Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
the Forums & Piano World

This custom search works much better than the built in one and allows searching older posts.
(ad 125) Sweetwater - Digital Keyboards & Other Gear
Digital Pianos at Sweetwater
(ad) Pearl River
Pearl River Pianos
(ad) Pianoteq
Latest Pianoteq add-on instrument: U4 upright piano
(ad) P B Guide
Acoustic & Digital Piano Guide
PianoSupplies.com (150)
Piano Accessories Music Related Gifts Piano Tuning Equipment Piano Moving Equipment
We now offer Gift Certificates in our online store!
(ad) Estonia Piano
Estonia Piano
Quick Links to Useful Stuff
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers
*Organs

Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano Accessories
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Piano Books
*Piano Art, Pictures, & Posters
*Directory/Site Map
*Contest
*Links
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Screen Saver
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#1011897 - 11/17/08 01:16 AM Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
chiyosdad Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/18/08
Posts: 27
So, I've been amusical my whole life and recently (that is, starting a couple years ago), I've had an urge to learn to play the piano. I just think it would be tons of fun. But I don't work well without concrete goals, so... I've taken it upon myself to learn to play the Revolutionary Etude over a timeframe of 2 years.

By this, I don't mean that I'm going to practice one piece all the time for 2 years. I would like to be all-around good at piano playing.

I've bought a digital piano for about a grand (I don't want to have to deal with tuning, and I'm a student, so I'll probably be moving a lot), and I have a teacher who I see on a semi-regular schedule. So this is something that I'm taking seriously (I have a tendency to start a lot of projects and not follow through).

Anyway, I've set up a blog to document my progress: http://revolutionaryetudein2years.wordpress.com/ I record videos with the webcam on my laptop and I upload them to youtube. Pardon the audio quality; I haven't really figured out how to record audio nicely yet.

Comments & advice welcome!


--------------------------
A list of all my videos on Youtube:

Week 3: Prelude 1-1 in C Major from Bach\'s WTC

Week 4: Menuett in G from the Anna Magdalena Notebook

Week 7: The Entertainer (easy arrangement from the Alfred book)

Week 9: When You Wish Upon a Star (from Disney\'s Pinocchio)

Week 11: Impertinence, by Handel

Week 15: Chopin\'s Prelude 28-20

Week 16: Cavatina (from Deer Hunter)

Top
(ads P/S)

Petrof Pianos

#1011898 - 11/17/08 09:05 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
chiyosdad Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/18/08
Posts: 27
Anyone? ...

Top
#1011899 - 11/17/08 09:21 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
NancyM333 Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/06/06
Posts: 1547
Loc: Roswell, Georgia
Revolutionary Etude is my dream piece, but I don't have a lot of confidence that I'm going to make it. For one thing, I have a high standard for how I want it to sound, and if it's halting or messy, I'd just as soon not play it.

I think it could be possible to learn it in two years if you are extremely talented, and you say you've been musical all your life. It's great to have a goal like that to keep your interest up, so I say give it a try. I look forward to hearing about your progress.

Nancy
_________________________

Estonia 168, Yamaha UX3

Top
#1011900 - 11/17/08 09:44 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
ll Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/14/08
Posts: 1101
He actually said "amusical"--which, while not a word per se, would fall more along the lines of "not musical," correct?

How long have you been playing? I think you are doing a wonderful job!! Your Minuet in G was very nice \:\) Does the weekly log begin from the bet time or total time you've been playing? For someone who has only truly begun with lessons and a teacher, I am awed and hope I can become as good as you are \:\)


You asked for suggestions, and there is only one I think that I am qualified to mention (or anyone really is!). That is, I don't think it's beneficial to look at one's hands when playing. This is just what I've read on the forum and in books, but I hope that will help any!
_________________________
II. As in, second best.
Only lowercase. So not even that.
I teach piano and violin.
BM, Violin & Percussion Performance 2009, Piano Pedagogy 2011.

