveal just how deep the depth of my ignorance is: If this piece is indeed in G, why not use the G major key signature and then natural the F's when they appear?
Posted by: Rodney

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/03/09 10:46 AM

You could always show a G major key signature with the F sharp and then flat that note every time, but why would you want to?

For example, would you want to write a song in A natural minor (Aeolian mode) with 3 sharps and then natural the 3rd, 6th and 7th every time they appear in the music? It's all about convenience and making the music less complex to read and interpret.

You could write any piece of music in any mode (relative to their major scale {which is in fact just the Ionian mode} ) and then mark the relative sharps and flats within the score, but this could become VERY combersome and difficult to read. Besides, understanding the mode of the piece, gives you a clue to the mood the composer was trying to convey with the music. This in turn is used in your interpretation and could reflect the manner in which you play it (tempo, amount of swing, dynamics, duration of a fermata, rubato, etc).

Rodney
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/03/09 12:08 PM

It makes sense to me that you would have fewer accidentals if you leave the piece in the C major key signature. But what confuses me is that if you do so, how does one easily tell that it's really G major Mixolydian mode and not C major? Or do you just have to look at the chord progressions and the fact that the G major chord is so prominent to deduce that it's not C major?
Posted by: NeNiRi

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/03/09 01:15 PM

Hi all, I have new to this forum but share your passion for Einaudi. My name is Richard and my favourite tune is Le Onde. I really cant play anything else, i never had any lessons but i am now with a teacher and starting to learn properly.

To begin with i copied the hands of Smokey Joe and then tried to slowly work out the bits i missed with the help of the sheet music.

Id like to post my playing up for you guys but i have never done an upload before.

Can anyone help?
Posted by: NeNiRi

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/03/09 02:13 PM

Hi

I think I worked it out i used the box.

A word of warning a bit of the song is missing as i have not worked that bit out yet. Also there is the expected major flub 3/4 thru.

Hope you enjoy and comments welcome.

My attempt at Le Onde (link below)

http://www.box.net/shared/p5qier7n40
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/03/09 03:20 PM

Hey, NeNiRi, welcome to the forum!! I tried to play your recording but Windows Media Player wouldn't recognize the m4A file. \:\( Any chance you can resave it as an mp3 file?
Posted by: NeNiRi

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/03/09 03:25 PM

Yes Monica sorry il do that
Posted by: NeNiRi

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/03/09 03:40 PM

There you go Monica, ty for your welcome hopefully i can drill you and Kawigirl and the rest for some tips, as i plan on trying to learn some more pieces.

Le Onde mp3

http://www.box.net/shared/5t1oot7ium
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/03/09 04:07 PM

Thanks! If you've read much of this thread, you'll know that I am the *last* person to give you any tips on Le Onde because it has been my nemesis Einaudi piece.

I have to say I am extremely impressed by your playing if this is your very first (and so far only) piece you've ever played in piano.
Posted by: tekkie

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/03/09 04:09 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
But what confuses me is that if you do so, how does one easily tell that it's really G major Mixolydian mode and not C major? Or do you just have to look at the chord progressions and the fact that the G major chord is so prominent to deduce that it's not C major? [/b]
I looked at the chord progression, melody, and cadence to guess that it wasn't C Major. I think this should work in most cases. However, there could be ambiguities in some modes - see the "ambiguity" section on this Wikipedia page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lydian_mode

I've been looking into modes the last few days, and found they're more common than I thought. Wikipedia gives notable songs in each mode. I also recently signed up at Quiescence Music which teaches new age improv, and the instructor uses examples with modes, particularly D Dorian.

It'll be interesting to see how many of Einaudi's pieces use modes.
Posted by: NeNiRi

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/03/09 04:33 PM

Ty so much Monica, i have read through the forum and iv seen that you think Le Onde is your achilles heel but i have heard your other tracks and loved them.

It really is the only tune iv played more than a bar of but i have played it mb 2000 times its driving my wife nuts. So i will now put it down and start working on something else or mb the bits that are missing.

I loved your rendition of I due Fiumi and it might be the next one i try. (any tips on this?)

I like Giorni Dispari but i dont have the sheet music for that so it will have to wait.

Are you playing on a regular acousic or digital?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/03/09 08:55 PM

I due Fiumi will be a cakewalk for you if you can play Le Onde that well.

You might as well go ahead and buy the "Best of" sheet music collection. It's a bargain at the price, and it sounds like you're hopelessly hooked on Einaudi like the rest of us. Besides, it could save your marriage. \:D

p.s. I have an acoustic, a Mason and Hamlin 5'8" grand. It was my midlife crisis indulgence. \:D
Posted by: NeNiRi

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 05:31 AM

Lovely must be nice. Im going to start on I Due Fiumi today. Ty for taking the time to chat. I look forward to contributing to the Einaudi chat.

;\)
Posted by: NeNiRi

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 01:43 PM

Monica or anyone who knows when do you pedal in I Due Fiumi?

It seems to suggets the first bar then stops??

sounds better with the pedal?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 02:10 PM

A lot of times in Einaudi's music he just shows pedal marks for places where there might be some question about whether to pedal, and then he assumes you'll pedal all the rest naturally.

I pedal with chord changes throughout all Einaudi pieces, including I due fiumi.
Posted by: Triryche

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 02:22 PM

So I look up The Best of Einaudi on amazon

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Ludovico-Einaudi-Piano-Solo/dp/0634078917

Am I missing something or is this some type of ridiculous price gouging?
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 02:25 PM

Hey NeNiRi, I haven't been here in awhile but glad I had checked in as I had a listen to you play Le Onde and you've done a fantastic job

Monica, hope you guys have your electricity back and that everything is back to normal.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 02:55 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Triryche:
So I look up The Best of Einaudi on amazon

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Ludovico-Einaudi-Piano-Solo/dp/0634078917

Am I missing something or is this some type of ridiculous price gouging? [/b]
I find the 'used or new' prices on amazon quite erratic. Sometimes you can get something much cheaper, other times you react like:

[One of my favourite cd's is currently on amazon.co.uk for around $300. Definately an ]

Have a look around - maybe musicroom.com has the book?
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 02:59 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Triryche:
So I look up The Best of Einaudi on amazon

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Ludovico-Einaudi-Piano-Solo/dp/0634078917

Am I missing something or is this some type of ridiculous price gouging? [/b]
Ouch. Looks like it is out of stock on amazon for now. I hope they will get it back in stock soon. The current low price from a third party seller is $98.98 with the other one over $300. I doubt anybody will be buying that one any time soon. I almost wonder if they meant to list it for something just over $30 but messed up with that one. I wonder how much my autographed version would be worth even though I wouldn't sell it now. \:\)

There is one other sheet music collection that Einaudi has out but I don't think it has as much in it as the Best Of collection.
Posted by: Triryche

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 03:00 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Euan Morrison:
Have a look around - maybe musicroom.com has the book? [/b]
Yeah, I found many sources for under $30.
Posted by: NeNiRi

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 03:38 PM

Ty Kawai Girl

May i say you play rather well yourself!!!(to put it mildly)

Do you memorize the tracks and play? or sight read?
Posted by: NeNiRi

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 03:40 PM

Hi to Euan too, i like your music also. Are you a Scot, im from Aberdeen?
Posted by: NeNiRi

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 03:51 PM

Oops forgot to say tx to Monica for pedal tips

il shut up now
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 04:11 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Euan Morrison:
[One of my favourite cd's is currently on amazon.co.uk for around $300. Definately an ] [/b]
Okay, I'll admit to being curious enough to bite: What CD is that, Euan?
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 04:31 PM

NeNiRi - Hi to you too. Yeah, I'm living in Fife and working in Edinburgh at the moment. Spent 5 happy years at uni in Aberdeen, though! Which part of the city are you from?

Monica - http://www.amazon.co.uk/Memoryhouse/dp/B000067UCZ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1233782997&sr=8-1

It's the Max Richter album Memoryhouse. It went out of 'print', but it gets re-issued next month \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 04:34 PM

Okay, I already have it, phew. (If I didn't, I would've had to order it, as I am confident that I would love an album that was designated as "Euan's favorite," whatever that may turn out to be. \:\) )

Incidentally, I just ordered Preisner's "Requiem for My Friend." What other albums of his would you recommend?
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/04/09 04:57 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
Okay, I already have it, phew. (If I didn't, I would've had to order it, as I am confident that I would love an album that was designated as "Euan's favorite," whatever that may turn out to be. \:\) )

Incidentally, I just ordered Preisner's "Requiem for My Friend." What other albums of his would you recommend? [/b]
Geez, I'm blushing now! In fact, Memoryhouse is my actual favourite. I love the darkness of it. Plus it was a 'blind buy', I bought it without listening first and I still remember the first time I put it in the stereo.

I don't have the Requiem album actually. It's more vocal music. With Preisner, I definately recommend the '10 Easy Pieces for Piano', or 'Preisner's Music' which is a sort-of 'best of'.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/06/09 01:52 AM

Since we've had the Einaudi thread dug up recently, I'll add that there are some excellent videos of a recent concert from Italy with Ludovico Einaudi and Ballake Sissoko doing songs from the album "Diario Mali" along with Ludovico doing a few solo pieces. I made a playlist on youtube in order to allow easy access to all the songs and to enable them to be played easily in order. Out of the solo pieces, track 8 is interesting as it may be a work in progress of a piece for Ludovico's upcoming album. It doesn't sound familiar at all. There are two other pieces that don't sound very familiar (6 and 13) with Ballake Sissoko playing along. Some of those observations were made over on the Einaudi Forums. Anyway, enough babble. If you've got some great time I find these tracks make excellent background music.

Concert footage (13 videos worth)

Just note that I didn't take the videos so feel free to leave a thank you for the person that did take the time to record and upload these.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/06/09 08:28 AM

Thanks, Anthony!! It's helpful to have them all put together in a playlist. \:\)

Last night I bought an Einaudi soundtrack off iTunes: "Sotto Falso Nome." I'm sometimes a bit leery of soundtracks, but this one is well worth buying if you're an Einaudi fan. It's more minimalist in tone (mostly... though there's also at least one TECHNO track! ), and definitely more brooding and ominous and haunting in tone. I have no idea what the movie is about, but I'm guessing it's some dark psychological thriller.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/20/09 09:20 AM

Thanks to the inspiring efforts of many here on AB forum[1], I have finally joined the 21st century and figured out how to post videos on YouTube. Here's the two Einaudi pieces I've put up so far:

I due Fiumi

Nuvole Bianche

In both cases, the video track comes from the Flip and the audio track is from my Zoom, laboriously and crudely spliced onto the video using Windows Movie Maker.

I heard in another thread that Zoom is going to come out with a combined audio/video recorder this summer. I'm going to start saving up for it even though I just bought the Flip because this editing stuff is making me pull my hair out.

[1]Among others, Anthony for being a good role model and posting his Einaudi recordings on YouTube; Lisztener for encouraging me to YouTube myself; Agilita for introducing me to the Flip Mino; and AnotherSchmoe for posting the sample Flip videos that convinced me to spring for it. \:\)
Posted by: Triryche

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/20/09 10:17 AM

Bravo!!
Posted by: wj3

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/23/09 04:29 PM

Wow!!!! I really enjoyed those. I also watched your performance of "Watching their Flocks".. I only hope that someday I'll be able to play as well....Thank you and keep them comming.....
Posted by: Mr Super-Hunky

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/23/09 11:04 PM

Very nice Monica. Both pieces were great and I noticed your memorization of them. The Mason really sounds great too.

You have motivated me to attempt a recording but it will have to be with a digital camera as the zoom has no video....yet!.
Posted by: Key Notes

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 02/26/09 01:17 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Monica K.:
Thanks to the inspiring efforts of many here on AB forum[1], I have finally joined the 21st century and figured out how to post videos on YouTube. Here's the two Einaudi pieces I've put up so far:

I due Fiumi

Nuvole Bianche

In both cases, the video track comes from the Flip and the audio track is from my Zoom, laboriously and crudely spliced onto the video using Windows Movie Maker.

I heard in another thread that Zoom is going to come out with a combined audio/video recorder this summer. I'm going to start saving up for it even though I just bought the Flip because this editing stuff is making me pull my hair out.

[1]Among others, Anthony for being a good role model and posting his Einaudi recordings on YouTube; Lisztener for encouraging me to YouTube myself; Agilita for introducing me to the Flip Mino; and AnotherSchmoe for posting the sample Flip videos that convinced me to spring for it. \:\) [/b]
Hi Monica,

Congrats on your successes with these YouTube videos! It's very nice seeing you again, and even nicer to watch you play these Einaudi pieces. I can see why "Nuvole Bianche" is one of your favorites. It's such a beautiful piece. Well done!

