O Fortuna by A New Member

Posted by: MusicaMusique

O Fortuna by A New Member - 10/12/12 02:38 PM

I am a piano self-learner. I signed up to this forum exactly 15 days now, please tell me what you think about my videos.

Below is O Fortuna, I learned this song by ears.




My Piano Blog:
http://tinyurl.com/fymusikblog

heart
Posted by: Mark_C

Re: O Fortuna by A New Member - 10/12/12 11:01 PM

Nice, and interesting!

By the way I think it would help if we say more about exactly what this is:

Opening movement of Orff's Carmina Burana.

I wouldn't have known if not that I've played it -- I was lucky to be the accompanist of my college's chorus when they did the piece.

Just a couple of thoughts:

I said it's "nice," and actually it's sort of 'too nice' to my taste. smile
I've always seen it as building to a much bigger crescendo and climax, and I think it's how I've always heard it. Of course that doesn't mean you can't do it this way, but....I think you're conceiving of it differently than usual in this respect and I wonder if you realize that you are.

Also, a detail: I think you wait much too long after the introduction before starting the main part, even with your different kind of conception. In fact, I think if anything, it's even more so with your kind of conception because if you're going to be staying so 'small-ish' in the main section, I would think it would be best to launch into it sooner rather than later.
Posted by: Rupak Bhattacharya

Re: O Fortuna by A New Member - 10/13/12 07:44 AM

Great playing and welcome to PWF! It's really interesting how you've thought about this piece and interpreted by ear. Best wishes for your journey of music.
Posted by: MusicaMusique

Re: O Fortuna by A New Member - 10/13/12 10:33 AM

Originally Posted By: Rupak Bhattacharya
Great playing and welcome to PWF! It's really interesting how you've thought about this piece and interpreted by ear. Best wishes for your journey of music.


Thanks for the warm welcome! I was happy when I did this song!
I enjoy the process to learn a new song.
Posted by: MusicaMusique

Re: O Fortuna by A New Member - 10/13/12 10:56 AM

Originally Posted By: Mark_C
Nice, and interesting!

By the way I think it would help if we say more about exactly what this is:

Opening movement of Orff's Carmina Burana.

I wouldn't have known if not that I've played it -- I was lucky to be the accompanist of my college's chorus when they did the piece.

Just a couple of thoughts:

I said it's "nice," and actually it's sort of 'too nice' to my taste. smile
I've always seen it as building to a much bigger crescendo and climax, and I think it's how I've always heard it. Of course that doesn't mean you can't do it this way, but....I think you're conceiving of it differently than usual in this respect and I wonder if you realize that you are.

Also, a detail: I think you wait much too long after the introduction before starting the main part, even with your different kind of conception. In fact, I think if anything, it's even more so with your kind of conception because if you're going to be staying so 'small-ish' in the main section, I would think it would be best to launch into it sooner rather than later.


Mark,
Thanks for the suggestion. When I learn to accompany a song, I just listen to the song over and over again to make it as similar to the original thing as possible with my less knowledge. So, everytime I am not sure if I did it correctly or not. As I learned alone, no one directly give me suggestion.

I am happy to learn from others, for example, this forum and some of the comments from the youtube people.

Do you mean I should play the intro faster???

Debbie
Posted by: Mark_C

Re: O Fortuna by A New Member - 10/13/12 12:28 PM

Originally Posted By: MusicaMusique
Do you mean I should play the intro faster???

No -- here's what I said:

Quote:
I think you wait much too long after the introduction before starting the main part

I thought that was clear, but to make it clearer:

I think you wait much too long after the introduction before starting the main part. smile

Oh sorry, I just repeated what I said before. grin

OK, let me try to do better:
I think the pause between the intro and the main part is too long. After you finish the intro, start the next thing sooner.

But now that you mention it, it's also true that the intro is probably too slow! But I didn't say anything about that because it's not as clear as I think the other thing is -- I mean, while I think most people would prefer it to be faster, I wouldn't say your tempo is bad.
Posted by: MusicaMusique

Re: O Fortuna by A New Member - 10/14/12 11:09 AM

Thanks, this is so clear hehe...

I will think about what you said and next time, I hope I will be improving!

laugh
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: O Fortuna by A New Member - 10/14/12 04:54 PM

My main suggestion would be that the main theme has to played with greater rhythmic steadiness because it's the endless repetitive rhythm that gives a lot of the drama to this piece. I would also play it slightly more slowly.

Chumachenko transcribed all of Carmina Burana for piano solo. The opening line of O Fortuna has several six note chords for left hand alone.
Posted by: MusicaMusique

Re: O Fortuna by A New Member - 10/15/12 05:29 AM

Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
My main suggestion would be that the main theme has to played with greater rhythmic steadiness because it's the endless repetitive rhythm that gives a lot of the drama to this piece. I would also play it slightly more slowly.

Chumachenko transcribed all of Carmina Burana for piano solo. The opening line of O Fortuna has several six note chords for left hand alone.


I wonder how could my 5 fingers by my left hand press on the six notes chord alone ^^
Posted by: pianoloverus

Re: O Fortuna by A New Member - 10/15/12 06:04 AM

Originally Posted By: MusicaMusique
Originally Posted By: pianoloverus
My main suggestion would be that the main theme has to played with greater rhythmic steadiness because it's the endless repetitive rhythm that gives a lot of the drama to this piece. I would also play it slightly more slowly.

Chumachenko transcribed all of Carmina Burana for piano solo. The opening line of O Fortuna has several six note chords for left hand alone.


I wonder how could my 5 fingers by my left hand press on the six notes chord alone ^^
The thumb takes two notes simultaneously by playing in the crack between two keys.
Posted by: MusicaMusique

Re: O Fortuna by A New Member - 10/15/12 08:09 AM

Thanks for showing me the way :DD

Unfortunately, I have short fingers, I can't do that!