Top
#1011901 - 11/18/08 01:02 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
Mary-Rose Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/16/06
Posts: 1428
Loc: Essex, England
chiyosdad, although it's great to have a goal to inspire you, I think 2 years for that Etude is completely unrealistic, as you might have realised by now. Perhaps you should discuss this with your teacher! But by all means have it as a long-term goal, and if you continue to discipline yourself as you have been doing, then I hope one day you will succeed.
_________________________
Best wishes from MR
http://www.extraloudpurrs.blogspot.com

Top
#1011902 - 11/18/08 01:12 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
xxmynameisjohnxx Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/27/08
Posts: 625
Loc: San Diego
Why do you guys think two years for the revolutionary Etude is ridiculous? I think that should be completely doable. yeah, it'll be tough and he'll have to work....but two years is a long time.
As long as you take it slow, make sure you get the fingering correct, smooth, and comfortable with each section, I think you'll be fine.

Also, take a look at this site.
http://www.chopinmusic.net/en/works/etudes/
It has a study guide for the Etudes, and a good way to look at approaching them musically.
I wish the best of luck to you! Setting high goals for yourself is usually beneficial if you're committed to them. I'm confident you can do it.
_________________________
Chopin: Nocturne No. 15 in Fm. Op. 55 no.1.

Top
#1011903 - 11/18/08 01:27 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
chiyosdad Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/18/08
Posts: 27
I don't want to discuss it with my teacher... I don't want him to laugh at me hahahaha.

I realize there's a good chance I might fail, but I won't know for sure until I try, so...

Nancy -- if it's your dream then you should totally go for it! Nothing is impossible with perseverance and... lots of time.

Yes, I do use "amusical" to mean "not musical". I've never played any instruments as a child and I wish I had, because I think making music is awesome and a lot of fun.

II -- why shouldn't one look at one's hand while playing? I have trouble finding the keys if I'm not looking at the keyboard, since I have not developed a feel for it yet.

Thanks for the comments everyone.

Edit: thanks for the link, John! I will definitely check this out!

Top
#1011904 - 11/18/08 01:54 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
Coolkid70 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 03/27/08
Posts: 378
Loc: Irvine, CA
I've heard plenty of stories where adult beginners blaze through the "grades" in short periods of time. Somebody posted a Youtube video here of a guy playing Scriabin's Op. 8 No. 12 after two years of instruction (though, it's certainly possible that it is exaggerated in some manner).

Have a look at Ranec16's Youtube page. http://www.youtube.com/user/Ranec16

He was a late starter also - I think he has been playing for about two or two and a half years. He's got some good stuff going. Maybe you can find some ideas or inspiration from his videos.

Good luck!

-Matt
_________________________
Kawai K-3 (2008)

Top
#1011905 - 11/18/08 03:20 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
ll Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/14/08
Posts: 1101
 Quote:
Originally posted by chiyosdad:
II -- why shouldn't one look at one's hand while playing? I have trouble finding the keys if I'm not looking at the keyboard, since I have not developed a feel for it yet.[/b]
Here is something I found:

"The most important thing to remember is to not look at your hands while playing. I know this may sound ridiculous, but you only need to look at your hands when you're learning the notes. Once you know what the notes are, you should be able to look at the notation and immediately form the hand position for those notes without looking at your hand. When you look at your hands too much is causes you to lose the fluidity in the music and can actually impede reading music coherently and contextually."

I think it's just one of those things that hinders playing the piano. I know my teachers told me to try and not look at my hands, my brother's teacher has said the same thing, and I've seen it quite a few times on the boards.

I could be mistaken, but it seems very consistent--best to wait for a more experienced player to comment.
_________________________
II. As in, second best.
Only lowercase. So not even that.
I teach piano and violin.
BM, Violin & Percussion Performance 2009, Piano Pedagogy 2011.

Top
#1011906 - 11/18/08 06:14 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
-Frycek Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/06/05
Posts: 5921
Loc: SC Mountains
I worked on it off and on for three years without the proper background or skills. It was a travesty. Have a listen.

http://www.chopinforever.org/frycek10twelve
_________________________
Slow down and do it right.