Key Notes \:\)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/06/09 09:25 PM

Something funny happened the other night. I was working late on a book I'm editing, and I was emailing the production editor with some questions. He emailed right back, and when I responded, I said "we are both working WAAAAY too late." He then wrote back that he got more done after hours and, besides, he was enjoying just kicking back and listening to "Divenire" by Einaudi while working. shocked The funny thing is that he had no idea of the piano- and Einaudi-part of my life... I publish as "Harris" (my maiden name) and that's who he thought I was. I naturally informed him straightaway that I was Einaudi's #1 fan and sent him my YouTube links and talked about the concert and everything. So now he probably thinks I'm rather strange, but it was still pretty neat to discover that Einaudi's fan base in the U.S. is spreading. smile
Posted by: Motorama

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/07/09 11:38 AM

I'm really starting to think that hand size matters after all.
I have childish hands (male) and on bar 78 I can't hold the high B while playing B-C notes with thumb and index.

I'd like to see someone with small hands making videos to show you can play anything even if your hands are small, till then I'm ready to believe it makes a huge difference and playing piano harder.

frown
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/07/09 11:41 AM

Bar 78 of what piece, Motorama? Sometimes I have to rearrange chords in certain Einaudi pieces or pick up a note with the other hand. If it's a piece I've played I can look to see how I handled that measure. smile
Posted by: Motorama

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/07/09 11:50 AM

Sorry, bar 78 of Nefeli.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/07/09 08:57 PM

I don't think hand size is really an issue here.

I've not played this piece but what I'm pretty sure will help is the sustain pedal. I know it's not usually printed on Einaudi scores but it should generally be used. The only time they usually will add pedal notation is when you need to be holding down pedal for different lengths of time for certain measures.

I hope you have fun learning Nefeli.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/07/09 09:22 PM

That section of Nefeli only calls for octave stretches, though it can be a little uncomfortable or awkward because you're holding down the top key while doing the alternating eighth notes with your thumb and index finger. With practice that stretch should become easier.

Also, the more you play piano, the more your ligaments etc. will stretch, and you will actually find yourself being able to reach more than you could before.

You may also want to experiment with using the sustain pedal, as Anthony suggested, so that you only have to hit that top note once and then you can concentrate on the other notes.
Posted by: Motorama

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/08/09 11:49 PM

Originally Posted By: Monica K.
That section of Nefeli only calls for octave stretches, though it can be a little uncomfortable or awkward because you're holding down the top key while doing the alternating eighth notes with your thumb and index finger. With practice that stretch should become easier.


These are pics of my hands



As you can see from the first pic when the thumb and index are in the right position the fifth finger doesn't reach the high B


In this second picture I show where the index would naturally place if the fifth finger is in the right playing position. As you can see the index is on F so to reach C it should be moved 4 notes below. When I move it below automatically the fifth finger gets displaced and ends up with the tip on A rather than B.

Besides, seconds pic shows how far my thumb can go, it's its maximum.

What you think?
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/09/09 02:56 PM

Motorama,

I would suggest you're making things unnecessarily difficult for yourself. If you look closely at how the passage in question is actually played:
  • The sustain pedal is depressed
  • The octave is played, thumb and 5th finger
  • The alternating eighth notes are played
  • The sustain pedal is released, you move to the next octave and repeat the sequence.

In other words, since you don't release the sustain pedal after hitting the octave, the note you play with your little finger continues to sound. When playing this passage, focus on playing the octave clearly (which your hand can span) then completely removing your pinkie from the key and playing the alternating eighth notes.

Although I can span an 11th and can play the section in question with my thumb and pinkie in place, it's much easier this way. Try it!

Edited to add: One thing that sounds kind of nice and is also a good way to practice this is to play the note with your pinkie slightly louder than the one with your thumb when playing the octave. It makes the melody line more apparent and is helps to practice the press and release.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/09/09 10:00 PM

Monica, since Le Onde is (was? I think you've conquered it) your Waterloo, can you answer a question for me on it? How do you handle measures 17 / 18?

My teacher does a recital in June, and I am determined to play Le Onde in it. (If I fail, I can always fall back on I Due Fiumi...)
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/09/09 11:15 PM

Originally Posted By: Always Wanted to Play Piano
Monica, since Le Onde is (was? I think you've conquered it) your Waterloo, can you answer a question for me on it? How do you handle measures 17 / 18?


I'm not Monica (although I aspire to be, one day laugh ) but could you elaborate a bit more on what you want to know about measures 17/18?
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/10/09 12:03 AM

Fair enough. In 17 and 18 (and 19, and others like it), do you go 54321 w/ the left hand?
Posted by: BB Player

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/10/09 01:50 AM

Originally Posted By: Always Wanted to Play Piano
Fair enough. In 17 and 18 (and 19, and others like it), do you go 54321 w/ the left hand?


OK, now I understand your question. No, I don't play them 54321 with the left hand. They are both played 52132. In measure 17, the left hand is gdgab. You play the gdg 521, pivot on your thumb (1) and play the ab with your middle and second finger (32).

Practice the left hand alone moving your hand and arm until you get a nice flowing motion up the keyboard. Much easier and more accurate than 54321!

Hope this helps!

p.s. Perhaps we should add a whole new category of answer for all questions on the forum - WWMD. What Would Monica Do? laugh
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/10/09 09:25 AM

LOL!! Actually, the WWMD for all things "Le Onde" is swear and gnash my teeth a lot! laugh And I wouldn't say "conquer" is the right verb... maybe "satisficing" instead. Or perhaps "surrendering."

Greg's fingering for 17 and 18 is what I use, too, AWTPP.

Good luck with your recital! "Le Onde" is such a beautiful piece, but so is "I due fiumi," so you'd be set with either one.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/10/09 09:36 AM

difference being that I can actually play IDF. On the other hand, it seems very few people have heard any of his music, so in amongst the typical recital stand-byes (Bach Two Part Inventions, things from method books, and what have you) the music is going to stand out enough as it is.

Gonna head straight over to the piano now and give this a try. Thanks everyone for your help.
Posted by: flyingfroggy

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/12/09 11:17 PM

For those of us who have not wanted to shell out over $300 for a used copy of "The Best of Ludovico Einaudi," I just discovered that it is expected to be back in stock at Amazon.com on March 17, for $26.56 including free shipping! I ordered a copy.
Posted by: NeNiRi

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/17/09 07:44 PM

Hi all im getting annoyed an frustrated.

I have played(the bit i can play) of LeOnde about a million times, i love the tune! But im wondering how to make it sound really good, like Kwai Girl's version or Einaudi's.

Mine just does not sound as punchy, im trying to work out why that is.

Is it my timing-too much (speeding and slowing)?

Inconsistent touch (tones not even)?

Playing the hands together improperly(i play from memory)?

Im not talking about the obvious mistakes (which there are a good few) but the the bits that are running well but dont sound right?


Maybe iv just played it too many times but i want to play it gooood!! (properly)

http://www.box.net/shared/drjc21zbid

tx Einaudi fans
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/17/09 08:10 PM

NeNiRi, I thought your version of "Le Onde" was very, very good!! thumb Maybe not in Einaudi's or Kawaigirl's league, but then again, few of us mere mortals are. grin

I wish I had some concrete advice to give you to make your already nice rendition even better, but it took me a very long time to get to close to where you are. The main difference I hear is that Einaudi's version accents the melody notes a shade more than you're doing, I think.
Posted by: NeNiRi

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/17/09 08:24 PM

Ty Monica,

kind words and i liked your YouTube vids, you give so much to this forum, i have noticed that you always have time for people.

I shall take your advice and try to accent more. I dont know what it is about kwai girls play? but to me i think it's her tempo. I think mine sucks and also she plays they keys really solid i feel that every other note is slightly (non solid)

Every time i try to use a metronome i play like a robot but i feel i use way too much speeding and slowing.

best wishes
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/17/09 08:41 PM

Listen to Einaudi, though, and you'll hear that he plays with tremendous rubato (variation in tempo). I don't think you want to play "Le Onde" too strictly according to the metronome. I think your tempo is slightly slower overall than how Einaudi plays, but not excessively so.
Posted by: kennychaffin

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/30/09 11:55 AM

Originally Posted By: Monica K.
...
.....

Nuvole Bianche

...


Wow. Excellent! This has got to be another one on my "Must Learn" list.
Posted by: kennychaffin

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/30/09 12:04 PM

Originally Posted By: NeNiRi
Hi all im getting annoyed an frustrated.
....
Maybe iv just played it too many times but i want to play it gooood!! (properly)

http://www.box.net/shared/drjc21zbid

tx Einaudi fans




Sounds wonderful to me. Much subtly in this that you are handling very well!
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/30/09 02:22 PM

I'm just starting out with Le Onde, with an eye towards performing it publicly at a recital in June. I must admit, it's slow going.

Don't have any specific questions, just an update. Frankly, I think the piece is beyond me, but I like it too much to set it aside so soon.
Posted by: Rodney

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/31/09 02:16 PM

Just started with Le Onde last night (yes I'm VERY late to the Einaudi party) and already I'm looking for some suggestions.

Let's start with bar 5:

I've tried fingering the melody (looks like the notes of a broken D9 chord to me {D. F#, C#, E, A, D}) and have a few methods that seem to work.

1) p, i, r, t, m, t
2) p, t, r, t, m, t
3) p, t, p, t, m, t
4) p, i, p, t, m, t

Where:

t = thumb
i = index
m = middle
r = ring
p = pinky


Since this pattern is repeated a lot, I want to be sure that I'm getting the optimal one into my fingers. Perhaps there is another fingering pattern I didn't think of which would work better?? Thoughts???

Rodney
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/31/09 02:49 PM

Hi Rodney,

I tend to go p,t,r,t,i,t.

However, looking at my hands while I play it, it seems to make no sense. So looking at your charts, the nearest 'sensible' way for me would be 2), only I use a larger i,t stretch instead of m,t
Posted by: Rodney

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/31/09 03:05 PM

Hi Euan,

#2 was my first choice but for some reason I found #1 & #3 to be smoother for some reason.
Posted by: Thorium

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/31/09 03:12 PM

I'd never heard of Ludovico Einaudi! Thanks! Lovely music. Reminds me of Philip Glass'. And great job, Monica!
Posted by: Tar

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/31/09 03:14 PM

Hi NeNiRi,

Beautifully played! I second the praises you've had above, well deserved! It's really refreshing to hear Einaudi (or indeed, any equivalent style) played well: the music may be simple to learn but it's this very simplicity that makes it so difficult to pull off a good performance.

My comments
1) Maybe a little less when you're "resolving". Whenever you're returning from A minor to B you tend to crescendo. To my ears it should be the other way round: it's much more magical when the "home" chord is less.

2) The rubato was getting quite "predictable" after a while. It might be because the music is repetitive and each time the same passage occurs you apply the same rubato (was that the intent?). Maybe a little creativity at this front will boost from a "beautiful" performance of this piece to an "breathtaking" one.

3) A matter of taste: a little less left hand would be so nice.

4) Again, a matter of taste: two instances of the passage with the F6->G->D progression (1:13, 3:42). Your interpretation says that the F6 chord should be important and therefore there should be a crescendo leading to it and a diminuendo away from it. Another way to show your appreciation of that beautiful harmony is to actually diminuendo into that F6. Again, it makes people listen harder. And since there're two instances, maybe do the first one with a dim and the second with a cresc?

I think the general observation is that less is more in a case like this. A lot of what I've said are my personal taste. In any case, I think it was superbly performed. Congratulations!
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/31/09 04:36 PM

Thanks for the nice words, Thorium, and welcome to the forum! smile If you make your way through this mega-thread, you will be a hard-core Einaudi fan. thumb I agree that his music is reminiscent of Glass's, but even prettier, in the sense of being more melodic.

Rodney, I'm away from my piano, but I'll try to take a look tonight and see what fingering I use for those measures. I *think* I use #2 but I have been woefully wrong before trying to recall fingering away from the piano. grin
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 03/31/09 09:06 PM

Hey Rodney... I just sat down at the bench. Forget what I said about using #2. The fingering I *actually* use isn't one of your options. Instead, I play:

5-1-4-1-2-1, or p-t-r-t-i-t, exactly the same as Euan. smile

[Monica swears NEVER to answer a fingering question away from the piano again. blush ]
Posted by: drm13

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/01/09 01:20 AM

Hi,

I recently caught Einauditis. Having read several people comparing his music to Glass's, I thought I'd check him out too. I listened to snippets of several songs, and formed the opinion that shattering glass sounds closer to Einaudi than Philip Glass. Is there a certain album of his I should check out or should I wait for the Ludovico virus to subside?