Top
#1011907 - 11/18/08 05:01 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
ll Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/14/08
Posts: 1101
 Quote:
Originally posted by -Frycek:
I worked on it off and on for three years without the proper background or skills. It was a travesty. Have a listen.

http://www.chopinforever.org/frycek10twelve [/b]
Though the trip may have been a travesty, the end result sounds beautiful.
_________________________
II. As in, second best.
Only lowercase. So not even that.
I teach piano and violin.
BM, Violin & Percussion Performance 2009, Piano Pedagogy 2011.

Top
#1011908 - 11/18/08 05:52 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
Yoke Wong Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/15/08
Posts: 43
Loc: California
Chiyosdad, I think that's an ambitious goal - I am most certain you can achieve that if you can set 40-60 minutes a day working on the piece.

I would also recommend breaking down the piece based on similar patterns. I also suggest that you listen to mp3 or some kinds of audio clip of this piece performed by other famous pianists - this will help you internalize the music.

Listen to this piece at least once or twice a day. You can do it when you have full or partial attention.

II - I am not sure I agree with you regarding not looking at your hands while playing. I strongly believe one needs to be able to play the whole piece looking at the hands and without.
Playing piano involves many senses - our hands are the most important tools in playing piano. There are time I felt like I had forgotten some music pieces yet my hands seem to be able to find their way around if I look at my hands and let them take over...
I do agree that it is good to establish the habit of playing without looking. Both habits enforce our learning experience.

Yoke Wong
_________________________
Take Your Playing To The Next Level
http://www.pianomother.com

Top
#1011909 - 11/18/08 07:51 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
YD Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 12/28/06
Posts: 590
Loc: San Francisco Bay Area
10/12 is a difficult piece. It is, actually, a virtuoso piece if played at correct tempo. It involves numerous techniques other than very fast harmonic minor scale played by left hand - in fact, that is where the piece just starts. I learned. I played it. I am not satisfied with my playing. It took me over a year to get it to somewhat presentable level.

Taking into account all that, I don't see any reason for you not to try. Frycek did it, and the result was (albeit not professional) quite satisfactory. I need to qualify this: it is next to impossible (unless you are a piano prodigy) to play 10/12 at PRO level. But, it will certainly give you a set of problems to work on, and your overall technique will improve.

If you don't mind me qualifying it even further, DO NOT DO this without consent of your teacher. If (s)he does not want to help you, maybe (s)he is not the right teacher for you... Without pro help, however, there is humongous margin for error here, and you can learn mistakes without learning techniques. It is certainly a very different set of techniques to play 10/12 at 80bpm and at prescribed >144bpm. These are NOT easy to learn, and pro guidance in absolutely essential. I understand some teachers will frown at you for attempting 10/12 at early stage, but if that's the case, maybe you should seek another teacher... Mine was quite OK with it even though my technique was lagging behind (I had a history of bad hand injury). In any case, if you don't get pro guidance, do yourself a favor and ask as many questions as you can while learning the piece, from here and PC, and all your piano playing friends you can get your hands on.

As usual, FWIW
_________________________
Yuri
FWIW; YMMV

Top
#1011910 - 11/18/08 09:20 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
Reaper978 Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/08/05
Posts: 1326
Of all the things you can do at the piano, the most important by far is to concentrate. Forget about practicing scales and arpeggios to death your first two years of practice, you are missing the point if you do. Concentrate to the point of entering a meditative state. Make yourself completely silent. The things around you move, you do not. From there, begin to play.

Muscle memory is not the point, repertoire is not the point, sight-reading is not the point, concentration is the point. All the details come through when you concentrate. Concentrate on recordings, on the sheet music, on the keyboard, on the sound you make. It is truly key.

I saw your latest video post on your blog. You see, one need not reach the technical requirements of Chopin etudes in order to have mature musicianship. Look to develop a rich, strong, mature tone. The maturity of your sound comes through in even the simplest music, and with a mature sound you can make the easiest pieces ring with excellence. Meditative concentration will help bring this forward. I would say that you evaluate your progress from month to month.

Technique and skill is not the issue at this stage. Concentrate always and it will grow.