Thanks,

Dave
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/01/09 09:12 AM

Welcome to the forum, drm13, and welcome to Eindaudi addiction. smile You can start with the "Echoes" best of collection, or the La Scala concert (which I think is almost better), but I must warn you that Einaudi addiction is a progressive disease, and you will find yourself wanting to buy everything he ever recorded, not to mention paying large sums of money to fly across the country to hear him play live... grin

Actually, the Echoes collection was released before his latest albums, which are some of his best, so you might want to buy Una Mattina or Divenire instead of that. Or in addition to. wink
Posted by: drm13

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/02/09 10:20 AM


Hi Monica,

Sorry, my post was confusing. I did already purchase a few Einaudi CDs (Le Onde, I Giorni), and I'm saving my pennies for more. My question was more about Glass -- Which of Glass's CDs remind people of Einaudi, because to me they are like night & day.

Thanks,

Dave
Posted by: Thorium

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/02/09 11:46 AM

drm13,

Some of his works for larger ensembles are very "out there", true, but the stuff for solo piano has much of the same elegant simplicity as Einaudi's, IMO. Glass is bit darker though, and perhaps more dissonant, and probably a truer example of Minimalism.

Have you heard his Etudes, and the Metamorphosis piano cycle?
Posted by: drm13

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/03/09 11:57 AM


No, I will go hunt them down. Thx, Thorium.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/03/09 01:50 PM

drm13,

I really like the music he wrote for the film The Hours:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1R-bDSAl6ME
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/15/09 05:12 PM

Good news and bad news on my progress on Le Onde. The good news is that I think I learned how to make it more musical. He (and those of you who play it so nicely) undergoes dynamic changes within phrases, in order to accentuate the sensation of wavelike movement. Starting in the very first measure, he crescendo's pretty significantly starting at the beginning of the measure, through the end of it. Then quiet again to begin the second measure, crescendo through it, and so forth. Conversely, in measure 5, the dynamics fall as the measure progresses. The D,C#,A progression gets progressively quiet as the measure progresses, then the pattern repeats. I am sure you all picked up on this a long time ago, but for me, it was a revelation.

Now the bad news: upon discovering this, I basically am in a position of completely relearning the piece. There is no way on God's green earth I will have it ready six weeks from now, for my piano teacher's annual student recital. Maybe good enough to play it for my children, but certainly not good enough to play it in public, in front of people I don't know.

Returning my attention, then, to IDF, which I always knew I could fall back on, should I need it.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/15/09 10:43 PM

Welcome to the "got my butt kicked by Le Onde club." grin

In all seriousness, I think your realization may be a blessing in disguise. "I due fiumi" is a much safer bet to play in a high stress context like a recital, and imo it's even prettier than "Le Onde." I'm sure your teacher and the other audience members will love it. thumb
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/27/09 12:50 PM

Oh boy! I just got an email announcing the May 12 release date of Einaudi's next album, Cloudland, as part of the new group he formed with Robert & Ronald Lippok called "Whitetree."

http://media.hmusa.com/listeningparty/whitetree/

If you click on that link it will bring up an ad along with a online player so you can hear snippets. It's a bit more experimental and ambient than his usual solo piano fare, but that won't stop me from buying it. wink

It looks like Whitetree will be performing live in New York (June 2) and L.A. (June 6), so any of you Einaudi fans lucky enough to live in or near those cities might want to look into it. I've already blown my budget for traveling to see Einaudi for the year, unfortunately.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/27/09 12:57 PM

I've had the album downloaded from iTunes for ages now as I had an iTunes gift card from Christmas. (Besides, when you've got an iPod singed by Einaudi it should have his stuff on it!)

I will say that I find the album quite listenable and it's a good break from his normal work. I think I'll give it another listen later on today since I've been working hard on the recital piece and can use some tracks to take a break in between practice sessions.
Posted by: kennychaffin

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/27/09 01:40 PM

I just got "Echos" over the weekend.

smile
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/27/09 03:49 PM

Did anyone ever figure out the music for his experimental wanderings on the La Scala version of I Due Fiumi? Man, I like that part. Maybe my piano teacher and I can figure it out. She's good with stuff like that.

But I figured I would ask here first. Seems like this has come up before.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/27/09 05:10 PM

There was a thread about the La Scala version of I due fiumi on the Einaudi forum, in which nobody volunteered the transcription for the new coda, but I haven't checked it lately. I absolutely LOVE that version and am determined to play it one way or the other, but I would infinitely prefer it to be the lazy way (e.g., waiting for AW2PP's teacher to figure it out for us) vs. the hard way (e.g., me figuring it out for myself). wink
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/28/09 05:26 PM

Uploading now to the iPod, Monica. Piano lessons are (checks clock) in 2 hours. We'll see how this goes.

My hope is that the patterns are simply excursions on themes developed elsewhere in the piece.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/28/09 08:03 PM

If you do manage to get just the notes for that section I could try to type them up into notation.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/28/09 08:57 PM

No luck this evening, we ran out of time. I'll try to work it out this week.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 04/30/09 12:58 PM

A thousand pardons if this video has already been posted here. (I tried searching for it and didn't find it, but I will be the first to admit that I have trouble working with this new search feature).

This is a video of Einaudi performing Divenire live. He evidently produced and posted the video himself, and it's very well done. I especially liked the still shots that were interspersed in the video. The video also does a good job of showing what a live performance by Einaudi is like--he merges sections of different pieces together into a medley.

Anyway, enjoy!

Posted by: Norah

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/23/09 08:56 PM

I purchased the single Le Onde and really enjoy playing it. It is quite surprising how in certain sections, the flow of notes suddenly fits perfectly into place. So now, I thought I would try I Due Fiumi. I have tried to locate a download online and through my local music store but can't find it. Is it only available in a book? I probably will buy the book in September but would like to have IDF now to work on over the summer. And....so I don't sound like an idiot, how do you pronounce his name?
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/23/09 10:02 PM

Welcome to the Einaudi thread Norah.

His first name is pretty much how you would think it would sound. The last name sort of sounds like "Eye-now-di"

I didn't have much luck looking for a digital download of "I Due Fiumi" on many of the popular online music stores. I will say it is in the "Best of Ludovico Einaudi" book that is available from Amazon. It looks like it runs just over $25 Canadian. Quite a steal for 36 songs worth of sheet music. I got it right when I started learning piano as I wanted some encouragement.

I would rather invest in getting the whole book before you spend a bunch on single sheet scores that will end up in a book you might purchase anyway! smile

Plus, you might get done learning I Due Fiumi well before the summer is over! Then whatever would you do?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/24/09 04:02 PM

I agree with Anthony. If you've polished up Le Onde, I due fiumi will be a cakewalk. "The best of" book is a tremendous bargain. It contains the sheet music to all the pieces on his first three albums. And there's not a clunker in the bunch. thumb
Posted by: Norah

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 05/28/09 03:53 PM

Thank you Anthony and Monica for your replies. Perhaps I should buy the book this summer. And....I hope I didn't give anyone the impression that I had mastered Le Onde. lol. Far from it!
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/11/09 02:26 PM

I posted my recital clip (I Due Fiumi, played last Friday):

http://aw2pp.blogspot.com/2009/06/my-recital-piece.html
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/11/09 04:19 PM

Oh, I'm so glad you posted this, AW2PP!! I had forgotten exactly when your recital was, but I was thinking the other day that it was right around now.

I know you said in your blog that you were shaking the whole time, but I can tell you that it sure isn't noticeable to the audience! You look very calm, and very focused! I thought you did a great job... only a minor bobble here or there, which people not familiar with the piece probably wouldn't have noticed.

What a huge rite of passage for you! Congratulations! thumb And how nice that you were able to share the experience with Jillian. (Who looks like an angel in those photos on your blog, by the way. smile )
Posted by: jotur

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/11/09 06:05 PM

Congratulations! I'll have to admit that the first thing I did was laugh, because I always laugh when people are twice my height laugh Then I saw your notice about the NBA. I'm more Jillian's size, myself. But both of you were great!

Cathy
Posted by: Sundew

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/12/09 03:05 AM

That was very nice AW2PP. The more I hear this piece the more it grows on me.Thanks for sharing. :o)
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/12/09 09:33 AM

Thanks, all!

I'm now in a "Now what?" phase. Over the last month, I have been spending most of my piano time working on IDF. I let Alfred's Book 2 slide, and I haven't been working on any fun pieces. I've tinkered a little with I Giorni, seems approachable enough.
Posted by: Norah

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/12/09 12:31 PM

Just a thought about Le Onde and if it has already come up before....my apologies. I seem to remember someone having difficulty in keeping the strong RH notes emphasized, D C A D C A etc. The second note, in this case, the C, IMO has a tendency to fade as we play. If you make a concerted effort to bring out that second note in all the runs, it is surprising how it all seems to come together much easier.
Posted by: Norah

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/12/09 12:40 PM

That was beautiful. The more I listen to his music, the more I enjoy it. I never perform in situations like that and always admire people who do. The increased confidence in your own abilities after a recital must be huge.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/12/09 08:12 PM

Originally Posted By: Norah
If you make a concerted effort to bring out that second note in all the runs, it is surprising how it all seems to come together much easier.


hmmm.... I'll have to give that a try. smile

I haven't played Le Onde in months. I know at some point I will dig it out (yet again) and try to get a better recording of it (yet again).

AWTPP, I think "I giorni" is an excellent next step. I found it only a little bit harder than "I due fiumi." The hardest part for me was playing the delicate arpeggios in the last part softly enough without skipping a note, and then voicing the chords in the last couple of lines. I'm used to emphasizing the highest note on a chord, but in this case, it's the middle note you have to emphasize.

(p.s. Oh, and I couldn't reach some of the big chords at the end and had to rearrange them, which sounded fine.)
Posted by: Motorama

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/19/09 01:28 PM

In "Le Onde" I can't hear a difference between holding the first note, of the two eight notes figure, while playing the second or releasing the first note while I play the second.

Talking about (D-F#, C#-E, A-D)
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/19/09 10:59 PM

Originally Posted By: Monica K.
[

AWTPP, I think "I giorni" is an excellent next step. I found it only a little bit harder than "I due fiumi." The hardest part for me was playing the delicate arpeggios in the last part softly enough without skipping a note, and then voicing the chords in the last couple of lines. I'm used to emphasizing the highest note on a chord, but in this case, it's the middle note you have to emphasize.

(p.s. Oh, and I couldn't reach some of the big chords at the end and had to rearrange them, which sounded fine.)


Ok, talk to me about this .... I just came across measure 86, and thought to myself, "Ok, there is no way Monica can play this without rearranging the chord." I could maybe reach it, but it would be hit or miss. Then there is the same reach in measures 186 and 187 at the very end... is this what you are talking about?

Can anybody here play these measures as written, and if so, how?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/19/09 11:55 PM

I'm out of town right now, AWTPP, so I don't have the book in front of me. But I'm pretty sure those are the chords I was talking about. And I'm also without a piano frown so I can't even say for sure how I re-arrange them. I think what I did was take the bottom note and move it up an octave, so it would then fit in between the other two notes. But that's going by highly imperfect memory, so I won't guarantee it.

If you don't have it figured out by the 25th (when I get back), shoot me a PM and remind me to tell you more specifically how I resolved it.
Posted by: edfairs

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - Le Onde PEDAL - 06/23/09 01:59 PM

Hi,

I'm learning Le onde, and have come pretty far with it, perfecting it quite well. I can play up to the part where the right hand 3 -step structure moves up an octave, and it gets faster/louder.

Anyway, i was wondering, how do you use the pedal for this piece, as my sheet music doesn't indicate with any sort of number system.

Thanks,
Ed
Posted by: edfairs

Ludovico Einaudi Le onde PEDAL - 06/23/09 02:00 PM

Hi,

I'm learning Le onde, and have come pretty far with it, perfecting it quite well. I can play up to the part where the right hand 3 -step structure moves up an octave, and it gets faster/louder.

Anyway, i was wondering, how do you use the pedal for this piece, as my sheet music doesn't indicate with any sort of number system.

Thanks,
Ed
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/23/09 03:03 PM

Originally Posted By: Always Wanted to Play Piano


Ok, talk to me about this .... I just came across measure 86, and thought to myself, "Ok, there is no way Monica can play this without rearranging the chord." I could maybe reach it, but it would be hit or miss. Then there is the same reach in measures 186 and 187 at the very end... is this what you are talking about?

Can anybody here play these measures as written, and if so, how?


I recorded this one probably around a year ago. From what I recall, I did manage the large chords as written. However, my fingers were taking the scenic route, and hanging off the edge of the keyboard, rather than going straight over the top of the keys!
Posted by: mwf

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/23/09 03:29 PM

I have some Einaudi performances on my youtube page, Passaggio, Le onde, Divenire, Primavera, in un altra vita and Questa Notte. Cheers
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/23/09 06:15 PM

Hi mwf,

Bit of a random question here, but do you know any other pianists from the Peterborough area? I did some work in that area of the country in 2008, and spent a week working with a young piano student called Richard Allum. I think he must have been around 22 or 23 yrs old. He gave me a cd of his playing which was fantastic.