Top
#1011911 - 11/18/08 11:16 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
ll Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/14/08
Posts: 1101
 Quote:
Originally posted by Yoke Wong:
II - I am not sure I agree with you regarding not looking at your hands while playing. I strongly believe one needs to be able to play the whole piece looking at the hands and without.
Playing piano involves many senses - our hands are the most important tools in playing piano. There are time I felt like I had forgotten some music pieces yet my hands seem to be able to find their way around if I look at my hands and let them take over...
I do agree that it is good to establish the habit of playing without looking. Both habits enforce our learning experience.

Yoke Wong [/b]
Thanks for the follow up Yoke!

I probably worded it wrong, but what I meant was "eventually stop looking at your hands." Would that be better, or do you feel that it doesn't matter either way?
_________________________
II. As in, second best.
Only lowercase. So not even that.
I teach piano and violin.
BM, Violin & Percussion Performance 2009, Piano Pedagogy 2011.

Top
#1011912 - 11/19/08 01:57 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
Yoke Wong Offline
Full Member

Registered: 08/15/08
Posts: 43
Loc: California
II,
When one pianist fully mastered a piece (able to perform, interpret, and memorize the piece), he/she usually can play without looking both hands.
Another way to illustrate:
The pianist who fully mastered a piece can perform it even if it is in a dark room.
I do enjoy watching my hands whenever I play a piece \:\)

Yoke Wong
_________________________
Take Your Playing To The Next Level
http://www.pianomother.com

Top
#1011913 - 11/19/08 09:01 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
NancyM333 Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/06/06
Posts: 1547
Loc: Roswell, Georgia
I did mis-read amusical as musical. I took it to mean he was very talented and picked up instruments easily. Since that is not the case, two years would be an extremely ambitious goal.

Yuri gives some great advice here. It truly is a virtuoso piece, and I love listening to it played well. I've taken over twelve years of lessons, and my teacher estimates for me to play that piece it would have to be the only piece I worked on for over a year. I think smaller steps would be better for most beginning pianists, but each person has to decide for himself what is motivating. I worked on Chopin's Harp Etude for a year, and it still didn't sound good enough for me to play for others. I think you have to compare the cost of time with the benefit of how it will sound to you in the end.

Yuri is right about needing guidance. Two years ago I started learning the Rachmaninoff Prelude in C#minor and got into some serious arm strain between lessons. Technically difficult pieces can cause lots of physical problems, and I had to lay off that piece for a few months before I could start back with no strain, and at that point I had to totally re-learn relaxation techniques. It was a great learning experience, but I am glad I had a teacher supporting my learning!

Nancy
_________________________

Estonia 168, Yamaha UX3

Top
#1011914 - 11/20/08 06:05 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
chiyosdad Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/18/08
Posts: 27
I think that since I am just starting, I can cut myself some slack XD. Maybe after I've been playing for a while I can expect to not look at my hands and just feel my way around the keyboard.

I did try playing some of my pieces with my eyes closed, and it's a totally different experience. I think aside from the benefit of being able to see where the keys are, the visual cues are actually a big part of how I memorize the pieces, so not being able to see made it harder to remember.

Top
#1011915 - 11/20/08 04:41 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
playadom Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 10/21/06
Posts: 1366
Loc: New Jersey
 Quote:
Originally posted by chiyosdad:
I think that since I am just starting, I can cut myself some slack XD. Maybe after I've been playing for a while I can expect to not look at my hands and just feel my way around the keyboard.

I did try playing some of my pieces with my eyes closed, and it's a totally different experience. I think aside from the benefit of being able to see where the keys are, the visual cues are actually a big part of how I memorize the pieces, so not being able to see made it harder to remember. [/b]
Try mental practice -- practicing in your mind. Very effective for memorization -- and you can do it anywhere.
_________________________
Practice makes permanent - Perfect practice makes perfect.

Top
#1011916 - 11/20/08 04:53 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
jjo Offline
500 Post Club Member

Registered: 04/09/08
Posts: 630
Loc: Chicago
I have to confess I don't understand this physical accomplishment approach to music, which is an art, not a sport. Music is not running a mile, where the only goal is to go fast. You may end up playing all the notes to a hard piece, but will you be making music? Will you be able to use the piece as a vehicle to express your innermost feelings, to communicate something to yourself or other listeners? The goal should be in two years to make real music, not to show that you were able to move you fingers quickly and play a lot of notes. I'm much more impressed with hearing someone play a simple piece in a way that moves me, than hearing a cold, mechanical performance of some virtuoso score.

Just something to think about. Good luck!

Top
#1011917 - 11/20/08 05:10 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
Damz Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/19/06
Posts: 264
Loc: Montreal, Canada
I think it's great that you set yourself a goal to stay focused and motivated, but your goal is not realistic in my opinion. If the Revolutionary Etude is your dream piece, why not take the time it needs and do it right instead of playing a half-assed version of it? If you learn it wrong, it's going to be that much harder to play it right afterwards.

Good things take time. Good luck \:\)

 Quote:
Originally posted by ll:
 Quote:
Originally posted by -Frycek:
I worked on it off and on for three years without the proper background or skills. It was a travesty. Have a listen.

http://www.chopinforever.org/frycek10twelve [/b]
Though the trip may have been a travesty, the end result sounds beautiful. [/b]
Either you're deaf, either you're lying. Sorry for being mean/cruel, but at least I'm honest.

Top
#1011918 - 11/20/08 05:11 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
ll Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/14/08
Posts: 1101
@jjo:

But would you not think that the physical accomplishment is required in order to play with your innermost feelings?
_________________________
II. As in, second best.
Only lowercase. So not even that.
I teach piano and violin.
BM, Violin & Percussion Performance 2009, Piano Pedagogy 2011.

Top
#1011919 - 11/20/08 07:37 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
Bryan P. Carney Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/23/06
Posts: 148
Loc: Cleveland, Ohio, US
As a serious adult-beginner amateur with three years of experience, I have learned a few things about my dreams. My dream "piece" was a fantasy in which I played the Goldberg Variations to a loving audience.

Along the way I have realized my dream was to be a musician. This dream has come true, to the extent that I live, as a musician, to the best of my abilty. When I am humiliated by attempts to force my way through repertoire, I can rest easy with the consolation prize of experiencing all the music I can play - because it is in my heart and my head. Additionally, by devoting an hour a day to Bach, I am now familiar with idioms of the Baroque which today enable me to play some of the Goldberg variations respectably. I have faith I can remain patient and learn a day's lesson in a day's time and one day play through each of the above variations because I have earned the ability.

If you truly hold Chopin's 10/2 as a goal the journey will not be so tough if you just follow the directions of your teachers, who won't lead you astray.

Today I still get discouraged by slow progress but I realize that with enough perspective every small accomplishment is a paradigm shift.

Just live a musical life, pay your dues, listen to the music which speeds your heart and then comforts you; anything is then possible.

Love,
Bryan
_________________________
=====================
nil volentibus arduum
Do it for Fux' sake.
=====================

Top
#1011920 - 11/20/08 11:20 PM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
NancyM333 Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/06/06
Posts: 1547
Loc: Roswell, Georgia
Bryan--What a lovely post. I re-started as an adult with a goal in mind and spend three years on it. I planned to quit lessons at the end of that time, but thank goodness I did not. Once I gave up the "end" and focused on the journey, piano became much more pleasurable.

That being said, you couldn't have convinced me of that when I was in the middle of accomplishing my goal.

Nancy
_________________________

Estonia 168, Yamaha UX3

Top
#1011921 - 11/21/08 12:41 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
Bryan P. Carney Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/23/06
Posts: 148
Loc: Cleveland, Ohio, US
 Quote:
Originally posted by NancyM333:
you couldn't have convinced me of that when I was in the middle of accomplishing my goal.
[/b]
Sometimes I think I'd be a better person if I weren't so stubborn. Often I think that I wouldn't have to go through the pain of defeat if I were more wise.

Case in point: A year ago, discouragement got the better of me. I was trying to work through some of Chopin's etudes on the power of my own will. I couldn't face the fact that I might be wasting my time because I had tied my esteem too tightly to a goal. I have a younger friend (IRL) who started playing with me. We both, as we still do, put about equal practice time into music but his skills seemed far beyond me. He was able to play, well, to my ears, the very same etudes which caused me to continuously flounder.