According to his website:
He was a Finalist in the European Piano Teachers’ Association Piano Competition in 2007 (2nd prize) and 2008 (1st prize), and was awarded a double scholarship to study at the 2008 Birmingham Interntional Piano Academy with John Lill, Peter Donohoe and Piers Lane.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi Le onde PEDAL - 06/24/09 07:30 PM

Originally Posted By: edfairs
Hi,

I'm learning Le onde, and have come pretty far with it, perfecting it quite well. I can play up to the part where the right hand 3 -step structure moves up an octave, and it gets faster/louder.

Anyway, i was wondering, how do you use the pedal for this piece, as my sheet music doesn't indicate with any sort of number system.

Thanks,
Ed


Welcome to the forum, Ed! smile

Einaudi's sheet music rarely indicates pedaling (but I play close attention when it does). What I do--and I believe it's consistent with what Einaudi does on his recording--is pedal with chord changes.

Good luck with Le Onde! It's a toughie, all right.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/25/09 01:41 PM

Originally Posted By: Euan Morrison


I recorded this one probably around a year ago. From what I recall, I did manage the large chords as written. However, my fingers were taking the scenic route, and hanging off the edge of the keyboard, rather than going straight over the top of the keys!


Ya, that is pretty much how I am going about it.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/25/09 04:15 PM

Wow, mwf! Thanks to the link to your YouTube channel and the covers of the Einaudi pieces. Those are beautiful. Am I correct that your intro to "Divenire" is played by ear and rather different from the sheet music? I think your rendition sounds even closer to the recording than the sheet music version. (I'd ask if you had a transcription of that section, except that it sounds even HARDER than the sheet music, and I have a hard enough time with that! laugh )

p.s. I'm listening right now to your transcription of the "Transformers" soundtrack... just stunning. thumb
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/29/09 09:51 AM

New question on I Giorni. Beginning with measure 82, there are some 8th notes that... how shall I explain it... alternate back and forth between two fingers and one. I am sure there is a standard way to do this, but (no surprise) Alfred's Book 2 doesn't cover it.

How do you do the RH in 82-86? For the life of me, I can't figure a way to make it smooth.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/29/09 01:43 PM

Strangely, when I first started practicing Dietro Casa a while ago I had a similar problem playing with certain fingers together. I guess I had gotten so used to either a chord or one note at a time that it was quite tricky to do!

What you may want to start with for this section is to practice hitting all three notes together. Then try hitting the two then the one. In that last section the thumb appears to be doing duty moving between the D and the E.

Anyway, here's what I came up with a few minutes of practice on that part. I've never played this section before and it sounds pretty strange until towards the end when it gets a bit more recognizable with the ending interval chord and arpeggio. I may have played it with the style of the ending of the song, I couldn't help myself there. wink

Here's my attempt at measures 82-87

The main hurdle I had with playing this section was just trying to start out as the E is used right in the beginning then the thumb goes to D. I kept starting out hitting the D as my hand wanted to revert back to that position right away...

Good luck learning the rest of the song aw2pp!
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/29/09 02:48 PM

Thanks, AnthonyB. I have been alternating between 2/5 - 1, as you suggest, and couldn't get it to sound smooth. I will try your suggestion about starting with all three notes first, and just play it over and over until it gets smooth.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/29/09 05:27 PM

Okay, I finally got home to my book so I could look up those measures. I use the fingering you describe: For measures 82-84, I use 2&5 alternating with my thumb. For measures 85-86, I initially tried to keep that fingering, but the stretch was way too hard for me, so I ultimately ended up using my thumb to hit all the low notes. These were the hardest measures to get smooth, but the nice thing about "I giorni" is that you're really not going too fast at that part so it is doable.

In addition to Anthony's suggestion, just try tapping that 2&5 vs. 1 rhythm out on the table (or steering wheel... whatever) whenever you've got a few spare seconds, and you'll eventually find it coming naturally.
Posted by: Woody-Woodruff

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/29/09 05:42 PM

Monica,
I have heard all of your YouTube recordings (and loved them) and I would like to start my Einaudi experience. Is his music about as difficult as David Nevue's? Which book do I start with?
Thanks,
Woody
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/29/09 06:56 PM

You are very sweet, Woody, though I suggest that for the TRUE Einaudi experience that you listen to HIS recordings, not mine. laugh

Definitely get the "Best of Einaudi" book... it's the most bang for the buck and has the full range of difficulty from very easy to downright hard. As for how Einaudi's music compares to Nevue's, difficulty-wise, hmmm... they're overlapping distributions. Nevue's easiest pieces (Solitude, say, or Wonderland) are easier than Einaudi's easiest pieces (Limbo, Exit). But Nevue also has some very difficult pieces that I can't play yet (as does Einaudi).

Enjoy! But be aware that Einaudi-addiction is just as profound as piano-addiction. wink
Posted by: Woody-Woodruff

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 06/29/09 08:22 PM

Thank you Monica for both the information and the warning (it is not taken lightly)but I'm afraid it may already be too late. Besides, what's one more healthy addiction anyway?
Woody
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/05/09 11:58 AM

Ah, there really is no better feeling than the one you get when you get done learning the final few measures to a song and now can play the whole thing.

I think this is also a bit of a record for me getting ready for the online recitals. It feels nice to get to this point of learning a piece with so much time to go.

I even feel good about mentioning the piece I'll be playing for the online recital this next time around since I'm so far along with it.

I'll be playing "La Nascita Delle Cose Segrete" from I Giorni (Somehow I keep learning pieces from this album and I've yet to do I Giorni itself!)

Do we have any idea yet how many Einaudi pieces we can play for John Frank in the next recital? smile
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/05/09 04:03 PM

Way to go, Anthony! thumb

I'm (probably) playing "Africana Melodia III" for the recital. I've got it maybe 80% there, so it depends on whether I get it polished and recorded by Aug. 1st, or *gulp*, the 14th. A safer backup plan is "Bella Notte," which was super-easy to learn because half of it is identical to "In un'altra vita," which I did for the first recital, and the half that ISN'T identical consists of: quarter notes. Nonstop quarter notes. But given the overlap I'd rather play AM III for the recital, especially as I don't recall anybody playing that here in PW yet.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/05/09 04:13 PM

I gave the beginning of III a try a while back but it's the ending that gets pretty quick that scares me. smile I also had laughs when going from practicing the beginning of III back to playing I Due Fiumi as I'd easily mess that all up...

The part of La Nascita that I need the most practice on is the part starting at measure 52. I seem to mess up there more than in any other part I've been playing. Luckily that part only comes around once in the song as the second time it would come there is a variation before leading into the ending. I really like playing the last part especially when compared to the part that always gets me tripped up. smile I also am a bit choppy on the g#-a-b-a-e bit when compared to the one that starts on the e. Sometimes it comes out alright and other times the fingers don't want to hit the notes smoothly. At least I've got lots of time to work it all out.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/05/09 04:24 PM

Originally Posted By: AnthonyB
I gave the beginning of III a try a while back but it's the ending that gets pretty quick that scares me. smile


Yeah, it's that ending that I'm still working on polishing. This may sound pretty weird, but the only way I am able to play it is by going on pure autopilot and letting muscle memory take over. If I try to concentrate on fingering or the notes or anything, it's hopeless. eek Maybe because the two hands are playing such different patterns at the same time. It's great hand independence practice.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/06/09 01:58 PM

Well, I made enough progress on I Giorni this past week to where there may be a possibility of my recording it for the recital. So add that to the list.

I Giorni, unlike IDF, has extended measures of both hands playing 8th notes. IDF had a couple of measures here and there, and indeed, those were a lot of fun once I had them down. More than a couple of measures' worth of concurrent 8th notes... this is new ground for me. If / when I get I Giorni down, I may take a look at In un'altra vita, which was probably the first Einaudi piece that captured my attention around this time last year. At the time, I wrote it off as something to return to, oh, maybe in 2 or 3 years. But maybe not.

So, Monica, to that end... I Giorni has a repeating pattern of 8th note arpeggios in the LH, which has made progress on the piece come more quickly than I expected. (I believe there are 4 chords that just keep repeating, in roughly the same order. I am sure a little music theory would help here.) Is the same true for In un'altra vita (and hence, Bella Notte)?
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/06/09 03:18 PM

Yes... and it's actually true for most of Einaudi's music. He sure likes those repeating ostinato bass patterns. smile The challenge is when he uses a right hand pattern that goes in the opposite direction of the bass. For 'In un'altra vita' (and many of his other pieces), it's often just a matter of brute force playing LH and RH over and over separately and then HT slowly until it clicks.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/06/09 04:29 PM

BTW, Monica, you are seriously jeopardizing your "I don't do Allegro" status with Melodia Africana III. Don't think we aren't paying attention to these things.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/06/09 08:02 PM

LOL!! You're right about that. One of the sneaky things about that Einaudi book is that he doesn't put metronome markings in it, and since I'm one of these clueless self-teachers who is too lazy to look up the Italian terms, I often don't realize just how fast it's supposed to be until I sit down to play it. eek (I just try to make it sound like the recording, so my estimates of tempo are based on aural memory.)

I'm still slogging away on the beautiful Elijah Bossenbroek piece, "Song for Simplicity" (there was a thread about it a while back). It's got a section in there where dotted quarters are slated at MM=168. Now THAT's fast!! If I master that section, I'll probably consider it my biggest piano achievement of the year. (But that's a big "if". whome )
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/12/09 11:26 PM

Wow, this thread was buried on page 6. ABF is a busy place.

2 things.

1. With I Giorni, I can pretty much play all the passages, in isolation. Putting them together, however, is going to take some time. Since I have put a lot of focus on the (for me) trickier sections, those now sound great (er, acceptable). The slower (ahem, "Easier", but not really) sections are rougher. And if I had a recording for you (I don't) you'd hear the seams between sections I have been practicing. Whether I get this in for next month's recital depends on whether I can iron out those rough seams.

2. Since last month's recital, I have now had three people email me for suggestions on I Due Fiumi. My latest blog post is a summary of lessons I learned from IDF, as well as some tips y'all were kind enough to pass along. If you've got a moment, and if you have some sort of magical tip that made a difference for you on IDF, I'd be honored if you could throw in a comment on the blog.

Thanks all.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/12/09 11:41 PM

I just did... and then after it got published I noticed a typo. I hate typos. mad
Posted by: Woody-Woodruff

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/13/09 01:08 PM

Monica,

You warned me and I went ahead and got a copy of "The Best Of" anyway. It arrived last Thursday which co-insided with a 4-day weekend. I'm like a kid in a candy store! 4 days of Einaudi. For anyone thinking about getting a copy read Monica's warning post above and they are available on Amazon for $23 plus shipping.

OK, so many of the songs are way over my ability at this time, but quite a few of them are easily workable (Limbo & Giorni dispari to name a couple). His music echo's my playing style perfectly and sounds great on even my little POS spinet!

Thanks again for the recommendation for my exposure to Einaudi.

Woody
(yet another believer)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/13/09 01:16 PM

Welcome to Einaudi-addiction, Woody. grin Yes, Giorni Dispari is beautiful. It's one of the pieces I've maintained in repertoire just because it's so pretty. I just love the bridge at the end when you're playing all those VERY VERY high notes. *shivers* I actually think it's harder than a lot of his other pieces, so if you can play that one, you should have no trouble with Nefeli, I giorni, I due fiumi, just to name a few.

I hope this means we can hear some recordings soon. smile wink
Posted by: Woody-Woodruff

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/13/09 01:55 PM

It will, as soon as I can get my Zoom H2 to make Molly (my spinet) sound like a real piano instead of toy piano. Between Molly, Zoom and I, we have had some really amazing recording disasters! Some of the them were actually quite funny. But we are learning!

Since my piano time is limited due to work (that nasty 4-letter word), I focus more on the playing than on the recording. But I'm actually making progress on both so who knows - maybe in a month or so I can share my recording efforts with the world - we'll see.

BTW, I didn't see Giorni Dispari on your YouTube channel. Some of the other efforts on YouTube are, well, interesting! Do you have a recording of it posted elsewhere? I like to play, listen, learn, play, listen, learn, etc.
Woody
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/13/09 02:04 PM

It's on my list to get a video made. (I recorded it before I got my Flip). But here's a link to the audio-only recording:

Giorni Dispari
Posted by: Woody-Woodruff

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/13/09 02:40 PM

Wow, Monica, now that's more like it!! Thank you
Woody
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/15/09 10:32 AM

At the risk of getting my head over my skis a little...

Has anyone here had any experience learning or trying "Monday" off the Divenire CD?

Guess I could do a search...
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/15/09 11:23 AM

I've not even considered it yet. It's got a section of triplets in the right hand with a regular 8th note pattern in the left hand. I'm positive the timing issues on that one would give me fits for now. (Actually, there's a lot of that type of pattern on songs from Divenire.) I've got enough stuff that isn't so difficult that I'll get around to playing first.
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/15/09 11:53 AM

I was listening to it on the road yesterday, and thought, "Hey, this doesn't sound so bad." The RH triplets, to my naive ear, sounded as if they followed the same timing pattern as Stella del Mattino, but I guess they don't.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/15/09 11:58 AM

The Divenire book is tough. The easiest selection in it is Primavera, but even that's hard (for me) if you play it at the proper blazing tempo. I've also happily butchered "Divenire" itself but decided to let it drop for a while with an eye to tackling it again next year.

On the other hand, the 3 against 2 is a crucial rhythm/skill to develop, and it's something you'd use in lots of other pieces in the future, so if it's a piece you're hooked on, I'd say go for it. But if it's just one of a whole bunch of pretty Einaudi pieces, I'd suggest working on something easier first. wink
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/15/09 10:39 PM

I ditto to what Monica says. The 3 against 2 is difficult to learn. But having said that, the Divenire book has many pretty pieces to not learn smile
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/17/09 09:38 PM

Here's my recording of "Bella Notte." I wanted to post it here so that I couldn't be tempted to use it for my recital piece. laugh (Which I also tried to record today, to no avail. help )

Bella Notte is easier than In un'altra vita, but now that I've played them both, I almost think I like Bella Notte better. The second half is so tranquil and almost wistful.

And, yes, I realize I've got some bobblehead action going with the first half. laugh I did the same thing on "In un'altra vita" and seem incapable of suppressing it.

Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/18/09 12:05 PM

Nice work Monica. I did chuckle when I saw your recording pop up in my Google Reader and I pretty much said "Well, that's not the recital piece now." even before I came here and read the comment saying as much. wink

For a little something extra (Ludovico forum readers may already have found it) there's a new Einaudi song on Ludovico's Myspace called "Berlin Song"

This might just be something he came up with while recording the new album or it may be from the album itself. Ludovico posted on his forum when he was in Berlin working on the new album a while ago.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/18/09 07:12 PM

Oh, "Berlin Song" is simply beautiful! wow Thank you for pointing that out, Anthony; it's been a while since I checked the Einaudi forum. If the rest of the new album is even half as good, it will be stupendous. [Monica shakes her head in disbelief that Einaudi's music can keep getting better and better... but somehow it does.]

p.s. I did get another non-Einaudi pace recorded as a backup, so I'll have *something* for the recital.

p.p.s. Oh, that ending of "The Berlin Song".... such a beautiful low bass that reverberates in the bottom of your heart. heart
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 07/20/09 12:07 PM

Originally Posted By: Monica K.


And, yes, I realize I've got some bobblehead action going with the first half. laugh I did the same thing on "In un'altra vita" and seem incapable of suppressing it.


You say that like it's a bad thing. I thought all the cool kids did this. Am I misinformed?

Next thing you're going to tell me is that it isn't with-it-and-hip to lift up your RH dramatically once in awhile.
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/18/09 03:14 PM

I kind of hate to be the person who wakes this thread back up (for my first post), but it also seems like the best place to introduce myself.

Working backwards...I first became aware of Einaudi in mid-April 2009 when my wife played for me a YouTube video of a freestyle dog show with "I Giorni" as the background music. We both fell in love with the song, so I proceeded to learn it. I have a somewhat rough video of it on my YT channel (made at 12 days before I noticed where my memory of the notes was a bit wrong and before I cleaned up some issues with dynamics).

After I acquired the 175 pg. 'best of' book I was searching for tips on the infamous measures of "Nefeli" and found this forum. I haven't yet recorded "Nefeli" though I could make a decent go of it now. I've been working on it at the same time as "I due fiumi" and "Stella del mattino" and have audio recordings of the latter two made at the one-week point on YT (hint, they are hesitant and rough and the notes on Stella weren't quite right--fixed now).

I've read all 30 pages of this thread, and it's helped hook me further on Einaudi, and introduced me to some new songs to learn. I think "Giorni dispari" will be next.

Finally...me. I took 5 years of lessons back in the '70s, from age 10-15. We're talking half hour a week, with very little practice on my part. I learned to read sheet music (basics), some simple songs and very little real music theory.

I've never really quit playing, which is why I hesitate to call myself a beginner. I mean, I've been playing for over 30 years. But most of that is self-taught and very part-time around work and life. I got a bit more serious and started to learn touch at the age of 21 after my mother passed away from cancer. Piano was my therapy.

I consider myself very much an amateur hack, with no real formal training. Like others here, it is my love of music and making music that pulls me to the bench. I hope others enjoy my songs but it's mostly for myself.

I don't know how active I'll be here, but I felt motivated to join. Don't worry, not all my posts will be novel-length.
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/18/09 03:21 PM

Two other things. Earlier in the thread Danny Niklas made some observations that really seemed insightful to me. I'm only paraphrasing, but the idea was that sometimes playing what seems like simple music can actually be more difficult.

Although the physical striking of the notes on the three Einaudi songs I've learned so far is not the most advanced I've encountered, to make the songs sound good ("right") ranks among my greatest pianistic challenges. Like Danny said, you can't hide behind runs.

Einaudi has continued to build on what Chopin taught me, which is how to play music instead of just striking notes...and how you sometimes have to put the emphasis on one or two fingers, and maybe not the ones that feel natural. Like Chopin, Einaudi has a knack for making simple-sounding music that might not be as simple as it first sounds or seems.

Finally, has anybody else here ever listened to or played any Suzanne Ciani? I refer mostly to her Pianissimo and Pianissimo II albums. Years ago I picked out "Simple Song" and "Berceuse" by ear, and although I currently prefer Einaudi, those looking for a bit of variety in the same kind of family might enjoy some of her work. I think these days sheet music is available.
Posted by: Triryche

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/18/09 04:12 PM

SwayingTree,

Welcome to the forum!!

I would suggest you start a new topic to introduce yourself though. Many do not not even peek into this thread.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/19/09 08:54 PM

Originally Posted By: SwayingTree
I've read all 30 pages of this thread, and it's helped hook me further on Einaudi, and introduced me to some new songs to learn. I think "Giorni dispari" will be next.


SwayingTree, you not only deserve a huge welcome to PianoWorld, you deserve a medal for sitting down and reading this entire thread!! grin

Yes, there's something about Einaudi's music that is mesmerizing, isn't there? You've picked some wonderful pieces to learn, and I think you'll like Giorni Dispari a lot, too.

I enjoyed reading your story of how you got into piano. Like you, I started playing piano after my mother died of cancer. (It was the inheritance I got from her that enabled me to buy my piano.) Triryche is right, though; you may want to copy and paste your introduction in the "Tell us about yourself" thread (a link to it is found in the "Important topics in AB forum" that is stickied near the top of the AB forum page). While the Einaudi thread has a devout and loyal following, there are--quite inexplicably--quite a few AB forumites who just don't share our passion. wink And they'll want to get to know you, too. smile
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/20/09 09:03 AM

Thanks, Monica. I got to read several of your posts in those 30 pages wink.

I've listened to a couple of your recordings on YouTube (will get to the rest soon) and am impressed that you're self-taught. Very nice work!

I'll get to Giorni dispari soon, maybe this weekend. I took one day (yesterday) to learn Limbo after listening to it in iTunes. That's a pretty little song. I've still got polishing to do on all four Einaudi songs I'm currently learning (first time I've ever done more than two at once but they all grabbed me).

For that matter, I still don't consider myself 'done' with I giorni even though it's been four months and I can play it now without missing a note. It's all about the touch and musical performance, and I learn or notice something every time I play it...which is still everyday.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/20/09 09:07 AM

[Monica blushes] Thank you! I have to clarify that I'm not *entirely* self-taught; I had 7 years of accordion lessons as a child, so I had a nice head start in piano.

I know what you mean about I giorni. I've been playing that piece now for well over a year. Some days it comes out magical; other days it's a nightmare. That last section with the delicate pp right hand arpeggios makes or breaks the piece, imo. It's a constant challenge to me to articulate them cleanly and quietly without skipping notes. frown
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/20/09 10:52 AM

Originally Posted By: Monica K.
[Monica blushes] I know what you mean about I giorni. I've been playing that piece now for well over a year. Some days it comes out magical; other days it's a nightmare. That last section with the delicate pp right hand arpeggios makes or breaks the piece, imo. It's a constant challenge to me to articulate them cleanly and quietly without skipping notes. frown


+1.

This is obviously still fresh in my mind. I had a very difficult time striking the right balance on those high notes. I WANTED to emphasize the higher notes, and let the nuance come from the quieter middle notes, where the melody (if that's what you call it) lives. Problem is, I never got to the point to where I could play those notes at a different volume. If I played the highest note (D, I think) at a certain dynamic, the whole RH had to be that dynamic. Which is not, in my mind, the intent there.

So be it, maybe some day.
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/20/09 12:48 PM

Originally Posted By: Always Wanted to Play Piano

+1.

This is obviously still fresh in my mind. I had a very difficult time striking the right balance on those high notes. I WANTED to emphasize the higher notes, and let the nuance come from the quieter middle notes, where the melody (if that's what you call it) lives. Problem is, I never got to the point to where I could play those notes at a different volume. If I played the highest note (D, I think) at a certain dynamic, the whole RH had to be that dynamic. Which is not, in my mind, the intent there.

So be it, maybe some day.


This is exactly what I meant when I wrote this:

Quote:
Einaudi has continued to build on what Chopin taught me, which is how to play music instead of just striking notes...and how you sometimes have to put the emphasis on one or two fingers, and maybe not the ones that feel natural.


I also cannot consistently hit the little C-D-C trill like in measure 11 and 27 with the exactly timed and delicate light touch. Sometimes it's magic and sometimes it's butchered.

But then my touch varies; I have what I term "Good hands" and "Bad hands" days.
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/20/09 12:57 PM

Oh, and if you're learning this lesson of music now, AW2PP, you are way ahead of my pace. I'd played for probably almost 30 years (casually and part-time, with some breaks during my late teens and 20s, you understand!) before I really had that "a-ha!" moment while trying to learn Chopin's Raindrop Prelude.

There are things I'm still relatively happy with in the recording of I giorni I put on YouTube, especially considering it was made on day 12 of learning it...and several things that make me lightly cringe.

I think it was Van who said much earlier in the thread that he had the unfortunate habit of making a recording at the first hint of success. This is also my unfortunate habit. It's why I have very raw versions of Stella del mattino and I due fiumi on YouTube, after only a week of learning. I hope to replace them soon...as soon as I acquire a working camera.
Posted by: Triryche

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/21/09 06:35 PM

Regarding Exit, measures 7,9,11 when the bass octaves come in.
I found 2 videos on youtube (here's one of them: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjDsunjVkoQ)
and in both videos it appears the person playing adds a rest in the bass clef before playing the octaves. I don't own the original recording (yet), but the samples I have heard do not include the rest.
Just wondering if there's another version recorded by Ludovico Einaudi played with the rests that anyone knows of??
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/22/09 12:01 AM

Hey Triryche, I just listened to "Exit" with the sheet music in hand. The sheet music shows rests with fermatas on top on each of those measures. It sounds like the youtube pianist interpreted those fermatas very liberally. (He also put in some very long rests toward the end of the piece, longer than I would have put in myself.)

There's no other recorded version of Exit by Einaudi that I'm aware of (it's not on his La Scala album). But it *is* true that Einaudi always engages in ample rubato. Lots of times when I listen to his recordings and compare it against the sheet music, there's more rests and/or held notes that don't show up on the sheet music.

So I think it boils down to personal preference and playing it the way you think sounds best. thumb
Posted by: Triryche

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/22/09 10:39 AM

Thanks Monica,
Maybe I have a different printing or something.
In measures 7,9,11 there are no rests or fermatas.
Although there are rests and fermatas in measures 8,10,12....

I will just buy the mp3 of the single to hold me over 'til I get the cd.


Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/22/09 03:29 PM

Allow me to immortalize my mistakes by linking to these audio recordings I made last night so I could hear where I am on Nefeli (approx. two weeks of part-time practice), and Limbo, which I've been learning for all of two days.

Be gentle, since I'm only beginning to decide how I want to turn the notes of Nefeli into music, now that I know how to hit them in the right order.

Limbo...I just really like this little song.

I appreciate any constructive criticism your more experienced Einaudi ears can provide.

http://www.box.net/shared/d87gc19tj2 (Nefeli)

http://www.box.net/shared/8fiky8uyce (Limbo)
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/22/09 03:30 PM

By the way, I will do an intro outside this thread, but first I feel like I need to finish reading everyone else's. Yes...I'm kind of odd.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/23/09 12:36 PM

Beautiful recordings, Swaying Tree! If you're playing "Nefeli" that well after only two weeks' practice on it, I'm not sure I'm in any position to be giving you advice. grin

In fact, there were only a couple of places I spotted that I might recommend playing differently:

1.) The bridge section starting on measure 69. Maybe it's just a function of the conversion to mp3, in which you're going to lose some dynamic range, but I usually try to make the contrast in volume between the first and second repetition of that melody more noticeable (it's marked pp at measure 69 and then mf at 84).

2.) On measures 68 and 163, it sounded to my ear that you're hitting that A in the right hand again, when it's a tie from the preceding measure.

3.) I think Einaudi holds the rest on measure 115 a bit longer than you do here.

But like I said... I think it took me two YEARS to get Nefeli sounding even close to being that good! laugh

...and then when I heard your "Limbo," which was that polished after only TWO DAYS! wow It sounded beautiful. thumb
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/23/09 12:38 PM

Originally Posted By: Triryche
Thanks Monica,
Maybe I have a different printing or something.
In measures 7,9,11 there are no rests or fermatas.
Although there are rests and fermatas in measures 8,10,12....

I will just buy the mp3 of the single to hold me over 'til I get the cd.




[Embarrassed silence while Monica goes back to kindergarten to learn how to count on fingers.] Er... yes... you're right about that. I was looking at the wrong measures. Einaudi doesn't put rests on those measures in the album recording, so I think it was just artistic license in the YouTube videos.
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/23/09 01:52 PM

Thanks, Monica.

1) You are absolutely right. Except for the fabled measure 17 section, 69-99 is the trickiest for me, perhaps because I need to adjust fingering (a weakness of mine...poor technical foundation). I have a lot of work to do here to be able to play the notes smoothly, adjust dynamics, etc.

2) Again right. I can mostly read sheet music, but ties and slurs can often trip me up. Sometimes when the notation looks to me like a noted is carried, I'll swear I hear performers striking it again. In this case my brain just decided that the A needed to be hit again. I'll fix that. Should be easier to close with the right touch, actually.

3) This is strangely very difficult for me, but I noticed the same thing when I listened, which is the purpose of early recordings of a new song. I have a hard time ending suddenly...smoothly. Einaudi somehow melts into an abrupt stop. I've done slightly better than on this recording, but it's often too harsh and jarring of a stop, and then I just can't wait to get started making pretty noise again. Again, more work.

Thanks again for taking the time to listen and comment. You've helped with a few things that should lead to a better performance, and the music deserves it.
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/23/09 02:00 PM

I haven't listened to or played "Exit" but want to make a general comment and see how others react. I'll limit this to Einaudi but I take the same approach in many cases.

I listen to his recordings because I figure he is in the best position to interpret the composer's vision. I use that as a guide once I know the basic notes. On "I giorni," for example, his recording helped me hear how the melody flowed out of particular notes (emphasis) that wouldn't be apparent just from the sheet music.

Similarly, his rubato gives me an idea of the flow and soul of the song.

I don't strive to completely imitate, though. I might play a song slower or faster. I might use slightly different dynamics. Some people might consider my choices wrong, and that's fine. I'm playing primarily for me and try to render a performance that matches the way the music makes me feel. This is also why the same song sounds different on different days, because my moods and therefore interpretations change.

In my brief time with Einaudi I've noticed that his own recordings vary in length between say the "I giorni" album and the same songs at Scala. He was in a slower mood at Scala, and closer to the way I feel them.
Posted by: Triryche

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/23/09 04:05 PM

Originally Posted By: Monica K.
Originally Posted By: Triryche
Thanks Monica,
Maybe I have a different printing or something.
In measures 7,9,11 there are no rests or fermatas.
Although there are rests and fermatas in measures 8,10,12....

I will just buy the mp3 of the single to hold me over 'til I get the cd.




[Embarrassed silence while Monica goes back to kindergarten to learn how to count on fingers.] Er... yes... you're right about that. I was looking at the wrong measures. Einaudi doesn't put rests on those measures in the album recording, so I think it was just artistic license in the YouTube videos.

Sorry, didn't mean to embarrass you.
I find it interesting that 2 different players interpret it the some way.
Posted by: Triryche

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 08/23/09 04:07 PM

SwayingTree, I'm not able to provide constructive, but very nice playing!!
Posted by: Always Wanted to Play Piano

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/03/09 07:06 PM

Resurrecting the thread here briefly...

Small complaint about Stella del Mattino... the tempo marking indicates "Andante", which, according to Wikipedia, means "a walking pace", or about 120 BPM (Give or take). My piano teacher says Andante means "slow". By my math, the CD version of Stella is played at about 155 BPM, and the comparatively slower version on La Scala is still close to 140 BPM.

What works for y'all?
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/03/09 08:38 PM

I tend to prefer the slightly slower La Scala version but I tend to play it fairly quickly due to how often I play the piece. I also tend to play Stella when I want to play something in a short amount of time like right before heading out the door. It's a nice quick piece that I find is some nice hand stretching for the right hand. The amazing part is I never thought I'd get past the La Scala version in terms of tempo while learning the piece.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/03/09 09:17 PM

I've never gotten around to playing Stella. But if past experience is any guide, I'd probably start off playing it slower because that's the best I could do, and then when I finally got it polished, I'd discover that I'm playing it too fast. grin Even now I have to concentrate on slowing my natural inclination for Nefeli.
Posted by: Triryche

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/03/09 09:58 PM

Originally Posted By: Always Wanted to Play Piano
Resurrecting the thread here briefly...

Small complaint about Stella del Mattino... the tempo marking indicates "Andante", which, according to Wikipedia, means "a walking pace", or about 120 BPM (Give or take). My piano teacher says Andante means "slow"...

For what it's worth (and if I remember correctly) Andante typically means at a slower pace, however, in modern composition, it is many often meant to indicate a slightly faster tempo. I forget what piece I was working on (not from Einaudi) but I ran across a similar scenario a couple years ago.
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/05/09 03:50 PM

Here's how things sound on day 10 of working with "Giorni dispari." As with my previous files, this is still very much a work-in-progress. The actual notes only made their magic way into muscle memory two days ago, so I'm barely starting on the musicality (this is how I work, no matter how wrong).

I did strike one errant note where I trusted my baby memory and went up to an A-flat like occurs later in the song. I also committed the heresy of adding some notes in the left hand because the section sounded too thin when I played it with the whole notes. We'll see if I keep this for the long run.

As always, I appreciate any comments and pointers that might lead me towards a better performance. I'm still working on choosing the tempo; this is kind of a middle ground. I think I might slow down just a taste.

http://www.box.net/shared/7q85mldqi0
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/05/09 07:37 PM

For only 10 days' practice, Swaying Tree, that sounds terrific! wow You're going to give Kawaigirl a run for the money for "quickest Einaudi study" around.

This is so impressive that I hesitate to offer any suggestions, but you asked specifically for feedback, so here goes: (1) in measures 17-24, you play the rhythm very straight, but Einaudi lays the rubato thick as molasses when he plays it. (2) For the section in measures 56-72, he's got most of it indicated as legato. I actually like your articulation of that section a lot, but thought I'd point it out.

Where'd you put the extra notes in, btw? I couldn't tell.
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/05/09 11:33 PM

Thanks again, Monica, for taking the time to comment, and for the nice ones at that.

I put the extra notes in the left hand for measures 41-54, and of course the two repeats of this section later. Instead of striking just the dotted half note and holding it, I hit the same chord three times, in time with the triads in the right hand. I'm not sure of the dynamics effects Einaudi is pulling off in La Scala (the only recording I've heard besides Kawaigirl's), but this was the only way I could have anything like what I wanted to hear. We'll see what happens in time.

I often think I'm happy with initial recordings, only to discover errors, poor dynamics, etc. and later become embarrassed by what I thought was good.

On 56-72...again, we'll see how things develop in time. I tend to evolve into an interpretation. I'm glad you liked what I did but I can't say it was necessarily conscious. Although that may well be the way the song feels to me and the way I always play it. Time will tell. As I said before, I start with Einaudi as a base but don't attempt to do a robotic copy--which I'd fail at in any case, being as I'm not a gifted freak of nature.

RE: 17-24, it's true that I mostly played it straight, but I did try to hold the initial A-flat that begins measures 17 and 21 (I was actually kind of happy with the effect). That's what felt right to me, not to mention that subtle rubato, as you noted yourself, is harder than it sounds, especially while the left hand is walking through arpeggios. If I tackled more it'd probably be a mess.

Please don't read anything there as defensiveness. I very much appreciate your pointers; you helped me greatly with two blind spots on "Nefeli," and I know that I've never ever played a single song that didn't have something that could be improved. It keeps me trying...
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/05/09 11:46 PM

Monica and anybody else...what are your thoughts on this possible plan?

The next (and, for now, last) Einaudi song I plan to try is "Le Onde." Just listening to it made me decide to leave it for last, as I think it'll be the trickiest of what I've tackled ("I giorni," "Nefeli," "Limbo," "Stella del mattino," "I due fiumi" and of course "Giorni dispari").

It would mean great personal shame but I'm thinking it could also be interesting and perhaps helpful and motivating to other ABF members.

The idea? To make daily recordings of 5-10 minutes documenting my learning progress on the song. I'd finish all of them, however long it takes to get to a decent, serviceable rendition, then publish the series on YouTube. I have to warn that the early days would be exceedingly painful. On day 6 for "Giorni dispari" I still couldn't play certain passages and my brain seized when I tried to make my hands do certain things. Day 1? Let's not talk about it.

The two possible flys in ointment are the fact that I'll be at a training session without piano access from the 14th through the 18th (aaah!!), and that I'm not sure my camera will behave. It's a JVC with built-in hard drive, and the last time I tried to make piano recordings it would cut off after 1-2 minutes with a disk failure. I've reformatted it numerous times to no avail, but today made a successful 7 minute test.

Anyhow, I'll think about it, especially if others would find value in watching my struggles (and keeping the laughs to themselves!).
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/07/09 05:48 PM

Time for two confessions. The first of which kind of relates to one of the mistakes Monica caught with my first test recording of "Nefeli" where I was re-striking an A that was supposed to be tied (measure 68 and the last one).

Not the same mistake, but the same idea of getting one thing into my mind, thinking I had it right, and not looking closely enough at the sheet music to notice what I was doing wrong.

In this case I'm talking about "I giorni," which is the first Einaudi song I learned (or even heard), back in April. The video I have on YouTube was made after about 12 days of practice, and about 2-3 days after I thought I had it committed to memory. The memory failed in one case in measure 68 (something cursed about that?) where I played F#-G-F#-G in the right hand instead of F#-G-F#-E. And of course the same thing on the repeat.

I noticed that a couple of days later and have long corrected it. That's still not the first confession, because I quickly fixed it.

The confession is that all this time I've been playing a completely wrong left hand for a few measures, having originally read the notes wrong and never really looking again. The lesson is to pay close, close attention even after you think you've figured the notes out, especially when your reading skills are as weak as mine. I broke out the sheet music for the first time in months because I've been reading about the need to not trust your memory. Good advice.

We're talking about beginning with measure 33. Instead of B-D-A in the left hand, I hit B-F#-A. In measure 34 I hit A-E-A. In 37 I hit B-F#-A, and then in 38 it's A-E-A-E-A-E.

Repeated each time this sequence occurs.

Second confession: I've experimented with the actual official version and I like my mistake better. It certainly sounds awesome when Einaudi plays it, but for me it's a bit discordant, which is probably how I blundered into my notes in the first place. I played the notes I expected to be there, liked the sound and never looked again.

I'll continue to re-evaluate since I may just need to get used to it, but for now I think I'm going to keep playing my mistake. It's not uncommon for me to change a few things from sheet music on purpose.

Thoughts?
Posted by: Collyermum

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/08/09 05:28 AM

That was beautiful Swayingtree, thank you for posting that, I am now inspired to go and see if I have that Einaudi in my book and give it a go!

I learned Le Onde first and then Nefeli, I don't think Le Onde is hard because there's lots of pedal and you can keep it all flowing, I thought Nefeli was much trickier with the jumps etc. So go for it, if you can do the others you'll be fine with Le Onde!
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/08/09 10:14 AM

I think your proposal is interesting, Swayingtree. I'm sure I'd enjoy being able to spy on your progress. This is crunch time for me at work, though, so I can't promise I'd be able to comment on every recording.

I think it's interesting how there is so much individual variability with respect to what's considered difficult. Collyermum finds Nefeli much trickier than Le Onde, whereas I think Le Onde is a GAZILLION times harder than Nefeli, for the simple reason that I have yet to play Le Onde even once in a manner that I'm happy with. mad cursing Obviously I need to work a lot harder on learning how to accent melody notes as lightly and delicately as Einaudi can.
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/11/09 11:37 PM

I'm still not 100% sure I should be doing this, yet here I am...

I don't know if this will be anything but annoying to watch, and I know it's embarrassing for me, but let's plunge on (at least until ya'll run me off the board for poisoning this thread).

I've just placed videos showing my 'progress' with learning "Le onde" for days 1 and 2. I decided to just host them myself since I don't think I want to deal with YouTube feedback on this.

Hopefully it will get closer to music with each passing day, though I must remind that I only have two more days (total of four) before I'm out of town until late next Friday. I shudder to think what walking away from a fresh, in-process song will do, but I also didn't want to wait to get started on the learning.

Day 1 (~12 min): http://swayingtree.sytes.net/Learning_Le_onde_Day1.htm

Day 2 (~9 min): http://swayingtree.sytes.net/Learning_Le_onde_Day2.htm
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/11/09 11:51 PM

I'll listen to your learning process for Le Onde shortly Swaying Tree. Walking away may not be as bad as you think it is. It may be important to play carefully and slowly and only the parts you are playing well right before you stop though. smile

I did get a chance to watch your recently uploaded youtube videos and even commented on one of them for you. I can't help but feel I somehow encouraged you to play some of those pieces as those are some of the same ones I started with. smile

As an added bonus, I'll add some Einaudi related things to the thread in regards to the new Album coming out next month for most of us.

Here's the opening track for the new album, Nightbook. The track is called In Principio.


For those who want to get teased with the rest of the tracks, annoying short samples from each track can be found on the UK amazon.com page.

Amazon.co.uk's Nightbook album page (digital version)
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/12/09 01:00 AM

Thanks, Anthony. I've just listened to a few of your YT videos. Very well done.

I need to catch up on sampling more of everyone's but now I need sleep...and the days at work have been so busy it seems like all I have time for is a bit of my own playing.

Many of you here are responsible for my latest songs, as well as the 30 second samples on iTunes. You certainly played a part (so go ahead and take some blame! laugh ).
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/12/09 08:03 PM

How on earth did I miss seeing that video you posted Anthony! Thank you!! I cannot wait for the whole album to be released. "In Principio" is beautiful in an eerie way... full of quiet foreboding. A lot like the "sotto..." soundtrack.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/12/09 08:09 PM

Hi Swaying Tree! Man, I wish MY pieces sounded so good on their second day as yours did. I don't know if it's on my end or yours, but I kept getting buffering lags while watching your video. So it was hard to get a solid impression, but one thing I found very impressive is that you played at a very steady tempo throughout, which I know is what one is supposed to do but that I rarely achieve. laugh
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/12/09 08:18 PM

Okay, here's my contribution to the Einaudi archives. I finally got a recording of "Ancora" that I was okay with. It's such a long piece (18 pages of sheet music!) that I had no hopes of recording an error-free version, but this one lacks any major goofs. However, because it was so long, I couldn't memorize it, so I also edited out the page swaps. I made a little movie of it by setting it to the pictures from our vacation out West this summer, but YouTube wouldn't take it because it was more than ten minutes long. I uploaded it to my blog though, so if you are dying to see visuals, click on my blog and look up the Aug. 27th entry.

"Ancora" is in my top 5 favorite Einaudi pieces, and in light of that and the fact that it is such a long piece, learning it represented a personal milestone.

My version of "Ancora"
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/12/09 09:22 PM

Here's the day 3 entry of "Learning Le onde." What's funny is that I actually made more mistakes during this recording than on my last practice run about 15 minutes earlier.

If you think the red dot is bad when you know a song, you should try recording yourself trying to learn something new!

Day 3 (7.5 min): http://swayingtree.sytes.net/Learning_Le_onde_Day3.htm

Monica, it's possible that the U-Verse upstream isn't behaving well today, but I don't usually have problems hosting these videos...though I might have been overly aggressive with the bitrate.

In any case, if you pause it, you'll see the buffer extend slowly to the right. Once there's a little space to the right of the cursor dot you can hopefully hear what's actually going on.

(I'm going to take a listen to your "Ancora" now. I don't know the song since I'm such a rank amateur at Einaudi.)
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/12/09 09:24 PM

On my work computer (just done remotely) I had to wait about 3-5 minutes for enough of the video to buffer so that it could play through smoothly and finish before catching up to the buffer. I'll make future ones a little lower quality since wading through my struggles, especially day 1, is probably painful enough without an extra wait.
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/12/09 09:47 PM

Wow, that was really well done, Monica. I don't think I'll be tackling that (beautiful) beast anytime soon. Watching your video brought back some memories, as I've been to many of those same places on family vacations long ago, including Mesa Verde twice. Good times.

I intended to stay in Colorado last summer when I rented a house for a get together with my brother and father, whom I don't see often enough. But dad's cardiologist wouldn't let him go to altitude so we settled on Taos, New Mexico, which I can highly recommend as another scenic, serene blend of history and natural beauty. We were about 20 minutes NW of town on a hill with no visible neighbors, and had absolutely spectacular views from the deck and living room with a wall of glass. I might go back to the same place. I could use a vacation...
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/13/09 10:54 PM

Well here's my video for "Learning Le onde - Day 4." As I noted on the web page, I didn't have a lot of time today what with preparing to leave town, but I still think there's some improvement over Day 3, one horrifying bobble notwithstanding.

I don't know if anybody has even watched Day 3 yet. I tried to cut the video size down a bit, and even re-encoded the previous days to reduce file size. I'm sure it'll still take a minute or two to build a decent buffer, but they should stream more smoothly.

I did make a stupid error on Day 1 and had a timeshift on...and of course overwrote the original without testing. I've got it re-aligned but the last six seconds has no audio...just the last few notes go missing.

Day 4 (7 min): http://swayingtree.sytes.net/learning_le_onde_day4.htm

I'll be away from a computer until the evenings due to all day training, but appreciate any comments, especially as I'm now almost wanting to approach the song musically now that the notes are 65-75% in the muscle memory bank.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/14/09 01:30 PM

Still making amazing progress, SwayingTree. thumb My main advice at this point would be to start working more on stressing/accenting the melody notes and de-emphasizing the alternating notes in the right hand. When you listen to Einaudi, those alternating notes are barely perceptible. Trying to mimic what he does proved to be my Waterloo on this piece. laugh
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/20/09 10:09 PM

Here we are on day 5.5 (see my comments on the web page) after a five day break for a business trip. Although this recording doesn't quite do justice to what I'm capable now at my best, it does show that somehow my brain continued to put the notes into memory while I was nowhere near a piano. When I got home and sat down I actually played it smoother than the day I left. Go figure. Still a LOT of work to do, but I can at least tell what song I'm trying to play now:

Day 5 (5:18): http://swayingtree.sytes.net/Learning_Le_onde_day5.htm
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/20/09 10:09 PM

By the way, Monica, thanks for the nice comments and tips. I'm trying, but it's going to take some time (but you already know that, eh?).
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/21/09 07:21 PM

There will be no recording tonight. (a) I'll only get to play through it 2-3 times, and (b) we're having major thunderstorms, so not a good time to hook up computers and video equipment, not to mention the noise.

If I don't get a recording tomorrow it will be several days, because the annual motorcycle rally called "Bikes, Blues and BBQ" starts Wed and the sound of revving engines will fill the air through the weekend. Also not good for recording quality.

I'm about done showing the learning progression anyhow. From here it's polishing and the day-to-day changes will be subtle and slow.
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/22/09 09:14 PM

Here is the recording for what I'll call Day 7 since I skipped recording yesterday. I only played it five times since the last recording for "Day 5."

*****************************************************
I apologize for the constant refocusing. The camera has done minor versions of this on previous days, but is far, far worse tonight. I need a new one. If it makes you need an eye doctor just close your eyes and decide how I sound, since that's more important.
*****************************************************

This will be the last recording of this series due to the Motorcycle festival starting here tomorrow and the fact that I'm almost done with the initial learning.

Don't get me wrong; I have a long way to go before I think I'm playing it well, as the bobbles in this video attest (like forgetting to strike the D again in measure 148). I just don't think anybody wants to watch endless videos that are almost the same as I crawl towards making good music.

Day 7 (5:51): http://swayingtree.sytes.net/Learning_Le_Onde_Day7.htm
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/23/09 10:43 PM

The bobbles are few and far between, Swaying Tree! Your Le Onde at 7 days already sounds better than my Le Onde did at, oh, 1 year. laugh

My main suggestion at this point would be to work on dynamics, making the pp's ppier and the ff's ffier. (Of course, it's highly possible that the compression of the video recording doesn't reflect how it sounds live. Such are the limitations of internet videos.)

Also, are you using the Una Corda pedal where indicated? Again, it could just be the recording, but I didn't hear a change in the tonal quality in the sections you're supposed to use the Una Corda pedal.

One last thing, and it's a question of burning importance to me: Just how did you manage to get SIX sheets of paper spread out across your music desk?! grin I can only get 5, which hampers me greatly on the 6-page pieces.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/24/09 01:50 AM

I'll give swayingtree the benefit of the doubt and maybe the purpose of all those 1.C.'s and 3.C.'s wasn't exactly obvious. I know it took me a while to figure out the 1C was for Una Corda and the 3C for Tre Corde.

I'll have to give the latest video a listen. I did watch the first few but failed to comment on those. But it's almost 1am and I really should just get off to bed. smile
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/24/09 08:39 AM

Yeah... that 1C notation isn't exactly obvious. I couldn't figure it out myself and had to ask here what it meant. laugh
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/24/09 08:58 AM

Thanks, Monica and Anthony for taking the time to listen and comment. Before I forget, Monica, I scanned the pages from the book so they'd be easier to work with. When I printed I just downsized to 77% since that's what allowed six pages to fit on my music desk. I scanned through Photoshop, saved as PDFs and printed from inside PS. And then of course cut the pages on my paper trimmer.

I'd like to try and limit my normal mini-novel of a response but it will take a bit of space to try and address the issues you raised and have any chance of it making sense and not seeming defensive, which I'm not. I know I have a LOT of room for improvement in my playing, both generally and on "Le onde." And as I've said before, you've pointed things out that I've missed, so I appreciate any pointers, even if occasionally I might still choose to go a different direction. We all have our own musical interpretations after all.

Thanks for the benefit, Anthony, but I saw the 1C markings, know what they mean and as yet have ignored them. I just read the thread on playing with feeling and on a song new to me I'm a bit like Mr. S-H described himself; while devoting near 100% of my efforts to learning/hitting the right notes, I don't yet tackle the subtleties of true music. That's what's just coming now. I already think I sound better than my Day 7 recording (will post a final one on YouTube later and link it here). Everything I'm about to say doesn't mean that I'm not going to be trying to improve dynamics and make the ff more fortissimo and the pp more pianissimo...at least somewhat.

That general comment out of the way, two--no, three--other factors made me ignore the una corda here, though an experiment this morning might change it for this song.

1) When I listen to Einaudi's recording of "Le onde" he does not, to me, appear to follow the dynamics marked on the page. Sometimes he does, but in other places, for a measure or two, he seems to do almost the opposite. I'll hear him doing a bit of a crescendo when the music says to dim. towards p, for example. So I'm attacking this song like I have his others. I read the music. I listen to him. Perhaps I have a rendition from a few others to consider their interpretation. I learn the notes and then see how my brain chooses to "feel" the song. Over time an interpretation will reveal itself, and this process is still ongoing for "Le onde." This interpretation will likely draw upon Einaudi's version quite deeply but I allow myself to deviate from both him and the music if I want to (oh, God...I sound like gyro). On "Stella del mattino," for example, the music shows waxing and waning as you work up and down the middle notes of the arpeggios. For me, though, that song feels right when played more mellowly and evenly, with less volume variation. So that's how I do it. I'm evolving towards a mellower "Giorni dispari" because the music sounds too harsh to me if I really forte the parts where the right hand is working away fast. I'm liking that song a little slower and with less variation in loudness. Which leads to...

2) On some of his other songs, such as "Limbo" or "I due fiumi" I have also ignored the 1C markings because to me, on my piano (see #3) it just doesn't sound right. I tried it both ways and decided to just play as softly as I can 3C. Partly this is because the shift of the keyboard and the foot action tend, due to my skill limitations, to make the overall blending and smoothness of the song suffer. I think I get a better effect overall in the flow of the song 3C. I could easily be wrong.

3) I've had my technician look into things and he swears everything is in working order, but I'm not happy with either my una corda pedal or the sustain. I've had this piano since 1986 and swear that things used to work better. The sustain is just way louder in its function than I recall and I get more pedal noise than I want (from both the mechanism and the dampers raising and lowering), but I of course have to use it (except on Clementi). It seems to start out really bad and 'warm up' into a semblance of acceptability after 20-30 minutes of playing. The una corda pedal is, I know, supposed to somewhat change the tone of the piano, but it sounds to me (now) like it cheapens and weakens the voice of my instrument. I experiment with it on every song where it's called for and usually discard using it, except in rare circumstances where the particular notes being played don't seem to suffer for the tonal change.

All that said, this morning I tried playing the 1C sections of "Le onde" with the una corda pedal, and I think it works on this song, especially for the closing measures and the two transitional passages (e.g., 64-73). I'm not sure about 78-81 and 86-99 because those are some of the passages where it doesn't sound to me like Einaudi quite follows the "pp" and "sottovoce" directives. But I'll listen and practice some more, consider different options, and my interpretion will emerge. Hopefully it'll be pleasing even if a little different from your choices.

Again, I really appreciate your time and thoughts, especially if you (anybody!) made it through reading this whole post.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/24/09 09:14 AM

Originally Posted By: SwayingTree
When I printed I just downsized to 77% since that's what allowed six pages to fit on my music desk. I scanned through Photoshop, saved as PDFs and printed from inside PS. And then of course cut the pages on my paper trimmer.


Aha!! I was reducing the size to 93%, because that's the only way to get it to fit on 8.5" x 11" paper, but I had not managed to think outside the box sufficiently to hit upon CUTTING the paper size down further! laugh Thanks for the tip...

As for the musical interpretation, I think it's clear from his concerts and the La Scala CD that Einaudi himself changes how he plays pieces according to the setting or his whimsy. So I would certainly encourage you to do go with what feels right. There are times I deviate from the sheet music, too; e.g., the sheet music might indicate that some passages should be played legato, whereas I think it sounds better to keep the notes relatively more distinct.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 09/24/09 11:51 AM

Tracks from Nightbook are slowly making their way onto YouTube, which is helping me stave off my impatience over the much-delayed U.S. release of Einaudi's latest album. So far the pieces are quite different in style than Divenire, but no less pleasing.

I really like this one, called "Indaco":

Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/01/09 02:46 PM

My copy of "Nightbook" arrived in the mail today. Wasn't the cheapest CD I've ever purchased but I got it for far less than the current Amazon.com price of just under $38. (Mine was under $24 with shipping.)

The copy is clearly an import version as it had a sticker on the outside wrapper detailing some of the Nightbook Tour dates in LUX, NL and BE. Sadly, I won't be going to any of those. wink
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/01/09 02:49 PM

[Monica gnashes teeth because she spent $38 on the amazon version that's not even due to arrive until November.]
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/01/09 04:27 PM

I know the price wasn't always as high as the near $38 mark. Did you place the order before that price hike? (But supposedly if it comes back down you could get the lower price.)
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/01/09 04:38 PM

Cheers for the heads up, Anthony + Monica. I see he is playing in Edinburgh on the 25th, so I may grab a ticket for that show!
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/01/09 05:11 PM

Originally Posted By: Euan Morrison
Cheers for the heads up, Anthony + Monica. I see he is playing in Edinburgh on the 25th, so I may grab a ticket for that show!


That sounds like a wonderful idea to me. I think you should go. smile
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/02/09 05:09 PM

Can't let the Einaudi thread slip down too far. wink

I managed to record a radio interview Ludovico Einaudi did this morning over in the UK thanks to the online stream the radio station set up as well as a "tweet" mentioning the time of the interview.

I posted a link to it over on the Einaudi forunms:

Einaudi interview
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/05/09 02:00 PM

Picked up my copy of Nightbook today!

I've only heard a few tracks yet, so I can't comment fully. My initial impression is that it is 'quite good', but I hope it is an album which gets better with more listens. For me, Divenire is still my favourite album by far. (that one was instant!)

On Nightbook, I like the 2 Snow Preludes, Reverie, and Lady Labyrinth the best so far.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/05/09 02:03 PM

Also, I don't think I will be going to the concert this month. Finances are quite tight and my football/soccer team is doing quite well these days, so my money is going there instead. Sorry i won't be able to give a report!
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/05/09 02:06 PM

Euan, Euan, Euan.... if it's a choice between Einaudi and football, that's a no-brainer to me! Even when we're talking soccer football! wink

I won't be getting my CD for ages, but fortunately there's enough clips uploaded on YouTube that I can get my Nightbook fix. So far "Indaco" is my favorite track.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/05/09 04:19 PM

The Nightbook CD has grown on me (even the tracks that I'm not overly thrilled about.)

For example, I put it on as I went to bed last night but didn't manage to fall asleep until it was over. I guess it held me captivated enough that I was paying too much attention to fall asleep. I've played it through a decent number of times so it wasn't like I had to hear every song on the album. Of course, I didn't have it on shuffle and likely wanted to make it to Reverie which is towards the end of the album.

Yeah, "Indaco" is pretty nice too. I bet that one will even be nice as a solo piano work, just don't ask me to play it yet.
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/05/09 06:43 PM

Originally Posted By: Monica K.
Euan, Euan, Euan.... if it's a choice between Einaudi and football, that's a no-brainer to me! Even when we're talking soccer football! wink

I won't be getting my CD for ages, but fortunately there's enough clips uploaded on YouTube that I can get my Nightbook fix. So far "Indaco" is my favorite track.


My decision took some calculation. I can get to two soccer matches for the price of the concert alone. Add on the expense of the cd purchase, and the possibility of a book purchase... it all adds up! So my plan is Nightbook cd+book, 2 football matches.

Will need to listen to Indaco - that can be the soundtrack to my commute tomorrow smile
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/10/09 02:49 PM

As I wrote in the YouTube description, it's still not making me happy, but a project at work is going to really reduce my piano time for the next month, so I wanted to get at least a semi-serviceable version in the bank.

Here's the 'final' version of "Le onde":

Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/10/09 03:36 PM

I'm afraid you're bound to make Monica a bit jealous with that rendition of Monica's Waterloo...er Le Onde.

For the small amount of time you've spent working on it I'd say it sounds pretty good and even I would have a hard time making it sound that good that fast.

I shall have to attempt playing one of Einaudi's more popular songs one of these days. However, I am having a bit of fun playing some of the less popular ones. One of the things that inspired my recording of "Come Un Fiore" was how few times it had been performed on youtube. The same thing can be said for my upcoming recital piece.
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/10/09 08:47 PM

Thanks, Anthony. Hopefully Monica won't hate me, because, like her, I feel like I have a long way to go to get the song "right." There's just something about his music that demands a final 10% I can't seem to consistently find.

I might have to look into some of his other songs, but to avoid my wife thinking I play nothing but Einaudi I'm going to take a bit of a breather; that and the hideous project at work that's going to be dominating my time for the next month.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/10/09 10:45 PM

Well, yes, I'm jealous grin , but in a nice humble way of tipping my hat to a wonderful performance. thumb I would be proud and satisfied myself if I could turn in a final version that good--but I fully understand what you mean about feeling that, as far as Le Onde is concerned, there is always more that can improved.

A breather from Einaudi?! I dunno... Einaudi addiction is awfully tough to kick. wink But good luck getting through your awful project, and I'll look forward to hearing some more Einaudi from you when you get the chance.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/12/09 05:36 PM

I'll just take a moment to note that I've managed to get a good video take of me playing "Exit" by Mr. Einaudi and that will likely be my recital piece for the upcoming recital. Even though the piano bar threads get started early I felt that it's more appropriate to start the "one month to recital" thread on time. smile

I had originally planned to do something composed by someone else for the recital this time around but I realized that I wouldn't get it done in time (despite there being so much time left to go.) So I picked up "Exit" due to the relative shortness of the piece and proceeded to hammer it out pretty quickly. One of the milestones of this one is that this is the first one I've done from the "Eden Roc" album. I doubt it will be the last.

Previously, I've done work from "I Giorni" and "Una Mattina" so that leaves out something from "Le Onde", "Divenire" and I guess now "Nightbook" even though sheets for the last one don't exist yet.

Now I have even more time to work on stuff before the next recital. smile
Posted by: Euan Morrison

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/12/09 06:15 PM

Originally Posted By: AnthonyB
"Nightbook" even though sheets for the last one don't exist yet.


Hey Anthony, congrats on your recording smile

As you are on the Einaudi board more than me, is there any news about sheet music for Nightbook yet?
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/12/09 06:36 PM

No, I have not seen anything about the sheet music yet. I don't know if you noticed but there is credit to Chester Music for sheet music on the Nightbook album liner. Maybe this was mainly for the sheets for all the accompaniment to use but it could also be dealing with the upcoming sheet music book. Either way (and even if I can't play the pieces) I'm sure I'll be getting a copy of the sheet music when it comes out.
Posted by: Kawaigirl1

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/12/09 08:06 PM

Swaying Tree, That's a beautiful rendition of Le Onde smile
Posted by: SwayingTree

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/12/09 10:24 PM

Thanks, Monica and Kawaigirl. Yes, it will be hard to not jump into another Einaudi song...I've learned seven in a row and trying to polish them/learn the new ones has dominated my practice time for the past couple of months so that many of my other pieces have gotten a bit rusty.

Thankfully my wife likes the Einaudi music but she also wants to hear something else from time to time (I know, blasphemy). Right now she wants me to find time to learn "Skating" by Vince Guaraldi before Christmas.

That's a different style for me, but I do like the song, so fingers crossed. I'm sure I'll be back in this thread before long, even if only to check in on the rest of you.

Take care.
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 10/16/09 07:54 PM

It appears the sheet music for Nightbook is now available.

http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/0705142/details.html
Posted by: AnthonyB

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/04/09 01:50 AM

There is word over from the Official Ludovico Einaudi forum that there may be some US concert dates coming up in March 2010. No word how many or where but it might be time to start saving up that travel fund again. wink
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/05/09 09:44 AM

My eagerly awaited "Nightbook" collection arrived yesterday. AnthonyB had gotten his a couple of days before and had given me the heads up that the transcriptions are pretty intimidating, which they are. eek But at least a couple seem doable ("The Sand Crane" is probably the easiest), and best of all, "Berlin Song," is in the realm of possibility. At the risk of sounding heretical, I think "Berlin Song" is prettier than any of the pieces that ended up on the official Nightbook release, so I'm happy that I might actually end up being able to play it. smile
Posted by: gintarec

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/05/09 09:56 AM

The Sand crane??? Monica, is there a different version of Nightbook in US? I don't have this song in my book...
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/05/09 10:35 AM

And now I'm *really* looking silly... I meant "The Crane Dance." I was going by (obviously imperfect) memory. whome
Posted by: gintarec

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/05/09 10:37 AM

Phew... I though I got a wrong book....
(And no, you don't look silly!)
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/08/09 08:13 PM

Since getting my Zoom Q3, I've been working on going back and making videos of Einaudi pieces that I had previously recorded in mp3 format for recitals etc. Here's my latest effort, the beautiful "Fuori Dal Mondo":



The name translates to "Not of this World", which fits well the somewhat sad, and even in spots anguished, tone of the piece. This is one I've kept in memorized repertoire, for a couple of reasons: (a) there's a lot of repetition, so it was easy to keep memorized; (b) except for those few wild measures about halfway through, where you're alternating 1&5 with 2 rapidly, it's one of Einaudi's easier pieces; and (c) it's one of my hubby's favorite Einaudi pieces, which actually is all the reason I need. heart
Posted by: Triryche

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/08/09 09:40 PM

Originally Posted By: Monica K.
This is one I've kept in memorized repertoire, for a couple of reasons: (a) there's a lot of repetition, so it was easy to keep memorized; (b) except for those few wild measures about halfway through, where you're alternating 1&5 with 2 rapidly, it's one of Einaudi's easier pieces; and (c) it's one of my hubby's favorite Einaudi pieces, which actually is all the reason I need. heart

not to nit pick, but that is more than a couple of reasons!!
Either a couple+1 or a few??

Regardless, thanks for sharing!! heart your playing and the tone of your piano laugh
Posted by: thumper49

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/12/09 12:24 AM

Thanks Monica, really enjoyed your performance. I need to spend more time listening to (and perhaps eventually learning to play some of) Einaudi's music.
Posted by: Wimbwicket

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/14/09 04:17 AM

Heya guys, last thursday I've been to Einaudi in Amsterdam. It was great!!! This is indeed a whole other style then Divenire and his other cds. The really great thing was that he was alway building up to a really large climax at the end of a song. Also the use of a tambourine as an important instrument was really nice to see. I really hope he will come to the Netherlands for his next album too!

Haha I've already asked the sheetmusic for christmas as soon as the show was over laugh. I just can't really find it anywhere. Only at musicroom.com.

Sorry I can't really tell about the concert all that elaborate because I'm going to have breakfast. If you have any questions, I'll be happy to answer them.
Posted by: Monica K.

Re: Ludovico Einaudi - 11/14/09 10:33 AM

Oh, you're so lucky, Wimbwicket! I'm having a bit of a hard time reconciling Einaudi's music with tambourine (!), but I'll take your word that it works. grin

Did he play mostly pieces from Nightbook or more of a spread across other albums? Did you wait in line after the concert to get his autograph? What was your favorite piece from the concert?