In the end I foundered on those rocks. I swore off the piano. I felt like a sham, a fake, and a delusional dilettante. I thought I was embarrassing myself with this silly musical affectation.

Needless to say, this lasted a short time before I came to my senses.

The aformentioned superman friend isn't so much better than me, in musical abilities or life. I have skills he lacks. My fault was in being so intolerant to reality that the only path left was defiance.

I am being so verbose because I esteem myself very highly, you see :rolleyes: , and to illustrate to the OP one of the pitfalls of such a narcissistic endeavor as musicianship or pianism. The battles we face may not only be the diffulties of mechanics, the vagaries of the intellect's focus, nor prioritization; the foe which slays everyman equally is ardor. We can aim so high, even with the best intentions, that we climb the next biggest hill, to our peril, while Parnassus may be this pleasant plateau.

Ardor, the purely emotional will to be, the desire which burns brightest, is what is common, actually. It keeps mankind locked in the prison that is the paradise of intentions.

LOL Nancy, you've got to see, music is the closest thing I have to religion. I suppose I'm a missionary at heart.
_________________________
=====================
nil volentibus arduum
Do it for Fux' sake.
=====================

Top
#1011922 - 11/21/08 05:14 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
-Frycek Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/06/05
Posts: 5921
Loc: SC Mountains
 Quote:
Originally posted by Damz:
 Quote:
Originally posted by ll:
 Quote:
Originally posted by -Frycek:
I worked on it off and on for three years without the proper background or skills. It was a travesty. Have a listen.

http://www.chopinforever.org/frycek10twelve [/b]
Though the trip may have been a travesty, the end result sounds beautiful. [/b]
Either you're deaf, either you're lying. Sorry for being mean/cruel, but at least I'm honest. [/b]
You may note that it was ll who added the "beautiful" bit. I agree it's a travesty. I'm neither a liar nor deaf. Nor am I any longer attempting pieces above my level of mediocrity.
_________________________
Slow down and do it right.

Top
#1011923 - 11/21/08 05:23 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
ll Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/14/08
Posts: 1101
@Damz:

"Either... either"? Did you mean to replace that first "either" with "or"? Please, if you are going to attempt to be "mean/cruel," don't make a grammatical mistake. It makes you seem foolish. Also, don't be mean/cruel. What's the point? He's trying his best and this forum is for BEGINNERS. I would hate to be your student if you are a teacher. Heck, I wouldn't even want to be your friend if you say things like that. Why not just say "You could use improvement" or something along those lines?

I said it's beautiful because, for the amount of time he's been playing and practicing, it sounded nice. No one who is not a trained musician will notice a missed note or a little mistake here or there--hell, even a big mistake. We listen to the "gist" of things. It sounded good to someone with serious ear problems (thanks for pointing that out--I'll let you feel like an *** on your own time, though).

@-Frycek:

Read above. I don't think it was a travesty and I said it was beautiful for the above reasons. I was not judging the song to the original piece, but to what he mentioned and it's relative position of playing and practicing.

I do agree that attempting a piece above your level will leave you with a "travesty" compared to someone who is at that level, but that's not what we are talking about here.
_________________________
II. As in, second best.
Only lowercase. So not even that.
I teach piano and violin.
BM, Violin & Percussion Performance 2009, Piano Pedagogy 2011.

Top
#1011924 - 11/21/08 05:47 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
-Frycek Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Registered: 08/06/05
Posts: 5921
Loc: SC Mountains
Dear ll, thanks for your support. Unfortunately I'm not really a beginner - a great many people on ABF aren't. We actually have some competition level players gracing us with their presence. Check out most of the participants of the Etude Recital. That piece isn't really that far above my present "level" now though it was when I began it. I'm just incompetent, poorly trained, and untalented, exactly the sort of person who shouldn't be playing Chopin. I had a great deal more background than the person in question who is attempting it "from scratch" and I should have known better.
_________________________
Slow down and do it right.

Top
#1011925 - 11/21/08 05:50 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
chiyosdad Offline
Full Member

Registered: 07/18/08
Posts: 27
Damz: I have no intention of half assing the project. When I say play, I mean REALLY play, musically and with emotion, not just learn the notes. I know that I still have a lot to work on with the pieces I have posted videos of so far, but that's the minimum standard I'm setting for myself. If I don't get there in 2 years, I'll keep going until I do. But I want to see if I can do it in 2 years, because 1) I have problems with discipline; with no goals, I tend to procrastinate, and 2) I enjoy a challenge.

Bryan: I absolutely want to be a musician. This piece is not my ultimate goal; I just thought this would be a fun project to try on the journey there, and to give me some direction. Because "to be a musician" is too vague; I really need very specific, concrete goals to stay focused.

Everything I've done so far has been tons of fun. I haven't been forcing myself to learn this one piece at the expense of my general musicianship. In fact I don't plan on touching the etude for quite a while. In the mean time I'm trying to build a good base to develop upon.

Thanks for your inputs, all. I appreciate the words of encouragement, as well as the advice, even when our opinions differ.

Top
#1011926 - 11/21/08 06:18 AM Re: Revolutionary Etude in 2 Years
ll Offline
1000 Post Club Member

Registered: 11/14/08
Posts: 1101
 Quote:
Originally posted by ll:
@Damz:

"Either... either"? Did you mean to replace that second "either" with "or"? Please, if you are going to attempt to be "mean/cruel," don't make a grammatical mistake. It makes you seem foolish. Also, don't be mean/cruel. What's the point? He's trying his best and this forum is for BEGINNERS. I would hate to be your student if you are a teacher. Heck, I wouldn't even want to be your friend if you say things like that. Why not just say "You could use improvement" or something along those lines?

I said it's beautiful because, for the amount of time he's been playing and practicing, it sounded nice. No one who is not a trained musician will notice a missed note or a little mistake here or there--hell, even a big mistake. We listen to the "gist" of things. It sounded good to someone with serious ear problems (thanks for pointing that out--I'll let you feel like an *** on your own time, though).

@-Frycek:

Read above. I don't think it was a travesty and I said it was beautiful for the above reasons. I was not judging the song to the original piece, but to what he mentioned and it's relative position of playing and practicing.

I do agree that attempting a piece above your level will leave you with a "travesty" compared to someone who is at that level, but that's not what we are talking about here. [/b]
_________________________
II. As in, second best.
Only lowercase. So not even that.
I teach piano and violin.
BM, Violin & Percussion Performance 2009, Piano Pedagogy 2011.

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >

Moderator:  BB Player, casinitaly 
What's Hot!!
HOW TO POST PICTURES on the Piano Forums
-------------------
Sharing is Caring!
About the Buttons
-------------------
Forums Rules & Help
-------------------
ADVERTISE
on Piano World

The world's most popular piano web site.
-------------------
PIANO BOOKS
Interesting books about the piano, pianists, piano history, biographies, memoirs and more!
(ad) HAILUN Pianos
Hailun Pianos - Click for More
ad (Casio)
Celviano by Casio Rebate
Ad (Seiler/Knabe)
Knabe Pianos
Sheet Music
(PW is an affiliate)
Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
(125ad) Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad) Lindeblad Piano
Lindeblad Piano Restoration
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Will this Piano Room have good Acoustics?
by flamenco88
09/17/14 10:59 PM
Proud new owner of a Yamaha P22
by amanda416
09/17/14 09:04 PM
Returning to piano, advice on slow learning process
by roninpro
09/17/14 07:57 PM
Anton Kuerti and Cyprien Katsaris
by pianoloverus
09/17/14 07:09 PM
Pianists' tessitura
by Riddler
09/17/14 06:54 PM
Who's Online
108 registered (AB99, Aljon, 3times2, accordeur, 35 invisible), 1180 Guests and 18 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
76237 Members
42 Forums
157594 Topics
2314822 Posts

Max Online: 15252 @ 03/21/10 11:39 PM
(ads by Google)

Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
|
Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World | Donate | Link to Us | Classifieds |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | Press Room |


copyright 1997 - 2014 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission